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Twentieth annual report of the Vancouver Board of Trade. 1906-1907 Vancouver Board of Trade 1907

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 Twentieth Annual Report
of the
Vancouver
Board of Trade
1906-1907
Vancouver, British Columbia
Canada
NEWS-ADVERTISER
PRINTERS AND BOOKBINDERS
301 PENDER ST., VANCOUVER. B.C.    Twentieth Annual Report 
of the 
Vancouver 
Board of Trade 
1906-1907 
Vancouver, British Columbia 
Canada 
NEWS - ADVERTISER 
PRINTERS AND BOOKBINDERS 
301 PENDER  ST., VANCOUVER,   B. C. OFFICERS.
.PAST   PRESIDENTS
1887-88...D. Oppenheimer (dec.)
1888-89...D. Oppenheimer (dec.)
1889-90...E. V. Bodwell.
1890-91...R. H. Alexander.
1891-92...John Hendry
1892-93...G. E. Berteaux.
1892-93...W. F. Salsbury.
1893-94...J. C. Keith.
1894-95...G. M. Major.
1895-96...H. Bell-Irving.
1896-97...H. Bell-Iving.
1897-98...Wm. Godfrey.
1898-99...Wm, Godfrey.
1899-00...O. E. Tisdall. .
1900-01...F. Buscombe. '
1901-02...F. F. Burns (dec.)
1902-03...W. H. Malkin.
1903-04...H. T. Lockyer.
1904-05...H. McDowell.
1905-06...A. B. Erskine.
1906-07...R. P. McLennan.
OFFICERS   FOR    1907-08.
PRESIDENT,
W. J. McMillan.
VICE-PRESIDENT.
E. H. Heaps.
secretary.
Wm. Skene.
COUNCIL.
12 MARKED (*) BEING THE   BOARD  OF ARBITRATION.)
Hall. J. E.
*Alexander, R. H.
Boyd, John
*Buchan, Ewing
*Buscombe, F.
*COTTON, F. O.
*Erskine, A. B.
*Godfrey, Wm.
*Mackenzie, W. G.
*Malkin, W. H.
*McDowell, H.
*McLennan, R. P.
*Stone, H. A.
*TlSDALL, C. E.
Von Cramer, D. STANDING  COMMITTEES.
1907-1908
THE  FIRST  NAME  ON   EACH  TO  BE   CONVENER.
LEGISLATION.
H. A. Stone W. H. P. Clubb J. F. Helliwell
W. H. Malkin F. R, McD. Russell
W. G. Mackenzie
Geo. G. Bushby'
R. Kelly
W. G. Mackenzie
Wm. Murray
H. McDowell
Dominic Burns
John Ross
RAILWAY   AND   NAVIGATION.
R. H. Alexander
A. K. Evans
R. H. Sperling
FREIGHT  RATES.
John Boyd
R. P. McLennan
James Ramsay
F. R. Stewart
TRADE AND COMMERCE.
W. R. Brown
Wm. Godfrey
H. A. Stone
FISHERIES.
H. Bell-Irving
Fred. T. Walker
J. H. Campbell
F. Buscombe
W. H. Ker
W. H. Malkin
J. A. McNair
A. G. Thynne
Ewing Buchan
Jas. E. Hall
Walter Taylor
R. J. Leckie
R. V. Winch
E. P. Gilman
W. L. Germain e
R. P. McLennan
E. E. Evans
MINING.
A. B. Erskine
H. W. Maynard
INSURANCE.
W. G. Harvey
D. Von Cramer
C. F. Jackson
P. G. Shallcross
PORT
R. H. Alexander Geo. G. Bushby
J. W. Hackett
C. E. Tisdall
F. Buscombe
ANNUAL REPORT AND   FINANCE.
F. Carter-Cotton Wm. Godfrey
CIVIC.
Frank Baynes J W. Hackett
Jonathan Rogers C. E. Tisdall
BOARD   ROOMS   AND  SECRETARY'S   OFFICE
Molson's Bank Building, Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C.,
Canada.        Annual Report,  1906-1907 11
Twentieth Annual Meeting
OF   THE
Vancouver Board of Trade,
MARCH   5th,   1907.
PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS.
To the Members of the Vancouver BoaMbf Trade :
" Gentlemen,—Following the custom set by my
predecessors in office, I beg to present a general statement of what has been done by this Board during the
year that has passed, the condition in which we find
ourselves at the present time and a few suggestions
with reference to future efforts.
"As this is the Twentieth Anniversary of the
founding of this Board, it may not be inopportune to
make a few references thereto. No particular profit
would result from drawing comparisons between what
Vancouver was at the inception of this Board and
Vancouver as we find it to-day. Whilst it might be
interesting to point out that lots which were sold for
$1,000 are worth $100,000 now, or if we could tell what
the lumber industry was worth to the city then and
compare it with what it is to-day, it would still prove
nothing in particular, excepting the immense possibilities that exist in the development of the natural
resources of our Province, and the strategic position
this city occupies, which must push it forward with
greater speed toward the front rank of cities in the
Dominion as a manufacturing centre and assembling
and distributing point for domestic and foreign trade. 12
Vancouver Board of Trade
In these respects, although we may be justly proud of
our trade and commerce returns for the last twenty
years, we have scarcely as yet touched even the fringe
of our possibilities.
| The Vancouver Board of Trade was formed on
November 20, 1887. Mr. David Oppenheimer was the
first president, and continued as such for three years,
and to this gentleman's optimism, enterprise and
ability was much of the success of this Board due,
and of the city itself in its early struggles.
I Thirty-one citizens signed the original application
for the organization of the Board, of whom six only
are now on the membership roll.
"It is interesting to note in the first presidential
address available (1889) that while some of the objects
aimed at have been accomplished, others are still in the
future.
"Amongst those accomplished are, direct steamship
connection with Australia and New Zealand, and a
submarine cable between Australia and Canada. Railway connection to the south is an actuality, but it was
predicted that Vancouver would shortly become the
terminus of five railway systems. We have three
transcontinental roads running into Vancouver now,
but whilit the other two are not yet with us, they
are tapping at our door. The necessity for a new post
office was also referred to. This office was built and
we in turn have out-grown it and a larger and more
modern one is now in course of erection.
" The possibilities of British Columbia becoming a
great fruit-growing and exporting Province were
recognised even then, and not only were exhibits of
fruit sent to the Colonial Exhibition at London, Eng.,
the Industrial Pairs of Toronto and London, Ont., but
President Oppenheimer was instrumental in  forming Annual Report,  1906-1907 13
the B. C. Fruit Growers' Association, which was organized February 1, 1889, in the Board of Trade rooms.
The seed sown at that time has brought forth abundantly and fruit-growing is rapidly becoming one of
our chief provincial industries.
I Reference was made to the desirability of erecting
Blast Furnaces and Rolling Mills in the city. After the
lapse of twenty years it would surely appear that, with
the immense amount of iron used in this Province today, and the possible markets of the Northwest, with
iron ore and coal at the water's edge, it is time such
an industry was established here.
" I also noticed that on the present day of the month
(March 5th) of that year, what was termed " The First
Annual Banquet" took place at the Hotel Vancouver,
the guests numbering 124, the Provincial Legislative
Assembly adjourning the House to enable its members
to be present. This Banquet was an elaborate and
highly creditable affair and was followed by a similar
function the following year and then allowed to drop,
and although in the interim the Board has on several
occasions done honor to special guests by a social
function, I venture to suggest that the revival of the
'Annual Banquet'is well worthy the consideration of
my successor in office.
" Referring to our own work during the year now
passed away, I shall not deal in detail either with the
various meetings, resolutions or statistics, as these will
all appear in the Annual Report, but I shall refer
mainly to the items which appear to be of most
importance.
Point Grey Inprovement.
"Following   up  the line of   action taken by the
Board in 1906, as regards Provincial Government lands.
»sk 14
Vancouver Board of Trade
at Point Grey, a special committee was appointed to
draft a resolution and present it to the Government
on July 3rd of last year, requesting that this land be
laid out by a competent landscape surveyor before
being placed on the market, and that a marine driveway, 200 feet wide, be built around the whole property.
We have been actively assisted by the different organizations in the city, and it is gratifying to be
informed that it is the intention of the Government
to lay out the grounds along the lines suggested. It is
to be hoped that the City of Vancouver will co-operate
in carrying out these plans. If carried out properly,
these land at Point Grey can be made one of the most
beautiful spots on this Continent, and be the means
of drawing a wealthy class of people to reside with us,
who would contribute very materially to the advancement of the city, municipality and province in every
way.
" In May last, the Board arranged for a lecture on
the Metric System by Professor McLennan, of Toronto
University, which was most interesting and instructive,
as well as being well attended.
Advisable Legislation.
" The matter of increasing the amount collectable
through the medium of the Small Debts Court from
$100 to $200 has been suggested, as this Court has
proved itself to be a much less costly method of
collecting small amounts, and just as effective as any
higher court. The matter will probably be dealt with
at this evening's meeting and should be pressed to an
issue.
I In this connection may be mentioned the legislation suggested by this Board with a view to prevent
merchants from selling their stock en-bloc, taking
what proceeds  they can obtain therefor and leaving Annual Report,  1906-1907 15
the country with the cash in their pockets whilst the
creditors who supplied the goods remain unpaid.
While this action is not of very frequent occurrence,
yet it has occurred in this Province a number of times.
Legislation has been introduced in other places to
prevent it and I think the legislative committee of
the Board should take the matter up at once, whilst
the House is in session.
Canadian  Forestry Convention.
"The B. C. Lumber & Shingle Association invited
the Canadian Forestry Association to hold its annual
convention in Vancouver, which convention was held
in September last. The Canadian Manufacturers'
Association visited the city at the same time. In
conjunction with the above Associations, and on their
invitation, this Board had the honor and pleasure of
assisting in the entertainment of these bodies, which
terminated in a banquet, attended by Earl Grey,
Governor-General of Canada, and other prominent
gentlemen from throughout the Dominion, as well
as from our good friends south of the 49th parallel.
Sixth Congress of Chambers of Commerce.
"At the Sixth Annual Congress of Chambers of
Commerce of the Empire, this Board was ably represented by Mr. R. H. Alexander. The reports show
that he kept British Columbia and Vancouver City
well before the Congress, and was mover of a resolution for the appointment of an Imperial Council to
consider questions of Imperial interest.
Civic Committee.
"The Civic Committee made a number of suggestions to the City Council which were endorsed by
the    Board.      Amongst   others   was   the   better   fire 16
Vancouver Board of Trade
protection for water frontage property, which should
be acted upon, as well as the desirability of creating
the city into one ward only instead of six as at
present.
| As it is apparent, even with an increased general
revenue, the needs of the city will increase at a much
faster ratio than the revenue, it was suggested that
the present method of using so much of the general
revenue for paving, sewers, &c, be discontinued and
a frontage tax to a larger extent for such local improvements be instituted. This latter plan has been
advocated by last year's Mayor, Chairman of the
Finance Committee and City Comptroller, but a
majority of the present Council have voted the question
down. The result will be that civic improvements
will shortly come to a standstill, and whilst persons
occupying outside locations have doubtless been contributing something towards the improvement of the
central portion of the city and walking home through
the mud themselves for the past twenty years, they
can rest assured that so long as the present system is
contimied just so long will they continue to contribute
to the upbuilding of the central portion of the city
and possibly wade home through the mud for another
twenty years. Under the Local Improvement plan,
they would have the satisfaction of knowing that
what money they contributed was spent for the improvement of the street in front of their own doors
and was not spent anywhere else.
Railway Commission.
1 Your Freight Rates Committee has not been idle-
With reference to the important question of obtaining equal rates with Winnipeg to Calgary, the
Kootenays and Macleod, we have kept in touch with
the Railway Commission and we are now in hopes
that a decision will   be   shortly   reached.    From the   Annual Report, 1906-1907 17
tenor of their expert's report on the question, we cannot but consider that the decision must be in favor of
the contention of the merchants of the coast cities.
"The fact that existing freight rates from Vancouver eastward are placed for the purpose of discriminating against us in favor of eastern cities,
merely goes to show that Vancouver should not be
dependent upon one line of railway only for entry
into the Northwest. We should use our efforts to
speed the building of competitive roads thereto and
more particularly roads whose main interests are on
the Pacific Coast and who are therefore interested in
seeing the Pacific Coast cities and this Province generally built up.
Petitions to Ottawa.
" The Dominion Government has been memorialized
on different occasions. The dredging of the First
Narrows; the clearing and keeping clean the harbor of
all flotsam and jetsam ; the scarcity of skilled labor; the
endorsation of the request for an appropriation towards
erecting a Canadian Building at the Alaska - Yukon
Exhibition at Seattle, have all been taken up and these
matters should be pressed.
" A petition asking the Government to enforce the
'Coasting Laws' in British Columbia waters was forwarded, and it is important that every effort should be
put forward by this Board to ensure their enforcement
at once, in justice to our Canadian coasting boats.
Grain Commissioners'  Visit.
"I consider that the most important event that
transpired in the way of new business and as affecting
the future of Vancouver was the visit to this city of the
members of the Royal Grain Commission. The members
of this commission convened with a number of members 18 Vancouver Board of Trade
in the Board rooms in November. The Commissioners
had traversed the Dominion, held meetings en route,
and were thoroughly conversant with the grain business.
At the meeting here, the many points involved in connection with the making of Vancouver a shipping point
for the wheat of Alberta were thoroughly discussed.
The Oriental and British markets, ocean rates, present
shipments from Tacoma of Washington soft wheat, railway rates, the quality of the wheat raised in Alberta,
the quantity produced last year and the increased prospective crop for 1907, were all taken into consideration
and compared with cost of transportation eastward, the
long wait at Fort William in the elevators until navigation opened in the spring, the storage charges, and so
forth. Above all this, appeared the increasing impossibility of the railroads to cope with the enormous crops
in carrying the wheat eastward.
" The Commissioners stated that the farmers and
grain dealers of Alberta were desirous of shipping this
way, and in the coming autumn would be prepared to
ship large quantities if we had elevators to store the
wheat in.
" They also stated their intention of recommending
to the Federal Government the advisability of erecting
one large elevator here to encourage foreign wheat
trade via Vancouver. This Board thereupon sent forward a petition to Ottawa requesting the erection of an
elevator of not less than 250,000 bushels, and the Boards
of Trade of Alberta and Saskatchewan were asked to
endorse it. This matter should be pressed with all the
vigor possible.
" The importance of this movement cannot be overestimated. One probable direct result would be the
lowering of freight rates from here to Alberta as well
as a sufficiency of empty cars for the lumber mills for
shipping purposes. Annual Report,  1906-1907 19
"A large shipping trade in wheat, lower freight rates
to Alberta and our mills busy shipping lumber would
spell continued prosperity to Vancouver even when
times were depressed in other parts of the continent.
Most Prosperous Year.
" The Province generally has had a most prosperous
year. Lumbering, mining, fishing, fruit-growing have
all been profitable, as statistics elsewhere in this report
will show.
"The lumber interest has been badly handicapped
by reason of car shortage. Whilst the railways were
not sufficiently equipped with cars, this trouble was
made much worse on account of the unparalleled storms
on the prairies. Appearances indicate that this difficulty
will shortly be overcome and freight be moved as usual
both east and west.
"Whilst in the mining of metalliferous ores the
mines were seriously handicapped by a strike amongst
the coal miners, which caused a shortage in fuel for
mining and smelting purposes, yet the output of the
mines has largely increased, and if such strikes can be
avoided during the present year, the development in
this important industry will be unprecedented during
1907.
Fisheries Commission.
" The fishing industry was successful in all lines
during the year. The salmon pack was a very large and
profitable one, and good "prices were obtained both by
the fishermen and the packers.
"A Royal Commission was appointed by the Dominion Government to enquire into the whole fishery question. This was done and recommendations relative to
fishery regulations have been made to the Government, 20 Vancouver Board of Trade
and relying upon the judgment of the commissioners,
it would appear as only reasonable that these recommendations should be carried out in the broader interests
of this great industry. Realizing this, this Board
endorsed these recommendations and asked the Federal
authorities to carry them out.
Yukon Trade Development.
" Trade with the Yukon has been on a much more
satisfactory basis than for several years past. This
golden district appears to be entering upon a new era of
prosperity. Hydraulic mining on the benches and
dredging in the beds of the creeks of the Yukon has
proved a success, and the output of gold will undoubtedly
increase. Many more dredges would be in operation if
they could be secured, and it is a great pity that Vancouver foundries and machine shops are not endeavoring to obtain the manufacture of this class of machinery.
Each dredge costs about $75,000.
Canadian - Mexican  Line.
"Arrangements have been made for the establishment of a line of steamers running between Vancouver
and ports on the west coast of Mexico. This line received
a subsidy of $50,000 gold from both the Canadian and
Mexican Governments. So sanguine is the company
which has made the arrangements for the line that a
large business will be done, that after obtaining two
steamships for the purpose it has decided to place three
on the route, and the third has been obtained. The first
boat will arrive here about the end of April ready to go
into service. These steamers are all over 3500 tons'
capacity and must be capable of carrying 120 passengers
and make not less than twelve voyages during the year.
Not only can a local trade be developed, but this opens
another through route from Europe to Vancouver, and
goods from England may be laid down in fifty-five days Annual Report, 1906-1907 21
by utilizing the short railway across Mexico, which I
understand has recently been completed.
City's Increase.
" Vancouver has increased in population by 10,000
during the year. It has added $17,000,000 to its assessment valuation in the same time, being 40 per cent,
increase over last year. In population it stands seventh
in the Dominion. In bank clearings it stands fourth,
and by long odds first in the percentage of increase
as shown by Bradstreets' weekly report.
"Whilst last year was the most prosperous one that
Vancouver ever experienced, the indications are that
1907 will far exceed 1906 in general prosperity, and if
such be the case, it will be a good year for speculators to
dispose of margins and get on a firm footing. We cannot always expect to have good times.
Official Visitors.
" We were visited during the year by Mr. Richard
Grigg, commercial agent of the London Board of Trade,
and also by Mr. Graham Gow, in the same capacity,
from New Zealand.
"The membership of the Board one year ago
numbered 139. During the year three left Vancouver,
three resigned, three were declared delinquent, and one
died, which makes the present membership 141.
" It is with feelings of deep regret that I refer to
the calling away by death of Mr. C. M. Beecher. Mr.
Beecher held a high position in the immense manufacturing business with which he was connected and
financially interested. He had long been a member of
this Board and could always be depended upon to do 
22 Vancouver Board of Trade
his best in the furtherance of any movement that would
be of benefit to the city commercially or socially, and
in his taking away this city lost a good citizen and the
Board of Trade an active, earnest member.
"Our financial position is better by $773.43 than
one year ago. We had then a balance of $1467.58
whilst to-day it amounts to $2241.00
"In conclusion, I desire to thank the members for
the interest taken by them in the business of the
Board and for the assistance and support given your
President during the year, for the good feeling pervading the Board and the evident intention of the
members to allow nothing in the way of personal
interest to interfere with them in their desire to advance the best interests of the city through the
medium of the Board of Trade.
"I also thank the Secretary for the painstaking
care and efficiency with which he has attended to the
many matters which have come to his hand to deal
with, the strength of any Board being largely due to
the efforts of its secretary.
Looking Forward.
" With a firm belief in the great future of our
City, Province and Dominion, and believing that in
the planning and carrying out of all our projects we
should grapple with them firmly and plan them on a
scale commensurate with our belief in our future
greatness as a city and a country, and thereby not
only reap the accruing benefits ourselves but strengthen
and stimulate others. I hand the work over to my
successor in office with my best wishes for a successful
year."
r. p. Mclennan.
March 5th, 1907. 
Annual Report,  1906-1907 23
SECRETARY'S REPORT.
BALANCE   SHEET.
Liabilities Dec. 30th, 1906.—Nil.
ASSETS.
Balance in Bank and in Hand $1,461 44
Dues in Arrears (good)       320 00
Room Bent (outstanding)        25 50
 $ 1,806 95
Furniture  300 00
Library  1 000 00
$3,106 94
Wisi. Godfrey,     \Av(iltor- Wm. Skene,
OHAS. E. Tisdau,, jAudJtors- Secretary.
FINANCIAL STATEMENT,    1ST   JAN.   TO   31ST   DEC,  1906.
RECEIPTS.
1906.
Jan.     1—Balance in Bank of B. N. A  $1,04158
Dec.   31—Dues Collected  $2,700 00
Entrance Fees        120 00
RentofRooms ^,  71 50
Savings Bank Interest  20 10
 2,911 60
$ 3,953 13
EXPENDITURE. 	
1906.
Dec.   31—Printing, Stationery and Binding $ 195 10
Postage and Sundries   106 06
Caretaker and Elevator  57 00
Electric Light  13 85
Telegrams  54 63
Telephone  51 90
Advertisements   41 00
File of three Daily Newspapers  37 00
Rent  240 00
Secretary  720 00
Total Ordinary Expenses  $ 1,516 54
Annual Report.
Evans & Hastings, 4,000 copies  627 00
Envelopes  25 50
Engraving, etc  20 50
Postage and Express   42 20
       715 20
EXTRAORDINARY EXPENSES.
1,000 copies B.C. Review        180 00
Postage          80 00
Dec.   31—Balance in Bank and in Hand  1,461 44
$ 3,953 18
360 00
N.B.—The Board also holds in trust a balance of $144.27 from
special collection made on account of Freight Committee, for legal
and expert expenses in Ottawa and Vancouver. 24 Vancouver Board of Trade
EXTRACTS FROM MINUTES.
Reported visit of their Majesties the King and Queen
to Canada.
At the monthly meeting of the Board held on Sth
June, 1906, the loyal address to His Majesty the King
adopted unanimously by the House of Commons at
Ottawa, on 18th April last, " humbly praying that His
Majesty and Her Most Gracious Majesty the Queen
will honor the Dominion of Canada with their presence
at such time as may be selected by His Majesty,"
having been considered with much interest it was,
I Resolved, that the Vancouver Board of Trade of
the City of Vancouver, B. C. impressed with the conviction that the presence of Our Sovereign and His
Gracious Consort in the Dominion of Canada could not
fail to be of the highest importance in fostering and
cementing the ties of loyalty which already bind the
Dominion to the Mother Country, unanimously endorses
the said address, and should His Majesty accede to the
petition of His Canadian subjects, this Board would
desire further to express a hope that in order to more
fully realize the extent, variety and importance of the
resources and natural beauties of the Dominion, His
Majesty may be graciously pleased to extend the Royal
progress to the Pacific Coast."
Conservation  of Dead man's Island to the City.
At monthly meeting of the Board held on 7th
August, 1906, it was resolved—
" That, in the opinion of the Vancouver Board of
Trade, the alienation of Headman's Island in Vancouver Harbor and its being utilized for manufacturing
purposes would be a very serious detriment generally
and would create a source of extreme danger to the Annual Report, 1906-1907
25
timber and beautiful undergrowth of Stanley Park, as
the liability of fire would thereby become much greater
and the Board strongly urges that the best interests of
the City of Vancouver will be served by the said "Dead-
man's Island" being made a part of Stanley Park and
included in the lease of that reserve to the City," and
"Further resolved, That a copy of the foregoing
resolution be forwarded to the Hon. The Minister of
Marine and Defence, Ottawa."
Protection of Property along the Water Frontage.
At monthly Board Meeting of 9th October, 1906,
it was resolved—
"That with a view to the better protection of
property along the shore-line of the City, the attention
of the City Council be called to the matter, suggesting
that no time should be lost in the. installation of a
properly equipped Fire-Boat."
Dearth of Labor in B. C.
At monthly meeting of 9th October, 1906, the
question of the great dearth of labor for industrial
and domestic help having been considered and fully
discussed, the following resolution was adopted :
I Whereas, all industries are suffering and the
general development of the Province is being
retarded by a dearth of labor,
| Be it resolved, That a Memorial be presented
to the Dominion and Provincial Governments, praying that immediate steps be taken to secure the
introduction of a suitable supply of labor sufficient
for the Country's needs." 26
Vancouver Board of Trade
Technical  Education throughout the Dominion.
At a monthly Board Meeting of 6th November,
1906.
"Resolved, That the Vancouver Board of Trade
strongly impressed with the great importance of the
establishment of a system of technical education
throughout the Dominion as an aid and impetus to
our manufacturing industries, heartily endorses the
Memorial on the subject addressed to His Excellency
The Governor-General by the Canadian Manufacturers'
Association, praying that the Dominion Government
may appoint a commission to report on the best
method for establishing a compi'ehensive national
system of Technical Education."
Franco-British  Exhibition, 1908.
At monthly meeting of 6th November, 1906.
" Resolved, That the Vancouver Board of Trade
endorses the scheme of the Franco-British Exhibition
to be held in London, England, in 1908, and requests
that the name of President R. P. McLennan be added
to the General Committee."
Alaska Yukon  Exhibition, 1909.
Resolution adopted at monthly meeting, 4th December, 1906.
| Whereas, there will be held at Seattle, U.S.A.,
in 1909, an Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, International in character; and
" Whereas, the said Exposition was primarily
projected in order to exploit the resources of
Alaska, the Canadian Yukon and Northern British
Columbia Territories; and Annual Report, 1906-1907
27
"Whereas, these Territories have furnished
untold wealth and revenue, and been important
factors in the up-building of Vancouver, and British
Columbia in general; and
| Whereas, the era of developing the immense
resources of these potential territories is yet in its
infancy and can be greatly accelerated by the
infusion of additional people and additional capital;
and
"Whereas, it is designed to have at said
Exposition a separate building for Alaska and the
Yukon to be known as the " Alaska-Yukon " Group,
the United States Government having been requested for a large appropriation for the former,
besides an appropriation for a separate Government building ; and
"Whereas, the choicest and most advantageous locations have been reserved by the management of said Exposition for these buildings ;
"Now therefore be it resolved, That the Vancouver Board of Trade favors the erection of a
Yukon building;
I And be it further resolved, That the Dominion
Government be and is hereby requested to grant
an adequate appropriation for such building at the
Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition in which to display to the World the magnificent mineral and
divers resources of the Canadian-Yukon and the
Northern British Columbia Territories."    Annual Report, 1906-1907
31
SUNDRY SHIPMENTS TO FOREIGN POINTS BY REGULAR LINE
STEAMERS AND OTHER VESSELS FROM HASTINGS MILLS.
TO
United Kingdom and Oont. of Europe.
Australia	
China	
Japan	
Fiji Islands	
New Zealand	
Yukon Territory	
Feet B. M.
Value.
227,593
$ 8,100
295,699
4,161
150,923
2,368
218,219
5,819
164,254
3,173
178,078
2,865
520,416
4,424
1,755,182
$30,910
SUMMARY OF FOREIGN SHIPMENTS FROM HASTINGS MILL
IN  1905.
TO
Feet B. M.<
Value.
United Kingdom and Cont. of Europe. 9,413,870
Australia  13,937,270
South Africa  2.549,427
Japan   2,360,890
China  2,363,809
Peru I 5,265,108
Chile I 4,869,206
Fiji Islands  807,839
New Zealand  178,078
Egypt   2,184,120
Alaska and Yukon  520,416
California   797,868
45,247,901
145,884
179,474
29,486
43,624
27,043
74,232
57,691
14,278
28,25
27,881
4,424
8,601
$ 615,483    Annual Report,  1906-1907
33
CARGO SHIPMENTS, FRASER RIVER SAWMILLS, LTD., FOR  1906.
Sailed
NAME
Mar. 20
May 31
June 2
9
July 27
" 28
I 23
Aug. 7
Sept. 5
" 15
" 26
Oct. 12
Dec. 28
Steinbek	
Henley	
Vellore 	
Tellus	
Tellus	
Tellus	
Aleric	
Wyneric	
Beacon Rock.
Duneric	
Quito  	
Curzon	
Tottenham....
DESTINATION
South America	
Australia	
South America  ,
Alaska	
Dearing, Alaska	
Kuwalik,       "     	
Nome, "     	
Nome, "     	
Adelaide, Aiistralia.
Nome, Alaska	
Nome,      "       	
Valparaiso, Chile	
Acapulco, Mexico ....
Total Cargo Shipments for year.
Feet
360,577
379,861
296,592
139,127
61,373
135,264
146,609
800,000
500,299
534.605
467,783
422,527
127,992
9,372,609
Total  Cut of  Lumber,  Praser River Sawmills,
for the year 1906	
Total Cut of Lath, Praser River Sawmills, for
the year 1906	
27,647,692 feet.
SUMMARY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA COAST MILLS FOR 1906.
Board Measure.
Total cut of Lumber
Poreign Shipments .
Rail Shipments	
450,000,000 feet.
86,000,000    "
220,000,000     I  Annual Report,  1906-1907
FISHING     INDUSTRY.
35
BRITISH COLUMBIA  SALMON.
PACK BY CANNERIES-FRASER   RIVER.
DISTRICTS AND
PACKERS
3
W
M
o
o
m
Red and
White
Springs
Humpbacks
and Dog
Salmon
m
o
o
o
O
Grand
Totals
North Arm Dist.—
B. C. Packers' Ass'n	
Totals
14,614
11,331
18,496
10,409
14,851
6,600
7,154
7,719
4,077
2,500
4,005
3,865
1,667
12,677
10,338
9,395
10,289
12.094
3,440
2,876
4,975
4,625
790
3,520
700
Totals
49
115
479
157
Totals
Totals
323
14,986
Canadian Can. Co., Ltd...
1,578
3,038
4,500
" "l33
11,446
Steveston Dist.—
A. B. C. Packing Co., Ltd.
Malcolm, Cannon & Co....
3,870
36
1,366
2,600
2,669
24,423
10,602
19,255
J. H. Todd &Sons	
383
175
1,397
13,700
Royal Packing Co., Ltd...
Canadian Can. Co., Ltd...
10,206;
7,894^
Burrard Can. Co., Ltd. ...
920
6,527
2,500.
2,913
45
6,918.
G. West Packing Co., Ltd.
139
950
122
210
359
133
-4,609-
2,61T
Canoe Pass Dist.—
2
12,801
A. B. C. Packing Co., Ltd.
10,548
B. C. Can. Co., Ltd	
3,593
13,347
Westminster Dist.—
B. C Packers' Ass'n	
	
10,422
St. Mungo Can. Co., Ltd.
1,204
2,690
4,412
3,390
17,710
Unique Can. Co., Ltd	
1,280
10,820
2,876
Outlying Dist.-
Northern Can. Co., Ltd...
857
1,800
25
960
4,632 |
5,832
J. J. Mulhall	
55
6,480
Nye Canning Co	
815
Victoria Dist.—
J. H. Todd & Sons	
4,480
Capital City Can. Co.,Ltd.
1,500
2,400
9,232
Totals, Fraser River...
"      Northern Dists.
183,007
276,672
7,523
24,821
15,543
52,762 1
34,413
34,719
240,486
388,974
Grand B. C. Totals
459,679
32,344 1
68,305 j
69,132 j
629,460 36                Vancouver Board of Trade
PACK BY CANNERS AND DISTRICTS—NORTHERN POINTS.
DISTRICTS AND
PACKERS
in
©
>>
©
M
o
o
m
TO+3 H
03
M
O
n cSCO
©
o
o
O
Grand
Totals
Skeena River Dist.—
B. C. Packers' Ass'n	
A. B. C. Packing Co., Ltd.
Malcolm, Cannon & Co....
J H. Todd & Sons	
Totals
14,254
14,321
6,356
7,820
10,218
11,439
4,806
5,543
1,986
7,651
2,000
40,067
14,963
19,760
18,100
14,629
15,112
10,203
4,657
7,306
5,249
11,783
5,299
10,000
3,970
5,245
1,502
2,264
169
Totals
4,681
3,863
58
1,560
3,969
2,184
367
1,198
698
1,196
364
57
33
Totals
7,538
5,807
4,501
3,200
3,123
4,043
2,541
4,204
3,175
859
Totals
3,752
2,385
1,096
1,100
1,981
2,046
890
1,575
400
714
958
66
30,225
26,376
12,011
13,680
19,291
19,712
8,604
12,520
3,084
12,736
4,181
40,190
14,996
19,760
18,100
14,657
15,175
14,024
9,262
9,248
7,924
15,231
11,188
10,000
7,388
8,210
6,600
4,182
419
B. C. Canning Co., Ltd....
Wallace Bros. P. Co., Ltd.
Skeena River Com. Co,Ld.
Cassiar Pack. Co., Ltd	
Alexandria Pack. Co., Ld.
Dawson & Buttimer	
Village Island Can. Co....
Rivers Inlet Dist.—
A. B. C. Packing Co., Ltd.
B. C. Canning Co., Ltd...
J. H. Todd & Sons	
28
63
318
249
354
Dawson & Buttimer	
2,161
2,248
1,588
1,588
1,848
4,879
Naas River Dist.—
Federation B. S. C. Co.Ld.
John Wallace	
1,342
2,108
Port Nelson C. & S.Co.Ld.
Lowe Inlet Dist.—
B. C. Packers' Ass'n	
1,087
1,573
Dean Channel Dist.—
Robert Dranev	
27
1,010
Bella Coola Dist.—
Smith's Inlet Dist.—
Wm. Hickey Can. Co	
Alert Bat Dist.—
B. C. Packers' Ass'n.-	
2,357
2,635
2,601
68
1,061
330
Clayoquot. Sd. Dist.—
Clayoquot S. C. Co., Ltd..
Alberni Dist.—
Alberni Pack. Co., Ltd....
2,497
47
Quathiaski Dist.—
T. E. Atkins	
1,803
250
Pender Harbor Dist.—
P. H. Alder	
North. C anneriesTotals
276,672
24,821
52,762
34,719
388,974
-  I
38 Vancouver Board of Trade
HARBOR AND SHIPPING.
VANCOUVER, B.C.,—twenty years ago an unknown
quantity—is fast assuming its position in the front rank
among the great ports of the world, and "via Vancouver"
is becoming as familiar a phrase in shipping circles as
"via Liverpool" or "via Hamburg."
The volume of trans-Pacific trade increases with
leaps and bounds and now that Canadian flour has been
successfully introduced in Japan, where wheaten bread
is becoming a staple article of diet, the transport of
foodstuffs from the plains of Alberta through this port
is likely to call for a large increase to our present fleet
of steamers, while the quick mail services established to
the Orient and the improvements in the Australian-
New Zealand services, as well as the inauguration of a
direct Mexican service, are bringing a large passenger
traffic this way and adding much to the activity on our
wharves.
The following are the regular lines at present in
operation:
The Canadian Pacific Royal Mail Steamship Line to
China and Japan, comprising the " Empress of
India," " Empress of Japan," and "Empress of
China," affords a tri-weekly service, the auxiliary steamers "Tartar," "Athenian," and
Monteagle" making regular additional interim
sailings.
The Atlantic "Empress" Liners " Empress of Britain"
and "Empress of Ireland," in conjunction with
the " Overseas Limited," running between Vancouver and Montreal, complete the " Empress "
route from Liverpool to Yokohama and Hong
Kong. Annual Report,  1906-1907 39
The Canadian-Australian Royal Mail Steamship
Line, comprising the turbine steamer "Maheno,"
the steamers "Manuka," "Moana " and "Aorangi"
gives a monthly service to Honolulu (Sandwich
. Islands), Suva (Fiji), Wellington (New Zealand)
and Sydney (New South Wales), with connections to Queensland and Tasmania.
The Canadian Pacific Steamship Company (British
Columbia service):
a. Vancouver-Victoria Daily Mail Service in connection with the transcontinental railway,
comprising the steamers " Princess Victoria,"
and " Charmer."
During the period of the " Trans-Canada
Limited" and " Imperial Limited" summer
service—June to October, the " Princess Victoria" runs daily to and from Victoria and
Seattle from Vancouver.
b. The Northern Express Service, comprising the
twin-screw steamers " Princess Royal," "Princess
May " and the " Amur," sail weekly to Skagway
in direct connection with the White Pass &
Yukon Railway and express steamers oh the
Yukon, passengers, making the journey from
Vancouver to Dawson by this route in six days.
c. Coasting Service. — The steamers " Princess
Beatrice," " Danube," and " Tees" make regular
sailings to all points on the coast, carrying mails,
passengers and supplies to the Northern canneries, also connecting with the Hudson's Bay
Company's steamers on the Skeena river during
the summer months.
d. Steamer "Joan" carries mail arid passengers
daily to and from Nanaimo, Vancouver Island. 40 Vancouver Board of Trade
e. Trarisfer service, conveying railway freight cars
and coal wagons in bulk between Vancouver
and Ladysmith (Vancouver Island), for Victoria
and Naniamo.
Alley Line.—(New Zealand Direct Steamship Service.)—Steamers "Bucentaur" and "Pondo"
make regular bi-monthly sailings, under contract with the Dominion and New Zealand
Governments.
Ocean Steamship Company, Ltd., and China Mutual
Steam Navigation Company, Ltd., from Glasgow Liverpool and London, for Vancouver.
Direct service to and from the United Kingdom,
via the Suez Canal, each 28 days, comprising
" Bellerophon " (8,918), " Teucer " (8,900), " Ping
Suey" (6,457), "Agamemnon" (7,010), "Ning
Chow" (8,813), "Hyson" (6,608), "Calchas"
(6,748), "Stentor" (6,773), "Oonfa" (8,819),
"Machon" (6,737), "Telemachus *' (7,449),
"Dencalion" (7,030), Yangtzse" (6,457), " Kee-
mun " (8,863).
Puget Sound Service.—The steamers " Ramona'
and "Wialele" afford a tri-weekly service to and
from Seattle, Washington.
Union Steamship Company, Limited, of Vancouver
affords a regular service to Prince Rupert, Port
Simpson, Van Anda and the chief coasting
points, logging camps and canneries, their fleet
being the " Camosun," " Cassiar," " Comox,"
" Capilano," and " Coquitlam."
The Terminal Steamship Company, Limited, steamers " Britannia" and " Defiance " ply daily to
and from Bowen Island, Britannia Beach, Howe
Sound, Lake Buntzen, Granite Falls, etc. Annual Report, 1906-1907 41
The Pacific Coast Steamship Company's steamers
| Sonoma," "President," "Umatilla" and "Queen "
sail every fifth day to and from San Francisco,
and the steamer " City of Seattle " makes regular schedule trips to Skagway (for Dawson).
Mexican Steamship Company (subsidised by the
Canadian and Mexican Governments) steamers
" Lonsdale" and " Georgia" carry passengers
and freight monthly from B.C. Ports to Salina
Cruz, Mexico (calling at Mazatlan, San Bias,
Mazanillo and Acapulco).
Mackenzie Bros. Steamship Co., Ltd. — Steamers
"Haldis,""Halverd," and "Henriette" do a general
freighting business from Vancouver to Puget
Sound, Northern Ports of B.C. and Alaska.
Mosquito Fleet—The local fleet of tugs and barges
required to tow logs and carry supplies to and
from the lumber mills and logging camps, and
the fleet of fishing boats and steamers employed
in the salmon and deep-sea fisheries aggregate
several thousand tons and are constantly being
increased.
Wharfage—Work has been commenced on the extended system of wharves in Burrard Inlet,
referred to in last year's report.
P.S.—As evidence of th? growth of the Port of Vancouver, the following shows the Ocean-going Vessels (with
their net tonnage)at the wharves June 11th to 24th, 1907:
Wyneric (3264), Boveric (2578), Bellerophon (5800),
Dolphin (498), Glenmark (1250), Georgia (1778), Sonoma
(3936), Monteagle (3492), Empress of Japan (3003), City
of Puebla (1713), Haldis (1065), Halvard (1066), Matter-
horn (1754), Sandhana (1110), Adderly (1147). 42
Vancouver Board of Trade
PORT   OF   VANCOUVER,   B.C.,   18
SEAGOING  VESSELS—INWARDS   WITH  CARGOES.
96.
No.
35
11
154
Tons Reg.
Freight
• Crews
Tons .Wgt.
Tons Mst.
British   	
Canadian...
Foreign	
82,061
412
180,224
32,219
1,062
28,223
53,867
697
33,949
4,349
881
7,158
Total
200
262,927
61,504
88,513
11,595
SEAGOING   VESSELS—INWARDS  IN    BALLAST.
8
9
04
81
11,490
1,831
22,744
170
Canadian...
115
782
Total	
36,065
1,067
SEAGOING  VESSELS—OUTWARDS   IN   BALLAST
British 	
2
25
61
2,355
2,318
15,714
47
Canadian...
199
Foreign
894
Total	
88
20,387
1,140
COASTING   TRADE—INWARDS.
Steamers....
2,072
60
420,925
19,369
32,811
Sailing Vsl.
201
Total	
2,132
440,294
33,012
COASTING   TRADE—OUTWARDS.
2,095
68
430,266
20,631
34,090
Sailing Vsl.
222
Total	
2,163
450,897
34,312
SEAGOING
FREIGHT.
Vessels
Tonnage
Tons Wgt.
Tons Mst.
Crews
Total Entries
In and Out
4,871
. 1,496,827
172,510
222,376
92,637 Annual Report,  1906-1907 43
port of vancouver, b.c., 1906.
SEAGOING   VESSELS—INWARDS   WITH   CARGOES.
No.
Tons Reg.
Fbeight.
Tons Wgt.
Tons Mst.
British 	
Canadian...
174
77
294
240,377
24,232
243,536
75,167
4,824
29,454
79,721
1,424
10,586
18,459
1,605
12,803
Total	
545
508,145
109,445
91,731
32,867
SEAGOING
VESSELS—INWARDS   IN   BALLAST.
British	
32
190
84
72,298
48,311
52,339
1,899
Canadian...
3,289
Foreign ....
3,266
Total	
306
680,803
8,454
SEAGOING   VESSELS—OUTWARDS WITH   CARGOES.
British                 119
Canadian...         107
Foreign               237
227,187
44,624
238,503
101,529
34,229
35,556
124,243
10,715
33,5s3
13,131
2,350
11,267
Total |       463
511,314
171,324
158,501
27,748
SEAGOING   VESSELS—OUTWARDS  IN   BALLAST.
British	
27
175
139
54,489
33,993
58,486
1,964
Canadian ...
2,498
Foreign	
5,023
Total 	
341
146,968
9,476
COASTING   TRADE—INWARDS.
3,929
271
639,954
203,194
54,902
Sailing Vsl.
1,469
Total.
4,200
843,148
56,371
COASTING TRADE—OUTWARDS.
Steamers....     4,115
Sailing Vsl.        248
691,668
181,296
Total      4,363
872,964
61,727
1,322
63,049
SEAGOING
FREIGHT.
Vessels
Tonnage
Tons Wgt.
Tons Mst.
Crews
Total Entries
. In and Out |  10,763
3,563,342
280,769
260,232
196,965  Annual Report, 1906-1907
45
INLAND  REVENUE,   DIVISION  OF VANCOUVER.
TWELVE MONTHS ENDING 31st MARCH, 1904-5-6-7.
1904 1905 1906 1907
Spirits $185,42184 $169,553 07 $182,574 43 $216,015 95
Malt    39,160 27 45,491 51 53,267 48 50,693 71
Tobacco    73,370 40 68,225 59 78,558 76 85,905 00
Raw Leaf       9,563 82 7,929 72 8,427 17 11,352 09
Cigars ex Factory.   25,146 78 20,616 05 22,604 51 31,839 63
Cigars ex Wr'house     1,622 40 2,629 65 1,999 60 1,172 58
Licenses       3,145 00 3,305 00 3,080 00 2,373 75
Methylated Spirits.        309 65 510 62 264 69 373 51
Other Receipts ....      4,212 23 135 38 1,001 78 780 85
Malt Liquor  1,946 10 1,252 10 1,402 10
Vinegar  1,302 66 1,814 89
Totals $341,952 39 $321,615 69 $344,333 18 $403,724 06
YEARS ENDING JUNE  30th,   1901-2-3.
1901
Licenses $   2,987 50
Spirits    172.451 13
Malt     30,955 47
Tobacco     60,530 40
Raw Leaf       6,975 82
Cigars ex Factory     16,806 90
Cigars ex Warehouse       1,139 40
Methylated Spirits  327 79
Other Receipts  337 40
Totals $292,511 81
1902
|   3,130 00
152,571 03
32,581 36
57,564 63
8,108 43
18,620 25
2,895 30
257 12
1,471 70
1903
$   2,942 50
154,541 96
31,306 84
59,746 09
8,219 84
19,354 27
2,445 75
380 42
1,865 64
$277,199 82       $280,803 31 46
Vancouver Board of Trade
BANKING    RETURNS.
VANCOUVER  CLEARING  HOUSE.
Comparative Statement of Clearings for years ending
March 31st, 1905, 1906, 1907.
1904-1905
1905-1906
1906-1907
April	
$ 5,436,749
5,977,818
6,875,815
6,573,713
6,665,173
6,721,250
9,998,960
6,964,217
6,300,644
6,430,014
5,337,364
6,207,292
$ 6,175,405
6,968,758
7,100,546
7,311,065
7,951,737
8,556,198
8,684,218
9,144,091
8,594,703
8,292,718
7,563,087
9,382,675
$   9,102,435
May	
10,112,408
July	
September	
November	
January	
February 	
March 	
10,252,571
10,565,706
12,048,239
11,910,710
13,961,545
14,321,269
15,092,995
13,402,453
12,601,515
14,587,073
Totals	
$76,489,013
$95,744,201
$147,958,919
COMPARISONS   OF   BANK   CLEARINGS   IN  ELEVEN   CITIES,
1904,   1905,   1906,   JANUARY  TO   DECEMBER.
1904
1905
1906
Montreal	
$1,065,067,000
.   842,097,066
94,601,437
103,749,300
74,640,500
90,115,783
74,502,550
59,003,081
51,422,085
45,552,230
32,993,113
$1,324,313,000
1,047,490,701
369,868,179
121,215,777
88,460,391
89,251,562
86,389,081
68,385,601
52,836,333
50,429,511
36,890,464
$1,533,597,000
Toronto 	
1,219,125,359
Winnipeg	
504,585,914
135,327,604
Ottawa 	
Quebec	
132,606,358
91,837,507
91,618 685
78,480,620
60,042,818
London, Ont	
57 863 782
45,615,615
Totals	
$2,735,744,235
$3,335,530,600
$3,950,701,262
(N.B.—Vancouver has now for some time held 4th place.)
L  48      Vancouver Board of Trade
EXPORTS TO THE UNITED STATES.
Exports to the United States from the Vancouver
Consular District during the twelve months ended
May 31st.
Beef, dressed    $      2,553 47
Bluestone  647 43
Bone Carbon  377 07
Butter  15,745 00
Cartridges  372 78
Cascara Bark  2,500 00
Cement  5,940 00
Clams  201 60
Coal, Anthracite  299 40
I    Bituminous  9,412 00
CocoanutOil  132 58
Coffee  4,824 96
Copper Ore  130,392 00
CopperNails  507 59
Currants  653 41
Dates  1,370 42
Diamonds  400 00
Diving Outfit  100 00
Dore Bullion  152,042 00
Felt Roofing  105 44
Fire Brick  1,319 46
Fish, Halibut, fresh  266,775 92
frozen  17,602 80
Salmon, canned  14,615 40
frozen  20,456 90
"       pickled  82,016 27
Herring, fresh  1,677 00
"       pickled  1,798 80
Furs, raw  • 17,202 13
Gold Bullion  430,040 39
"   Concentrates  3lj,320 00
"   Coin   1,460,000 00
Granite  2J780 00
Hides, raw  84,239 41
Carried forward $ 2,760,421 63
1 Annual Report, 1906-1907 49
Brought forward. $2,760,421 63
Horns  942 25
Horses  5,500 00
Household Goods  58,897 12
Iron  115 50
Lime  3,080 00
Liquor  2,191 90
Logs  327,569 57
I   Piling  3,531 67
"   Telephone and Telegraph Poles  4,170 82
Lumber, Australian  5.527 93
Fir  27,494 38
Timbers  10,232 08
Railway Ties  14,080 65
Machinery  795 34
Merchandise '.  1,445 93
returned American  206,386 90
Nets  1,987 45
Peanuts   979 40
Pipes  162 00
Potatoes, evaporated  5,737 02
Potassium Cyanide  8,181 52
Salvage outfit   5,500 00
Scrap  23,215 11
Shingles  477,196 91
Shingle Bolts...r "  2,100 00
Steam Shovel  12,000 00
Steel  531 90
Sugar, Maple  415 60
Syrup  20,469 94
Tea  62,525 45
Tin, pig  26,352 50
"   plate  9,807 00
Tobacco   556 73
Wire Rope    145 00
Total $ 4,089,238 20 50
Vancouver Board of Trade
TABLE OF DISTANCES FROM VANCOUVER, B.C.
Eastwards— Statute Miles
Vancouver to Rossland, Kootenay      563
to Calgary, Alberta      641
'• to Edmonton, Alberta      833
" to Regina, Saskatchewan     1,125
" to Winnipeg, Manitoba  1,482
" to Toronto, Ontario  2,769
to Montreal, Que  2,906
| to Quebec, Que  3,054
" to Halifax, Nova Scotia  3,660
Nautical Miles
Quebec to Liverpool, England  2,650
to Plymouth,       "        2,680
Halifax to Liverpool,       "        2,355
"       to Plymouth,       "  2,400
Westwards— Nautical Miles
Vancouver to Vladivostock (Russian terminus of the
Siberian railway) direct'  4,460
Vancouver to Yokohama, Japan  4,270
Yokohama (via Nagasaki) to Dalny, Manchurian terminus of Siberian railway, about  1,0C0
Yokohama to Shanghai, China  1,060
to Hong Kong, China  1,600
Hong Kong to Singapore  1,440
Singapore to Calcutta, India  1,630
to Madras '.  1,630
Southwards— Nautical Miles
Vancouver to Moreton Bay, Queensland  6,510
to Honolulu, S. 1  3,435
Honolulu to Suva, Fiji  2,760
Suva, Fiji, to Moreton Bay  1,560
" to Sydney, N. S. W  1,770
" to Auckland, New Zealand  1,170
Moreton Bay to Sydney       445
Vancouver to San Francisco, Cal     833
" to Mazatlan, Mexico  2,311
Statute Miles
Vancouver to Seattle, Washington      178
" to Tacoma, "      219
" to Portland, Oregon      405
" to San Francisco, Cal  1,177
Northwards- - Miles
Vancouver to Skagway, coast steamer     891
Skagway to White Horse, Yukon railway      Ill
White Horse to Dawson, river steamer     450 Annual Report,  1906-1907 51
Northwards (Continued)— Miles
Vancouver to St. Michael, by ocean steamer    2,660
St. Michael to Dawson City, by river steamer  1,690
Vancouver to Prince Rupert, by coast steamers      600
ORDINARY  DUES OF A VESSEL IN VANCOUVER.
Hospital dues, per register ton  $       02
Health Inspector's fee  4 00
Harbor dues  5 00
Bill of health, outwards  1 00
Pilotage, per foot (each way)  2 00
Pilotage per foot (steamers)   1 50
Port Agency (according to size) $25 00 to   100 00
Discharge of ballast (usually done by ship's crew)
or per ton  25
Harbor tonnage  10 00 to    20 00
Stevedoring—
General cargo or salmon, per ton  45
Sugar, per ton  25
Lumber and timber, per M feet, according to
the style of cargo and facilities of the
ship  89 to      1 00
Watering  15 00to    20 00
RATE OF TOWAGE.
PILOTAGE   DISTRICT  OF  YALE   AND   NEW WESTMINSTER.
The ports of the Pilotage District of Yale and New
Westminster shall be as follows:
Port of Vancouver.
Port of New Westminster.
Port of Yale and several landings on the Fraser
River.
(1) The limit of the Port of Vancouver shall be inside a line drawn from Point Atkinson to the red buoys
on Spanish Bank.
(2) The limit of the Port of New Westminster shall
be inside a line drawn between the outer buoys and
north and south sand heads at the entrance of Fraser
River. 52      Vancouver Board of Trade
DUES.
For vessels entering or clearing from the Port of
Vancouver the rates of pilotage shall be as follows:
Vessels, under sail $4 00 per foot
"      in tow of a steamer  5 00
"      under steam  150       "
The pilotage from Cape Flattery or Royal Roads to
a line drawn from Point Atkinson to the red buoy on
Spanish Bank, and vice versa, is not compulsory, but if
the services of a pilot are required, he shall be paid the
following rates : -
For vessels under sail—
From Cape Flattery $6 00 per foot
"     CallumBay 5 00
"     BeachyHead 4 00
"     Race Rocks or Royal Roads 3 00
For vessels under steam, or in tow of a steamer, the
following rates shall be paid—
From Cape Flattery $3 00 per foot
"     Callum Bay  2 50
"     BeachyHead  2 00
"     Race Rocks or Royal Roads, vessels under steam 1 00       "
" " "   in tow of a str. 1 50       "
NEW    WESTMINSTER.
From the lighthouse on Fraser Sand Heads to New
Westminster:
For Vessels under sail $4 00 per foot
" in tow of steamer  2 00       "
" under steam  150       "
From the lighthouse to Cape Flattery or Royal
Roads, and vice versa, the pilotage is not compulsory,
but if the services of a pilot are required, he shall be
paid the following rates : Annual Report, 1906-1907 53
For vessels under sail—
From Cape Flattery $6 00 per foot
I     CallumBay  5 00
"     BeachyHead  4 00
"     Race Rocks or Royal Roads  3 00       "
For vessels under steam, or in tow of a steamer,
the following rates shall be paid—
From Cape Flattery $3 00 per foot
"     CallumBay  2 50
"     BeachyHead  2 00
"     Race Rocks or Royal Roads, vessels under steam 1 00       "
" 1 " I "   intowofastr. 1 50
Any fraction of foot not exceeding six inches shall
be paid for as half a foot, and any fraction of foot
exceeding six inches shall be paid for as a foot.
SCHEDULE OF PORT WARDEN   DUES.
PRIVY COUNCIL,  CANADA.
At the Government House at Ottawa,
the 22nd Day of September, 1902.
Present:
His Excellency
The Governor-General-in-Council.
The Governor-General-in-Council, in accordance
with the Port Wardens Act, Chapter 85, Revised
Statutes of Canada, is pleased to approve and doth
hereby approve the accompanying revised tariff of
Port Warden fees proposed to be levied at the Port of
Vancouver, British Columbia.
(Signed) John J. McGee,
Clerk of the Privy Council.
^> 54
Vancouver Board of Trade
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE.
Molsons Building, Vancouver, B. C, Canada,
15th August, 1902.
In re
The Port Wardens Act, Sec. 30, Cap. 85, Revised
Statutes of Canada.
Tariff of Port Warden fees to be levied at the Port
of Vancouver, B. C, as revised from Memorandum from
the Department of Justice, Ottawa, to the Deputy
Minister of Marine, dated August 5th, 1902.
1. For every survey and the certificate thereof by the port
warden and his assistant of the hatches and cargo of any
vessel, or the hull, spars or rigging thereof, or of damaged
goods, a fee of eight dollars, and a further sum of five
dollars payable to each shipwright or other skilled person
employed by him.
2. For every valuation of a vessel for average, and every in
spection of a vessel intending to load :
(a) For a vessel not exceeding 500 tons a fee of $ 5 00
(6) For a vessel 501 tons and not exceeding 700 tons.. 7 50
(c) For a vessel 701 tons or over  10 00
3. For hearing and settling disputes of which the port warden
is authorized to take cognizance, and for the fees on
appeal to the Council of the Board of Trade :
(a) Providing the value of the thing or the amount
in dispute does not exceed $500.00, a fee of $10 00
(b) If exceeding $500.00, a fee of   20.00
4. For the inspection   and   superintendence   of vessels
loading grain, provided that the total quantity of
grain in any one vessel is not less than 100 tons, a
fee of    5 00
5. Part cargoes of   grain in sacks,  not exceeding one
hundred tons in any one vessel Fbee
(Signed) Wm. Skene,
Secretarv. Annual Report,  1906-1907 55
customs of the port of vancouver.
RATES   OF  COMMISSION.
Amended   schedule   recommended by special committees and adopted by the Board (1896).
XV.   "When no special agreement exists, the follow-
shall be collectible:
1. On purchase of stock, bonds, and all kinds of
securities, including the drawing of bills for
payment of same 24 per cent.
2. On sale of stocks, bonds and all kinds of securities,
including remittances in bills and guarantee.. 24 per cent.
3. On the purchase and sale of specie, gold dust
and bullion 1   per cent.
4. On sale of bills of exchange, with endorsement.. 24 per cent.
5. On sale of bills of exchange without endorsement   4 per cent.
6. For endorsing bills of exchange when desired... 24 per cent.
7. On sale  of   produce   and   merchandise,   with
guarantee 74 per cent.
8. On goods received on consignment and after
wards withdrawn 24 per cent.
9. On purchase and shipment of merchandise, on
costs and charges 5  per cent.
10. For collecting and remitting delayed or litigated
account 10   percent.
11. For collecting freight money, on amount collected 24 per cent.
12. For collecting general claims 5   per cent.
13. For collecting general average — on the first
$20,000 or any smaller amount 5   percent.
14. For collecting general average—on any excess
over $20,000 5   per cent.
15. On purchase or sale of vessels 5  percent. 56      Vancouver Board of Trade
16. For entering and clearing vessels and attending
to the customs business of the ship  $25 00
17. For "Port Agency," attending to discharge of
cargo and transacting ship's business other
than entering and clearing at customs :
On vessels not exceeding 250 tons cargo  25 00
"        with 251 tons, and not exceeding
500 tons cargo  35 00
" with 551 tons, and not exceeding
750 tons cargo  50 00
" with 751 tons, and not exceeding
1000 tons cargo ,. 75 00
over 1000 tons <■  100 00
in ballast  10 00
18. For disbursements of vessels by consignees 24 per cent.
19. For procuring freight or passengers 24 per cent.
20. For chartering vessels, on amount of freight,
actual or estimated, to be considered as due
when the '-Charter Parties" or memorandum
of their conditions, etc., are signed..- 5   per cent.
21. For landing and re-shipping goods from vessels
in distress, on invoice value, or in its absence,
on market value 5  per cent.
22. For receiving and forwarding goods—on invoice
amount 24 per cent.
23. For effecting marine insuring—on the amount
of premium 5   per cent.
24. The foregoing Commission to be exclusive of Brokerage and
every charge actually incurred.
25. Vessels to pay clerk hire and labor on wharf, sorting and
delivering cargo
1 Annual Report, 1906-1907 57
CONSULAR AGENCIES IN CITY.
BELGIUM.
J. M. Whitehead, Esq., Vice-Consul.
chile.
Hon. M. P. Morris, Consul-General.
ECUADOR.
Hon. John MacQuillan, Consul-General.
FRANCE.
Hon. Duchastel de Montrogue, Consul.
GERMANY.
Hon. Johann "Wulffsohn, ConsuL
JAPAN.
Hon. K. Morikawa, Japanese Imperial Consul.
NETHERLANDS.
C. Gardiner Johnson, Esq., Vice-Consul.
NORWAY AND  SWEDEN.
C. B. Stahlsmidt, Esq., Vice-Consul.
PERU.
R. H. Alexander, Consul.
SPAIN.
Capt. H. A. Mellon, Vice-Consul.
UNITED  STATES.
Hon. L. Edwin Dudley, Consul.  Annual Report, 1906-1907 591
THE CITY OF VANCOUVER,  1887 - 1907.
Looking along the closely-built, well-paved streets-
of the Vancouver of to-day, with their substantial warehouses and handsome financial, public and educational
buildings in full occupation or in course of construction,
viewing the fleet of vessels moored to her extensive
•wharves, and considering the fine houses and beautiful
gardens of the residential quarters, it seems impossible
to realize that, so recently as 1885, its site was covered
by dense forests, amid which stood only the hamlet of
Granville, as shewn in the cut opposite.
Vancouver was incorporated in 1886, and on the 13th.
June in that year the embryo city was destroyed by fire,,
four wooden buildings remaining.
On the same day, 13th June, 1886, the first transcontinental train left Montreal for the then terminus,
"Port Moody," but it was not until a year later, 25th
May, 1887, that the first passenger train reached
Vancouver.
At that time the Canadian Pacific executive offices,
and the only bank, the Bank of British Columbia (now
merged with the Canadian'Bank of Commerce) were
joint occupants of the building herein reproduced; by
contrast to which, the present handsome terminal building of the C. P. R. (see frontispiece) is already proving
too small for the requirements. Other railway companies have acquired terminal sites, and there are now
twelve chartered banks established here, viz.: Montreal,
Commerce, British North America, Imperial, Royal,.
Molsons, Hamilton, Nova Scotia, Merchants, Eastern
Townships, Union and Northern. The bank clearings-
for the week ending 13th June, 1907 (twenty-first anniversary of the fire), having been $3,673,000, and fourtb
place in the cities of the Dominion.
*See Harbor and Shipping 60
Vancouver Board of Trade
At this period of its majority it seems fitting to
recapitulate the names of the gentlemen who have
passed the Civic chair, viz:
M. A. Maclean (deceased) 1886 and 1887
D. Oppenheimer (deceased) 1888, 1889, 1890 and 1891
F. Cope (deceased) 1892 and 1893
R. A. Anderson 1894
H. Collins (deceased) j 1895 and 1896
W. Templeton (deceased) 1897
J. F. Garden 1898, 1899 and 1900
T. O. Townley 1901
T. F. Neelands 1902 and 1903
W. J. McGuigan, M. D 1904
F. Buscombe 1905 and 1906
The present occupant (1907) being Mr. Alexander Bethune.
Since the beginning of 1906 the population has in-
creasedatan averageof lOOOper month,60,000being a very
conservative estimate of the present status (June, 1907).
The actual city limits have already been over-reached in
every direction by the demand for residential sites, and
it would seem that before many years the "Greater
Vancouver" of the future will be bounded on the southeast by the city of New Westminster and occtipy the
entire peninsula between the Fraser River and Burrard
Inlet; while on the North shore of the latter there has
recently arisen and been incorporated the City of "North
Vancouver," to connect with which a bridge is projected
to cross the "Second Narrows" and serve as a highway
for vehicular traffic and for railway connection with the
North and with the Grand Trunk Pacific and other
transcontinental lines now in course of construction to
Prince Rupert and other points not yet determined.
Water Supply.—During the past year an immense additional source has been secured in Seymour Creek Valley from which to supplement the present splendid water
supply, while by removing the in-take in Capilano Valley to a higher level the fire protection has been
greatly increased. Annual Report, 1906-1907
61
Electric Power.—The electric railway system, already
extending 16 miles to Steveston and 12 miles to New
Westminster, is now projected to Chilliwack and Ladners, on the south bank of the Fraser (over 40 miles
from east to west). Extensive electrical power works by
an independent company are in course of construction at
Stave River, which, when completed, will, with the reserve
power of the B. C. Electric Ry. Co., not only supply the
needs of future manufacturing industries, but it has been
announced, may be further utilized to supply energy for
the proposed electric road from Vancouver to Seattle.
Industries.—The number and capacity of the local
Lumber Mills have been greatly increased during the
past year, the production of Wood Pipes and Paving
Blocks, and the construction of Tug-boats, Scows,
Fishing and Pleasure Craft goes on apace, the premises
of the B. C. Sugar Refinery have been much extended,
and an important start in handling Grain has been
made by the active operation of an Elevator and Flour
Mill.
Building.—Two important Public Buildings are now
in hand, viz.: The Post Office and Court House; the
Canadian Bank of Commerce has in course of erection
one of the handsomest bank buildings in Canada;
warehouses of greater extent and more substantial
construction are filling up the business section and
dwelling houses of all classes are at a premium and
occupied so soon as completed; Hotel accommodation
is taxed to the utmost and is being supplemented by
apartment buildings. m
Vancouver Board of Trade
MUNICIPAL STATISTICS.
[From the Official Report, 1908.]
STATEMENT OF CITY PROPERTY AND APPROXIMATE
VALUE,  DEC.  31,  1906.
sundry properties (capital assets.)
Buildings axd Lands :
Buildings. Lands.
Old Police Station (not including site) $   2,000 00
New   " "       and Court House,   Gaol
Wall and Cells    39,000 00 10,000 00
Fire Halls^-No. 1, Cordova St    22,000 00 11,500 00
No. 2, Seymour St    32,000 00 12,500 00
No. 3, Mt. Pleasant      2,000 00 3,000 00
No. 4, Fairview      1,500 00 2,500 00
No. 5, East End      3,400 00 2,500 00
•City Hall and Addition, less Library Site....   22,000 00 116,000 00
Old Hospital and Cottage Hospital     10,800 00 90,000 00
•Contagious Diseases Hospital      2,000 00 5,000 00
Pound Site and Buildings  1,500 00
Crematory and Buildings  4,000 00
Lotsl toll, Block 1, D. L. 302, Works Yard     1,500 00 100,000 00
Powell Street Grounds  62,000 00
Harris'Street Grounds  34,000 00
Fairview Grounds  18,000 00
Free Library Site    50,000 00 40,000 00
English Bay Property     10,000 00 110,000 00
■Cambie Street Grounds  35,000 00
Old High School and Central    45,000 00 65,000 00
Strathcona School    30,000 00
Dawson School     51,000 00 38,000 00
West End School (old)      1,000 00 20,000 00
Mount Pleasant School     55,000 00 32,000 00
(old)       4,000 00
Fairview School     16,500 00 22,000 00
Roberts        "           15,850 00 36,000 00
Seymour      "           19,550 00 17,000 00
New High    "          90,000 00 29,000 00
West Fairview School     19,350 00 10,000 00
Grandview School     10,600 00 4,000 00
Model School    52,250 00 15,000 00
Cedar Cove School    12,300 00 7,000 00
Lotl, Block 32, D. L. 192  4,000 00
Septic Tank Grounds  15,000 00
$620,600 00 $971,500 00 Annual Report, 1906-1907
63
sundry properties   continued.
Lands as per Foregoing Details  $   971,500 00
Buildings " "        620,600 00
Waterworks System and Supplies and
Equipment $1,447,320 01
Supplies and General Equipment on hand       27,604 25
- 1,474,925 16
Fire Hall Apparatus, Equipment and
Supplies  66,540 40
School Apparatus, Equipment and
Supplies  37,103 42
Sewers and Septic Tanks       539,000 00
Basement Drains       53,222 00
 592,222 00
Streets:
Wood Paved  291,924 00
Asphalt  194,000 00
Macadam  343,350 00
Cleared and Graded  331,264 00
Stone-Paved Lanes   16,000 00
Brick     "         "         6,000 00
Stone and Concrete Crossings  188 00
 1,183,026 00
Sidewalks :
Cement      252,220 00
Wooden        46,267 00
 298,487 00
Sundry Assets :
Bridges        47,700 00
Hea.tley Avenue Wharf        14,000 00
Gore Avenue Slip  900 00
Paving Plant  350 00
 62,950 00
Gaol Furniture and Equi pmen t  2,732 90
City Tools, Rollers, Logging Engine, etc.. 12,531 95
Books in Free Library  15,226 74
City Hall Furniture  5,000 00
$5,342,845 57 64
Vancouver Board of Trade
CITY OF  VANCOUVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS.
[EXTRACT  FROM  OFFICIAL  RF.PORT  FOR  1907]
STATEMENT   SHOWING    TEACHERS   EMPLOYED,    PUPILS   ENROLLED,   YEARLY
EXPENDITURE,    ETC.,    FROM   1893   TO    1906   INCLUSIVE.
Year
No. of
Teachers
No. of
Pupils
Yearly
Expenses
Expended on
B'ld'gs & Grounds
1893	
1894  	
1895	
1896	
1897	
1898	
1899
41
44
45
49
54
60
65
72
78
88
92
J101
1112
J127
2175
2247
2375
2403
2644
2983
3296
3493
3639
4036
4334
5003
5678
6103
$ 39,450 43
47,537 33
43,300 00
48,162 87
48,051 20
56,380 00
56,296 27
66,184 62
78,542 18
88,525 75
89,822 14
102,351 84
115,477 21
135,240 38
§  16,082 04
3,172 02
68,937 26
1900	
1901
61,054 83
1902
*
1903	
1904	
1905	
1906	
18,721 17
96,044 78
55,085 71
76,144 73
JAlso three Manual Training Instructors, Drill Instructor and
Supervisor of Music.
ENROLLMENT AND AVERAGE ATTENDANCE FOR EACH  MONTH OF 1906.
Month
January .
February.
March
April	
May	
June	
August ...
September
October . ..
November.
December .
Enrollment
5,830
5,836
5,827
5,895
5,818
5,515
5,725
6,251
6,437
6,382
6,103
Av. Attendance
5,245.38
5.206.12
5,098.58
5,043.64
4,966.01
5,008.26
5.492.90
5,519.85
5,655.63
6,571 01
5,503.65
ENROLLMENT FOR THE MONTH OF NOVEMBER   FOR   EACH   YEAR   SINCE  1887
Sear
Enrollment
1898	
2,724
1899	
3,078
1900	
3,316
3,634
4,063
4,334
1901	
1902	
1903	
1904	
5,003
5,678
6,382
1905	
1906	    66 Vancouver Board of Trade
CHURCHES IN THE CITY OF VANCOUVER.
Presbyterian.
First Presbyterian Hastings Street East
St. Andrew's Church Eichards Street
St. John's Church Comox Street
Mount Pleasant Church Quebec Street and Ninth Av.
Chalmer's Church Fairview
Cedar Cove Church Victoria Drive
Church of England.
St. James' Church '■ Cordova Street East
Christ Church Georgia Street
St. Michael's Church Mt. Pleasant
St. Paul's Church Jervis Street
Holy Trinity Church Fairview
All Saints' Church Cedar Cove
Methodist.
Wesley Church Georgia Street
Princess Street Methodist Church Princess Street
Mt. Pleasant Methodist Church..Westmstr. and Ninth Av.
Fairview Methodist Church Sixth Avenue
Park Drive Methodist Church	
Congregational.
First Congregational Church Georgia Street
Knox Congregational Church Cordova Street East
Baptist.
First Baptist Church Hamilton Street
Jackson Avenue Baptist Church Jackson Avenue
Mount Pleasant Baptist Church Westminster Road
Fairview Baptist Church Fourth Av. and Maple St.
Roman Catholic.
Church of Our Lady of the Holy Rosary...Dunsmuir St.
Church of the Sacred Heart..Campbell Av. and Keefer St.
Lutheran.
German Lutheran Church Prior Street
Y. M. C. A. Building, Cambie Street
Salvation Army. Annual Report, 1906-1907 67'
Extracts from the Latest Official 'Bulletins published bj the 'Bureau of
Provincial Information.
BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA.
"Bulletin No. 23, 1907.
British Columbia, Canada's Maritime Province on
the Pacific Ocean, is the largest in the Dominion, its area
being variously estimated at from 372,620 to 395,610
square miles. It is a great irregular quadrangle, about
700 miles from north to south, with an average width of
about 400 miles, lying between latitudes 49 degrees and
60 degrees north. It is bounded on the south by the
Straits of Juan de Fuca and the States of Washington,
Idaho and Montana, on the west by the Pacific Ocean
and Southern Alaska, on the north by Yukon and
Mackenzie Territories, and on the east by Athabasca and
the Province of Alberta. From the 49th degree north
to the 54th degree the eastern boundary follows the axis
of the Rocky Mountains, and thence north the 120th
meridian.
The Province is traversed from south to north by
four principal ranges of mountains — the Rocky and
Selkirk ranges on the east, and the Coast and Island
ranges on the west. The Rocky Mountain range preserves its continuity, but the Selkirks are broken up
into the Purcell, the Selkirk, the Gold and the Cariboo
mountains. Between these ranges and the Rockies lies
a valley of remarkable length and regularity, extending from the international boundary line along the
western base of the Rockies northerly 700 miles. West
of these ranges extends a vast plateau or table land
with an average elevation of 3,500 feet above sea level,
but so worn away and eroded by water courses that in
many parts it presents the appearance of a succession
of mountains.   In others it spreads out into wide plains 68      Vancouver Board of Trade
and rolling ground, dotted with low hills, which constitute fine areas of farming and pasture land. This,
interior plateau is bounded on the west by the Cascade
or Coast Range, and on the north by a cross range
which gradually merges into the Arctic slope. It is of
this great interior plateau that Professor Macoun says ;
1 The whole of British Columbia, south of 52 degrees
and east of the Coast Range, is a grazing country up
to 3,500 feet and a farming country up to 2,500 feet,
where irrigation is possible."
The Coast Range is a series of massive crystalline
rocks, averaging 6,000 feet in height, and a mean width
of 100 miles, and descends to the Pacific Ocean. The
Island Range, supposed to have been submerged in past
ages, forms the group of islands of which Vancouver
and the Queen Charlotte are the principal.
One of the most noticeable physical features of
British Columbia is its position as the watershed of the
North Pacific slope. All the great rivers flowing into
the Pacific, with the exception of the Colorado, find
their sources within its boundaries. The more important of these are: the Columbia (the principal
waterway of the State of Washington), which flowa
through the Province for over 600 miles; the Fraser
(750 miles long); the Skeena (300 miles); the Thompson,,
the Kootenay, the Stikine, the Liard and the Peace.
These streams, with their numerous tributaries and
branches drain an area equal to about one-tenth of the
North American continent. The lake system of British
Columbia is extensive and important, furnishing convenient transportation facilities in the interior. The
area of lake aggregates 1,560,000 acres.
Many of the smaller streams are not navigable, but
these furnish driveways to the lumbermen and supply-
power for sawmills, and electric plants, and water for
irrigation.    The water power is practically unlimited Annual Report,  1906-1907
69
and so widely distributed that no portion of the Province need be without cheap motive power for driving
all necessary machinery.
Historical.
In 1537 Cortez discovered California and for nearly
half a century the Spaniards were the only navigators
of the North Pacific. Sir Francis Drake was the first
of the British to visit the Pacific Coast, in 1578, when
he raided the Spanish settlements and set up the British
flag at Drake's Bay near San Francisco and took possession of the country in the name of Queen Elizabeth,
calling it New Albion. In 1592 Juan de Fuca discovered
the strait which bears his name, and other captains
Juan Perez, Quadra, Behring and others, visited tbe
coast at intervals until 1778, when Captain James Cook
cast anchor in Nootka Sound, while on a mission to
discover a northeast passage to the Atlantic. After
sailing north to the Arctic Ocean and naming many
sounds, inlets and island, Cook's ships sailed to the
Sandwich Islands, where he was killed in a fight with
natives. His vessels, the Resolution and the Discovery,
returned to England, however, and the reports of their
crews respecting the great opportunities for fur trading
aroused so much attention that several expeditions were
outfitted in England and in China and India for the
North Pacific Trade. For several years merchant adventurers, British, Spanish and Dutch, visited the coast
as rival fur traders, but it was only in 1788 that Captain
Meares established a permanent settlement on Nootka
Sound, where he built a ship called the North West
America. The following year a Spanish force under
Don Estevan Martinez seized the settlement in the
name of his soverign, confiscated the British ships and
imprisoned the crews. These arbitrary acts nearly
caused war between Britain and Spain, but the affair
was finally settled by arbitration, Spain abandoning
the  territory   and   paying  an indemnity   of   $210,000. r
70
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Subsequently in 1792 and following years, Captain
George Vancouver made a survey of the coast and
established the existence of Vancouver Island, which
had been a matter of dispute since the days of Juan de
Fuca. The Mainland was for many years "No Man's
Land," and it is due to the North-West Fur Company
and the Hudson's Bay Company that that vast territory
was brought to the notice of the world.
Alexander Mackenzie, who was the first man to
cross the continent north of the Mississippi, reached
the shore of the Pacific at the mouth of the Bella Coola
River in July, 1793.
In 1800 David Thompson, travelling overland from
Red River, near the present site of Winnipeg, reached
the Bow River, near the present site of Calgary, and
subsequently crossed the mountains and discovered the
river which bears his name.
Sir Alexander Mackenzie, Simon Fraser and David
Hearne also made extensive explorations and added
materially to the knowledge of the great North West
and the Pacific Coast.
In 1849 the Island of Vancouver was granted to the
Hudson's Bay Company for a period of ten years. A
government was established and Richard Blanchard was
sent from England as Governor. He resigned in 1850
and was succeeded by James (afterwards Sir James)
Douglas. An assembly was called and held its first
meeting at Victoria in August, 1856. While Vancouver
Island was thus constituted a Crown Colony, the mainland, known as New Caledonia, remained practically
unknown and inhabited by Indians and a few fur traders.
Gold was discovered on the Fraser River in 1857, and
miners began to crowd into the country, making the
establishment of some form of government a necessity.
Therefore the whole of the mainland, west of the Rocky Annual Report,  1906-1907 71
Mountains, was created a Crown Colony under the name
of British Columbia.
In 1866 the two colonies were united by Act of the
Imperial Parliament, and on July 20th, 1871, British
Columbia became a Province of the Dominion of Canada*
British Columbia entered Confederation upon the condition that within two years the construction of a railway should be begun which would connect it with the
Eastern Provinces. This road is now the Canadian
Pacific Railway. It was completed in 1885 and gave
Canada and the Empire a great highway from the
Atlantic to the Pacific.
The Provincial Government consists of a Lieutenant-
Governor, appointed by the Dominion Government, an
Executive Council, or Cabinet, of five members (who are
elected members of the Legislative Assembly), and a
Legislative Assembly of forty-two (including the Cabinet
Ministers), elected by the constituencies into which the
Province is divided.
The revenue and expenditure of British Columbia
for the fiscal year 1905-6 were:
Revenue $3,044,442.49
Expenditure  2,677,645.72
Surplus $   366,796.71
Resources.
With the exception of nickel (which has not yet been
discovered- in quantity) all that the other Provinces
of Canada boast of possessing in the way of raw material
is here in abundance. British Columbia's coal measures
are sufficient to supply the world for centuries; it
possesses the greatest compact area of merchantable
timber in North America; the mines have produced over
$275,000,000 and may be said to be only in the early stages
of development; the fisheries produce an average annual 72
Vancouver Board of Trade
value of $7,500,000, and, apart from salmon fishing, their
importance is only beginning to be realized; there are
immense deposits of magnetite and hematite iron of the
finest quality which still remain undeveloped, the agricultural and fruit lands produced approximately $7,000,000
in 1906, and less than one-third of the available land is
settled upon, much less cultivated ; the Province has
millions of acres of pulpwood as yet unexploited;
petroleum deposits, but recently discovered, are among
the most extensive in the world, and much of the territory is unexplored and its potential value unknown.
With all this undeveloped wealth within its borders can
it be wondered at that British Columbians are sanguine
of the future? Bestowed by prodigal nature with all the
essentials for the foundation and maintenance of an
empire, blessed with a healthful, temperate climate, a
commanding position on the shores of the Pacific, and
encompassed with inspiring grandeur and beauty,
British Columbia is destined to occupy a position second
to none in the world's commerce and industry.
Climate.
Varied climatic conditions prevail in British Columbia. The Japanese current and the moisture-laden
winds from the Pacific exercise a moderating influence
upon the climate of the coast and provide a copious
rainfall. The westerly winds are arrested in their
passage east by the Coast Range, thus creating what is
known as the " dry belt" east of those mountains, but
the higher currents of air carry the moisture x,o the
loftier peaks of the Selkirks, causing the heavy snowfall which distinguishes that range from its eastern
neighbor, the Rockies. Thus a series of alternate moist
and dry belts are formed. The climate of British
Columbia, as a whole, presents all the conditions
which are met with in European countries lying within the temperate zone, the cradle of the greatest
nations of the world, and is, therefore, a climate well Annual Report, 1906-1907
73
adapted to the development of the human race under
the most favourable conditions. As a consequence of
the purity of its air, its freedom from malaria, and the
almost total absence of extremes of heat and cold,
British Columbia may be regarded as a vast sanatorium. People coming here from the east invariably
improve in health. Insomnia and nervous affections
find alleviation, the old and infirm are granted a renewed lease of life, and children thrive as in few other
parts of the world.
The climate of Vancouver Island, and the coast
generally, corresponds very closely with that of England ; the summers are fine and warm with much
bright sunshine, and severe frost scarcely ever.occurs
in winter. On the Mainland similar conditions prevail
till the higher levels are reached, when the winters are
cooler. At Agassiz, on the Lower Fraser, the average
mean temperature of January is 33 degrees, and of
July 64 degrees ; the lowest temperature on record at
this point is .13 degrees, and the highest 97 degrees.
There are no summer frosts, and the annual rainfall is
67 inches, 95 per cent, of which falls during the autumn
and winter.
To the eastward of the Coast Range, in Yale and
West Kootenay, the climate is quite different. The
summers are warmer, the winters colder and the rainfall rather light—bright, dry, weather being the rule.
The winter cold is however, scarcely ever severe, and
the hottest days of summer are made pleasant from
the fact that the air is dry and the nights are cool.
Further north, in the undeveloped parts of the Province, the winters are more severe.
The great diversity of climate and the unique
climatic conditions existing in the mountains, valleys
and along the coast, to which, if is added the scenic
beauty of the landscape, give to life in British Colum- 74
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bia an undescribable charm. There is scarcely a farm
house in all the valley regions that does not look out
upon great ranges of majestic mountains, more or less
distant. The floral beauty of the uncultivated lands
and the wonderfully variegated landscape are a source
of constant delight. Each one of the numerous valleys
appeals to the observer with some special charm of
scenic beauty, and presents distinct qualities of soil and
climate, bounded by mountains stored with precious
and economic minerals, watered by lakes and streams
of crystalline purity, and clothed with a wealth of-
vegetation which demonstrates the universal fertility.
These impress one with the great extent of the Province and its inexhaustible resources. And this great
natural wealth is so evenly and prodigally distributed
that there is no room for envy or rivalry between one
district and another, each is equally endowed, and its
people firmly convinced that their's is the "bonanza"
belt, unequalled by anything on earth.
Districts of British Columbia.
British   Columbia   is   divided   into   the " following
districts:
Kootenay (East and West) ] 5,000,000 acres
Yale 15,000,000 "
Lillooet 10,000,000 "
Westminster         4,900,000 "
Cariboo 96,000,000 "
Cassiar 100,000,000 "
Comox (Mainland)     4.000,000 "
Vancouver Island   10,000,000 "
Each of these great districts would require a separate
and detailed description in order to set forth its particular advantages of soil, climate, mineral and timber
resources, and diversity of scenery, but space forbids
more than brief mention. Annual Report, 1906-1907
75
The Kootenays.
Kootenay District (or, "The Kootenays") forms the
southeastern portion of British Columbia, west of the
summit of the Rocky Mountains, and is drained by the
Columbia and Kootenay rivers. East Kootenay contains
a large extent of agricultural land, much of which requires irrigation, but suited to fruit growing and all
kinds of grain and vegetables. Most of the land is well
timbered and lumbering is, next to mining, the principal
industry. There are considerable areas of fertile land
in West Kootenay and a good deal of it is being utilized
for fruit growing. The fame of the Kootenay mines is
world-wide, the mountains being rich in gold, silver,
copper and lead, and the eastern valleys underlaid with
coal and petroleum. British Columbia mining has
reached its highest development in Kootenay and, as a
consequence, many prosperous cities and towns have
been established. The development of the Crow's Nest
coal fields and the activity in metalliferous mining has
caused a rapid increase in population, especially in East
Kootenay, where it is estimated to have more than
doubled since 1901.
Yale.
Lying west of the Kootenays is the splendid Yale
District, rich in minerals and timber and possessing the
largest area of agricultural land in the Province. It includes the rich valleys of the Okanagan, Nicola, Similkameen, Kettle River, and North and South Thompson,
and the Boundary, and has been appropriately named
"the garden of British Columbia." The main line of the
Canadian Pacific passes nearly through the centre of
Yale from east to west, while the Okanagan branch and
the lake steamers give access to the southern portions.
New branch lines are projected, and some are in course
of construction, which will serve to open up a very large
mining and agricultural area. Cattle raising on a large
scale has been one of the chief industries, but many of 76
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the ranges are now divided into small parcels which are
being eagerly bought by fruit growers and small farmers.
The district is very rich in minerals and coal, but development has been delayed by lack of transportation
facilities—a drawback which will soon be removed.
Lillooet.
In natural features Lillooet resembles Yale. It is
largely a pastoral country, well adapted to dairying,
cattle raising and fruit growing. Placer and hydraulic
mining is carried on successfully, and quartz mining is
making fair progress, but railway communication is
needed to insure success.
Westminster.
One of the richest agricultural districts of the
Province is Westminster, which includes all the fertile
valley of the Lower Fraser. The climate is mild, with
much rain in winter. The timber is very heavy and the
underbrush thick. Westminster is the centre of the
great lumber and salmon canning industries. Its agricultural advantages are unexcelled in the Province,
heavy crops of hay, grain and roots being the rule, and
fruit growing to perfection and in profusion. A great
deal of the land in the Fraser valley has been reclaimed
by dyking.
Cariboo and Cassiar.
The great northern districts of Cariboo and Cassiar
are practically unexplored and undeveloped, although
in the early days parts of them were invaded by a great
army of placer miners, who recovered about $50,000,000
in gold from the creeks and benches. Hydraulic mining
on a large scale is being carried on by several wealthy
companies at different points in the district with fair
success, and individual miners and dredging companies
are doing well in Atlin. Recently large deposits of gold
and silver quartz were found in Windy Arm, east of Annual Report,  1906-1907
77
Atlin, and give promise of rich returns. Large coal
measures have been located on the Telqua River and at
other points, and copper ore is found in many localities.
The country is lightly timbered and promises in time to
become an important cattle raising and agricultural
district, as there are many fertile valleys, which, even
now, despite the absence of railways, are attracting
settlers. In the southern part of Cariboo, along the
main wagon road, are several flourishing ranches which
produce cattle, grain and vegetables, finding a ready
market in the mining camps.
Comox.
The northern portion of Vancouver Island and a
portion of the opposite mainland is known as Comox
District. It is very rich in minerals and timber, and
there is considerable fertile land. The deeply indented
coast line and the adjacent islands afford fine opportunities for the fishing industry, which is now being
developed on a considerable scale.
Vancouver Island,
Not the least important portion of British Columbia
is Vancouver Island, which, from its great wealth of
natural resources and its commanding position on the
Pacific Coast, should become one of the richest and most
prosperous districts of the Province. Coal mining and
lumbering are the chief industries, and fishing, quartz
mining, copper smelting, shipbuilding, whaling and other
branches are being rapidly developed. Immense deposits of iron ore occur at several points along the west
coast and in the interior of the Island, which, with
abundance of coal in close proximity, should insure the
establishment of iron and steel works at no distant day.
The Equimalt & Nanaimo Railway (now owned by the
Canadian Pacific Railway Company), running from
Victoria to Wellington, serves a section of country which
it would be difficult to surpass anywhere in the world 78
Vancouver Board of Trade
for beauty of scenery and natural wealth. There are
prosperous agricultural communities along the railway
and in Comox District, and several mines are being
developed. There is quite a large area of agricultural
land, but it is heavily timbered and costly to clear by
individual effort. The Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway
Company has arranged for the clearing of 150,000 acres
of its land (which consists of about 1,500,000 acres) and
it is expected through the exercise of economical methods
in removing the timber, that the company will be enabled to sell the cleared land to settlers at moderate
prices.
LAND AND AGRICULTURE.
A Year of Progress.
During the past year, or since the publication of
the fourth edition of Bulletin No. 10, Agriculture in
British Columbia, conditions have materially improved
in all branches of this important industry. In 1905
the importations of agricultural products decreased by
about $500,000, and as the population increased considerably during the year, it can safely be inferred that
this falling off in imports is far more than balanced by
increased home production.
One of the important events of the year was the
demonstration of the practicability of supplying the
British market with British Columbia fruit in prime
condition.
The Provincial Department of Agriculture has
pursued the policy of collecting all available data as
to local progress and conditions from every part of the
Province, and its officials have done excellent work in
protecting the farms and orchards from insect pests,
through   a rigorous  inspection of   all  imported seedi Annual Report, 1906-1907 79
and nursery stock, and by practical demonstrations
on the ground of the best methods of destroying those
insect foes which have succeeded in gaining an entrance.
As a result of the untiring efforts of these officers,
British Columbia is singularly free from the injurious
insects and plant diseases which work such havoc in
other countries.
The efficiency of the system in vogue in British
Columbia is recognised abroad, no less an authority
than the London "Times" commending it as follows :—
"The insect plagues which worked such mischief in
California have been excluded hitherto, and this immunity gives B. C. an enormous advantage. The
expense and risk of insecticides are avoided."
Mr. McNeill, of the Dominion Department of Agriculture, says :—" The one thing which impressed me
was the fact that, as far as the fruit industry is concerned, the growers commence in this country with a
clean slate."
The Dominion Department of Agriculture has
rendered valuable assistance in this work of prevention, as well as supplying lecturers on agricultural
subjects, who visit the Province and address the
Farmers' Institutes.
Arrangements have been perfected with the Dominion Government whereby sales of pure-bred live stock
are held at convenient times, thus enabling stockmen
and farmers generally to improve their herds.
An Inspector of live stock and dairies has been
appointed by the Provincial Government, whose work,
although as yet in the organization stage, is already
showing good results. Although general farming has
made gratifying progress, in the way of an increase in
the   acreage   of   cultivated   land   and  a   consequent 80
Vancouver Board of Trade
addition to the total of agricultural products, the
most noticeable advance has been made in fruit-growing, the acreage under fruit having increased by about
20,000 acres, representing an aggregate of over a million
trees planted, besides which about 500 additional acres
were set out in strawberries and other small fruits.
There has also been a marked improvement in
dairying, the co-operative creamery taking over the
work formerly done by the farmers' wives and
daughters. The output of the creameries doubled in
1905, producing about 1,400,000 pounds, while the dairy
butter aggregated about 400,000 pounds. While these
figures are gratifying, and indications are that they
will be greatly surpassed this year, there is ample room
for further expansion in the dairying industry, for
large imports of butter, exceeding the total local production, are still necessary to supply the provincial
markets. The establishment of a cheese factory at
Langley marks the initiation of a new industry, which,
under good management, should prove highly profitable.
Considerable progress has been made in the live
stock industry, a general movement being in the
direction of getting rid of scrubs and replacing them
with the best obtainable strains of beef and dairy
cattle. Sheep and hog-raising are also securing more
attention, and give promise of growing to important
proportions in the future.
One of the most promising signs of the times is the
breaking up of many of the large cattle ranches into
small farms and orchards, which are being eagerly
bought by actual settlers, a majority of whom are
taking up mixed farming and fruit-growing.
Although it is impossible to sectire complete returns of the fruit crop, dairy output, live stock shipments,  and   the  results  of   the harvest of   1906,  the   Annual Report,  1906-1907
81
figures available at this writing (December, 1906) show
that very satisfactory progress has been made in all
branches of agriculture.
Agricultural  Areas.
Gold was the lode-stone which first attracted attention to British Columbia; next the fame of its forests
and fisheries spread, and lumbering and salmon fishing
assumed the importance of great industries. The
agricultural possibilities were overlooked or ignored
by the miner, lumberman and fisherman, and for many
years the world at large was ignorant of their existence.
The opening of the country by the trunk line and
branches of the Canadian Pacific Railway, however,
disclosed the fact that the agricultural and pastoral
lands of British Columbia are not the least valuable of
its assets and that they are not confined to a small
proportion of the total acreage. Professor Macoun,
after careful personal investigation, says :—
"The whole of British Columbia, south of 52 degrees and east of the Coast Range, is a grazing country
up to 3,500 feet, and a farming country up to 2,500 feet,
where irrigation is possible."
This is a most important statement and its truth is
being confirmed by the practical experience of settlers
who have established themselves in the country. Within the boundaries thus roughly defined by Professor
Macoun the capabilities of the soil are practically
unlimited. All of it that is not too elevated to serve
only for grazing purposes will produce all the ordinary
vegetables and roots, much of it will grow cereals to
perfection, while everywhere the hardier varieties of
fruits can be successfully cultivated. As far north as
the 54th degree it has been practically demonstrated
that apples will flourish, while in the southern belt the
more delicate fruits   peaches, grapes, apricots, etc. are 82 Vancouver Board of Trade
an assured crop. Roughly estimated the extent of
these fertile lands may be set down at one million
acres, but this figure will-probably be found far below
the actual quantity capable of cultivation when the
country has been thoroughly explored. The anticipation of such a result is justified from the fact that at
several points in the mountains, even in the most
unpromising looking localities, where clearing and
cultivation has been attempted it has proved successful.
In several instances also, bench land, pronounced only
fit for pasturage by " old timers," has been broken and
cropped with very satisfactory results. The agricultural lands just mentioned are located as follows ;—
Acres.
Okanagan  250,000
North and South Thompson Valleys    75,000
Nicola, Similkamen and Kettle River valleys. 350.000
Lillooet and Cariboo  200,000
East and West Kootenay  125,000
West of the Coast Range are several extensive
tracts of arable land of the richest quality, notably
the Lower Fraser Valley, Westminster District, Vancouver Island and adjacent islands in the Gulf of
Georgia. These sections of the Province are recognised as agricultural districts, and are faiily well
settled, but much of the land is still wild and im tilled.
North of the main line of the Canadian Pacific Railway,
on the Pacific Slope, and but partially explored, are vast
areas of agricultural and grazing land, which will be
turned to profitable account when the country is a few
years older. Much of this northern region is fit for
wheat growing, and all of it will produce crops of the
coarser cereals, roots and vegetables, except the higher
plateaux, which will afford pasturage to countless herds
of cattle, horses and sheep. Some of these districts best
known and in which settlements have been established,
are Chilcotin, Nechaco, Blackwater, Bulkley, Ootsa,
Kispyiox, Skeena, and Peace River Valleys, and they Annual Report,  1906-1907
83
are estimated to include some 6,500,000 acres. That this
is a conservative estimate is clear from the fact that
the late Dr. Dawson and Professor Macoun credited
that portion of Peace River Valley lying within British
Columbia with 1,000,000 acres of wheat land.
The agricultural lands of the Province are so
widely distributed and so intersected by mountains,
that in the absence of surveys, in many instances even
of an exploratory nature, it is impossible to describe
them comprehensively or in detail. In the prairie
provinces east of the Rocky Mountains, the contour of
the country admits of easy and inexpensive subdivision
into townships and sections, and the surveyors' field-
notes furnish precise information as to the nature of
the soil, timber, etc. The prospective settler in those
provinces has, therefore, little difficulty in choosing a
location, but in British Columbia he is, as a rule, called
upon to make a special trip to the district in which he
proposes to establish himself and stake out his preemption after having satisfied himself of its suitability.
The lands in the Railway Belt (20 miles each side of
the Canadian Pacific Railway), owned and administered
by the Dominion Government, are partly surveyed into
townships, but, taking the Province as a whole, the rule
is that a settler must seek for and stake his land at his
own expense. This handicap to the rapid settlement of
the vacant lands of the Province will no doubt be removed
through the Dominion Government adopting a system of
surveys in the Railway Belt in the near future, and the
Provincial Government may take similar action with
respect to Provincial lands, but up to the present no
provincial administration has found it compatible with
the revenue to adopt such a system.
In the settled portions of the Province, along the
established lines of travel and in the neighborhood of
the cities and towns, there is very little good land left 84
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.for pre-emption, but there are many desirable tracts of
land and farms more or less improved, which may be
purchased from the owners at prices which vary according to locality and extent of improvements—running all
the way from $5 to $1,000 per acre, the latter being for
matured orchards and carrying the good-will of a well
established business.
Large Holdings.
The tendency in the early days when land laws were
lax or non-existent was to stake large areas of land. In
this way many of the most fertile valleys were monopolised by a few individuals, who owned from 1,000 to
30,000 acres, many more than they could possibly cultivate or otherwise utilise. These big estates are now
being subdivided and sold in small parcels, with the result that small farms and orchards are becoming numerous on ground which was held for years as pasture or
merely for purposes of speculation. The breaking up
of these large ranches is one of the most hopeful signs
of the times, as it insures a large increase in the industrial
population as well as the bringing under cultivation of
very considerable areas of land in different parts of the
Province and the establishment of new communities, all
contributing to the general prosperity.
A New Era.
Since the opening of the southern portions of the
Province by the Canadian Pacific Railway main line and
branches, the construction of other short railways and
the establishment of steam navigation on some of the
principal lakes and rivers, the advance in all branches of
agriculture has been steady, but the great opportunities
offered by the prairie country for quick profits in wheat
checked the westward tide of immigration, and it is but
recently that settlers in large numbers have begun to
cross the Rocky Mountains and establish homes in
British Columbia. The advantages offered by the Province, however, are so manifest that no sooner has a new Annual Report, 1906-1907
85
comer established himself than he becomes an enthusiastic immigration agent and hastens to advise his friends
and old neighbors to "pull up stakes and come to the
Garden of Canada." The ideal conditions of soil and
climate, in the midst of beautiful and inspiring scenery,
and the ready sale at good prices of everything produced
are fully appreciated by men who have been "grubbing
along" in the worn-out fields of the older countries, and
their glowing reports are inducing thousands of farmers
in Eastern Canada, the United States and the British Isles
to sell out and secure land in British Columbia, which is
destined to become, in a measure, the Orchard of the
Empire, as the prairie provinces are its Granary.
Markets.
It is an axiom in trade that " there is no market
like the home market," and in this respect British
Columbia is singularly blessed, for there is no country
in the world which offers such exceptional advantages
in the way of markets for farm products. The mining
and logging camps, with which the whole country is
dotted, employing thousands of men; the numerous
working mines and smelters with their large staffs of
employees; the railways, operating and under construction, and the lake and river steamers, are all liberal
patrons of the farmer at prices unaffected by competition, for imported articles do not disturb local
trade, and in every case home products are preferred
to those from abroad. The established cities and towns
and the new ones which are constantly springing up,
with the opening of new mines and the establishment
of new industries, afford splendid markets to the
farmer, who deals directly with the consumer or retailer for cash—the trading system in vogue in older
countries being practically unknown. Fruits and early
vegetables not disposed of locally find an unlimited
market east of the Rocky Mountains and in the Coast
cities of the Province.    Eggs, butter, milk and cream 86
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are always at a premium, the local production falling
far short of supplying the demand. In many towns
fresh milk is hard to get, and it is unknown in the
mining, lumbering and railway camps, where the
imported condensed substitute is used. The importations of these articles into British Columbia for an
average year throw light on the possibilities for dairying and poultry-raising in Southern British Columbia.
They are :—
Butter $1,179,511
Condensed milk and cream 165,000
Eggs 339,000
Poultry 73,700
If cheese, which is not made in quantity in British
Columbia, be added, $333,342, we have a total of over
$2,000,000 sent out of the Province annually for articles
which can be profitably produced at home.
Again in the matter of fresh meats, and pork, ham,
bacon and lard, the yearly importations aggregate
$2,136,366, as well as $800,000 worth of beef cattle, sheep
and swine, all of which should be raised by the farmers
of the Province.
Although British Columbia has begun to export
fruits the home market falls far short of being supplied,
for we find that in the same year (1904) the Province
imported $800,000 worth of fruits and fruit products,
viz.:—Apples, other fruits (not tropical) canned fruits,
jams and jellies. The importation of apples may be
accounted for by the demand in the early spring and
summer months, when no home grown stock is available, which has to be supplied from New Zealand and
Australia. The "other fruits" represent berries and
early fruits grown in California and brought in before
the local fruits have matured. The jams, jellies and
canned fruits, however, should and will be produced
in the Province as the fruit industry developes, and in Annual Report,  1906-1907
87
good time all the other products of the ranch, farm,
dairy and orchard, of which the Province now imports
over $7,000,000 worth annually, will be won from the
fertile valleys and hillsides of British Columbia. There
is no fear of over-production in any branch of agriculture, for in the future as in the past, the farmers
will not be able to supply the ever-increasing demand,
created by the march of industry. Should a day arrive
when they find themselves with a surplus the great
mining camps of the north will provide a market for
more than they can offer.
While on the subject of home markets attention
may be called to the fact that of 3,181 tons of fruit
shipped by freight over the Canadian Pacific Railway
in 1905, 1669 tons were consigned to points within the
Province.
There is, therefore, practically no risk to the farmer
in settling in British Columbia. His market is at his
door and will be for many years, and he can confidently
assure himself of such prices for his produce as will
give him a comfortable living and enable him to lay by
a " nest egg " every year, in anticipation of his old age.
If he is possessed of sufficient capital to start on a
comfortable scale he should become independent and
well-to-do in a few years. Even with limited means
there are no difficulties in the way which may not be
surmounted by industry and perseverance.
Fruit-Growing  Areas.
Mr. Maxwell Smith, Dominion Fruit Inspector, describes the fruit-growing areas of the Province as follows:
"No. 1 might be called the South-Western Coast
District, which includes the southern half of Vancouver
Island, adjacent islands, and what is usually called the
Lower Mainland. Here the production of small fruits
may be said to be more successful, and consequently 88
Vancouver Board of Trade
more profitable, than that of the tree fruits. Nevertheless, there are a number of very excellent varieties of
apples, pears, plums, prunes and cherries which grow to
perfection in this district, besides many different varieties of nuts, and, in especially favored spots, peaches,
grapes, nectarines, apricots and other tender fruits.
"In most parts of this district the mild character'of
the climate and the excessive moisture during the winter
season are very favorable to the development of fungous
diseases, and it is therefore necessary to practice persistent and systematic spraying of the orchards, clean
cultivation of the soil, and a thorough system of under-
draining, in order to get the most profitable results.
"District No. 2 includes the valleys of the Upper
Fraser, the main Thompson, and North Thompson, the
Nicola and Bonaparte Rivers. Here there are practically none of the above-names difficulties to contend with,
but the question of water to irrigate the land is one requiring serious consideration, as without an abundant
supply of water in the dry belt it is impossible to be sure
of a crop every year. The prospective fruit grower,
however, does not have to contend with heavy forests
along the Thompson River that have to be encountered
on the Coast. The fruits grown are of the very highest
quality, and include all the varieties mentioned in connection with District No. 1.
"The largest quantity of grapes shipped annually
from any one point in the Province are produced near
the junction of the Fraser and Thompson Rivers.
"District No. 3 may be briefly described as the
valleys of the Similkameen and its tributaries, portions
of which are perhaps the most tropical in climatic conditions of any part of British Columbia, and most favorable locations for the cultivation of grapes, peaches and
other delicate fruits, wherever sufficient water for irrigation purposes is available. Annual Report.  1906-1907
89
"No. 4 includes the districts surrounding Adams,
Shuswap and Maple Lakes, and the valley of the Spal
lumcheen River. Here the natural rainfall is sufficient,
and splendid apples, pears, plums and cherries are successfully grown. The climatic conditions of this district
resemble very much those of Southern Ontario, and a
fruit-grower with fixed ideas from the latter Province
might be more successful in this district than he would
on irrigated lands. The timber is, generally speaking,
light, and the land rich.
"No. 5 is the great Okanagan Valley, stretching,
from Larkin southward to the International Boundary.
The vicinity of Kelowna, in this valley, contains the
largest area of fruit lands of any one place in the Province. Peaches are now being shipped in large quantities
from the Okanagan, and all Northern fruits are successfully grown by the irrigation system. Improved modern
methods are in general use by the growers in this district,
and the industry is perhaps more advanced than in any
other part of British Columbia.
"No. 6 is generally called the Boundary or Kettle
River country, and although the smallest of all the
districts named, the quality of the land is excellent, and
the climatic conditions all that could be desired. Where
a sufficient water supply is obtainable, there is no trouble
in producing fruit of the highest quality.
" No 7 is West Kootenay, an enormous fruit-growing district where only a little progress has been made
on the southern portion, but sufficient to indicate the
possibilities and the superior quality of the. fruit which
may be raised along those lakes and streams. The
neighborhood of Nelson and Kaslo has accomplished
wonders in the past few years, but the shores of the
Arrow Lakes are practically untouched by the hand of
the fruit-grower, and the valley of the Columbia, from
the Biff Bend south to Arrowhead, affords opportunities
§> 90
Vancouver Board of Trade
little dreamed of by many of those in search of fruit
lands. In the greater part of this district, irrigation
is only necessary in the very dry seasons.
" District No. 8 is the country known as East Kootenay, and is separated from No. 7 by the Dogtooth range
of mountains- It is traversed by the Upper Kootenay
River from Thunder Hill southwards to the Phillips
Ranch, on the International Boundary, and from
Thunder Hill northwards by the Upper Columbia
River, to the Big Bend. In the southern portion of this
district there are immense stretches of thinly-wooded
lands suitable for fruit-growing purposes, and the valley
of the Upper Columbia River has many choice locations
for the enterprising fruit-grower. The lack of transportation facilities is a great hindrance to the development of the fruit lands of the Upper Columbia.
I District No. 9 comprises the Coast Region from
Jervis Inlet to Skeena River. There is little known of
its capabilities, but, undoubtedly, it has a few surprises
in store for the future. Though in small quantities as
yet, apples, peaches and grapes have been successfully
grown on the Skeena. The first apple trees were
planted at Hazelton in the spring of 1901 and fruited
in the fall of 1904."
^
P*y Annual Report,  1906-1907
GENERAL  FARMING.
91
Grain Growing.
Wheat is grown principally in the Fraser Valley,
Okanagan, Spallumcheen, and in the country around
Kamloops in the Thompson River Valley, and is manufactured at Enderby, Armstrong and Vernon. Until
the northern interior of the Province is brought under
cultivation through the construction of railways, the
wheat area will not be increased. Wheat is only grown
on the Mainland Coast and Vancouver Island for fodder
and poultry feeding.
Barley of excellent quality is grown in many parts
of the Province.
Oats are the principal grain crop, the quality and
yield being good, and the demand beyond the quantity
grown. Rye is grown to a limited extent, and is used
for fodder.
The average yield of grain and prices are as
follows :—
Wheat, bushels per acre 25.62 ; Price per ton $33 14
Oats " I        39.05 ;      " "       27 00
Barley " "        33.33 ;      " "        28 00
These averages are very much exceeded in many
cases, and according to nature of soil and local conditions. In the matter of oats, as high as 100 bushels
to the acre is not an uncommon yield.
Root Crops.
Potatoes, turnips, beets, mangolds and all other
roots grow in profusion wherever their cultivation has
been attempted, Sixty-eight tons of roots to a
measured acre is recorded at Chilliwhack, and near
Kelowna, on Okanagan Lake, 20 acres produced 403
tons   of  potatoes,  which   sold at   $14 per ton.     The 92
Vancouver Board of Trade
Dominion census places the average yield of potatoes
at 162.78 bushels to the acre. The average price of
potatoes is $14 to $16 per ton, while carrots, turnips,
parsnips and beets sell at an average of about 60 cents
per bushel.
Hop  Culture.
The Okanagan, Agassiz and Chilliwack Districts are
well suited to hop-growing and produce large quantities
unexcelled in quality. British Columbia Hops command
good prices in the British market, and most of the crop
is sent there, though recently Eastern Canada and
Australia are buying increasing quantities. The yield of
hops averages 1,500 pounds to the acre, and the average
price is 25 cents per pound.
Fodder Crops.
Besides the nutritious bunch-grass which affords
good grazing to cattle, horses and sheep on the benches
and hillsides, all the cultivated grasses grow in profusion
wherever sown. Red clover, alfalfa, sainfoin, alsike,
timothy andbrome grass yield large returns—three crops
in the season in some districts and under favorable circumstances. Hay averages about 1| tons to the acre?
and the price was about $17.25 in 1904.
Special Products.
Tobacco-growing has proved successful in several
districts, notably in Okanagan, where a leaf of superior
quality is produced. Tobacco of commercial value will
grow almost in any part of Southern British Columbia,
and there is no reason why the farmers of the Province
should not cultivate it in a small way for their own use,
as is the custom in many parts of Quebec and Ontario.
Experiments made recently have proved that the
soil and climate in and about Victoria are admirably
adapted to the production of flowering bulbs, and quite
a large business has been established.    There is a good Annual Report, 1906-1907
93
market for all the bulbs that can be grown, as the bulk
of those used in North America are imported from
Europe, and the Pacific Coast alone uses fifty million
annually. The profit to be derived from bulb growing
is estimated at over $2,000 per acre.
The importance of apiculture is beginning to be
recognized and a considerable quantity of delicious honey
of home production is found in the local market. As the
area of cultivation extends, bee-keeping should become
a profitable adjunct of general farming.
The Coast Districts and many of the lowlands of the
Interior are well suited to cranberry culture, which is
being tried in a small way, but with success, by settlers
on the West Coast of Vancouver Island.
Celery, another vegetable luxury, is grown in limited
quantities, but the soil and climate warrant its cultivation on a more general scale. Celery properly grown
and packed would command good prices, and an unlimited market.
Sugar beets grow to perfection in several localities,
but their cultivation on a large scale has not been
attempted.
Indian corn, melons and tomatoes are profitable
items in the output of the small farmer, and are successfully grown in all the settled districts. 94
Vancouver Board of Trade
Shipments of Agricultural Products./;
The following table shows the quantities of agri.
cultural products shipped over the Canadian Pacific
Railway from all points on the Pacific Division for 1903,
1904 and 1905.
Grain and Hay, tons
Vegetables,
tons.
Fruit, tons.
1903.
1901.
1905.
1903.      1904.
1905.
1903.
1904.      1905.
January	
948
822
789
70 1     130
89
8
7
56
February ...
671
522
486
87      203
121
37
8       19
March	
766
444
636
374
804
342
49
37       63
April	
1,012
336
261
979
1,219
202
28
34       60
May	
443
408
650
800
618
156
3
9       21
June	
771
337
336
249
357
202
242
142
122
166
35
235
11
2
July	
13       10
August	
285
1,099
265
356
331
210
75
152     265
September.
769
895
1,448
537      715
779
531
736     996
October 	
448
986
1,343
2,396   1,672
2,647
857
839   1,184
November..
872
880
949
608
759
498
230
229
308
December .
943
676
624
286
199
154
41
61
48
8,265
7,653
8,010
6,877
6,938
5,468
1,870
2,116
3,032
The above figures do not represent the total shipments of produce and fruits, being only what was carried
on the main line of the C. P. R. A great deal of aerri-
cultural produce is carried by the river and coasting
steamers, figures for which are not obtainable.
N.B.—Further particular may be obtained by application to the Government Bureau of Information,
Victoria, B. C.
*6M
T      98
Vancouver Board of Trade
MINERAL PRODUCTION OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA.
[Extracts from the Report of the Minister of Mines, 1907.]
Method  of Computing  Production.
In assembling the output for the lode mines in the
following tables, the established custom of this Bureau
has been adhered to, viz.: The output of a mine for a
year is considered that amount of ore for which the
smelter or mill returns have been received during the
year. This system does not give the exact amount
mined during the year, but rather the amounts credited
to the mine on the company's books during such year.
For ore shipped in December the smelter returns are
not likely to be received until February in the new year,
or later, and have, consequently, to be carried over to
the credit of such new year. This plan, however, will be
found very approximate for each year, and ultimately
correct, as ore not credited to one year is included in the
next.
In the Lode Mines tables, the amount of the shipments has been obtained from certified returns received
from the various mines, as provided for in the "Inspection of Metalliferous Mines Act, 1897." In calculating
the values of the products, the average price for the
year in the New York Metal Market has been used as a
basis. For silver 95 per cent., and for lead 90 per cent.,
of such market price has been taken. Treatment and
other charges have not been deducted. Annual Report, 1906-1907
99
TABLE I.
TOTAL PRODUCTION FOR ALL YEARS  UP TO AND INCLUDING 1906.
Gold, placer $68,721,103
Gold, lode   41,015,697
Silver   25,586,008
Lead   17,625,739
Copper   35,546,578
Coal and Coke   79,334,798
Building stone, bricks, etc     5,543,706
Other metals        270,099
Total $273,6^3,722
TABLE II.
PRODUCTION FOR EACH YEAR FROM 1890 TO 1906 (INCLUSIVE).
1852 to 1889 (inclusive) $71,981,634
1890 f.  2,608,803
1891  3,521,102
1892  2,978,530
1893  2,588,413
1894  4,225,717
1895  5,643,042
1896  7,507,956
1897  10,455,268
1898   10,906,861
1899  12,393,131
1900  16,344,751
1901  20,086,780
1902  17,486,550
1903  17,495,954
1904  18,977,359
1905  22,461,325
1906  24,980,546
Total $273,643,722 100 Vancouver Board of Trade
PROGRESS OF MINING.
The value of the mineral products of the Province
grows steadily greater, each year showing a material
increase over the preceding year.
The production for the year 1906 was $24,980,546,
which is 11.2 per cent, greater than that of 1905, 31.6 per
cent, greater than in 1904, and 42.8 per cent, greater
than in 1903.
An analysis of the returns shows, however, that the
increase this year is due chiefly to the Boundary and
Coast Districts, with a slight increase in the Cassiar
District.
Bast Kootenay and Cariboo Districts about held
their own this year, while Lillooet and West Kootenay
show a considerable decrease. In this latter district,
however, Ainsworth more than doubled its output,
Rossland and Nelson nearly held their own, but Slocan
and the rest of the district show a marked decrease.
The tonnage of ore mined in the Province, exclusive
of coal, was this past year 1,963,872 tons, some 257,193
tons, or 15 per cent, greater than in 1905.
The number of mines from which shipments were
made in 1906 was 154; and of these only 77 shipped over
100 tons each, during the year—practically no change
from the preceding year.
Some 41 mines shipped in excess of 1000 tons each
during the year, of which 14 were in the Boundary
District, 8 in Nelson Mining Division, 6 in Trail Mining
Division and 5 on the Coast. Annual Report,  1906-1907
101
The following table shows the number of metalliferous mines which shipped ore during the past year,
together with the location of these mines and the
number of men employed both above and below
ground:—
TABLE SHOWING DISTRIBUTION OF SHIPPING MINES IN 1906.
No. of
Men Employed
Tons of
No. of
Mines
in these Mines 1i
Ore
Mines
Shipping
Shipped
Shipping
over 100
tons in 1906
Below
Above
Total
Cassiar :
Skeena	
5,394
2
1
36
49
85
East Kootenay:
Fort Steele	
180,036
3
3
293
85
378
Windermere ■...
243
6
0
21
16
37
"West Kootenay :
Ainsworth	
19,431
50,135
14,973
14
23
54
7
15
16
78
233
245
37
130
92
115
Nelson	
363
337
Trail	
279,527
10
8
513
237
750
Other Divisions....
8,715
5
3
54
25
79
215
1
1
3
2
5
Yale :
Boundary 	
1,182,517
26
17
808
303
1,111
Ashcroft-Kamloops..
3,837
1
1
40
10
50
Similkameen-Vernon
3
1
0
1
1
2
Coast	
218,846
8
5
210
196
406
Total	
1,963,872
154
77
2,535
1,183
3,718
In explanation of the table, it should be said that
in its preparation, a mine employing 12 men for 4
months is credited in the table with 4 men for 12
months, so that the total given is less than the actual
number of individuals who worked in mines during
the year. 102
Vancouver Board of Trade
Statistical  Tables.
Referring to the preceding Statistical Tables of the
mineral production of the. Province, the following is a
summary of their contents :—
Table I. shows the total gross value of each mineral
product that has been mined in the Province up to the
end of 1906. From -this it will be seen that coal mining
has produced more than any separate class of mining—
a total of $79,334,798—followed next in importance by
placer gold at $68,721,103, and third by lode gold at
$41,015,697.
The metal gold, derived from both placer and lode
mining, amounts to $109,736,800, the greatest amount
derived from any one metal or mineral, the next most
important being copper, of a total gross value of
$35,546,578, followed by silver at $25,586,008, and lead at
$17,625,739.
Table II. shows the values of the total production of
the mines of the Province for each year from 1890 to
1906, during which period the output has increased
nearly ten-fold, and has now reached a production for
the past year valued at $24,980,546, or more than double
what it was in 1899.
Table IV. gives a statement in detail of the amount
and value of the different mineral products for the years
1904, 1905 and 1906. As is has been impossible as yet to
collect accurate statistics regarding building stone, lime,
brick, tiles, etc., these are estimated.   Annual Report, 1906-1907
105
TABLE   VIII.
COAL AND COKE PRODUCTION PER YEAR TO DATE.
COAL.
Years Tons (2,240 lbs.)
1836-90 (inclusive)    5,516,278	
1891    1,029,097.
1892	
1893	
1894	
1895	
1896	
1897	
1898	
1899	
1900	
Value.
 $16,930,358
  3,087,291
826,335  2,479,005
978,294  2,934,882
1,012,963  3,038,859
939,654  2,818,962
896,222  2,688,666
882,854  2,648,562
1,135,865  3,407,595
1,306,324  3,918,972
1,439,595  4,318,785
1901    1,460,331  4,380,993
1902    1,397,394  4,192,182
1903    1,168,194  3,504,582
1904    1,253,628  3,760,884
1905    1,384,312  4,152,936
1906.    1,517,303  4,551,909
Total.
24,144,633 $72,815,423
COKE.
1895-6  1,565.
1897  17,831.
1898 (estimated)  35,000.
1899  34,251.
1900  85,149.
1901  127,081.
1902  128,015.
1903    165,543..
1904  •   238,428.
1905  271,785..
1906 S  199,227.
7,825
89,155
175,000
171,255
425,745
635,405
640,075
827,715
,192,140
,358,925
996,135
1,303,875
$6,579,376  Annual Report,  1906-1907
107
Table IV. gives the amounts, in the customary units
of measure, and the values, of the various metals or
minerals which go to make up the grand total of the
mineral production of the Province, and also, for purposes of comparison, similar data for the two preceding
years.
The table shows that there has been a decrease in
the production of placer gold of some $20,900, and at the
same time a decrease in the output of lode gold of
$302,463, thus leaving for this metal a balance of $323,363
as a decrease. /^f*
The amount of silver produced this past year was
2,990,262 ounces, having a gross value of $1,897,320, a decrease from the preceding year of $74,498, due chiefly to
the decreased production of the Slocan district.
The table shows an output of lead in 1906 amounting to 52*408,217 pounds, valued at $2,667,578, which,
although a decrease from the production of the preceding year of 4,172,486 pounds of lead, is still greater than
that of any other year since 1900, but owing to the
greatly increased market value of the metal, and in spite
of the materially decreased amount produced, the value
of the product this year shows an increase over the preceding year of $268,556.
Table V. shows the proportion of the total mineral
productions made in each of the various Districts into
which the Province is divided.
It will be noted that this year again the Boundary
District has the honor of first place on the list, followed
in order of output by the Coast District and East Kootenay, with West Kootenay, for many years our greatest
producer, as only fourth on the list.
The Coast and East Kootenay Districts, however,
owe a considerable percentage of their outputs to the 108
Vancouver Board of Trade
coal mines situated within their limits, whereas in the
other districts the production is entirely from lode
mining.
Table VIII. contains the statistics of production of
the coal mines of the Province. The total amount of
coal mined to the end of 1906 is 24,144,633 tons (2,2401bs.),
worth $72,815,423. Of this there was produced in 1906
some 1,517,303 tons, valued at $4,551,909, a larger amount
than has been produced in any year previous.
In these figures of coal production is not included
the coal used in making coke, as such coal is accounted
for in figures of output of coke.
The amount of coal used in 1906 in making coke was
381,773 tons, from which was produced some 199,227 tons
of coke, worth $996,135, a decrease of some 72,558 tons
from the preceding year in coke production.' These
figures are to a certain extent misleading, however, as in
1905 some 3,694 tons of coke were put into stock, whereas
in 1906 all the coke that was made was sold, together
with 13,009 tons taken from stock, making the coke sales
this year 210,897 tons.
Coal.
During the year 1906 the actual production of coal
in British Columbia has yet been confined to the two
well-known districts, the collieries in vicinity of the
Crow's Nest Pass and the collieries on Vancouver Island.
In the former of these districts the Crow's Nest Pass
Coal Co. has been operating collieries at Michel, Coal
Creek and, for the first portion of the year, at Carbonado,
but latterly this last colliery has been closed down.
The collieries on Vancouver Island have been operated by two companies, the Western Fuel Co. at Nanaimo,
and the Wellington Colliery Co. at Ladysmith and
Comox. Annual Report, 1906-1907
109
The gross output of the coal mines of the Province
for the year was 1,899,076 tons (2,240 lbs.), which, with
17,230 tons taken from stock, makes a total consumption
of 1,916,306 tons. Of this total amount, 1,361,728 tons
were sold as coal, of, which 681,899 tons were for consumption in Canada and 679,829 tons were exported,
while 381,773 tons were used in making coke and 172,805
tons were used under the companies' boilers, etc., or sold
locally.
The amount of coke made was 199,227 tons (2,2401bs.)>
which, together with 11,670 tons taken from stock, made
the sales for the year 210,897 tons.
The following table indicates the markets in which
the coal and coke output of the Province was sold :—
COAL.
Coast
Crow's
Nest Pass.
Total
(2,240 lbs.)
Sold for consumption in Canada, Tons
"      export to United States     "
''      export to other countries   "
531,106
433,183
15,783
150,793
230,863
681,899
664,046
15,783
980,072
381,656
1,361,728
COKE.
Sold for consumption in Canada      "
"      export to United States     "
"      export to other countries   "
14,547
8,304
134,646
53,400
149,193
61,704
22,851
188,046
210,897
Gold.
PLACER   GOLD.
The production of placer gold during the year 1906
was about $948,400, which is about 2.2 per cent, less than
that of 1905.    This falling off, though slight, is general 110
Vancouver Board of Trade
and represents the lessened work of the individual
miner, whose successors, the large companies, have not
as yet got into satisfactory operation.
The Atlin District produced very nearly as much
gold as it did the previous year, chiefly the work of
comparatively small companies, although in this district
individual miners are still at work, but the ground
suited for this class of mining is gradually diminishing.
The two large dredges installed in this district have
been practically abandoned, as the ground upon which
they were working was found unsuitable for dredging
operations.
A large steam shovel plant has been installed on
shallow ground, and from present indications promises
to be a large-producer. The small shovel, the first installed in the district, has not been a commercial
success, owing to the quite inadequate arrangements
for handling and washing the dirt lifted.
In the Dease lake section of Cassiar, despite the
difficulties of transportation, one hydraulic company
recovered between $20,000 and $25,000 in gold, and a
second company will probably be in operation in 1907,
Here, however, the individual miner has almost disappeared.
In the Cariboo District, the Cariboo Mining Division
shows a marked increase over the preceding year, about
18.6 per cent., chiefly from small- hydraulic enterprises,
but the Quesnel Division shows a decrease of about
30 per cent., due to the fact that the largest producing
company did little mining, being taken up with large
operations for increasing its water supply.
The Port Steele District continues to produce a
little gold from the old creeks, but the quantity is
yearly diminishing. Annual Report, 1906-1907
111
The bars on the Thompson and Fraser rivers have
been very disappointing, and the dredges installed
thereon have not been successful.
GOLD FROM LODE MINING.
The value of the gold produced from lode mining
in the Province in 1906 was $4,630,639, of which about
95 per cent, was recovered from the smelting of copper-
bearing ores. There are practically no stamps in
operation since the Ymir mine ceased to operate, excepting one at Hedley.
Silver.
The total amount of silver produced in the Province during the year was 2,990,262 ounces, valued at
$1,897,320, a decrease of about 449,155 ounces and in the
value of the product of $74,498.
About 77 per cent, of the silver is found in association with lead, in argentiferous galena, the remainder
being found in conjunction with copper ores.
The Fort Steele Mining Division produced 1,049,536
ounces, about the same as in 1905, but the Slocan shows
a decrease in output of 474,335 ounces, or 45 per cent.
Lead.
There was produced in the Province in 1906 some
52,408,217 pounds of lead, valued at $2,667,578. Although
this is a decrease of 4,172,486 lbs. from the preceding
year, the value, owing to the higher market prices,
shows an increase of $268,556, and is the highest
amount ever received for the lead product of the Province, except in 1900.
With lead, as with its associated metal silver, the
greater part of the production comes from Fort Steele 112
Vancouver Board of Trade
Division, while the production of the Slocan in 1906 is
only 55.1 per cent, of that of 1905, or 28 per cent, of
the production of 1904.
The following table shows the output of the various
districts, and the percentage such bear to the total out-
pub for the year :—
Port Steele Mining Division 44,487,481 lbs. = 84.88 j
Ainsworth "   3,173,353   "        6.05
Slocan 1   2,975,674   |        5.66
Nelson "   1,034,553   "        1.96
Allother "       737,156   "        1.45
52,408,217   "    100.00
For the whole of the year 1906 the market price
of lead has been above £12 10s. in London; consequently the Dominion Government lead bounty has,
during this period, been proportionately reduced.
Copper.
The copper output in 1905 was the largest the Province had ever made, but the production of 1906 exceeds
it by some 5,298,237 lbs., an increase of 12.32 per cent.,
while the value of the total product this year is
$2,412,343 in excess of the preceding year, an increase
of 41 per cent.
The production of copper in 1906 was 42,990,488 lbs.,
having a gross value of $8,288,565. This increase is
chiefly attributable to the Boundary District, although
there is an increase in the Coast District, but Rossland
shows a decrease. Of the total output, the Boundary
District produces 73 per cent., the Coast District 12 per
cent., and Rossland 10 per cent.   Annual Report, 1906-1907
113
The following table shows the production of the
various districts for the year 1904, 1905 and 1906 :—
1904. 1905. 1906.
Boundary   Dist...22,066,407 lbs. 27,670,644 lbs. 32,226,782 lbs. ■-
Rossland       "   ... 7,119,876
Coast "   ... 5,960,593
Yale-Kamloops...   .328,380
Nelson Dist     220,500
Various Districts.       14,372
5,800,294
3,437,236
680,808
92,663
10,606
35,710,128
37,692,251
4,750,110
5,431,269
355,377
216,034
10,916
42,990,488
= 74.90%
11.40
12:45
.75
.45
.05
100.00
camps,
The average assays of the copper ores of the various
based upon the copper recovered, were as follows:—
Boundary, 1.4% copper; Coast, 1.21%, and Rossland, 0.85% copper.
Other Minerals.
IRON ORE.
There has been no iron ore mined in the Province
during this past year, for the reason that there is no
market for it on the Pacific Coast. There has been considerable prospecting work done in connection with the
known iron deposits on the Coast, and schemes have
been in consideration for the erection of blast furnaceSj
either in British Columbia or on Puget Sound.
ZINC   ORE.
The production of zinc ore this past year was very
small, only some 654 tons, and the industry has been
practically at a stand still. In 1905, concentrating or
"enriching" plants were erected for the production of
concentrates that would assay about 50 per cent, zinc,
for which there was a market in the United States, into
which country they were admitted free of duty as "crude
mineral;" but in 1906 a decision of the United States
Customs Department ruled that these concentrates were
not "crude mineral," and, consequently, were subject to
duty, which duty was so high as to be prohibitive, the
result being a suspension of zinc mining in British
Columbia. This decision has, however, been appealed
from, and on February 7th,  1907,  the United States 114
Vancouver Board of Trade
General Appraisers reversed the decision, deciding that
these concentrates were "crude mineral" and, consequently, free of duty.
The Commission, headed by W. R. Ingalls, of New
York, and Philip Argall, of Denver, appointed by the
Dominion Government to investigate the zinc resources
of British Columbia, has published its report, which
goes into the subject most thoroughly. Copies of this
report can be obtained from the Mines Branch of the
Department of the Interior, Ottawa.
The following is a brief summary of some of the
more important points brought out in the report:—
Present Possible Zinc Output.
EAST KOOTENAY.
The two mines working are essentially lead mines,
although containing considerable zinc—one of them
has more developed zinc ore than any other mine in
British Columbia—but the character of the ore is such
that zinc extraction is almost hopeless.
AINSWORTH  M.  D.
Assuming Blue Bell ore to carry 15 per cent, zinc
mined en masse, then, if mined and concentrated at the
rate of 200 tons of ore a day, it might produce 39 tons
a day of 50 per cent, concentrates. All the other mines
in the Division might produce 15 tons a day of 50 per
cent, concentrates.
SLOCAN.
Ingalls says 15,000 tons per annum of concentrates
(45 to 50 tons a day) would be a liberal estimate for
Slocan, and this could only be produced as a by-product
from lead mining. Annual Report, 1906-1907 115
COAST.
"The zinc deposits of the Coast are still of unknown magnitude; they are, in fact, nothing but
prospects."
Possibilities and Cost of Zinc Smelting1 in B. C.
The ore must be taken to the coal, as the consumption of coal is 2 tons to 1 of ore ; hence the only places
adapted for zinc smelting in British Columbia are
Crow's Nest or Coast. Ore or concentrates must
contain over 40 per cent, metallic zinc. "It is difficult
to see how zinc smelting could be profitably carried on
in British Columbia with coal at Crow's Nest Pass Coal
Co.'s price "—$2 a ton.
"The prospect for zinc smelting on the Coast, at
least by the standard method, is too remote to merit
detailed consideration at the present time."
The estimated cost of smelting in British Columbia,
given by Ingalls, for the running expenses of a perfectly equipped and economically run modern smelter—
with no allowance for interest on investment, or
legitimate profit—with coal at $1.50 a ton, and skilled
labour at $3 a day of 10 hours, is $15 a ton.
(If we substitute in this estimate the lowest price
at present available, viz.:—Coal at $2 to $2.25 a ton, and
skilled labour at $3.25 to $3.50 for eight hours, it will
make the estimated costs of operation about $18.75 a
ton of 50 per cent, concentrates.) Ingalls further
estimates the cost of marketing the spelter produced
from 1 ton of zinc concentrates at $8.50, which makes
his total estimate $23.50 a ton of concentrates (or, if
corrected as above noted, $26.75 a ton).
The Report further estimates the cost of shipping
the same concentrates to Europe for treatment would
be $25.03 a ton, from which it would appear that zinc
smelting is not at present feasible in British Columbia. 116
Vancouver Board of Trade
Electric Smelting of Zinc Ores.
The following are the conclusions arrived at by the
Commission as to electric smelting of zinc ores in British
Columbia:—
(1.) " Electric smelting will never displace ordinary
(fire) smelting, if it is necessary to generate the power
from coal."
(2.) " Electric smelting may be, in the future, economically conducted' at places where very cheap hydroelectric power is available." (By cheap he means less
than $15 per h.p. per annum. Nelson and Trail are now
paying $45 per h.p.)
(3.) "Aside from, the question of power, up to the
present time, certain peculiar and serious metallurgical
difficulties in electric smelting have not been satisfactorily overcome.''
" It is unlikely that electric smelting of zinc ores can
ever be profitably carried on in the zinc-producing
districts of the East and West Kootenays."
PLATINUM,
Platinum continues to be found in small quantities
in various parts of the Province, but as yet no systematic
attempt has been made to save it. As already noted in
previous reports, it is found in alluvial washings in the
Similkameen District, on the Quesnel river in Cariboo,
on Thibert creek in Cassiar, and also in the Yukon.
The latest find was at Lillooet, from which district there
was received a few ounces of the crude platinum sand,
saved by a prospector in washing for gold, for which the
Provincial Mineralogist was able to obtain some $25 an
ounce net cash. Annual Report, 1906-1907
117
BUILDING STONE.
The quarrying of stone for building purposes has
as yet only on the Coast taken the form of an industrys
as in .that district only has the use of stone for building
become at all general. In a previous report descriptions
were given of the more important quarries that had
been opened up on the Coast, to which there is not
much to add now, except to note that the general output, of the quarries has nearly doubled in the last couple
of years.
BRICK.
The manufacture of red building brick is constantly
increasing with the market. A special report on the
industry and the clay deposits of the Coast will be
found elsewhere in this report. The greater consumption of brick, and consequently the greater production
is on the Coast, near Vancouver and Victoria, although
scattered throughout the Interior are small yards
supplying local demands, suitable clay being found in
.abundance.
FIRE BRICK.
The manufacture of fire brick formerly carried on
at Comox has, as far as is known, ceased, although
about 3,500 tons of fire clay were mined from the coal
mines in the vicinity. A deposit of fire clay of apparently very fair quality is being- developed near
Vancouver, and a brick-making plant erected, the
product of which has not, however, been on the market
for a sufficient time to assure its reputation.
The manufacture of earthenware, such as sewer
and drain pipes, chimney caps, flower pots, etc., has been
carried on near Victoria by the B. C. Pottery Company,
the output having a value of somewhere about $80*000,
while other firms have also been making drain tiles and
pipes. 118
Vancouver Board of Trade
LIME.
The production of lime is naturally associated more
or less closely with constructions of brick or stone, aside
from its use in internal plastering, and, consequently,
the greatest production has been on the Coast, the most
extensively operated lime-kilns being situated at Victoria and on Texada Island, at both of which points a
lime of almost theoretical purity is made, although the
kilns are rather primitive and the economies of production have only begun to be introduced.
CEMENT.
Although other enterprises are in contemplation, the
only concern manufacturing cement in British Columbia'
to any extent, is the Vancouver Portland Cement Co.,
with works at Tod Inlet, some 14 miles from Victoria, a
description of whose plant, as it then existed, was given
in the Report of the Minister of Mines of 1904, since
which time the capacity of the plant has been about
doubled and the demand for the cement will probably
necessitate further enlargements in the near future.
The value of the output in 1906 approached a quarter
of a million dollars.
OIL AND  OILSHALES.
There has been no serious attempt made to develope
the supposed oil fields in the Flathead valley, owing
probably to the conflicting and questioned validity of
titles to the various claims; but this matter has now
been practically settled, and it is expected the coming
season will see active operations tending to prove the
field. Nothing further has been heard of the oilshales
found in the vicinity of Harper's Camp, Cariboo, and no
serious attempt has been made to prospect for oil in the
Queen Charlotte Islands, where seepages were reported
as found. Annual Report, 1906-1907
119
Developments of the Year.
There have been few developments or occurrences
during the past year that require special notice. Mining
is becoming more a settled business, by the elimination,
to a large extent, of visionary schemes.
PLACER   MINING.
In placer mining a departure has been made in
Atlin, from the methods formerly in vogue, in the
installation of the first properly equipped steam shovel,
with apparently satisfactory results. In Cariboo, the
long-preached axiom that the quantity of water available for hydraulicking is the measure of the output, has
had the effect of starting extensive plans and works for
rendering available considerably more water, the effect
of which will not be noticeable for a couple of years.
Dredging in Atlin has proved a failure, owing to
the character of the gravel rather than the scarcity of
gold. Dredging on the Fraser River and its tributaries
has not proved successful, for various reasons.
Individual placer mining is decreasing to such an
extent as to be now relatively unimportant.
METALLIFEROUS   MINES.
The increase in the production of the metalliferous
mines of the Province this year is entirely due to the
increase in the market price of metals, together with
the effect this has had in stimulating the output of
copper ore in the Boundary and Coast Districts. The
chief product of the East Kootenay District is silver-
lead ore, of which practically all is obtained from two
or three mines in the Fort Steele Mining Division.
Here, although the amount of lead produced this year
is about 3,761,347 lbs. less than in 1905, this year's production   is   over   double   that. of   1904.     Despite   the 120
Vancouver Board of Trade
decreased production, the market price has been so
much higher as to make the value of this year's
diminished product greater than was that of last year.
The same is true of the silver product. The quantity
of ore handled this year has increased by about 10,000
tons.
Fort Steele Mining Division this year produced about
85 per cent, of the total lead output of the Province.
The North Star Co. has again begun to ship a considerable quantity of ore from another of its properties.
In the Windermere Mining Division some six mines
shipped during the year, but did not average 50 tons
each.
In the Nelson Mining Division the tonnage of ore
mined was about the same as in the previous year, but,
owing to the closing of the Ymir mine, the production of
gold decreased, while the copper output more than
doubled. Several of the smaller properties in the
Division have been energetically and successfully
operated.
In the Slocan District some 52 mines shipped ore—
about the same as in the previous year—but of these
only 16 produced over 100 tons each during the year.
During the past year the metallic content of the ore is
only about half what it was in 1905, or one-quarter of
what it was in 1904.
This great decrease is partly attributable to the fact
that this year there has been no market for zinc ore,
which is a by-product in the mining of galena. Neither
the Dominion Government bounty nor the high price of
the metals seems to be able to stimulate the lead industry
in this district. Annual Report,  1906-1907
121
In the Rossland Camp there is a decrease in the
tonnage of ore mined of 15 per cent., with a somewhat
greater decrease in gold and copper contents.
In the Boundary District, despite a shortage of coal
and coke for about two months,. there has been an
increase of some 22 per cent, in the tonnage of ore
mined. The value of the gold' product has increased
about 19 per cent.; of silver, about 18 per cent.; and of
copper, of 44 per cent. The value of the copper product in this district is 75 per cent, that of the whole
Province.
In the Coast District, on Texada Island, the Marble
Bay mine has maintained regular shipments, while the
Copper Queen and Van Anda properties have again
begun to ship, although in small quantities. The iron
mines have not been operated.
In the New Westminster District, the Britannia
mine has been in operation, but on account of troubles
with the aerial tramway, and difficulties encountered in
the concentration of the ores, has not been as successful as it was hoped it would be. There were mined,
however, during the year about 90,000 tons of ore, of
which some 35,000 tons were shipped direct to the
smelter and about 55~,000 tons were concentrated, producing nearly 10,000 tons of concentrates. The metallic
contents of the ore mined were, approximately, 2,800
ounces of gold, 4,500 ounces of silver, and 2,600,000 lbs. of
copper. The smelter operated by this company, situated
at Crofton, has been in operation during the year on
Britannia ore, supplemented by ores from Alaska and
from, the Portland Canal.
The Portland Canal District has at least partly fulfilled its promise of last year, and during the latter
part of this year has been shipping to the smelter at
Hadley, Alaska, from one mine, about 100 tons of copper
ore a day. 122
Vancouver Board of Trade
In the Omineca Mining Division, on the headwaters
of the Telkwa and Zymoetz rivers, a number of prospects are being developed which have good surface
showings, chiefly copper ore. These will, however, be
too remote from transportation to be available until
after the Grand Trunk Pacific railway is built.
On Vancouver Island, the Tyee mine shipped some
24,000 tons of ore, containing 1,800,000 pounds of copper,
in addition to the gold and silver values. The development of the lower levels of the mine has been continued
regularly, but has so far failed to disclose any important
ore bodies.
On the Richard III. shipments have again been
begun from a body of ore, a continuation of the Tyee
ore body.
A shipment of almost 100 tons of copper ore was
made from the Southern Cross mine, on the Alberni
canal.
Active development has again begun on the copper
properties at Sidney Inlet on the West Coast of the
Island.
^FJ Annual Report, 1906-1907 123
CARIBOO DISTRICT.
Cariboo and Quesnel  Mining Divisions.
'Report by George Walker, Gold Commissioner.
I have the honor to submit herewith my report on
mining operations in Cariboo District during the year
1906.
I am unable to announce any increase in the gold
output of the mines, but, at the same time, the actual
conditions give the greatest encouragement, that the
district is on the eve of a prosperous term that has not
been equalled for years, from the fact that more applications for mining leases have been granted than in any
previous year, while there has also been an increase in
the revenue. The work done during the past year has
given evidence of such a substantial character that it is
safe to predict greatly increased activity in the near
future. Several of the small properties, hitherto held
and worked by individual miners, have been purchased
by strong companies and formed into large enterprises,
necessitating the construction of extensive ditches,
flumes, reservoirs and other works of a substantial
nature. This changing of the methods of working,
together with the very dry season, has had a deterrent
effect upon the output of our hydraulic operations, the
method by which three-fourths of the gold of the district
is produced, and has curtailed this year's output of gold,
but, when the extensive preliminary works already under
way are completed, .there will undoubtedly be a large
increase in the gold yield of the district.
Quesnel Mining Division.
Report by W. Stephenson, Mining Recorder.
In submitting the annual report, with the estimated
yield of  gold obtained for the mining season of 1906 124
Vancouver Board of Trade
from the Quesnel Mining Division of Cariboo District,
it might be inferred from the small amount of gold
obtained for the season that this section of the district
was becoming unproductive, or, as miners would say,
worked out. Such is not by any means the case. The
first and real cause of the very apparent shortage of
gold obtained is the scarcity of water for the working
of hydraulic and other surface mining. As is well
known, the winter of 1905-6 the snowfall was very light
in this division. The same conditions have held for the
last four winters. Consequently, each succeeding year,
for the last four years, the water in the lakes, swamps
and other natural reservoirs has been diminishing, and
many of these natural reservoirs have become exhausted by evaporation; a number of the gulches and
small streams which were fed from these sources have
become altogether dry, while some of the lakes have
fallen below the level of the ditch-heads through which
the ditches formerly drew their water supply. Through
the mining section of this division a large number of
the small mining claims were unable to work for lack
of water, and the same was the case with the large
hydraulic mines, the water supply being so limited that
they did not attempt to operate during the season. For
this reason we have no returns whatever from our chief
producers. Owing to the demand, at good wages, for
labour, it may be said that desultory mining on the
river bars and creeks was abandoned during the season,
the men doing better by working for the wages to be
obtained from the companies and contractors on the
preliminary work in constructing roads, digging ditches
and other works which is being pushed as fast as available labour will permit and the materials can be procured. Judging from the work already done and the
work contracted for, it would seem that mining men
and capitalists have confidence in the future of this
section of Cariboo District. Annual Report, 1906-1907
125
CASSIAR  DISTRICT.
Atlin   Mining   Division.
Report of J. A. Fraser, Gold Commissioner.
I have the honor to submit my annual report on
mining operations in the Atlin Mining Division of Cassiar
District for the year ending 31st December, 1906.
This division now includes what were formerly the
Chilkat, Bennett and Teslin Mining Divisions, and
covers the north-west portion of the Province from the
height of land between the Teslin and Stikine rivers on
the south and east to the Yukon and Alaskan boundaries on the north and west. There were about as many
men engaged in mining during the summer season (1906)
as last year, viz., about 450, and though the individual
operators were fewer, the results, generally speaking,
were as good as in previous years. There is, apparently,
a falling off in production and amount of royalty
obtained, as compared with 1905, but this is more than
accounted for by the decreased output from Boulder
creek alone, which is explained elsewhere. If the output from that creek is deducted from each season's returns there will be an increase shown for the remainder
of this district of about 1,000 ounces in favor of 1906.
The scarcity of water was again an embarrassment,
and will doubtless continue to be so until reservoirs are
established on the various creeks and sources of supply.
The drifting operations of last winter were, on the
whole, very satisfactory, but I regret to say that there
are fewer men operating in that way this winter than
for several years; there being not more than 100 as
against 190 last winter and 250 the winter before, and so 126
Vancouver Board of Trade
on. This is due to several causes, the principal being
that the sections along the creeks where the best results
have been obtained in the past have been pretty well
worked out, and, while the " pay" is not by any means
exhausted, the operators realise the necessity for better
plant and facilities for operation, the installation of
which would involve an expenditure which they, individually, are unable to undertake. Consequently the
properties are being acquired by companies, who are not
disposed to prosecute winter operations to any extent.
There is no reason for supposing that portions of Spruce
and other creeks which remain practically untouched
will not prove just as rich as the parts already tested
when systematically operated.
Drifting operations are being carried on this winter
on Spruce, Pine, Gold Run, Boulder and Gold Bottom
creeks.
11
TSS Annual Report, 1906-1907 127
BUREAU  OF  MINES.
Work  of the  Year.
The work of the Bureau of Mines increases, of
necessity, year by year, and this growing activity is due
to the following causes :—The extension of the mining
area of the Province, with the proportional increase in
the number of mines; the increasing desire of the outside public for the free information which the Bureau
supplies with regard to the various mining districts and
camps ; and the appreciation by the prospector of the
fact that he may obtain, gratis, a determination of any
rock or mineral which he may send to the Bureau.
The routine work of the office, and the preparation
and publication of the Report for the year just ended,
followed by the examination in the field of as many of
the mines and mining districts as the season would permit, together with the work of the Laboratory and
instruction of students, fully occupied the staff for the
year. The staff of the Bureau consists of the Provincial Mineralogist, the Provincial Assayer, and a
junior assistant in the Laboratory, with a clerk as
temporary assistant during the publication of the
Report.
PROVINCIAL   MINERALOGIST.
After the publication of the Annual Report for the
previous year and the finishing of office work, the
Provincial Mineralogist, early in June, made a trip to
the vicinity of Cowichan lake, visiting there such
mineral claims as had had any material amount of
work performed on them, and making a report on the
same. A report was also made as to the necessity for
and the best route to be followed for a "trail into certain
claims situated on the Nanaimo river. The field work
to be undertaken during the summer months by the 128
Vancouver Board of Trade
Bureau was then planned out and preparations for the
main summer trip of the Provincial Mineralogist made.
On July 12th the Provincial Mineralogist, acting
under instructions of the Hon. the Minister of Mines,
started on a trip to the valley of the Peace river, east
of the Rocky mountains and west of the 120th meridian, the Provincial boundary between the 54° and 60°
north latitude. The [reports of rich finds of gold, and
also of coal, in this district, combined with its agricultural possibilities, on all of which the Government
had no authentic information, and the fact that this
was a proposed route of the G.T.P. Railway across the
Province which seemed most likely to be followed,
rendered an early report on this district very desirable.
The route chosen was to go up the Skeena river
from Essington to Hazelton; thence by pack-train to
Babine lake, portaging to Stuart lake, and thence to
Fort St. James, at the outlet of this lake. From here
pack-horses were taken to Fort McLeod, on the Pack
river, one of the tributaries of the Peace river, a
distance of 85 miles. At McLeod Lake post canoes
were obtained, with which, and later the use of a
bateau, the tributaries of and the main Peace river
were followed to Peace River Crossing, some 430 miles
down stream, during which run three or four side trips
were made into the ^adjacent country by pack-train or
on foot.
From Peace River Crossing a waggon road was
followed for 100 miles to Lesser Slave Lake, which discharges through Lesser Slave river into the Athabasca
river ; and these waterways were descended in a canoe,
a distance of 200 miles, to Athabasca Landing, from
which place to Edmonton the trip of 100 miles was
made in a waggon. From Edmonton to Victoria the
trip was made by the Canadian Pacific Railway.   Annual Report, .1906-1907 129
CIn relation to  the country   through 'which the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway is likely to pass, the following may be interesting.)
ESSINGTON  TO EDMONTON.
Via Skeena River, Babine and Stuart Lake's and Peace
^fH River.
'Report by Wm. Fleet Robertson, 'Provincial Mineralogist.
Under instructions from the Hon. the Minister of
Mines, the Provincial Mineralogist, during the summer
of 1906, made a trip to, and an examination of, that portion of British Columbia lying east of the Rocky mountains, but to the west of the 120th Meridian of west
longitude, and known as the Peace River Valley District
of British Columbia. As this portion of the Province is
at present most remote from transportation facilities of
any sort, the time occupied in reaching it from Victoria
was greater than was required to make the examination of the district.
A route was selected embracing a stretch of British
Columbia of which little authentic information was
available and about which such was desired.
This report must necessarily partake largely of a
description of the country along the route travelled or
adjacent thereto, but, since the line of travel was "crossing the formations," both physical and geological, the
features noted will, in all probability, be found to extend
a certain distance north and south of the section
traversed.
Tha route taken on this trip was parallel to, but a
little further north than, that travelled over in 1905
across the Northern Interior Plateau, and the description
of the major physical features contained in the Report
of 1905 are applicable to this more northerly route.
The party consisted of the Provincial Mineralogist,
with Mr. Harold Nation as an assistant, and, for part of
the time only, a cook. 130 Vancouver Board of Trade
• A general description of the route taken is as follows:—From Victoria and Vancouver to Essington, at
the mouth of the Skeena river, by Canadian Pacific
Railway Co.'s steamer, a distance of 645 miles. From
Essington up the Skeena river to Hazelton by Hudson
Bay Co.'s steamer, a distance of 180 miles. From Hazel-
ton to Babine lake by pack-train, 70 miles. From Babine,
up Babine lake by canoe, across a portage of 12 miles to
Stuart lake by wagon road, and, again by canoe, down
Stuart lake to Fort St. James, at the outlet, a distance
of 150 miles. From Fort St. James to McLeod lake by
pack-train, a distance of 85 miles.
McLeod lake is on the headwaters of the Peace river,
and here canoes were taken to the head of the canyon
of the Peace, a distance of 182 miles, where the canoes
had to be abandoned and a portage of 14 miles made
around the canyon to Hudson Hope, the party packing
all its supplies and camp outfit across the portage.
From Hudson Hope to Fort St. John, on the Peace
river, a distance of 60 miles by the river, which it was
expected would have to be made on a raft, but, being so
fortunate as to encounter an Indian with horses, a side
trip was made to Moberly lake and the Pine river district
to the south, arriving at Fort St. John overland, after a
.trip by pack-train of some 90 miles.
From Fort St. John another trip by pack-train was
made to the south, to the Pouce Coupe prairie, returning
to Fort St. John after travelling, by pack-train some 185
miles.
A short, trip was also made from this point to the
north, on foot, as no horses could be obtained on the
north side of the river.
At Fort St. John a bateau was obtained from the
Hudson Bay Company, and the party, here reduced to
two, floated down stream to Peace River Crossing, at
the junction of the Smoky with the Peace River, a
distance of 180 miles, crossing the Provincial Boundary
into Alberta some 45 miles below Fort St. John. Annual Report, 1906-1907
<*3!31
gli OBlrom Peace River Crossing the party went by a
freight wagon to the upper end of Lesser Slave lake, a
distance of 100 miles, travelling from that point in a
Peterboro' canoe, kindly loaned by the Royal North-
West Mounted Police, down Lesser Slave lake and river
and the Athabaska river to Athabaska Landing, a
distance estimated at 200 miles, from which point to
Edmonton is 100 miles by a good wagon road.
At Edmonton railway facilities were again obtainable and the party proceeded by the Canadian Pacific
Railway to Victoria.
The distance travelled was estimated at, approximately, 3,120 miles, divided as follows :—By steamer,
910 miles ; by pack-train or on foot, 470 miles ; by canoe
or bateau, 700 miles ; by wagon, 200 miles; and by railway, 840 miles. These distances and the modes of
travelling are set forth in tabular form in the following
table:—
TABLE
DF DISTANCES TRAVELLED, SUMMER
OF 1906.
From
TO
Steamer
Railway
Pack-
train or
on foot
Wagon
Canoe
Total
Essington	
85
560
180
70
105
12
33
85
20
72
90
14
90
185
14
Hudson Hope	
St. John	
St. John via Moberly lake
North of river
<i
180
Peace River Crossing
100
On   "          "     \
m      river >
On Athabasca river J
200
Athabasca Landing1..
100
195
645
Calgary	
85
910
•   840
470
200
700
3,120 132     Vancouver Board of Trade
The time occupied between transportation points,
viz., Hazelton and Edmonton, was 77 days, including
Sundays, in which time 85 camps, or moves, were made.
The route taken, while seemingly longer than necessary
to reach and return from the district inspected, proved
that " the longest way around is sometimes the shortest
way home," as it was almost entirely down stream on
the waterways, in which direction 40 miles a day could
be covered with little labor or expense ; whereas, going
up stream, only about 10 miles a day could have been
made, and three or four Indians would have been required to "track" the canoes up stream.
Mineral   Possibilities.
The Babine range of mountains, over which the
trail from Hazelton to Babine leads, rises to heights
of 7,000 feet in the peaks, and its rock formation
consists of schists, quartzites, shales, etc., cut by numerous porphyritic dikes. This range is practically the
length of Babine lake, forming its southern shore and
watershed, dying out both to the east and west of the
lake. The range has only begun to be prospected, and
its potentialities are as yet undemonstrated; but, at the
same time, there have been a number of claims staked
there, as yet quite undeveloped, which produce at least
samples of copper, silver and gold ores that indicate
possibilities and lead to the hope of greater things in
the future.
On the north side of Babine lake the country is so
; covered with recent superficial deposits, of Glacial age,
that few exposures of solid formation occur to tempt
the investigation of the prospector, particularly as the
adjacent formations to the south have not as yet been
proven.
To the south of Stuart lake there is a range of
rocky hills which does not attain to the dignity of being
called a mountain range, in which there are exposures Annual Report, 1906-1907 133
of solid formation, chiefly sedimentaries of Palaeozoic
age, more or less disturbed, but which, as far as could"
be observed, have not been cut by the igneous dikes
which elsewhere appear in some way to have been,
if not the cause of, at least formed at the time when
the mineralisation took place, and which dikes form, to
the prospector, the visible sign of a possible mineralisation. .
On the north side of Stuart lake, until within a few
miles of its eastern end, the country is covered with
glacial deposits, and, from a mineral view-point, is unpromising, and from this district we have no record of
even placer gold indications ever having been discovered.
Within a few miles of the eastern end of the lake a
great knob of the underlying limestone protrudes, from
which there are probably exposures of the same rock
extending to the north-west, but this point was not investigated. The borders of this limestone area may
prove worthy of investigation by the prospector, but the
apparent absence of any serious igneous action is here
also against the chances of its proving a profitable field.
Such igneous action may be found to have occurred
further to the north and have as yet failed to escape
notice, since the lake provides such an easy line of travel
as to have left the adjacent country practically untrav-
elled, save by the local Indians.
The line of the trail from Fort St. James to McLeod
lake is uninteresting in a mineral sense, as it is covered
deep in gravel, clay, etc., and the few exposures of rock
seen were mostly unpromising sedimentaries.
The course down the Pack and Parsnip rivers was
through similar country and lay at the base of the western foothills of the Rockies, a range which, as we know
it in the more southerly part of the Province, where the 134 Vancouver Board of Trade
geological formation and conditions are very similar,
'has not, as yet, proved productive of mineral wealth,
although a few prospects have been located therein.
The Peace river, formed by the confluence of the
Parsnip and Finlay rivers, derives from the latter
tributary, wash from the north-west, from the vicinity
of Manson creek, a district in which placer gold has been
already found in various localities and in considerable
quantities. Consequently, as might be expected, the bed
of the Peace river shows black sand and indications of
placer gold through its explored length, some of the bars
giving " colors " quite sufficient to offer inducements to
prospect for dredging or steam-shovel ground, but, so
far as is known, at no place have the bars contained a
sufficient proportion of gold to be profitably worked by
what has been called " individual" methods.
Unlike most of the streams in the southern part of
the Province on which dredging has so far been attempted, the bars on the Peace river are found to be
free from boulders of any material size, a fact which
should greatly favor dredging operations and render
possible the working of a deposit of a grade which
might not be profitable where such conditions did not
exist. These remarks apply not only to the bed of the
present river, but also, to a certain extent, to the banks
of the river, which were at one time the bars in the
greater valley of the ancient river into which the
present river has cut. It was in banks of this description, some miles below Fort St. John, that small
quantities of gold were found in 1905, which led to the
staking of numerous claims and the rather sensational
newspaper articles about them attributed ■ to members
of the Dominion Government Peace River Exploration
party.
Coal.
So far as is known, there have been no indications,
of coal found in. the section of country passed through Annual Report, 1906-1907 135
between Hazelton and the head of the Peace river,
although there is a possibility that lignite, at least, may
be found under some of the glacial drift to the north of
Babine and Stuart lakes. It seems unlikely that.the
western slope and the foot-hills of the Rockies will be
found to be coal-bearing, as, at this latitude, the coal
measures appear to be almost exclusively on the eastern
slope of these mountains.
On passing down the Peace river through the main
range the foot-hills are reached, where rocks of the
coal-bearing formation are seen and continue to below
the Canyon, some 75 miles to the east, in which extensive region it is possible that, in the future, coal may
be developed at many points.
Up to the present time the whole district to the east
of the mountains has been under Government Reserve,
so that no coal or other land might be staked or recorded
there, which fact has prevented the district from being
prospected or settled. A few prospectors, either in ignorance or in disregard of the reserve, located and staked
coal lands in the vicinity of the Canyon, but as a record
of these claims was refused by the Provincial Government, the prospectors and those interested are extremely
reticent as to their finds, hoping to re-stake as soon as
the reserve is opened, and it is felt that it is but right
that the location of their discoveries be not made public.
The coal found appears to be a bituminous coal of
very fair quality, in beds of workable thickness.
Some, distance east of the Canyon and south of the
Peace river, on. Coal.creek, a tributary oj.the South Pine,
and on the headwaters of Muddy river and other streams
of that vicinity, coal has. been reported as found ; the,
latest mention of such being by Mr.^j. A. Macdonnell, in
the. report of. his explorations. of the district for the
Dominion..Government, in which, he mentions fining a
good bituminous: coal. &&> 136     Vancouver Board of Trade
The writer, who followed his trail through the
district for a considerable distance, found lignite, but
was unable to see any bituminous coal, which, it is expected, wOuld be found to be confined to the district
more closely bordering on the mountain range. It is
thought that, as soon as railway transportation through
the district becomes an established fact, a number of
workable deposits of coal will be developed, but under
the present conditions any such deposit would be without value.
Timber.
Of timber, such as is called timber on the Coast,
there is none in the district travelled through. Such
timber as there is, is spruce, balsam and jack pine, the
best of it ranging from 12 to 24 inches in diameter, and
not tall for that diameter, with numerous knots, etc.
Timber line in the Interior, at this latitude, may be
placed at, approximately, 4,000 feet above sea level,
although a few scrub trees and bushes range higher.
Timber which would be even locally merchantable for
lumber is scarce, the repeated forest fires having pretty
thoroughly cleared out the greater portion of it, leaving
a few isolated patches of the older trees, while the subsequent growth has not as yet reached a size to make it
of value for this purpose. Of these patches, probably
the best is to the south of Babine lake, towards its southeastern end, where there is a very fair body of spruce
. timber. There is a very limited area of fir on Stuart
lake, near the portage, and a few isolated patches of
spruce at intervals along the south shore of the lake.
There is an area of very fair spruce to the east of McLeod
lake, but along the Parsnip river there is no timber fit
for lumber, with the exception of isolated spruce trees
and large cottonwood, which may be utilised and now
serve for making the dugout canoes used in the district.
These latter trees grow very plentifully and sometimes
very large on the river bottoms of the streams of tho
northern watershed. Annual Report," 1906-1907 137
To the east of the mountains, on the upper benches,
there is little or no timber, as a rule, the whole country
having been burned over. There are, however, on the
trail to the Pouce Coupe, a couple of small areas which
escaped the general conflagration and are correspondingly the more valuable.
A few tamarack (Larix Americana) trees were seen
east of the mountains, but that such do not grow west
of the mountains here may be inferred by the fact that
the Indians from Stuart lake had never seen and did not
know the tree.
Agricultural   Lands.
In the district passed through there are, to the west
of the Rockies, no large blocks of land suitable for agriculture or even grazing, although there are a number of
strips of such land, some of them of considerable area.
On the south shore of Babine lake, near its outlet,
there is a small area of good land, but the remainder of
this south shore did not appear promising, good land
only being found around the mouths of the few creeks.
On the north shore of the lake there is a quantity of
very good land. There is a strip of this land extending
almost continuously from the outlet up to the lake for
some 40 miles, and extending from the shore at least a
mile back. The greater part of this area is open, free
from trees, clear, and supports a magnificent crop of wild
hay, which in July was being mowed by the Indians for
winter horse and cattle feed, the stock in summer finding good grazing on the higher land, further back from
the lake. This was one of the finest strips of land seen
on the trip. The soil is a clayey loam; the slope from
the lake is gradual, with a southern exposure, and Would
support grain of all sorts, as well as vegetables.
The district is at present remote from transportation, but the lake is eminently suited for navigation, 138 Vancouver Board of Trade
with a low valley opening from its south-eastern end
towards Fraser lake, through which a road could be
easily built, and it seems probable that connection will
thus be made with the main line of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway, soon after the road is built.
In this valley just mentioned there is good agricultural land extending up the valley for miles, but not
exceeding in width one or two miles.
To the south of both Babine and Stuart lakes the
hills rise from the water's edge, and except in a few
instances around the mouths of creeks, there is no land
suitable for agriculture. At the east end of Stuart lake
there is a considerable area of fine land to the south-east,
which was fully described in the Report of 1905.
The trail from Stuart lake to McLeod lake passes
along the height of land separating three drainage areas,
and the greater part of the land in this section consists
of gravel benches, barely supporting a scanty growth of
jack pine. There are, however, a few patches of land in
bottoms which is very fair, and a few good hay meadows,
but these are too isolated to be of any general importance. These conditions prevailllall the way down the
Pack and Parsnip rivers to the Peace river.
In passing down the Peace river, the mountains
occupy the land for some distance, followed by the foothills as far as the Canyon, and it does not seem to offer
any inducement to the agriculturist. Possibly, when the
country is more developed, a few valleys in the foothills,
of very limited area, may eventually prove of use.
From the Canyon east to.the boundary of the Province a considerable proportion of this great area, as far
as soil, etc., is concerned, is quite suitable for cultivation,
being rolling prairie bench lands some 800 to 1,000 feet
higher than.-the.. Reace river, and reqiaa&i&g. $&tle or,no
clearing, such tree growth as there is being small poplar Annual Report, 1906-1907 139
and willow. The stream courses are cut down into this
bench land to such an extent as to preclude all possibility of irrigation for the greater part of the district,
but from observation in a dry season and from information picked up, it would seem that the summer rainfall
and dews are quite sufficient for ordinary crops, while
streams and numerous small lakes provide all the water
needed for stock.
Of this large area of land, which will some day be
utilised for farming, the choicest parts seen were at
the Pouce Coupe prairie and around the ends of
Moberly lake, the former about 40 miles long by 25 miles
wide, a solid block of fine rolling prairie, clear of trees
and covered with grass suitable for hay, well watered
and with splendid soil, the analysis of which is given in
the detailed report. This is probably the largest solid
block of farming land in British Columbia.
Agricultural   Possibilities.
In the whole of the district passed through there are
no settlers or settlements, except the isolated posts of
the Hudson Bay Co., which are primarily fur-trading
posts. Cultivation of the soil being a question of inclination of the Factor, there have been few attempts at
cultivation from which to draw definite conclusions as
to the agricultural possibilities of the region. At Babine
Post the ordinary root crops and vegetables grow without difficulty, although occasionally summer frosts
trouble the potatoes. Hay and other wild grasses grow
so prolifically that it is. considered there -would be no
difficulty experienced with barley, rye, oats, wheat, etc:
The summers are reported tojbe warmer than at Stuart
lake, with a greater summer rainfall and heavj^r. snowfall, together with a win top season averaging two weeks
longer than at gjfeuart lake, and probably a lower winter
temperature. Jg^tuart lake all the garden y/ggetables
'and root crops havft^gn grown successfully, as^haye the 140
Vancouver Board of Trade
small fruits, such as raspberries, currants, strawberries,
etc., both at the Hudson Bay Co.'s post and at the R. C.
Mission, a mile further up the lake, at which latter point
barley, rye and oats were seen growing and almost ripe,
with fine full heads.
Owing to the difficulty of getting young trees into
the district, no attempt has been made to grow fruits,
such as apples, plums, etc., but it is not expected that
there will be any difficulty in growing these fruit trees.'
The climate compares very favorably with that of the
Province of Quebec, with which the writer is familiar,
where fruit is grown equal in flavor to any produced in
the Dominion.
At McLeod lake summer vegetables and root crops
have, for many years, been grown with success by the
Hudson Bay Factor, although the soil around the Post is
very poor and requires artificial irrigation. The crop of
wild hay here, where the soil was suitable, was good,
and the berry crop plentiful and of good quality.
There is no permanent habitation on the Peace
river between the Rocky mountains and Fort St. John,
but east of the mountains the vegetation was found to
be luxuriant, and seemed to indicate a favorable climate-
The wild berries were as good as anywhere in the Province, although not as plentiful. The size of the
"apples" on the wild rose bushes was particularly
noted, as being larger than seen anywhere else in
British Columbia.
At Fort St. John the Hudson Bay Co.'s Factor grows
vegetables, etc., but has never attempted anything
further. In 1906 the potato crop at the Post was very
poor, owing to the unusual dryness of the season.
South of Fort St. John, in the Pouce Coupe district,
no cultivation has been attempted, but the growth of
wild grasses and the general condi&ons seem to compare favorably with portions of Alberta seen later, and
which successfully supported a fine crop of grain. Annual Report, .1906-1907 141
Around Dunvegan, on the Peace river, in Alberta,
vegetables and grain of the usual sorts are grown on
the lower benches, but it is reported that attempts to
cultivate the higher bench lands, some 600 to 800 feet
higher than the river, have not been successful.
At Peace River Crossing, at the junction of the
Smoky with the Peace river, the usual garden vegetables were seen growing in the latter part of September, while melons were reported to have been grown
nearby, although these were not seen, but the writer
ate ripe tomatoes, grown outside by Mrs. Anderson,
whose husband, Sergeant Anderson, is in charge of the
R. N. W. Mounted Police barracks.
This point is more northerly than any part of the
Peace river in British Columbia, and the climate is
colder, yet at Vermilion, some 300 miles still further
to the north and down the Peace river, grain is reported
to be grown to an extent to justify the existence of the
three flour mills in operation there.
"At St. John (on the Peace river) a few minutes'
observation tended to show that this point was much
warmer than Hudson Hope, that the soil was richer and
that the vegetation was in a far more advanced state.
Raspberries and service berries were fully ripe and in
great abundance. Potatoes, oats, barley, and many
varieties of vegetables were in a very flourishing state
in ' Nigger Dan's' garden. The oats stood fully five feet
high, and the barley had made nearly equal growth.
"I started up the hill in rear of the Fort. We
found the level of the country above the river valley to
be about 700 feet.
"Clumps of willows and poplars, of various ages,
were interspersed with the most astonishing growth of
herbaceous plants I ever witnessed.      ItjrgiV Imt 142 Vancouver Board of Trade
" Willow herb (fireweed), cow parsnip, geum, triticum
(bunch grass), poa, and a numberof other tall-growing
species, covered the whole region with a thick mass of
vegetation that averaged from three to five feet.
"The soil must be exceedingly rich to support such
a growth year after year.
"My observations all tend to show that, omitting
the slopes on the left bank, the flora of this region is
almost identical with that of Ontario.
I It would be folly to attempt to depict the appearance of the country, as it was so much beyond what I
ever saw before that I dare hardly make use of truthful
words to portray it.
"The country passed over in your own (Selwyn's)
excursion, ten miles to the north-west, you report to
bear a vegetation similarly luxuriant, more so than
about Edmonton, or anywhere in the Saskatchewan
Country. Rainy river and the Lesser Slave lake
marshes are the only regions known to me that are in
any way comparable to it.
"The latter, however, is swamp, while this is a
plateau, nearly level, and in parts over 700 feet above
the river."
Dr. G. M. Dawson, in the Geological Survey report
of 1879, writes of this district as follows :—
Climate and Agriculture.
"With regard to the climate of the Peace river
country, we are without such accurate information as
might be obtained from a careful meteorological record,
embracing even a single year, and its character can, at
present, be ascertained merely from notes and observations of a general character, and the appearance of
the natural vegetation. Annual Report, 1906-1907 143
"It may be stated at once that the ascertained facts
leave no doubt on the subject of the sufficient length
and warmth of the season to ripen wheat, oats and
barley, with all the ordinary root crops and vegetables,
the only point which may admit of question being to
what extent the occurrence of early frosts may interfere
with growth. This remark is intended to apply to the
whole district previously defined, including both the
river valleys and the plateau.
Wintering Stock.
I Horses almost invariably winter out well, without
requiring to be fed. Hay should be provided for cattle,
to ensure perfect safety, for a period of three or four
months, though in some seasons it is necessary to feed
the animals for a few weeks only. The Indians of the
Cree settlement on Sturgeon lake, previously referred
to, winter their horses without any difficulty around the
borders of a neighboring lake, the shores of which are
partly open. From Hudson Hope the horses are sent
southward to Moberly lake to winter, and, according to
Mr. Selwyn, do well there. Lesser Slave lake, with its
wonderful natural meadows, has long been known as
an excellent place for wintering stock, and is referred
to as such by Sir J. Richardson."
•GX 144
Vancouver .Board of Trade
DEEP SEA FISHERIES.
As compared with 1905, the quantity of Halibut
landed at Vancouver during the past year shows an
increase of about 50 per cent., the figures being :—
January-December, 1905 6,162.000 lbs.
1906 9,050,000   "
this, however, being only about one fourth of the total
catch from the banks lying off the. Coast of the Province and within or beyond the 3 mile limit, the larger
proportion being taken by American Vessels from
Puget Sound Ports.
Some attention is being given to Herring in the
neighborhood of Nanaimo, and a Whaling Company is
successfully operating on the West Coast of Vancouver
Island, and erecting further stations.
It needs, however, only the most casual comparison
of the climatic conditions of our immense shore-line,
identical in every way with those of the North Sea on
the West Coast of Europe and the British Isles, and
to see the quantities of all the enemies of the food
fishes which abound, from Sea Lions, Ground Sharks
and Hair Seals to Dog-fish, to prove that beyond any
doubt an immense undeveloped source of wealth lies
awaiting the necessary enterprise and capital to turn it
to account.
Beyond the better classes of Salmon; Halibut, Cod,
Skil, Dog-Salmon, Herring, Smelts and Oolachan are in
great quantities. Anchovies and Sardines appear in
certain localities, while Crabs, Shrimps, Clams and other
shell fish are plentiful.
Vancouver Island affords protection from the open
Pacific for vessels passing to and from the Halibut
banks and harbors of refuge, on Canadian territory,
are readily available all the way to the Alaskan
boundary. INDEX,
Officers of the Board  2
Standing Committees, 1906-7  3
Membership Roll  4
President's Address  11
Secretary's Report  23
Extracts from Minutes  24
Lumber Industry—
Lumber and Shingle Manufacturers  28
Foreign Shipments from Hastings Saw Mill, 1906  30
Foreign Shipments from Ohemainus   "            "       32
Foreign Shipments from Fraser River Saw Mills, Ltd., 1906. 33
Strength of British Columbia Timber  34
Fishing- Industry—
Pack of B. C. Salmon (by Canneries), 1906—Fraser River.... 35
I               "       "                      "                "     Northern Points 36
Comparative Statement for 10 years, 1897-1906  37
Deep Sea Fishing—Halibut Fishing  144
Harbor and Shopping  38
Customs Returns—
Comparative Statement, Seagoing Vessels, 1896-1906  42
Exports and Imports, 1899-1907  44
Inland Revenue, Vancouver, 1901-1907  45
Banking Returns, 1904-1907  46
Post Office Returns, 1889-1906  47
Exports   to   the   United   States   from  Vancouver
District, 1906  48
Table of Distances from Vancouver, B. C  50
Ordinary Expenses of a Vessel in Vancouver :  51
Port Warden Dues  54
Customs of the Port of Vancouver :  55
The City of Vancouver—
General  59
City Property  62
Public Schools—General Statistics  64
"          1        —Detailed Expenditure  65
City Churches  66
Consular Agencies  57 The Province of British Columbia—
Physical Characteristics  67
Historical Record  69
Resources  71
Climate  72
Districts  74
Agriculture—
General Conditions  78
Fruit Growing Areas -.    87
C**^P*>
3 ng? 3olj
\
Grain and Roots ,      91
Shipments of Agricultural Products    94
Failures in the Dominion of Canada—
From "Dun & Co." '  95
From " Bradstreets "     96
Statistical Summary of the Dominion of Canada    97
Mining Industry (from the official report)—
Mineral Production of British Columbia    98
Developments during 1906  119
Interesting Journey of Provincial Mineralogist through
expected Route of Grand Trunk Pacific and other
Transcontinental Railways  127
Illustrations— ..'. •
Vancouver Terminus—Meeting of East and West... Frontispiece
In Stanley Park, Vancouver  facing   16
The Narrows,   Vancouver Harbor—"Princess Victoria"
leaving for Victoria, V. 1     32
Hamlet of Granville, 1885     58
Executive Offices Can.  Pac.  Rly. in 1887,  and Bank of
British Columbia , ,    64
On the Way to Vancouver-
Lake Louise, near Laggan...   ....   80
Mount Stephen,' near Field    96
Fraser Canyon- above Yale  112
Railway Traffic Bridge, Fraser River, N. West  128 I
I  Population
1886

Bank Clearings
1902
$50.000.000.00

THE
City of Vancouver

Vancouver board of trade

Six

Trains Daily
with choice
of Three
Routes

1906
55Q0Q.
BankClearings
1906

GOLD
COPPER
Big
Seeds
SALMON
HALIBUT.
Vancouver
A/VO
Yukon.

GRAZING
Grand
Trunk
Pacific FRUIT
CEREAJLS
LUMBER
SHINGLESSeattle
Tacoma
Portland
San
Francisco
Los
Angeles
Mexico
Panama
Chile
Peru

SALE CENT
SILVER
PROSPECTING
MINING and
HUNTING OUTFITS
of all descriptions.


AND FUTURE SEAT OF MANUFACTURES FOR WESTERN CANADA.

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