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Twenty-seventh annual report of the Vancouver Board of Trade. 1913-1914 Vancouver. Board of Trade 1914

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Array Twenty-Seventh Annual Report 
OF THE 
Vancouver 
Board of Trade 
1913-1914 
Vancouver, British Columbia 
Canada 
WHITE   &   BINDON   LIMITED.    COMMERCIAL   STATIONERS   AND   PRINTERS.   VANCOUVER.   B   C.    Twenty-Seventh Annual Report 
OF THE 
Vancouver 
Board of Trade 
1913-1914 
Vancouver, British Columbia 
Canada 
WHITE   &   BINDON   LIMITED.    COMMERCIAL   STATIONERS   AND   PRINTERS.   VANCOUVER.   B   C. VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
OFFICERS
FAST   PRESIDENTS
1887-88....D. OPPBNHEIMEK
1888-89....D. OPPENHEIMER (dec.)
1889-90....E. V. BODWELL (dec.)
1890-91 R. H. ALEXANDER
1891-92....JOHN HENDRY
1892-93.-.G. E. BERTEAUX (dec.)
1892-93...W. P. SALSBURY
1893-94....J.  C.  KEITH
1894-95....G. M. MAJOR
1895-96....H.  BELL-IRVING
1896-97....H. BELL-IRVING
1897-98....WM. GODFREY
1898-99....WM.  GODFREY
1899-00....C. E. TISDALL
1900-01....F. BUSCOMBE
1901-02....F. F. BURNS  (dec.)
1902-03....W. H. MALKIN
1903-04....H. T. LOCKYER
1904-05....H. Mcdowell
1905-06-A.  B.  ERSKINE
1.906-07....R. p. Mclennan
i907-08....'w. J. McMillan
1908-09....E. H. HEAPS
1909-10...H. A.  STONE
1910-11....EWING BUCHAN
1911-12...A. G. McCANDLESS
1912-13....A.  B.  ERSKINE
1913-14....HON. F. CARTER-
COTTON
OFFICERS  FOR  1914-15
PRESIDENT
JONATHAN ROGERS
VICE-PRESIDENT
ALFRED   SHAW
SECRETARY
WESLEY A.  BLAIR
OFFICERS  FOR   1914-15
WITH THEIR TELEPHONE  NUMBERS
JONATHAN ROGERS, President—Seymour 8793
ALFRED SHAW, Vice-President—Seymour 4538
W. A.  BLAIR,  Secretary—Bayview  550 R
COUNCIL
(12 Marked * Being the Board of Arbitration)
ARNOLD,  W.   R S.  6060      'GRAHAM,   G.   E	
*BANFIELD,   J.   J S.     153
*BLAIR,  G S. 2048
*COTTON, F. CARTER $M 133
♦COTTRELL,   G.   H S.  72jpf'
FLETCHER,  T. W .'.Si' 2032
GODFREY, W S. 5894
♦TISDALL,   C.   E
 S. 950
HEPBURN, W S. 2076
♦MALKIN,  W.   H S. 3790
♦MATHERS,  J. B S. 1260
♦McCANDLESS,  A.  G S. 360
♦RAMSAY,  J H. 543
♦STONE,  H.  A S. 5500
 S.     152
DATES OF  REGULAR MONTHLY  MEETINGS,   1914-15
COUNCIL
12:15 p.m. Thursday
April  9
May     7
June   4
July    9
August     6
September     3
October   8
November   5
December   3
January     7
February     4
March     4
FULL BOARD
8:00 p.m. Tuesday
April     14
May    12
June      9
July   14
August     11
September        8
October   13
November     10
December      8
January     12
February        9
March        9
W. A. BLAIR,  Secretary. ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
STANDING   COMMITTEES
1914-15
The first name on each to be Convenor
LEGAL AND   LEGISLATIVE
"W.  H.  MALKIN F. R. McD. RUSSELL      P.   DONNELLY
W. HART  McHARG      J. P. NICOLLS P.  G.  SHALLCROSS
J, A, HARVEY G. A. CAMPBELL L. W.  SHATFORD
HARBOUR AND NAVIGATION
J. RA
T. Mc
E. H.
g. a.
A. G.
W. H
W. G.
•W. D.
H. ALEXANDER
PYBUS
THOMPSON
JffSAY R.
E.  ROBERTSON H.
BEAZLEY N.
BUSHBY
RAILWAY AND  FREIGHT
McCANDLESS      G.  H. COTTRELL
. MAT.KTN J. FYFE SMITH
MACKENZIE       W. N.  O'NEIL
&JLTON
E. TISDALL
WALl|LCE
W.  GREER
W. PETERS
RATES
H.  PIM
F. R. STBprART
F.   P.   WILSON
C.   McRAE
H. A.  STONE
F. T. COPE
G. BLAIR
W.  H.  LECKIE
C. E.  TISDALL
H.   BELL-IRVING
W.  GODFREY
R.  H.  ALEXANDER
J. W. HACKETT
G.   BLAIR
C.   S.  MEEK
C.  F.  LAW
T. W. FLETCHER
G.   E.   GRAHAM
M.  P.   COTTON
J.   J.   BANFIELD
T. W.  GREER
W.   R.  ARNOLD
W. HEPBURN
E.  ODLUM
J.  B.  MATHERS
H. G. ROSS
W.  DALTON
G. E.  GRAHAM
W.  H.  KER
BOARD
W.   R.  ARNOLD
TRADE AND COMMERCE
F. G. CRICKMAY • K.  J.  MORRISON
J.  C.  THORN G.   E.   GRAHAM
J.   RAMSAY W.  GODFREY
J. N. HARVEY J. D.  McNEILL
C. MONKS
FISHERIES
A. L. HAGAR
H B. BRENTON
LUMBER
E.   G.   BAYNES
G.  E.  GRAHAM
E. H.-HEAPS
MINING
N.   THOMPSON
J. B.  MATHERS
MEMBERSHIP
W.   S.  CAMERON
W.   LONMGAN
W.  R.  DOCKRILL
P.  DONNELLY
INSURANCE
A.   B.   ERSKINE
D. VON CRAMER
J.  HAYDN YOUNG
CIVIC
w
s
CAMERON
A
T.
T.
LANGLOIS
C.
LAND   SETTLEMENT
O.
E.
TISDALL
F
o.
M.
WOODWORTH
E
H.
A.
STONE
GRAIN
T
J.
E.
HALL
■T.
c.
S.
MEEK
C.
w
DALTON
R. J. LECKIE
E. LIPSETT
D. VON CRAMER
M. M.HARRELL
T. F.  PATERSON
H. G. ROSS
C.  E.  TISDALL
A.  H.  WALLBRIDGE
T. McE. ROBERTSON
N.  C.   SAWERS
J.  N.  HARVEY
W. J. TWISS
P. G. SHALLCROSS
W. HEPBURN
G.  McCANDLESS
SANGSTER
CARTER-COTTON
ODLUM
W.  FLETCHER
H.   R.   GILLESPIE
P. COLES
OF TRADE BUILDING COMMITTEE
J.  P. D. MALKIN J.  P.  NICOLLS
W.   HEPBURN F.  J. PROCTOR
G.
G.
H.   COTTRELL
E.   GRAHAM
NEW  INDUSTRIES
F.   T.   COPE
K. J. MORRISON
E.  W.  LEESON
T. W.  B.  LONDON
JNO. HEAPS
BOARD  ROOM AND   SECRETARY'S OFFICE
MOLSONS BANK BLDG., HASTINGS ST. W., VANCOUVER, B. C
W. A. BLAIR,  Secretary      ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914   VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE        VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE         TWENTY-SEVENTH   ANNUAL   MEETING
OF THE
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
MARCH   lOTH, 1914
PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS
To the Members of the Vancouver Board of Trade:
Gentlemen,—While I am not fortunate enough to be able
to repeat the statement of my predecessor in the presidency
of this Board—that the year of my occupancy of the office
has been the most prosperous in the history of Canada—
I think I am fully justified in congratulating the Board, representing as it does the mercantile, manufacturing and shipping
interests of British Columbia, on the manner in which the
commercial community of Vancouver has passed through a
period of financial stringency and depression in some of the
most important Provincial interests. That the year, notwithstanding untoward circumstances, has been marked by no serious financial or commercial failures is a proof that business
generally had been conducted on a sound basis. Otherwise
the period of stress and strain would have been emphasized by
commercial wrecks and re-constructions, and re-organizations
in our commercial system would have been necessary before
we should be in a position to cope with the commercial opportunities which the development of our vast natural resources
and the growth of our foreign trade must present.
Although through the circumstances to which I have
alluded, the past year has not been as generally satisfactory
as was, its predecessor as regards profitable trade and industry, it is interesting to note that the year 1913 will be remembered as one of the most lucrative in the annals of Canadian
banking. While by their action in restricting credit, and by
asking higher rates in many cases for financial accommodation, the banks themselves have put a brake on commercial 28
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
expansion, the results to their shareholders in the matter of
dividends and additions to their reserves have not been unsatisfactory. At the same time it cannot be denied that the check
given to speculation—especially in real estate—and undue
inflation in many directions, has had a most salutary effect in
inducing caution and economy in commercial circles, the result
of which will be greater ability to meet the demands of trade
which' the growth of population and legitimate industrial
expansion will bring about. Banking has been well described
as "the handmaid of commerce," and the manner in which the,
Canadian banks have ministered to the needs of commerce in
the past, leads one to believe that they will be found in the
future equal to the responsibilities devolving upon them.
In laying before you the statistics of the city of Vancouver for the year 1913, you will not be surprised that, except
in one or two instances, they are not equal in the volume of
' business which they disclose, to the figures of 1912.
The Customs collections, which amounted to $8,920,527
in 1912, were only $8,235,273 in 1913—not a very great diminution, but still a decrease.
The amount of Building Permits for Vancouver proper
in 1913 was $10,484,447, and for Greater Vancouver $12,-
651,000, as compared with $19,438,432, and slightly over $25,-
000,000, respectively, in 1912. This diminution has, of course,
been reflected in the lesser demand for materials and for labor
that has affected adversely the trade and circumstances of
those connected with the building industry.
Bank Clearings for 1913 were $605,899,710, as compared
with $645,118,337 for 1912.
The revenue of the Vancouver Post Office for 1913 was
$515,000, as compared with $505,000 for 1912; a not unsatisfactory record under the conditions which have prevailed.
The establishment of a postal parcel service will doubtless considerably increase the revenue of the local office, while
at the same time proving a great convenience to traders and
others.
MINING
Referring briefly to some of our industries, it is interesting to note that the industry which first attracted attention
to British Columbia and drew population to our shores—that
Sfefl ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
29
of mining—is still the leading industry in the Province. The
value of the mineral production of British Columbia in 1913
was $30,158,793, a reduction of $2,250,000 from that of 1912.
This reduction was mainly in trie output of coal, $1,722,385,
caused by the interruption through strikes, of the operation
of the mines on Vancouver Island. During the year 1913 the
quotations for metals were higher than in the preceding year.
One feature of the mining industry in 1913 was the large
increase in the rate of dividends paid shareholders in some of
the largest mining companies—a circumstance that shows the
greater development which has taken place during recent years
in the mining industry, and which can scarcely fail to draw
capital to it.
During the past year a Chamber of Mines has been established on a basis which seems to promise permanency. Such
an institution can do much for the development of mining,
and I would urge on the members of the Board of Trade the
importance of aiding the work of the Chamber in every possible way.
FISHING
Our fishing industry is still in a flourishing and improving condition. The pack in 1913 amounted to 1,353,901 cases,
which is the largest pack of any year in the history of the
industry.
It was regretted in the speech of the President of the
Board of Trade last year, that the pack of the Fraser River
was fast declining, and that it produced, in 1905, 877,000 cases,
and in 1912 but 174,000 cases. I am pleased to inform you
that the Fraser River produced during 1913 slightly over one-
half of the whole pack of the Province, while during 1912 its
proportion of supply was but one-sixth of that of -the Province. This is a satisfactory rehabilitation of the industry on
the Fraser.
It is to be regretted that the fisheries treaty amicably
entered into by Canada and the United States, has not been
ratified by the latter country.
The Hon. J. D. Hazen, Minister of Marine and Fisheries,
informed our Board when we were honored by an address
from him during the year, that President Wilson's administration would likely denounce or adopt the treaty during the
present session of Congress. 30
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
Apart from that of salmon fishing, I wish to state that
the herring catch was much greater in 1-913 than in any previous year, having increased its value by more than $600,000.
A similar increase is shown in the value of the halibut
fishery. In round numbers the value of the halibut catch in
four years increased from $1,000,000 to $2,500,000.
The number of persons employed on sea and shore in
connection with the fisheries was 15,628.
LUMBER
The lumber industry of the Province is not in as satisfactory condition as during 1912. The total amount of lumber produced in 1913 was 1,105,000,000 feet, against 1,226,-
000,000 in 1912; 750,000,000 feet were sawed by the mills on
the coast, and 355,000,000 feet by the mountain section of the
Province. Of this product, 935,000,000 feet entered Canadian
domestic consumption, and 46,000,000 feet were exported to
foreign countries. This leaves a balance of 124,000,000 feet
still in stock, with a dull market to look forward to. The
removal of the duty on shingles and lumber by the United
States has already stimulated the lumber trade of Eastern
Canada, and will likely tend towards the opening of markets
for British Columbia.
The Act passed at the recent session of the Provincial
Legislature seems calculated to prove of great benefit to the
lumbering industry. It guarantees a certainty of tenure for
forty years to the holders of timber licences, and thus does
away with their complaint that under the previous conditions
it was impossible to obtain the financial assistance they required, in order to hold and operate the timber areas they had
under their licences. At the same time the Act settles for the
period mentioned the amount of royalty that the Government
may collect on the cut of timber, and this on a basis that
seems to be fair and reasonable to both the Government and
the licence-holders; but until the Act has been in operation
for sometime, it will be impossible to say whether it will
achieve all that is anticipated from it. Much will depend on
the way in which the lumbermen comply with the provisions
of the Act, but from the manner in which they have expressed
their satisfaction with it, it would seem that there is every
probability of their hearty co-operation with the Government
in carrying out its provisions.
I      K ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
31
MANUFACTURES
The manufacturing industry has not been dealt with by
any of my predecessors in their addresses, but I wish to state
that British Columbia is now taking her place with the older
Provinces as an important manufacturing territory.
The B. C. Manufacturers' Association recently organized
and now working in co-operation with our Board, has done a
great deal towards stimulating manufacturing interests, and
inculcating the spirit of patronizing home industries.
Your Board has been instrumental in placing several
industries in and adjacent to our city during the year, and has
answered many inquiries respecting prospective industrials
which wish to establish themselves in our city. The City
Council is wisely appointing an Industrial Commissioner, who
in conjunction with your Board and the Manufacturers' Association, cannot but be of great material benefit to Vancouver
in establishing industries where investments will make legitimate returns.
AGRICULTURE
I wish to state that the past year has been, in the main,
one of good crops for the Province. Fair prices have been
secured for all the products of the farm. In fact, a better
state of affairs prevails generally, owing to the cessation of
speculation in farming lands, which heretofore has hindered
rather than promoted agricultural developments.
The total importations of foodstuffs for 1913 amounted
to $20,070,757, while those for 1912 were $14,984,396, an
increase of $5,086,361. This, of course, does not demonstrate
that $5,000,000 worth less agricultural products were produced
during 1913 than in 1912, for our population has increased
materially in the same period, and the consumption thus was
proportionately greater.
The production of live stock, fruit and vegetables, poultry
and eggs, and meat, is rapidly increasing; but that of dairy
products, hay and grain, is decreasing. It is anticipated that
next session of Parliament will bring into effect legislation as
the result of the investigations of the Royal Commission on
Agriculture, which will materially better the condition of the 32
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
settler and the farmer, and mend the anomalous condition
respecting demand and supply in a Province which should be
a great producer of agricultural products.
I wish to draw to the attention of the Board that the
Weekly Trade Reports issued by the Minister of Trade and
Commerce are received in the Secretary's office weekly.
The address corresponding to the inquiries made in that
report can be obtained only at the Board of Trade office.
During the year there have been 367 applications for
addresses of firms making inquiries, and the Secretary has.
requested'me to point out the importance of these reports,
which can always be obtained upon application.
PORT OF VANCOUVER
From the statistics which have been compiled of the
shipping entering our harbour during the past year, it will
be seen that the commerce of the Port of Vancouver has
shown a healthy growth during 1913. An increase in the
tonnage ente^ig the port, which represents 10.7 per cent, in
coastwise, and 14.5 per cent, in foreign tonnage, cannot but
be regarded as satisfactory.
COASTWISE TRADE—INWARDS
In 1912 there were 8,237 vessels having a tonnage of 3,205,067-
In 1913 there were 8,788 vessels having a tonnage of 3,455,472.
COASTWISE TRADE—OUTWARDS
In 1912 there were 8,623 vessels having a tonnage of 3,449,620.
In 1913 there were 9,028 vessels having a tonnage of 3,925,000.
FOREIGN TRADE—INWARDS
In 1912 there were 2,420 sea-going vessels with tonnage of
2,031,943.
In 1913 there were 2,776 sea-going vessels with tonnage of
2,381,816.
V   ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
33
FOREIGN TRADE—OUTWARDS
In 1912 there were 2,305 vessels with tonnage of 2,025,715.-
In 1913 there were 2,680 vessels with tonnage of 2,263,240.
I think the members of this Board are agreed on the
important part which the maritime commerce of the port will
play in the growth of our city, and that they will not fail to
do all in their power to make Vancouver the leading port of
the Dominion.
The Dominion Government has already given practical
proof of its realization of Vancouver's position as a great port,
by its undertaking important works designed to afford greater
facilities for the loading and unloading of vessels. In the
session of Parliament last year an Act was passed creating a
Harbour Board for Vancouver. The Board has already
entered on its duties, and is actively engaged in looking after
its conduct and convenience. It has applied to the Government for an appropriation for contemplated improvements in
the harbour so that there may be the necessary accommodation for the large additions to the tonnage frequenting the
port, that may be expected with the opening of the Panama
Canal.
The commercial and economic effects of the opening of
that great waterway are still a matter of controversy by
experts, and it may seem to be hazardous for a layman to
express an opinion on the subject. Whether the operation of
the Canal will have much effect on railway freight rates, is a
question on which arguments may be adduced of a. directly
contrary character. The probabilities are that the Canal is
not destined to work any great revolution in traffic conditions
or rates. Like other new facilities, its functions as a creator
of new business will be more important than that of a disturber of the old. But in one particular I look for a distinct
and favorable change in present conditions as the result of
the opening of the Canal. That is in bringing more nearly to
a balance the inward and outward freight tonnage of the principal Pacific ports. At the present time the freight tonnage
inwards at the three ports of British Columbia—Vancouver,
Victoria, New Westminster—measured by weight, is more
than twice as great as the freight entered outwards for sea.
There is no money for either ship or train in a one-way load.
Our ports have been held back by their lack of outward cargoes.    Our fish, lumber and minerals have not bulked large
ii 34
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
enough to fill the vessels bringing manufactured goods to our
ports. The total inward freight of the three ports for 1913
was 979,329 tons, a comparatively small amount, and yet much
larger than the outward freight of 455,036 tons for the same
period. The Canal is likely to change this, and with inward
and outward freight tonnage more nearly balanced, an advantage to both the ship-owners and the ports will be secured.
IIP* Still more important, I think, will be the movement of
population from middle and south-eastern Europe to this
coast as the result of the more direct and much cheaper facilities of transportation that the Canal will afford, and I think
that the attention of both the Federal and the Provincial Government should be directed to the various problems which a
large influx of immigrants will force on their attention. If
ignored, the results may be injurious to our industrial population and-afford much anxiety to those who are responsible
for the maintenance of law and order, and the satisfactory
regulation of Provincial affairs.
(The above figures do not include the tonnage by measurement.)
WORK OF BOARD
Your Board has had another year of great prosperity,
and its members have evinced an added interest in the many
matters that have come before it for consideration.
Most of your Standing Committees have been convened,
and some of them many times during the year, while many
Special Committees dealt with matters of importance to the
Board.
The membership of the Board in March, 1913, was 501.
There have been added during the year 88 members to the
roll, which made the total membership 589; two members
have died during the year, 26 have left the city, 7 have
resigned, and 14 have been suspended for non-payment of
dues, which makes a total membership of 547.
It is impossible for me to treat with all the subjects dealt
with by the Board during the year.
The Mining Committee took up, through Mr. H. H'.
Stevens, our Member, and the Minister of Mines at Ottawa,
the matter of a charge of one-eighth of 1% imposed as a cost ANNUAL REPORT,' 1913-1914
35
for assaying and stamping gold bullion marketed at the local
Assay Office. They were instrumental in having such tax
removed, which made Vancouver Assay Office one of the
most profitable markets on the continent of America for gold
bullion, and the most profitable for that metal obtained in the,
Yukon territory. Through the work of this Committee there
has been marketed at the local Assay Office over half a million dollars more than during the year 1912, and as trade follows the gold, no doubt our merchants have been much benefitted thereby.
The Railway and Freight Rates Committee, through
co-operation with the Western Boards of Trade of Canada,
has been instrumental in maintaining the present advance
cartage charges made by the railroads, entering our city. This
in itself is estimated to have saved the shippers of Western
Canada over $800,000 a year, and maintained an accessibility
to freight sheds and other facilities for shipping, which, if
dispensed with, would have meant great confusion, delay, and
loss of time to the merchants and wholesalers.
Your Harbour and Navigation Committee reviewed the
provisions of the proposed Bill to be submitted to the Federal
Legislature during the present session, respecting the provision for installation of life-saving apparatus on passenger vessels, and have reason to believe that our recommendations
will be taken into reckoning by the Minister of Marine and
Fisheries.
Your Land Settlement Committee had many meetings
during the year, and made recommendations, not only to the
Government, but to the Royal Commission on Agriculture.
Many of our recommendations have been embodied in the
report recently brought down by the Royal Commission and
-presented to the Legislature at the last session. We regret
that this report was not presented in time to receive legislative enactment this year.
It would entail too much space to recount, even in condensed form, the work of the many Committees of the Board
during the year, and I will but briefly mention some of their
work.
Among the matters dealt with was that of the Ladner
Ferry on the Fraser River, connecting the city of Ladner with
Woodward's Landing, so that the produce of the fertile Delta
Valley was made accessible to our citizens. 
36
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE

The Board throughout the year bore the brunt of the
fight to secure the re-adjustment of Western Freight Rates.
The decision on this matter is expected from the Railway
Commission in the next few weeks.
The Board has endeavoured, through all the. channels
open for its use, to have the Indian Reserves adjacent to our
harbour, put under the control of the Harbour Commission.
It has been instrumental in having the C. P. R. put a
steamer on the run regularly between Vancouver and the West
Coast of Vancouver Island.
The matter of compulsory pilotage was discussed with
the Minister of Marine, and some amendments to the Pilotage
Act, as affecting -the Western Coast, were promised by the
Honorable Mr. J. D. Hazen.
Among the many important and urgent matters relative
to the port which the Board dealt with, was that of the establishment of terminal elevators to take care of the shipments
of grain that are sure to come West upon the opening of the
Panama Canal.
Your Board also took up the matter of a Commercial
Drydock, believing that facilities thus afforded are an absolute necessity if the port is to maintain its position among its
competitors upon the Pacific Coast.
The Board endorsed the idea of advancing the standard
time in the Province, for the purpose of saving summer daylight, from the first Sunday in April to the third Sunday in
October. This innovation on the markings of time was supported by every leading Board of Trade and City Council in
the Province.
Your Board also dealt with the planning of a Civic Centre for Vancouver, which is at present assuming definite form.
The Imperial Home Re-Union Association, which is governed by a Committee of your Board, held 18 meetings during
the year to receive applications for aid in bringing families
from Great Britain to Vancouver.
Your Committee has been the means of uniting the heads
of 63 families, accompanied by 190 children. ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
37
There was not such extensive aid given during the year
1913, owing to the fact that positions -were somewhat precarious, and caution had to be exercised in the outlay of money
for such purposes.
A general meeting of the guarantors to this fund will be
held sometime during the month, and a report made to the
. Board respecting the Association's work.
The following are a few other matters dealt with during
the year:—
The placing of the Gulf Island Ferry system on a more
satisfactory basis. Negotiations with large steamship owners
with respect to the establishing of direct lines to Vancouver.
Among these were a freight service of the Union Steamship
Company of New Zealand, now in operation; a New Orleans-
Vancouver line through the Panama Canal; a Montreal-
Vancouver line, and others, j
The appointment of a Canadian Customs Officer at New
York.
The nominations of Peruvian and Swiss Consuls.
Matters affecting Customs regulations at our port.
The matter of having B. C. Municipal Bonds on the list
of securities for the investment of trust funds.
Recommendations with respect to the Bank Act.
The strike in the collieries of Vancouver Island.
The disposition by the Government of the old Court
House site.
The Race Meets held at Minoru Park.
Trade relations with Australia.
The dispute between the Government and the B. C. Electric Railway Company respecting fares charged to Letter
Carriers.
The raising of fares on City Railways by the B. C. Electric Railway Company, a report on which will be made at the
next meeting of the Board, and many other matters of more
or less interest to our citizens. 38
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
Besides, the Secretary has answered thousands of communications, and sent literature, pamphlets, and information
to inquirers in many countries of the world.
Your Board has affiliated with it the Canadian Chamber
of Commerce in London, the Chamber of Mines, the Imperial
Home Re-Union Association, the City Planning and Beautifying Association, and work in direct co-ordination with the
City Council, Manufacturers' Association of B. C., Vancouver
Branch of B. C. Society of Architects, and the Society of
Civil Engineers, these bodies combined filling any and all the
business and commercial requirements of our city.
I wish to state that the Annual Report of your Board has
become the most reliable compilation of its kind in British
Columbia, and is sought after by bankers, investors and business men in Great Britain and elsewhere, when looking for
information respecting our city and Province.
In conclusion, I desire to express my thanks to the members of the Council and of the Board for the cordial support
they have at all times extended to me, and at the same time
to express my appreciation of the manner in which the Secretary and Staff have performed their duties during the past
year.
F. CARTER-COTTON,
President Vancouver Board of Trade.
Vc« ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
EXTRACTS   FROM   MINUTES
39
MEMORIAL PRESENTED TO THE HON. J. D. HAZEN,
MINISTER OF MARINE AND FISHERIES.
Vancouver Board of Trade,
Vancouver, B. C, 19th August, 1913.
The Honorable J. D. Hazen, M.P.,
Minister of Marine and Fisheries:
Sir,—
The Board of Trade of Vancouver wish to take this
opportunity of extending to you in your prolonged visit to
this coast, a hearty welcome, and of expressing its appreciation of the objects you have, as a Minister of the Crown, in
personally acquainting yourself with the industrial progress
and with the rapidly changing conditions of the West which
require attention, and which are related to the Department
over which you have control.
The Board recognizes the significance of your visit com-,
bined with that of the Honorable Robert Rogers, Minister of
Public Works, foreshadowing, we trust/the intent to keep
pace with the great increase of trade and shipping at this port
by the undertaking of such harbour improvements and works
as will give Burrard Inlet the same advantage of extending
its commerce as has been given to the harbours of Eastern
Canada. Burrard Inlet is one of the finest and safest natural
harbours in the world, and although the Government, until
quite recently, have not made any expenditure on its improvement, yet in a few years its shipping has grown to exceed that
of the port of Montreal.
SHIPPING
With three transcontinental railroads having, and several
seeking termini on its shores, being the natural Western outlet for grain and the terminal port for British Australian, and
Asiatic steamship lines, and being a direct and most important
link in the chain of Imperial communications, its development
and improvement are of interest to the entire Dominion.
To demonstrate to you how our port has grown during
the last five years, we submit the following figures:
Sea-going Vessels Inward with Cargo—
Increase in number of vessels, 300%.
Increase in registered tonnage, 412%. 40
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
Sea-going Vessels Outward with Cargo—
Increase in number of vessels, 193%.
Increase in registered tonnage, 231%.
Coasting Trade Inwards—
Increase in number of vessels, 275%.
.Increase in registered tonnage, 594%.
Coasting Trade Outwards—
'  Increase in number of vessels, 276%.
Increase in registered tonnage, 591%.
or a grand increase of vessels in the Foreign and Coasting
Trade of 286%, and an increase in the Registered Tonnage in
use of 468%, or an aggregate increase greater than any other
city on the continent.
ELEVATORS.
Among the more important and urgent matters relative
to the port which the Board wish to bring before you, is the
need of the establishment of terminal elevators to take care
of the shipments of grain that are sure to come this way upon
the opening of the Panama Canal. It is now less than a year
when this great water highway will be completed. At the last
session of the House, $4,000,000 was voted for the construction of terminal and other elevators, yet no move has been
made by the Government of Grain Commission on the Pacific
Coast to utilize that vote. It will require eighteen months to
build the elevators, and we trust the Government will see its
way clear to immediately undertake this enterprise, in view
of the fact that the cities on the Pacific Coast and the other
side of the border are leaving no stone unturned in preparation for the anticipated expansion of trade through the opening of the Panama Canal.
.HARBOUR
We appreciate the work of the Government through our
Member, in placing the harbour under the control of a Commission similar to that which has charge of the Port of
Montreal.
This Board has always endeavoured to maintain the
reputation of this port for its low shipping charges such as ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
41
have in the past encouraged commerce, and is most anxious
that the expense of contemplated works and improvements
should not affect our harbour by any material increase in the
cost of shipping.. In this connection, in a separate resolution
presented to you by a Committee of the City Council and
Board of Trade combined, we have ventured to hope that a
means will be found of providing a nucleus asset for the Harbour Commission of such Indian Reserves as are on the shores
of our harbour, by arranging that as acquired by the Government, they be developed by the Harbour Commission for the
improvement and benefit of the port, by providing dockage,
warehouse, terminal, and other facilities.
DRYDOCK
A commercial drydock is an absolute necessity if the port
is to maintain its position among its competitors on the Pacific
Coast. Our Board has recommended to the Government that
a subsidy be granted for the construction of a floating dry-
dock of 15,000 tons capacity. Delay in this enterprise will
retard the progress of our port, and as several companies have
made application to the Government for aid through the
"Drydock Subsidies Act," we trust the greatest expedition
may be obtained with respect to this enterprise.
PILOTAGE
We should also draw your attention to the fact that the
Shipping Act does not admit of the Vancouver Pilotage Board
granting a flat pilotage rate to regulate steamers engaged in
the coasting trade on the Pacific. This privilege has been
granted Boards on the Atlantic Coast, and although the Pilotage Board of Vancouver District has asked your Department,
through several of your predecessors in office, no> action has
been taken. We would strongly urge the importance of granting this privilege, as the correct carrying out of the Shipping
Act as it stands would not only entail unnecessary hardships,
but would be disastrous to the coastwise shipping entering
our port.
IMMIGRATION BUILDING
The Government, four months ago, acquired some property from the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, for the
purpose of constructing a new Chinese detention building.
We urge its speedy completion, as the contemplated and much 42
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
needed Burrard Street extension and improvements are
delayed until such time as the present.Immigration Sheds are
removed.
Finally, we trust your observations will incline you to
the speedy completion of arrangements with the Harbour
Commission so that body may get to work in providing the
urgently needed harbour improvements.
Signed on behalf of the Board,
F. CARTER-COTTON, President.
W. A. BLAIR, Secretary.
Mr. Hazen, in reply, stated that he appreciated the reference's in the Board of Trade memorial to his colleague and
himself, who are in the West procuring information effecting
their Departments. He stated that, dealing with the development of trade, he had always considered that no Government
would have done its duty unless developing seaboards, so as
to enable, the products to be handled with the same economy
as existed in the interior. The Government, it was certain,
would deal generously with the West. He stated that the
Public Works Department had the drydock matter under consideration,- that plans for the same were submitted to the Government and would be dealt with at once.
The matter of changing the Shipping Act to admit to the
Vancouver Board's right to allow a flat pilotage rate on coasting vessels, would be investigated and if the matter stood as
represented in the memorial, it would be remedied at once.
REPORT OF THE LAND SETTLEMENT COMMITTEE
of the Vancouver Board of Trade.
January 13th, 1914.
To the President and Members
of the Vancouver Board of Trade:
Your Committee is confident that the most important
problem confronting our legislators is the filling up of the
hinterland of our Province with thrifty farming communities,
and believe no expense should be spared in supplying a sound,
practicable and efficient policy tending towards this end. ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
43
As the attached report does not deal with financial assistance to settlers, which we believe is a matter equally as important, the Committee reaffirms its findings with respect to Land
Settlement as presented to the Provincial Executive in 1913.
We would direct your attention to Clause 10 of that presentment, which reads as follows: "That a policy of practical
assistance to settlers be inaugurated, such as establishing district settlements in various parts of the Province, selected with
the view of most easily building and maintaining regular communication with a market, and providing the means to such
settlements at minimum cost, of part clearing, draining, irrigating, or otherwise assisting the starting of farming operations, as circumstances may require, such outlays chargeable
against the land until repaid."
We would further urgently suggest that pending new
regulations resulting from the investigations made by the
Royal Commission on Agriculture, that Land Offices and
Boards of Trade be supplied with full information as to what
lands are available for pre-emption, as well as Field Notes
covering the same.
We also suggest that guides or agents be supplied by the
Government, so that applicants for pre-emptions may be properly directed and assisted to locate in selected districts.
The Provincial Commission on Agriculture, availing itself
of all possible avenues of information, has requested the Board
of Trade to give them the benefit of their knowledge and experience in connection with what they might consider to be the
most beneficial and practical way for the Government to give
financial assistance to farmers.
With that object in view, we have consulted the various
systems of financing the agriculturists in several of the countries of Europe, viz., Germany, France, Belgium, and Holland.
In these' countries they have a system of Rural Banks, the
capital of which is secured by small subscriptions of about
$20.00 each to the shares of the bank, which shares bear an
unlimited liability of each shareholder for the entire liabilities
of the bank. This liability is made pro rata over all members
of the bank in case of liquidation.
The capital of these banks consists of the amount received
from the sale of shares; the amount received from Government grant, free of interest; the amount received from savings accounts, and the amount the bank is able to borrow from
-it
I 44
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
other banks. The dividends paid on the shares are always the
same as those paid on savings accounts, so that no profits can
be made by shareholders. The loans from the banks are made
in most cases only for such things as will increase the productiveness of the land. The Government encourages the
organization of these banks by giving them long time loans
without interest, for the full amount of their organization
expenses, and a percentage for loans. But while this system
works satisfactorily in old established districts, it does not
meet the needs of a new country like ours, where the land is
timbered. It has, though, many excellent points which it is
thought can be applied to this Province with considerable
advantage.
We have also looked into the system of direct loans to
farmers as adopted by the Commonwealth of Australia and
Dominion of New Zealand, where it has proved itself to be
very beneficial, the Government in some districts loaning as
high as 100% (as is the case in Western Australia), where the
money is to be used in improvements on the land.
We think that the Government might safely adopt this
principle of direct loans to farmers for beginners in this Province, but should be very careful to know that the land to be
cleared would be good fertile land when the costly operation
of clearing has been completed, for we find that the best land
is generally the most easily cleared.
Other parts of Australia and New Zealand advance from
50% to 80% to farmers on mortgage, but with a condition
that not more than approximately $2,000 to $10,000 could be
loaned to any one person, with a proviso that all small loans
have precedence over larger loans so as to provide assistance
to those most in need. The rate of interest and the length of
time loans are granted vary with the different Provincial interests, running from 4% to 6% per annum, with terms .of repayments extending from 5 to 31 years.
As a result, your Committee, after looking carefully into
the success and difficulties of each of these systems, have
mapped out a plan which they consider might be embodied
advantageously in any additional legislation that may be proposed on the subject.
. It is not claimed for this plan that it covers all the difficulties of the settlers, but it is put forward as a possible solution or assistance tending towards the desirable end of put-
V ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
45
ting our agriculturists in.a position where they will be able
to secure a reasonable amount of money at a reasonable rate
of interest;
This proposal does not deal with the very important subject of giving assistance to the farmer who is without capital.'
What this plan does aid to accomplish is to make it possible for the farmers of the older districts, who have spent
many years endeavouring to clear and stock their lands,
handicapped for finances for that purpose, such handicap
resulting in a great loss of time and energy on their part and
a corresponding loss to the community.
Your Committee considers that the most rapid and satisfactory results will be obtained from these early settlers,
and that their need and assistance should be first considered.
It is estimated that we import $16,000,000 worth of farm
produce into our Province each year. Much of this could be
produced by our farmers. They hold a sufficient number of
fertile acres, which, if brought under proper cultivation, could
supply this enormous demand.
There are three principles on which this proposed plan
of financing the farmer is. founded:—
First—That the best way to help the individual is to put
him in a position by which he can help himself.
Second-
the land.
-That the fundamental basis of all securities is in
Third—That in unity there is strength and security.
In working out this plan, the first proposal is to unite
the individual farmers (which in this plan must be land holders) into a mutual organization, each farmer allowing the
borrowing credit of his land to be placed with the organization for the purpose of securing cheap capital. This is where
we consider the plan can be worked to greater advantage than
in Europe, where a great percentage of the farmers are lease
holders and not owners.
After this had been done, the organization would then
proceed to make a debenture issue on the security of the lands
of the individual members, the lands of each member being
carefully appraised by a committee from the organization who
are familiar with the values,. and then again re-valued by a
1 46
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
Government valuator, so as to establish beyond doubt such
appra'isal. To exemplify the proposed plan, suppose the
organization be composed of 100 farmers with an average
holding of 100 acres each, and with an average value of $100
per acre. This would give a total value of $1,000,000. A
' debenture issue at 60% of that value would represent $600,000.
Estimating that the lands are encumbered with mortgages to
50% of their value, it would require $500,000 to liquidate
these mortgages, leaving $100,000 as a loaning capital for the
organization, which amount would always be available to
make temporary loans to its members.
To enable the organization to sell its bonds to the best
advantage (say at 4j4%), the Government would be asked to
guarantee a bond issue of 60% on the land value for a long
term, say 31 years, so as to secure the highest price for the
debenture. By this means short date existing mortgages, with
a possible average of 8%, would be reduced to Al/2% or
5% per annum, thereby saving these 100 farmers 3^% interest on $500,000 per annum, which would amount to $15,000
per annum, or $465,000 in 31 years, without interest. The
$15,000 thus saved each year would remain as an additional
capital in that small community, thereby increasing the purchasing power of the members by that amount. The interest
on the capital of $100,000, which would be re-loaned by the
organization, would be paid by the organization itself.
In securing the interest from the farmers to, whom the
short loans would be made, at a rate of 1% over the amount
of interest payable on the Government guaranteed debentures,
provision would thus be made for ordinary running expenses.'
No dividends of any kind would be paid. The organization
would then make a second debenture issue of 20% of the
value of the lands held by the members of the organization;
this issue would be for a term of ten years, and would bear
interest at 1% more than the interest paid on the Government guaranteed debentures.
This debenture issue would be in denominations of $100
each, and when placed would be handed back to the farmers,
to be used by them in' securing temporary loans from the
organization, and would not be offered for sale. To enable
the organization to secure additional funds for these loans,
over and above the $100,000 provided by the sale of the Government guaranteed bonds, it is proposed that the organization be empowered to accept savings accounts, the same as is ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
47
adopted in Europe, paying thereon the same rate of interest
that they would pay on the Government guaranteed bonds, say
4}4% or 5%. It is proposed that the Savings Department
shall not receive on deposit any amount in excess of 30% of
the land value, so that they would at all times be perfectly
protected. |ppg
These savings would be loaned only to individual members of the organization depositing debentures to the full
amount of the loan, accompanied by notes payable at a certain date and bearing interest at the same rate as the debenture. It is also proposed that this debenture would not have
a stationary value, but would be appraised once a year by an
Appraising Committee of the organization, who would establish their values for loaning purposes, so that in accordance
with the success or energy of the individual member, he would
make his particular debentures below par, at par, or above
par, according to the improvement which he had made on his
properties.
These loans would be made only for certain specific purposes, such as clearing, ditching, fencing, etc., for buying
stock or implements, building of barns or other necessary
works, or any improvements that will increase the productive
resources of the lands. No moneys could be borrowed from
this fund to make speculative or other investments.
In the Government guaranteed debenture issue, if any
member of the organization has no encumbrance on his lands,
then the debentures are handed to him, 10% only being
retained by the organization; but should he require the money
for other purposes, he may hand back the debentures to the
organization and proceed as others whose lands are encumbered by mortgage; the only difference being that he gets
cash instead. Each member who has the mortgage on his
land liquidated or has received cash from the sale of the Government guaranteed debenture, shall give to the organization
a mortgage or other evidence of debt, for the same amount,
along with duplicate coupons representing the amounts of the
interest coupons attached to the Government guaranteed
debenture. The organization would collect from the individual the amounts of the debenture interest, plus one-eighth of
1% for expenses, and would be empowered to take proceedings against the individual if the interest is not promptly paid
the same as under an ordinary mortgage.
! 48
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
MR
It is also proposed that the first debentures shall be on
individual 'acres or blocks of acres as the individual may
require, so that in case of a subdivision or sale of part of the
lands, there shall be a .certain amount against each particular
acre. Then it is proposed that a guarantee of the organization should be given to the individual exempting each particular piece from the balance of the debenture debt. In case
of the second issue, it may be redeemed at any time.
To redeem the Government guaranteed debentures, there
shall be paid an amount of 1^% per annum as a sinking fund
for approximately 31 years, when the. debenture issue would
be redeemed, this amount to be deposited with the Government, bearing the same rate of interest as is paid on the Government guaranteed bonds. The farmer will thus lose nothing on redemption account. Neither does he lose anything on
borrowing account, for any amount paid on redemption
account on the Government guaranteed bonds may add to the
value of his borrowing bonds, so that the amount of cash
available at all times remains practically the same. The evolution which will take place will be the gradual paying off of
the foreign loan and the concentration of capital within the
•district.
It is also proposed that any member df the organization
desiring to pay off the Government guaranteed debenture may
do so at any time by paying the amount into the organization
and receiving discharge of his mortgage, the organization
paying the amount to the Government in the same manner as
is provided for the payment by the redemption fund, only
that it shall be done earlier and receive discharge from the
debenture encumbrance as is provided in the trust deed, the
organization redeeming at the same time its 10% on the members' lands by paying to the Government the money received
from the sale of the bonds. By that method the individual is
then free from all liability under the Government guaranteed
bonds, and if he wished to withdraw from the organization,
may do so by returning all the bonds of the second issue and
receiving a discharge of his lands from same, or he may discharge the Government guaranteed bond and continue on with
the second, or he may discharge the second and remain with
the first only.
In making the original trust deed for the bond issue, it
is proposed to set out each individual property with its valuation, with a proviso for discharge of that particular piece upon
^J   ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
payment to the Government of a sum equal to the amount of
the debenture issued against the particular piece, the Govern-.
ment advising the trustee of the receipt of such monies. At
the Government's request the trustees will make the discharge.
The Government will retain the money and pay the interest on
the redeemed debenture until its maturity. The trust deed
should also contain a proviso that money received on the sale
of the debenture issue would be distributed by the organiza-.
tion only upon receipt by them of a mortgage on the members' lands, free from all encumbrances. Any encumbrances
on the lands may be paid from the proceeds of the debenture.
Only farmers actually living on and engaged in the cultivation of land can be members of this organization.
It is suggested that the work of such an organization as
has been outlined might be done through our present "Farmers' Institute Act," or by an amendment to that Act. 50
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS (PROVINCIAL AND
IMPORTED)
For the  Years  1911,  1912 and  1913
Horses   No.
Cattle (beef) "
"    (dairy)   "
Sheep   "
Swine     "
Poultry    lb.
Live    Stock....
Butter  lbs.
Cheese   "
Milk    gals.
Dairy
Produce	
..lbs
Beef, Veal
etc	
Mutton, ■
Lamb ..;  "
Pork and Pork
Products., lbs.
Lard   "
Meats    ,
Apples lbs.
Other  fruits
Berries	
Vegetables  tons
Fruits and
Vegetables
Eggs  doz.
Honey  lbs.
Malt    lbs
Hay    tons
Grain—
Wheat,.   Oats,
Barley,    Rye
...... Bu.
Hops   lb.
Flax     "
Nursery   stock.
Miscellaneous—
Canned   Meats
Jams,   etc lb
Totals
HOME PRODUCTION
1913
Quantity
Value
36,109
88,362
38,222
28,104
34,038
6,747,392
1,355,650
Xone man
7,902,065
5,663,066
923,850
365,600
19,092,254
6,274,365
2,404,709
126,456
5,020,381
44,610
No   re
320,982
2,531,508
922,000
38
5,055,260
6,627,150
3,439,980
252,936
459,513
2,024,217
17,859,056
542,260
ufactured
2,051,144
2,593,404
867,157
152,435
63,980
1,083,572
' 572,767
228,080
230,722
2,782,032
3,813,601
1;757,133
8,-475
1,765,608
turns
5,777,676
1,524,109
276,600
48
318,825
5,669,498       103,446
8,000,704
35,115,945
1912
Quantity
8,900
12,350
5,000
10,594
13,450
5,404,000
1,500,000
No re
7,960,000
953,000
2,102,000
50,000
22,652,400
4.682.-144
1,656,000
173,100
3,437,750
50,274
No re
399,885
2,264
612,000
9
Jams only
6,500,000
Value
1,379,500
988,000
500,000
84,752
183,5^3
1,351,000
4,486,845
630,000
turns
2,388,000
3,018,000
76(240
320,555
9,000
405,795
526,800
120,052
175,260
2,049,694
2,'871,S06
1,203,212
12,562
1,215,
turns
74
7,197,930
2,264,400
214,200
18
270,000
325,000
10,271.548
22.269.768
1911
Quantity
8,959
13,442
4,171
13,458
14,398
505,136
2,463,655
10,985,000
2,220,000
1,475,060
1,602,744
49,462
10,291,200
1,084,380
3,843,442
162,966
850,373
100,495
Value
1,343,850
1,008,150
375,390
107,664
187,174
626.284
3,648,012
985,462"
3,295,000
4,280,462
399,536
111,860
223,707
7,914
743,017
385,920
62,328
429,933
4,206,060
5,084,241
255,112
35,173
290,285
223,59',
2,460.926
518,500
40
3,300,000
4,913,566
,160,327
207,400
80-
199,038
115,000
7,595,411
21,641,928
,*^ipS»«ifr4» ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
51
i
AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS (PROVINCIAL AND
IMPORTED)
For the  Years  1911,  1912  and   1913
IMPORTED FROM CANADIAN PROVINCES
1913
1912
1911
Quantity
60,000
2,000
105,500
43,600
1,260,500
7,562,000
1,985,000
1,704,500
13,325,000
See
7,537,500
1,785,200
4,500
No re
None
5,763,200
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Horses    No.
Cattle (beef)  "
"    (dairy)   "
$
4,680,000
150,000
692,000
856,000
283,480
6,025
11,500
Kpi'l 1,500
154,250
3,125
2,344,595
$
1,054,375
690,000
172,500
617,000
46,875
422,027
5,985
11,497
1,203
153,677
2,188
5,124,378
1,047,375
689,820
138,345
537,870
32,820
Poultry    lb.
1,024,875'
Live    Stock....
6,661,480
2,041,740
317,750
681,800
3,002,777
796,000
501,549
>  252,000
1,549,549
3,471,105
610,173
612, 548
Butter  lbs.
3,980,000
3,343,663
840,000
3,050,865
3,039,694
732,600
Milk    gals.
366,300
Dairy
3,041,290
1,406,500
sheep
1,084,235
1,589,021
217,422
Beef, Veal,
1,087,109
Mutton,
2,484,011
851,261
JPork and Pork
447,1,22
136,202
Lard   "
212,349
42,469
Meats   	
2,490,735
446,300
575
583,324
540
259,981
3,900
Apples  lbs.
25.S00
78,000
2,700
270
Vegetables tons
Fruits and
1,872,000
325,164
540
468,000
|  81,291
549,291
4,170
Eggs  doz.
Honey  lbs.
2,507,588
301,4S5
501,517
75,372
446,875
turns
imported
296,600
296,600
12.936.980
576,889
Malt               lbs
	
155,827
1,837,695
Hay    tons
Grain—
Wheat,.   Oats,
Barley,    Rye
 Bu.
Hops   lb.
Flax
74,760
2,160,000
1,345,680
2,160,000
2,804,886
2,021,464
No re
turns
115,589
100,000
Nursery   stock-
Miscellaneous—
Canned   Meats,
Jams,   etc lb.
132,245
458,960
	
3,721,269
4,958,595
Totals   	
$9,406,750
10.859.671 52
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS (PROVINCIAL AND
IMPORTED)
For the Years  1911, 1912 and 1913
Horses   No.
Cattle (beef)  "
"     (dairy)    "
Sheep   "
Swine        "
Poultry    lb
Live    StocK...
Butter  lbs
Cheese      "
Milk    gals
Dairy
Produce	
Beef, Veal,
etc lbs
Mutton,
Lamb   "
Pork and Pork
Products., lbs
Lard   •<
Meats   	
^PPles  lbs.
Other  fruits  j
Berries	
"Vegetables  tons
Fruits and
Vegetables..,
gggs  doz.
H°ney  lbs.
Malt    lbs.
Hay    tons
Grain—
Wheat,.   Oats,
Barley,    Rye
„ Bu.
-Hops   lb
Flax     "
Nursery    stock..
■Miscellaneous—
Canned   Meats,
Jams,   etc lb.
-Totals
IMPORTED FROM POINTS OUTSIDE CANADA
1913
Quantity
1,545
531
69,459
5,490
6,011,600
566,400
976,565
5,836,747
4,844,881
4,046,352
18,780,4S0
6,147,723
2,876,038
No re
4,876,513
144,871
1,778,747
20,250
203,876
67,227
4,311,511
Value
160,866
20,600
253,480
469
191,238
626,653
1,689,932
127,560
226,369
2,043,861
.454,001
497,576
675,698
1,627,275
300,644
227,278
197,643
725,565
1,170;6#9;
20,339
1,190,918
42,056
285,980
229,944
19,435
50,246
291,844
$919,505
$7,133,777
1912
Quantity
4)343,
304
74,360
6
982,000
3,090,000
375,19.4
1,250,000
4,854,869
4,400,275
1,569,359
11,438,430
7,594,150
1,172,987
3,744,000
190,725
704,899
29,120
250,810
56,794
4,836,307
Value
454,345
9,630
250,890
130
126,760
841,655
618,000
79,435
375,000
1,072,435
447,569
693,209
196,546
1,337,424
255,784
265,663
92,941
614,388
823,680
25,604
849,280
18,024
371,302
1911
Quantity
2,968
368
61,471
14
512,437
1,486,825
233,836
lb) 65,213
3,261,328
3,317,915
165,106
2,199,322
8,097,720
5,277,439
700,026
.Value
$
294,116
10,341
218,644
200
117,860
641,161
344,735
, 42,158
7,367
394,260
487,443
246,068
21,713
244,976
1,000,200
245,322
228,162
69,630
2,362,038
123,666
655,473
15,283
|
237,67
543,114
471,616
17,060
488,676
10,233
237,674
20,510;.
33,547|.
296,995|.
.978,0531.
5,845,275
19,506
505,359
772,772
$3,840,183
wSBBte... -mamm     ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
57
APPROXIMATE   FIGURES   OF   PRODUCTION,   SHIPMENTS
AND STOCKS OF LUMBER
WESTERN CANADA   LUMBER   MANUFACTURERS
(For the Year 1913 and Compared with 1912 and 1911.)
1911 1912        1913
Million  Million  Million
Ft. Ft.          Ft.
Lumber Cuts—
Coast Mfrs    739 902          776
Mountain Mfrs     450 360          385
Spruce Mfrs. Northern Alta., estimated-     25 20     I
\    170
Spruce Mirs. Northern Sask., estimated-    167 178    J
Pine Mfrs    180 150          140
Lumber Shipments (By Rail)—
Coast Mfrs    341 - 472 '        392
Mountain Mfrs    420 440          335
Spruce Mfrs. Northern Sask., estimated..     80 180      [
Spruce Mfrs. Northern Alta., estimated-     17 24     J
Pine Mfrs    120 200          200
Local Sales—
Coast Mfrs    326 394          250
Foreign Shipments (By Water)—
Coast Mfrs.      47 51            46
Imported from the United States—
Into the four Western Provinces    263 300           138 58
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
FISHING INDUSTRY
British Columbia Salmon Pack by Canneries
1913.
DISTRICTS AND
•CANNERIES
c/>
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Red and
White
Springs
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Fraser River District—
B. C. Packers' Association	
Cases
271,886
88,602
27,000
53,835
35,731
25,656
14,001
15^10
22,136
25,137
24,638
28,013
17,520
11,415
23,316
684,596
Cases
1,967
282
50
141
Cases
4,160
■254
2,000
9,867
Cases
2,558
1,263
3,700
100
75
1,150
Cases
280,571
A. B. C. Packing Co., Ltd	
90,401
J. H. Todd & Sons	
32,750
Canadian Canning Co., Ltd	
63,943
B. C. Canning Co., Ltd	
35,806
St. Mungo Canning Co., Ltd	
602
178
46
306
50
5,370
32,778
The Glen Rose Canning Co., Ltd...
14,179
Great West Packing Co., Ltd	
300
450
790
16,056
M. DesBrisay & Co	
22,892
Scottish Can. Canning Co.,  Ltd	
25,977
Jervis Inlet Canning Co., Ltd	
10,542
35,180
Kildala Packing Co., Ltd	
122
761
379
11,648
28,135
Gosse-Millard Canning Co., Ltd	
18,281
Steveston Canning Co	
11,794
English Fisheries, Ltd	
3,622
32,193
23,316
Total  	
732,059
Skeena River District—
B. C. Packers' Association	
14.254
10.799
13,317
8,733
8,510
3,792
5,504
2,471
8,636
9,482
5,600
66,045
12,114
685
670
514
397
397
1,200
970
1,700
.18,647
50,484
A. B. C. Packing Co.. Ltd	
7.197    6.181
22,796
J. H. Todd & Sons	
4,615
6,309
4,023
2,968
4,268
7,293
2,000
52,927
1,600
1S,395
Kildala Packing Co., Ltd	
10,615
B. C. Canning Co., Ltd	
866
553
284
6,153
10,790
Skeena River Com. Co.,' Ltd	
6,389
Cassiar Packing Co., Ltd	
14,388
Wallace Fisheries, Ltd	
23,898
Can. Fish & Cold Storage Co., Ltd.
9,300
Total 	
26,436
164,055
Rivers Inlet District—
B. C. Packers' Association	
23,487
7,059
7,700
7,263
9,151
7,085
61,745
325
106
75
23,887
A. B. C. Packing Co., Ltd	
.1,000
1,000
8,165
J. H. Todd & Sons	
3,380
205
12,080
B. C. Canning Co., Ltd	
7,468
Kildala Packing Co., Ltd	
66
97
594
97
2,097
9,217
Wallace Fisheries, Ltd	
7,279
Total  	
3,660
68,096 ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
59
DISTRICTS AND
CANNERIES
CO
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to
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White
Springs
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Grand
Total
Naas River District—
B. C. Packers' Association	
5,846
11,014
6,714
23,574
932
1,803
416
3,151
3,957
6,115
13,454
23,526
968
431
1,773
3,172
11,703
A. B. C. Packing Co., Ltd	
19 363
Kincollette Packing Co., Ltd	
22 357
Total  	
53,423
Outlying Districts—
B. C. Packers' Association	
21,863
520
4,020
16,865
3,330
2,940
35,200
38,407
1,546
10,800
1,310
83
2,302
10,150
149,336
1,321
3,746
22,915
6,233
2,022
1,327
7,335
10,800
31,474
9,148
7,663
13,022
1,701
13,105
16,500
146,991
5,892
4,962
151
693
269
3,256
4,370
3,680
1,099
32,822
A. B. C. Packing Co., Ltd	
28',397
Kildala Packing Co., Ltd	
465
18
10,869
B. C. Canning Co., Ltd. (Victoria)
Clayoquot Sound Canning Co., Ltd
19,598
4,926
Quathiaski Packing Co., Ltd	
20
13,551
-j. H. Todd & Sons (Esquimalt)
Wallace Fisheries, Ltd	
50,370
4,770
271
78,331
John Wallace 	
12,064
Jervis Inlet Canning Co., Ltd	
18,463
E. Bella Bella Pkg. Co., Ltd	
2,771
17,103
B. C. Fisheries, Ltd	
1,784
M. DesBrisay & Co	
81
300
\  7,246
352
5,200
32,695
15,840
Draney Fisheries, Ltd..	
32,150
Total	
336,268
PACKED  BY  DISTRICTS  PREVIOUS  YEARS
Fraser River
Skeena River
Naas ■ River ..
Rivers  Inlet
Outlying-    f
Totals  —
Fraser River
Skeena River
Naas River ..
Rivers  Inlet
Outlying    	
Totals   —
1913
1912
1911
1910
732,059
173,921
301,344
223,148
164,055
254,258
254,410
222,035
68,096
137,697
65,684
39,720
53,423
71,162
101,066
129,398
336,268
359,538
226,461
147,900
1,353,901
996,576
948,965
762,201
1908
1907
1906
1905
89,184
163,116
240,486
877,136
209,177
159,255
162,420
114,085
46,908
i 31,832
32,534
32,725
75,090
94,064
122,878      83,122
122,330
99,192
71,142      60,392
542,689|
547,459|
629,460|
1,167,460
1909
567,203
140,739
40,990
91,014
.127,974
967,920
1904.
128,903
154,869
19,085
94,295
68,745
465,897 RECAPITULATION
Of the Quantities and Values of all Fish caught and landed in a Green State, and
of the Quantities and Values of all Fish and Fish Products Marketed in a
fresh, dried, pickled, canned, etc., state, for the Whole Province of British
Columbia, during|fthe Year 1912-13.
Kinds of Fish
Salmon  cwts
|     used fresh 	
"     canned cases
"     salted  cwts
"     mild cured 	
"     smoked 	
Cod	
"   used fresh 	
"   shipped green-salted 	
"   dried   :	
Oysters  brls
Herring  .'. cwts
"     used fresh    •"
"     smoked     "
I     dry salted    "
"'     pickled   brls.
"     used as bait    "
Octopus   cwts
Whiting      "
Perch    "
Halibut    " .
Flounders    "
Smelts     "
Trout    "
Oulachans   '....    "
Sturgeon    "
Soles      "
Skate     "
Shrimp       "
Mixed fish     "
Clams and Quahaugs brls.
. I "   used fresh   "
"   canned ....cases
Crabs, Cockles and other shell
fish cwts
Salmon roe  :..   "
Whale fertilizer    "
Fur seal skins  No.
Hair seal skins    "
Guano  ,. tons
Fish oil  gals.
Whale oil    "
Whales  No.
Whale bone meal cwts
Total values 	
Caught and landed
in a Green State
Quantity     "Value
1,221,057
28,580
150,275
2,781
729,567
11,282
823,167
245
500
1,306
253,283
2,155
3,277
2,761
14,795
5,051
3,520
898
27
10,798
■   11,577
20,252
1,107
3,647,920
1,715
1,750
. 7,836
953,159
9,825
20,624
27,615
73,175
35,357
17,600
2,694
270
53,990
23,154
81,008
332,100
6,857,213
Marketed
Quantity     Value
84,441
1,050,357
134,000
51,042
5,019
26,948
211
376
2,781
42,708
8,856
299,395
18,765
51,894
245
500
1,306
253,283
2,155
3,277
2,761
14,795
5,051
3,520
898
27
10,798
3,622
7,955
20,252
2,000
1,484
205
2,275
150
85,826
1,369,096
656
$
930,160
6,996,908
1,309,555
258,030
55,715
200,330
2,637
5,640
338,295
122,995
449,093
53,650
53,384
.15,380
31,820
14,455,488;
>*J ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
RECAPITULATION
61
Of the Number of Fishermen, etc., and of the Number and Value of
Fishing Vessels, Boats, Nets, etc., in the whole Province of
British Columbia, during the year 1912-13.
Number
Value
Vessels (tonnage 2,954) s	
38
2,468
1,334
143
4,740
235
7
57
550
1,580
1
4
60
2
15
46
85
528
$
1,359,500
189,345
705 900
Boats  (sail)	
Boats   (gasoline)   	
Tugs,   Smacks,   etc	
432 200
Gill Nets 	
571,619
145 502
Seines  	
Salmon Traps 	
71,000
2 850
Smelt Nets 	
Trawls   	
27,500
2,773
Hand Lines 	
Oil Factories 	
35,000
500,000
Whaling Stations 	
Salmon Canneries             	
-  2,517,000
8,000
Clam Canneries 	
Freezers  and Ice Houses	
1,377,000
325,600
Smoke and Fish Houses	
Piers and Wharves	
1,659,700
Skates of Gear ("400 fathoms e.rmal 1 skate')	
10,560
Totals   !    - 	
9,941,049
Number of men employed on Vessels and Tugs.
Number of men employed on Boats	
Number of persons  employed in  Fish Houses,
Freezers,
778
7,969
3an-
   6,881
Totals         mMRg&$[  ft
  15.628
Halibut Landed at the Port of Vancouver for Year Ending
31st March, 1914
From U. S. A. vessels, March 31st, 1913 |  8,100,000 lbs.
From U. S. A. vessels, March 31st, 1914 :  5,260,000 lbs.
From Canadian vessels, March 31st, 1913  5,400,000 lbs.
From Canadian vessels, March 31st, 1914  5,280,000 lbs. 33&to
62
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
SHIPPING
The following are the regular lines in operation:
The Canadian Pacific Royal Mail Steamship Line to China
and Japan, comprising the "Empress of Russia," "Empress of Asia," "Empress of India," "Empress of Japan"
and "Monteagle," the two first named making the trip to
Japan in ten days and to China in fifteen.
The Atlantic "Empress" .Liners, "Empress of Britain" and
"Empress of Ireland," in conjunction with the "Imperial
Limited" running between Vancouver and Montreal, complete the Empress route from Liverpool to Yokohama
and Hong Kong. The Steamer "Lake Champlain" carries second class and steerage passengers from Liverpool
to Montreal.
The Canadian-Australasian Royal Mail Steamship Line, (oper-
atedby the Union S.S. Co., of New Zealand, Ltd.), comprising the new steamer "Niagara," the "Makura," and
"Marama," gives a monthly service to Honolulu (Hawaiian Islands), Auckland, N. Z., Suva (Fiji), and Sydney
(Australia), with connections to all other New Zealand,
Australian and Tasmanian ports.
This company also operates cargo steamers twice monthly,
from Vancouver and other Pacific Coast ports, to New
Zealand and Australian ports.
The Canadian Pacific Steamship Company, British Columbia
Service:
The following are the regular lines at present in operation :—
Vancouver—Victoria: Double daily mail service in connection
with the transcontinental railway, comprising "Princess
Charlotte," "Princess Adelaide," "Princess Alice."
In   connection   with   the   Imperial   Limited,   Trans-Canada
Limited  and  Toronto   Express,   the  three-funnel   twin-'
screw steamers. "Princess Charlotte" and "Princess Victoria" make a daily service to and from Vancouver^ Victoria and Seattle. |p|l|
The S.S. "Princess Patricia" operates a summer months double
daily service between Vancouver and Nanaimo.
j ^^SQaBxJS^fiffl
|B9S ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
63
S.S. "Charmer" plys between Vancouver, Nanaimo, Union
Bay, and Combx, making three trips weekly.
S.S. "Princess May" and S.S. "Princess Sophia" sail every
five days to Prince Rupert.
S.S. "Princess Alice" sails every week to Skagway, calling
at Alert Bay, Prince Rupert, Port Simpson, Wrangell
and Juneau.
The steamers "Princess Ena," "Amur," "Queen City" and
"Tees," make regular sailing between Vancouver and
all coast points on the mainland and on Vancouver Island, also making connections at Skidegate and other
points on Queen Charlotte Islands.
S.S. "Tees" plies between Victoria and the west coast of
Vancouver Island.
S.S. "Beatrice" operates a weekly schedule between Vancouver, Prince Rupert, and Granby Bay, calling at Skeena
River and Naas River canneries.
S.S. "Maquinna" makes a weekly service between Victoria and
west coast of Vancouver Island, going to end of Island
every alternate trip.
S.S. "Joan" makes six trips weekly between Vancouver, Victoria and Gulf Island ports.
Tugs "Nanoose," "Czar," "Qualicum" and "Wm. Joliffe,"
conveying railway freight cars and coal wagons in bulk
between Vancouver and Ladysmith (Vancouver Island)
for Victoria and Nanaimo.
The Ocean Steam Ship Co. Ltd. and China Mutual Steam
Navigation Co. Ltd., Local Agents, Dodwell & Co., Ltd.,
operate the Blue Funnel Line direct from London, Glasgow and Liverpool to Vancouver via the Suez Canal each
28 days with the following vessels: "Bellerophon," "Cyclops," "Antilochus," "Ixion," "Titan," "Prostesilaus,"
"Teucer," "Talthybius."
Harrison Direct Line, Local Agents, Balfour, Guthrie & Co.,
Antwerp, London, Glasgow and Liverpool for Vancouver.
S.S. "Statesman," "Historian," "Crown of Galicia," "Comedian," "Candidate," "Crown of Castile," "Huntsman," 64
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
"Architect," "Crown of Arragon," "Musician," "Engineer," "Crown of Toledo."
Pacific Coast Steamship Company.—Steamers "Governor,"
"President," "City of Puebla," and "Umatilla" sail every
fifth day to and from San Francisco.
G. T. P.—The three-funnel twin-screw steamers "Prince
Rupert" and "Prince George," make weekly sailings to
Seattle, Victoria, Vancouver, Prince Rupert, Gfanby Bay
and Stewart.
S.S. "Prince John" and "Prince Albert" ply from Victoria,
Vancouver and Prince Rupert, from there to Queen Charlotte Islands.
S.S. "Henriette" carries freight to coast points.
Union S.S. Company of B. C, Ltd., of Vancouver, affords a
■ regular service to Prince Rupert, Granby Bay, Port Simpson, Port Essington, Lund, Van Anda (Texada Island),
Nanaimo, Comox and Campbell River, Powell River, also
the chief coasting points, logging camps and canneries,
their fleet being "Chelohsin," "Cheakamus," "Camosin,"
"Cassiar," "Capilano," "Cowichan," "Comox," "Coquit-
lam," "Venture" and "Melmore."
Terminal Steamship Co., Ltd.—Steamers "Baramba," "Britannia," and "Bowena" ply daily to and from Bowen Island, Britannia Beach, Howe Sound, and Squamish.
Vancouver Steamship Co., Ltd.—Steamer "Tartar" sails daily
for Gibson's Landing and way points.
The Northern Steamship Co..of B. C—Steamers "Cetriana"
and "British Empire" ply between Vancouver and Prince
Rupert and Stewart, "British Empire" taking freight
only.
Mosquito Fleet.—The local fleet of tugs and barges required
to tow logs and for carrying supplies to and from the lumber mills and logging camps, and the fleet of fishing boats
and steamers employed in the salmon and deep sea fisheries, aggregate several thousand tons, and are constantly
being increased.   ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
65
Halibut Fleets.—The steamers "New England," "Kingfisher,"
"Manhattan," "Flamingo," and "Celestial Empire," ply
all the year round between Vancouver and the fishing
grounds in Hecate Straits, Dixon's Entrance, etc.
Hamburg American Line.—Local Agents, C. Gardiner Johnson & Co.—Monthly service from Hamburg, Antwerp,,
via the Orient to Vancouver. Average amount of cargr>
inward and outward, 1,000 tons.
East Asiatic Line.—Local Agents, C. Gardiner Johnson & Co..
—Hamburg, Rotterdam, Antwerp, via Magellan Straits
to Vancouver, giving a bi-monthly service. S.S. "Arabian," "Bangor," "Kina," Motor S.S. "Siam," S.S. "Lord
Lonsdale," S.S. "Transvaal."
Royal Mail Steam Packet Company.—Local Agents, Frank
Waterhouse & Co.—Operating a monthly service with the
following: "S.S. "Cardiganshire," "Radnorshire," "Den.
of Ruthven," "Glenlochy," "Carnarvonshire," "Merionethshire," "Glenroy."   
68
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
PORT OF VANCOUVER, B. C.
Fiscal Year Ending March 31st, 1913
Seagoing Vessels—Inwards with Cargoes
No.
Tons Reg.
Freight
Tons Vfgt.
Tons Mst.
Crews
British 	
224
593
864
475,461
792,948
475,527
226,083
27,299
501.264
106,700
3,825
46,770
18,504
Canadian	
37,002
Foreign 	
14,158
Total -n	
1,681   |    1,743,936
754,646   |   157,295
69,664
Seagoing Vessels—Inwards in Ballast
British .
257
236
285
174,456"
68,719
53,427
20,782
3,679
Foreign
2,713
Total
778
296,602
27,174
Seagoing Vessels—Outwards with Cargoes
British 	
363
169
440,252
189.665
91,275
40.189
96,987
9,677
72,114
32,275
Canadian 	
8,955
Foreign  ...
260   1      330,706   |       41,640
8,403
Total 	
792   |      960,623         173.104   |   178,778
49,633
Seagoing Vessels—Outwards in Ballast
British 	
112
563
838
157,976
56,797
291,407
8,417
Canadian 	
2,934
Foreign 	
9,707
Total 	
1,513
506,243
21,058
Coasting Trade—Inwards
Steamers	
7,591
576
2,908,955
522,408
170,868
Barques ch	
3,315
Total	
8,167
3,431,363
174,183
Coasting Trade—Outwards
Steamers 	
7,940
588
3,028,377
539,972
208,596
Barques 	
3,403
Total 	
8,528
3,568,349
 | 211,999
Grand  Total
21,459      10,507,116         927,750
336,073
553,711 ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
69
PORT OF VANCOUVER, B. C.
Fiscal Year Ending March 31st, 1914
Seagoing Vessels—Inwards with Cargoes
No.
Tons Reg.
Freight
Tons Wgt.
Tons Mst.
Crews
British 	
263
640
619
645,816
824,706
465,248
396,725
114,421
429,891
125,600
14
21,837
24,811
Canadian	
36,683
Foreign 	
15,425
Total 	
1,522
1,934,770
941,037
147,451
76,919
Seagoing Vessels—Inwards in Ballast
British 	
243
289
200
219,534
99,541
98,704
18,415
Canadian	
5,431
Foreign 	
2,684
Total 	
732   |      317,779
 11	
- 26,530
Seagoing Vessels—Outwards with Cargoes
British 	
411
177
353
621,695
257,643
290,582
122,672
29,329
66,799
150,155
90,82
255,027
37,470
Canadian 	
12,012
Foreign 	
10,890
Total 	
941
1,169,920
218,800
414,264
60,372
S
eagoing- Vessels—Outwards in Ballast
British
92
636
460
158,800
633,437
271,110
4,903
38,228
Foreign 	
6,956
Total 	
1,188   |    1,063,347
 |   50,087
Coasting Trade—Inwards
7,620
611
3,190,828
564,523
168,517
Barques ch	
3,600
Total
8,231
3,755,351
!  mm
172,117
Coasting Trade—Outwards
7,836
613
3,243,784.
564,836
1
206,337
Barques 	
3,596
Total 	
8,449        3,808,620
209,933
Grand  Total
21,063
12,049,787
1,159,837
561,715
595,958  ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
DECLARED EXPORTS TO THE UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA DURING 1911, 1912 AND 1913
71
1911 1912 1913
Animals    $ 1,620 $    13,754 $    50,549
Animal  Products    33,721 20,824 44,051
Automobiles     36,397 47,870 24,448
Building Material   31,927 31,006 52,003
Bullion   679,964 955,434 1,419,661
Cascara Bark   1,850 5,981   	
Coal  :  14,083 3,789 1,385
Fish—Halibut     .147,028 .69,421 1,403,272
Salmon  j  67,656 31,731 81,644
Miscellaneous   6,304 6,181 13,205
Furs, Raw  r...  40,244 106,176 j 101,171
Hardware and Machinery  21,390 13,717 18,853
Hides    J  353,694 515,842 598,941
Household Goods   98,266 115,297 -  221,144
Junk     21,414 87,225 28,124
Liquors   13,800 10,462 9,743
Miscellaneous     15,557 14,952 67,443
Ore (Gold, Silver and Copper)  567,016 1,858,420 2,099,591
Provisions   158,536 103,011 188,141
Tin, Pig  ;  47,586 59,564 29,127
Wood, Manufactured and Unmanufactured—
Logs    415,295 515,504 439,058
Lumber  59,059 29,002 92,124
Piles     17,269 22,066 25,958
Poles   21,862 19,197 48,193
Shingles  ,  415,869 392,593 572,229
Shingle Bolts  \  16,102 5,508 31,158
Wood Pulp   32,534 59,337 114,065
Total  $3,342,043 $5,113,864 $7,775,281
Returned American Goods—
Merchandise, including Fish from
Alaska    $ 764,756 $1,224,923 $1,453,321
Fish caught by American vessels.... 399,467 266,547 238,695
Grand Total  $4,506,266 $6,605,234 $9,467,297  ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
73
BANKS OF VANCOUVER
The sixteen Chartered Banks established in Vancouver have in
addition 47 branches, making a total of 63.   These are:
Bank Capital Reserve
Bank of Montreal $16,000,000 $16,000,000
Canadian Bank of Commerce  15,000,000 12,500,000
Royal  Bank of  Canada   (including Traders'
Bank    11,560,000 12,560,000
Bank of Nova Scotia    5,859,100 10,692,740
Imperial Bank of Canada    6,755,265 6,755,265
Bank of Toronto 1    5,000,000 6,000,000
Dominion Bank     5,166,155 6,166,155
Merchants Bank of Canada    6,754,960 6,410,760
Molsons Bank    4,000,000 4,800,000
Bank of Ottawa i   3,888,730 4,388,730
Bank of Hamilton    3,000,000 3,500,000
Union Bank of Canada    5,000,000 3,300,000
Bank of British North America    4,866,666 2,774,000
Quebec Bank     2,500,000 1,250,000
Northern Crown Bank    2,723,490 300,000
Eank of Vancouver |       850,870 40,000 74
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
BANKING  RETURNS
VANCOUVER CLEARING HOUSE
Comparative Statement of Clearings for Years ending
1911, 1912, 1913, 1914.
April	
May 	
June 	
July  	
August ...
September
October
November
December
January .
February
March 	
Totals  .
1910-11
$ 36,731,598
36,460,680
37,092,464
llP0,303
36,533,143
40,428,M
40,115,870
43,041«
42,674,185
38,953,289
ll|29,964
44,084,854
$470,276,101
1911-12
41,337,756
46,522,543
45,558,690
43,239,102
47,232,335
47,008,169
49,210,372
54,031,618
49,775,662
48,371,226
45,351,107
49,902,878
$567,541,458
1912-13
52,324,013
55,979,196
53,781,824
53,840,212
55,929,324
53,896,987
59,492,120
60,815,185
55,434,815
52,431,327
50,641,407
47,535,145
$652,101,555
1913-14
54,383,263
54,445,095
49,389,201
51,411,870
47,435,329
51,812,940
51,891,335
47,711,848
47,810,950
41,353,351
34,054,576
41,714,259
$573,414,017
COMPARISON OF BANK CLEARINGS IN FOURTEEN CITIES,
1910, 1911, 1912 AND 1913, JANUARY TO DECEMBER
1910
1911
1912
1913
Montreal   	
$2,088,558,000
1,593,954,254
953,415,281
444,988,818
193,714,890
150,677,031
.   123,710,055
101,226,496
95,855,319
91,567,074
77,843,546
71,633,122
67,154,567
50,739,160
$2,368,493,239
1,852,397,605
1,172,762,142
543,484,354
213,952,293
218,681,921
133,319,176
125,250,984
87,994,043
134,929,816
77,328,182
121,438,394
71,534,221
73,032,089
$2,845,470,000
2,170,230,376
1,537,817,524
645,118,887
■   244,123,453
275,492,303
158,760,185
158,127,435
100,466,678
183,544,238
88,969,218
220,727,617
84,526,961
115,727,648
$2,879,118,000
Toronto   	
2,181 281,507
Winnipeg 	
1,634,977,237
Vancouver 	
606,899,710
Ottawa   :....
207,667,008
Calgary   	
248,715,948
Quebec  	
165,674,745
Hamilton  	
177,946,610
Halifax   	
105,347,636
Victoria   	
176,977,074
St. John 	
82,447,747
Edmonton   	
213,053,418
London 	
■  90,720,752
Regina   	
132,087,457
Totals 	
$6,105,037,613
$7,194,598,459
$8.829.102.523 $8.902.914.849
!
y
m£-~.
tfff-HW'mWtfa  76
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
CORPORATION   OF   THE   CITY   OF   VANCOUVER
MUNICIPAL STATISTICS
(From the Official Report, 1913)
Schedule "C," Supplementary to Balance Sheet
December 31st, 1913
SUNDRY PROPERTIES (CAPITAL ASSETS)
Buildings and Lands:
Buildings
Lands
City Hall .
 $
22,000.00 $
325,000.00
Free Library 	
50,000.00
190,000.00
Old Police
Station (not including1
site)   	
2,000.00
New Police
Stat
on	
185,000.00
43,000.00
Fire Hall No. 1,
Cordova St. E.
22,000.00
53,000.00
<(     <t
'    2,
Seymour St	
32,000.00
42,500.00
CC            cc
,    3,
12th   Ave.   and
Quebec St	
20,700.00
7,500.00
cc         cc
|    4,
10th Ave., Fair-
,    5,
view  	
16,500.00
3,400.00
7,000.00
cc         cc
Keefer St	
7,500.00
cc         cc
'    6,
Nelson St	
17,500.00
12,500.00
cc         cc
'    7,
5th Ave.,  Fair-
view   	
7,500.00
5,500.00
cc          «
'    8,
Cedar Cove 	
7,500.00
7,000.00
cc         cc
"    9,
Charles   Street,
Grandview 	
7,250.00
4,200.00
cc        cc
\ io,
13th Ave., Fair-
"   11,
view   	
6,800.00
5,500.00
cc        cc
St.     Catherines
and 12th Ave	
9,500.00.
4,500.00
cc         cc
"   12,
8th    Ave.    and
Balaclava 	
9,500.00
5,500.00
tc         cc
"   13,
Burns   St.   and
25th Ave	
8,800.00
4,500.00
le         cc
"   14,
Cambridge   and
Slocan Sts. 	
8,800.00
5,000.00
Carried Forward     $436,750.00     $729,700.00 ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914 77
SCHEDULE "C"—Continued
Buildings Lands
Brought Forward    $436,750.00     $729,700.00
Fire Hall Site, cor. Granville and
Broadway     35,000.00
Fire Hall Site, Broadway, Mount
Pleasant \         2,000.00 22,500.00
Juvenile Home, Lots 19 and 20, -J^
Blk. 349, D. L. 526..,         9,500.00 8,000.00
Old Hospital and Cottage Hospital  ;       10,000.00        350,000.00
Contagious    Diseases    Hospital,
Hastings Townsite       62,500.00 50,000.00
City Creche  1  26,600.00          22,700.00
City Pound, Front St  5,000.00
Crematory, Dufferin St  12,500.00
Incinerator, Union St  36,000.00         100,000.00
Work Yards, Lots 1 to 11, Blk.
1, D. L. 302         3,000.00        200,000.00
New   Incinerator,  Cambie  Street
Yards   j       51,000.00
Works   Yards,   Lots   11   and   12,
Blk. 344, D. L. 526  4,000.00
Parts South of R. of W., Lots 20
to 25, Blk. 1, D. L 196  15,000.00
Lots 4, 7, 8 and 9, Blk. 3, D. L.
200a  60,000.00
Market and Wharf       62,250.00        125,000.00
Exhibition    Buildings,    Hastings
Park       355,000.00
Cemetery, exclusive of the part
given by Provincial Government (nominal asset only, vide
By-Law 454)  $100,000.00
New Cemetery, Burnaby (equity) 81,500.00
Police Sub-Station, Lots  14 and
15, Blk. 112, D. L. 301         2,250.00 8,000.00
Carried Forward     $756,850.00  $1,828,900.00
PPPP-1 ■H
78
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
■
SCHEDULE "C"—Continued
	
Buildings Lands
Brought Forward  $756,850.00  $1,828,900.00
Police Sub-Station, Lots 9 and 10,
Blk. 268, D. L. 526  2,000.00          11,500.00
Police Sub-Station, Lots 7 and 8,
Blk. 35, D. L. 184 §  3,600.00 7,750.00
Old People's Home and Tempo- .
rary Jail, Hastings Townsite.... 8,400.00    •      27,400.00
Cambie Park   800.00        600,000.00
Clark Park   17,000.00          75,000.00
Oppenheimer Park  750.00        250,000.00
McLean Park   8,500.00        165,000.00
Strathcona Park 1  7,200.00 <        80,000.00
English Bay   84,500.00        500,000.00
Tatlow Park   2,700.00          40,000.00
Kitsilano Beach Park  (Old Portion)  9,500.00     ' 110,000.00
Kitsilano Beach Park (Lease from
C. P. R.)  12,000.00
Kitsilano Beach Park (under option, C. P. R.)  1,000.00
Robson Park  5,000.00          45,000.00
Victoria Park  4,800.00          40,000.00
Douglas Park (Sundry Lots, Blk.
159d, D. L. 264a)  36,000.00
Woodland Park   650.00          75,000.00
Templeton Park  1,800.00          68,000.00
Garden Park   41,500.00
Sunnyside Park  '..... 2,900.00          38,300.00
McBride  Park    4,700.00
Granville    Park    (under    option
from C. P. R.)  2,700.00
Stanley Park   222,000.00
Hastings Park   28,000.00
Blocks 33 and 34, D. L. 184  1,350.00        126,000.00
Carried Forward $1,188,700.00  $4,165,350.00 ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
79
SCHEDULE "C"—Continued
Buildings Lands
Brought Forward $1,188,700.00 $4,165,350.00
Lot 14, Blk. 64, D. L. 185  12,500.00
Lots 14 to 16, Blk. 65, D. L 185.... 45,000.00
Lots 15 to 22, Blk. 66, D. L. 185.... 100,000.00
High School (King Edward)  293,500.00 125,000.00
High School (Britannia)  226,000.00 42,000.00
Model School   59,000.00 65,000.00
Central and Old High School and
School Board Offices  95,500.00 750,000.00
Dawson School   212,750.00 200,000.00
Strathcona School   32,750.00
Mt. Pleasant School  65,500.00 125,000.00
Fairview School   48,500.00 125,000.00
Kitsilano  School   34,350.00 115,000.00
Roberts School  j  74,850.00 112,500.00
Seymour School   77,550.00 70,000.00
Grandview School   31,600.00 60,000.00
Macdonald School   33,300.00 60,000.00
Aberdeen School   45,000.00 45,000.00
'Simon Fraser School !  65,000.00 40,000.00
Alexander School   78,000.00 50,000.00
Lord Nelson School  127,000.00 25,000.00
Cecil Rhodes School  103,800.00 45,000.00
Lord Tennyson S*chool  144,500.00 40,000.00
Henry Hudson School  132,500.00 45,000.00
Florence Nightingale School  146,000.00 55,000.00
General Gordon School  71,700.00 35,000.00
Laura Secord School  63,500.00 25,000.00
Livingstone School   68,000.00 55,000.00
Charles Dickens School  68,000.00 47,000.00
Old  Government  School   (D.  L.
301)     1,200.00
Hastings School   67,O00.O0-
Franklin School   . 8,500.00
Carried Forward  $3,663,550.00 $6,679,350.00 80 VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
SCHEDULE "C"—Continued
Buildings
Brought Forward  $3,663,550.00
Beaconsfield School          1,600.00
School Site, Block 38, D. L. 540....      29,250.00
School Site, Block 106, D. L. 540..
School Site, Block 360b, D. L. 526
School Site, Pt. Blk. 6, S. E. Ya
Sec. 45, Hastings         2,000.00
School Site, Block 70, N. W. %
Sec. 30, Hastings	
School Site, Lot 18, Blk. 24, D. L.
264a    :.         2,300.00
Total  $3,998,700.00
Land as per Foregoing Details—.
Bldgs. as per Foregoing Details..
Water Works, Supplies and
Equipment:
Capilano Creek: Cost of clearing •
right-of-way, making road,dam,
tunnels, etc., settling basin and •
intake,    steel    mains,,   wooden
mains and land connected with
system.
Stank)' Park: Mains, reservoir
and stand-pipe.
City of Vancouver: Mains, hydrants, meters, services, etc.
Submerged mains, valves, telephone line.
Seymour Creek: Cost of lands
and right-of-way, making road,
steel bridge, settling basin, intake, C. P. R. crossing, steel
mains, wooden mains, valves,
water record, clearing reservoir
site, wharf and warehouse, and
land connected with system.
Little Mountain Reservoir $4,827,356.50
Lands
$6,679,350.00
. 46,000.00
27,500.00
60,000.00
23,500.00
22,800.00
2,700.00
$6,861,850.00
$6,861,850.00
3,998,700.00
wa& 
MARINE DRIVE, VANCOUVER, B.  C.  ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
Supplies on hand, valves, hydrants, fittings, tools and general equipment  46,267.69
Fire Hall Apparatus, Equipment
and Supplies:
No. 1 Fire Hall $ 42,218.85
I   2   "      1      57,669.75
"    3    "    " I      21,967.08
I   4   |      1      11,437.83
H   5- "   M    ...  14,001.87
1   6   "      "'      16,075.85
I   7   "      "   •  14,085.76
1    8    I      |      11,633.61
I   9   "      I      4,927.80
I 10    "      J      10,440.20
"11    I      I     ,  7,859.65
| 12   I      J      3,018.41
I 13    1       "     :.-:  3,521.07
"14   "      1    ..:...: $| 2,733.74
Machine Shop   2,787.00
Spare Auto Parts  3,"516.41
$ 227,894.88
Fire Alarm System  91,305.60
Police Department:
Equipment and Furniture, etc $ 34,494.27
Patrol Signal System  64,031.50
■Ornamental Street Lighting.... $ 85,900.00
School   Apparatus,   Equipment
and Supplies:
Aberdeen   $ 2,811.80
Alexandra    3,776.35
AJexandra Orphanage    117.25
Beaconsfield     593.90
Britannia High  1  10,858.45
81
4,873,624.19
$  319,200.48
98,525.77
85,900.00 82 VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
SCHEDULE "C"—Continued
Cecil Rhodes  3,702.50
Central  3,422.05
Children's Home  , ,.  551.15
Dawson    3,984.70
Charles Dickens   1,842.67
Fairview    1  3,096.15
Florence Nightingale   3,651.55
Franklin |||   739.85
General Gordon   2,328.80
Grandview   2,290.25
Hastings  2,832.05
Henry Hudson  j  3,535.10
King Edward High  18,911.09
Kitsilano  3,288.50
Livingstone   1,764.40
Macdonald  \ ]  2,211.79
Model  1  4,001.65
Mount Pleasant   4,194.05
Lord Nelson  .-....„  3,311.30
Roberts \  4,686.75
Laura Secord  — 1,827.50
Seymour  ....'...J  4,819.70
Simon Fraser  \.  4,700.05
Strathcona   3,196.19
Tennyson  |  5,415.80
Domestic Science   7,200.00
Manual Training  _.... 12,134.00
Office    6,600.00
Sewers and Septic Tanks $3,278,566.10
Basement Drains   70,466.30
Streets and Lanes:
Wood Paved, Asphalt and Bithu-
lithic  $4,511,649.29
$    138,397.34
$ 3,349,032.4a ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
SCHEDULE "C"—Continued
Macadam Streets   862,960.53
Cleared and Graded Streets  2,021,413.43
Stone Paved Streets  12,867.85
Stone Paved Lanes  133,205.16
Concrete Paved Lanes  7,315.24
Macadam Lanes   59,326.48
Plank Roadways   303,271.33
Cleared and Graded Lanes  79,883.82
Hassam and Granitoid Pavements 211,837.43
Sidewalks:
Gement Walks and Curbs $1,292,891.29
Wooden Sidewalks  175,186.96
Bridges, Wharves, Etc.:
Bridges' $1,720,596.20
Heatley Avenue Wharf  10,206.00
Gore Avenue Slip  656.10
Salsbury Drive Slip  2,076.03
Balsam Street Slip  6,710.04
Bidwell Street Slip  360.00
Rock Crushing Plant, Wharf and
Bunkers    25,732.35
Sundry Assets:
City Hall Furniture $ 12,500.00
Board of Works, Tools, Rollers,
Horses, etc  118,169.56
Scavenging       System,       Tools,
Horses, etc  42,252.87
"City Garage Equipment and Autos 9,083.40
City Analyst's Equipment  750.00
Pound-Keeper's Horse and Rig.... 250.00
Books in Free Library  30,000.00
Furniture   and   Book   Stacks   in
Free Library  j  2,800.00
$ 8,203,730.56
$ 1,468,078.25
mm
$ 1,766,336.72 84        VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
Furniture,   etc.,   in  Old   People's
Home    900.00
Furniture, etc., in Creche  600.00
Furniture, etc., in Isolation Hospital     1,400.00
Ambulance, Rig, Horses and Supplies     1,897.00
Furniture, etc., in Juvenile Court.. 2,034.00
Park    Tools,    Roller,    Crusher,
Seats, etc ,  12,533.17
Park Office Furniture  588.00
Health Office Furniture  810.00
City Market, Furniture and Fittings   : '  120.00
$    236,688.00
■ '    . '
$31,400,063.71 ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
85
CORPORATION OF THE CITY  OF VANCOUVER
General Balance Sheet as at December 31st, 1913
CAPITAL ASSETS
Sundry Properties, as per Schedule "C" $31,400,063.71
General Hospital, Advances to 31st Dec, 1912..$ 489||2.70
General Hospital, Advances during 1913     126,050.01
       615,202.71
Advances upon Capital Account for Local Improvements, etc., in anticipation of Debenture Issues, as per contra $3,232,659.61
'Balance of proceeds of sale of Stock and Debentures in hands of Fiscal Agents pending
remittance      313,047.50
Bank of B. N. A.—Money available for Capital purposes      192,978.63
Advances to Revenue, covered by Revenue
Assets outstanding  ,.     447,894.03
    4,186,579.77
Local Improvement Taxes Assessable, being that portion
of Sinking Fund to be contributed during term of By-
Laws by property owners benefited towards repayment
of Local Improvement Debentures    2,108,078.57
Sinking Fund Assets, as per Schedule "B"    2,219,543.58
$40,529,468.34
CURRENT ASSETS
Treasurer's Cash Balance $ 42,558.24
Bank of B. N. A., Special Account, "Contractors' Deposits"     19,135.45
 $     61,693.69
Revenue Receivable :
General Taxes, Arrears to 1910 $ 16,137.95
General Taxes, Arrears for 1911    46,631.50
General Taxes, Arrears for 1912...:.. 145,620.15
General Taxes, Arrears for 1913  481,579.59
 $689,969.19
Local Improvement Taxes:
Pavement Taxes, Arrears to 1912....$   4,761.18
Pavement Taxes, Arrears for 1913..   22,971.39
    27,732.57
Sewer Taxes, Arrears to 1912 $      178.20
Sewer Taxes, Arrears for 1913        441.30
        619.50 86
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
Cement Walks  Taxes,  Arrears to
1912    $   2,062.33
Cement Walks Taxes, Arrears for
1913         6,055.11
  8,117.44
Street   Sprinkling   Taxes,   Arrears
to 1912  $      260.35
Street   {sprinkling  Taxes,   Arrears
for 1913       1,043.80
  1,304.15
Ornamental Lighting Taxes, Arrears for 1913 952.37
Water Rates Arrears $ 74,634.31
Liquor Licenses Arrears  6,600.00
Scavenging Fees Arrears  3,016.15
Incinerator Fees Arrears .'.  115.15
Electrical Inspection Fees Arrears  238.09
B. C. E. R. Company's Percentages (Dec.) :... 10,818.30
B. C. E. R. Company's Bridge Rentals (Dec.).... 500.00
Cemetery Fees Arrears  (Dec.)  1,072.00
Government Grants for quarter ending 31st Dec, 1913	
Sundry Debtors $187,079.67
Stores on Hand, as per Inventory  190,289.14
Insurance Unexpired   6,268.20
School Trustees' Emergency Account  3,000.00
Park Board Advance  50.00
D. L. 264a, Re-Survey | 1  38,876.44
728,695.22
96,994.00
43,036.40
$41,885,451.10 ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914 87
CORPORATION  OF THE  CITY  OF VANCOUVER
General Balance Sheet as at December 31st, 1913
CAPITAL LIABILITIES
Debentures and Stock as per Schedule "A":
General Debentures  $ 9,367,851.20
General Registered Stock ]  16,171,300.00
$25,539,151.20
Local Improvement Debentures  (City's Proportion)       1,974,545.54
$27,513,696.74
Local   Improvement   Debentures    (Property
Owners' Proportion)    3,275,188.72
 $30,788,885.46
Advances  for  expenditure  on Local  Improvements,  etc.,"
repayable upon issue and sale of Debentures    3,232,659.61
Capital Surplus (including increase of valuation of Real
Assets, as per report of Assessment Commissioner, 31st
December, 1913)     6,507,923.27
$40,529,468.34
CURRENT LIABILITIES
Sundry Creditors:
Warrants approved for payment $300,853.41
Amounts withheld on contracts, etc : 142,076.28
 $    442,929.69
Water Consumers' Deposits $       30.00
Cemetery Fund Reserve    21,396.18
Cemetery Fund Interest         854.10
Debenture Interest Coupons Unpaid    24,784.00
Tax  Sale   Fund      6,102.92
Land  Redemptions    1.35
Tax Suspense Account       1,314.41
Water Rates Suspense Account      1,045.14
Reserve against Scavenging Fees Arrears (Contra)   ~         350.00
Market Reserve   .      250.00
Market Consignors' Account  3.28
        56,131.38
Contractors' Deposits          19,135.45
Advances from Capital, as per contra \       447,894.03 tmm
88        VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
Revenue Surplus:
After   Adjustments   as   at   31st   Dec,   1912,
General   ..$101,219.08
After   Adjustments   as   at   31st   Dec,   1912,
Water     512,629.79
$613,848.87
General Revenue, 1913 (Deficit) $303,620.47
Water Works Revenue, 1913 (Surplus)  1    79,663.81
Net Deficit .for 1913 $223,956.66 223,956.66
-     389,892.21
$41,885,451.10 ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
89-
STATEMENT OF DEBENTURES AND STOCK
31st December, 1913
Showing Amounts Maturing Each Year
Yea
1914.
1915
1917
1918
1919
1921
1922
1923
1924"
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
$
60,000.00
59,500.00
385,000.00
90,000.00
230,000.00
165,000.00
145,000.00
155,000.00
589,759.20
569,592.00
70,000.00
12,000.00
250,000.00
80,000.00
80,000.00
155,500.00
244,000.00
350,000.00
572,500.00
990,000.00
585,000.00
2,133,000.00
1,397,000.00
2,207,900.00
2,818,000.00
6,417,600.00
4,727,800.00
Local I
improvement
83,000.00
5,078.76
57,444.00
61,134.29
25,000.20-
19,319.18
455,010.63
923,882.17
84,785.41
336,273.46
787,764.14
615,429.60
705,488.09
70,341.20
110,656.95
20,963.34
182,807.74
378,676.69
15,793.67
52,810.80
"'66,300.66
37,865.00
13,471.89
9^66.66
28,000.00
"71,436.66
31,561.65
TOTAL
'$
83,000.00
65,078.76
116,944.00
61,134.29
25,000.20
19,319.18
455,010.63
1,308,882.17
84,785.41
336,273.46
877,764.14
845,429.60
870,488.09
215,341.20
265,656.95
610,722.54
752,399.74
378,676.69
15,793.67
52,810.80
70,000.00
78,300.00
287,865.00
93,471.89
80,000.00
165,000.00
272,000.00
350,000.00
643,936.00
990,000.00
616,501.05
2,133,000.00
1,397,000.00
2,207,900.00
2,818,000.00
6,417,600.00
4,727,800.00
$25,539,151.20 | $ 5,249,734.26 [ $30,788,885.46 
90
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
STATEMENT OF DEBENTURES AND STOCK
December 31st, 1913
Showing Amount of Debentures and Stock Outstanding at
the Different Rates of Interest
General
Local Improvement
TOTAL
At 6%
At 5%
At Ay2% ....
At 4%
At 2>y2% ....
$    320,000.00
315,000.00
5,112,800.00
18,869,851.20
921,500.00
$    187,100.00
1,948,280.24
3,114,354.02
$    320,000.00
502,100.00
7,061,080.24
21,984,205.22
921,500.00
Total
$25,539,151,20 1 $ 5,249,734.26
$30,788,885.46
^""~ ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
91
Comparative   Statement   Showing   Assessment,   Rate,   Taxes,   Gross.
Income and Expenditure, from Date of Incorporation of
City in 1886 to Close of Fiscal Year
Ending December 31st, 1913
VALUATION AT BEGINNING OF YEAR  -
Rate of
Year
Taxation
.   Real Property
Improvements
Total Assessable
Property
Mills on $
Nett
1887
$   2,456,842.00
$      182,235.00
$   2,639,077.00
1888
2,786,509.00
677,096.00
3,463,605.00
12^ Mills
1889
5,275,596.00
730,027.00
6,005,623.00
12^     1
1890
8,077,505.00
1,326,940.00
9,404,445.00
12J4   "
1891
10,477,420.00
1,501,665.00
11,979,085.00
\2y2 "
1892
14,061,311.00
2,586,401.00
16,647,712.00
16
1893
16,032,744.00
2,832,960.00
18,865,704.00
16
1894
15,513,604.00
2,787,480.00
18,301,084.00
16
1895
13,829,724.00
4,317,660.00
18,147,384.00
16
1896
13,109,394.00
4,278,680.00
17,388,074.00
16
1897
13,000,869.00
4,441,490.00
17,442,359.00
16
1898
12,672,649.00
4,551,740.00
17,224,389.00
16
1899
12,705,099.00
5,011,190.00
17,716,289.00
16
1900
12,826,905.00
6,726,740.00
19,553,645.00
16
1901
12,792,530.00
7,440,600.00
20,233,130.00
18
1902
12,842,150.00
8,223,220.00
21,065,370.00
18
1903
13,845,565.00
9,091,270.00
22,936,835.00
18
1904
14,440,935.00
10,247,920.00
24,688,855.00
18
1905
16,739,640.00
11,804,250.00
28,543,890.00
18
1906
25,101,760.00
14,087,640.00
39,189,400.00
20
1907
38,346,335.00
16,381,475.00
54,727,810.00
20
1908
41,641,870.00
20,127,035.00
61,768,905.00
20
1909
48,281,330.00
24,405,210.00
72,686,540.00
20
1910
76,881,820.00
29,572,445.00
106,454,265.00
20
1911
98,720,345.00
37,858,660.00
136,579,005.00
20
1912
138,557,595.00
53,515,295.00
192,072,890.00
20
1913
144,974,525.00
68,010,654.00
212,985,179.00
20
Valuation at close of 1913 (subject to Court of Revision-
Real  Property
$150,629,410.00
Improvements
$76,215,783.00 92
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
Comparative   Statement   Showing   Assessment,   Rate,   Taxes,   Gross
Income and Expenditure, from Date of Incorporation of
City in 1886 to Close of Fiscal Year
Ending December 31st, 1913
Total Expenditure
Gross Amount,
Total of Arrears j
from Revenue
Population
of Taxes
at close of each
Gross Income
including City improve
at Close of
Levied
Year
Each Year
ments, Interest and
Sinking Fund
Year
$    16,935.71
$    14,708.65
1,000
-$    32,998.46
$   3,510.82
47,337.97
41,798.53
5,000
43,295.06
4,984.60
67,196.23
67,274.82
8,500
75,070.28
7,532.82
98,663.27
97,263.57
10,500
117,555.56
13,340.27
144,561.70
128,746.59
12,000
239,581.70
27,799.88
. 231,656.54
238,326.58
*13,685
208,096.40
38,019jife
214,851.80
258;451.62
15,000
377,314.08
87,402.51
325,298.98
314,413.92
16,000
366,021.68
143,521.67
336,386.14
308,954.84
17,000
323,771.18
190,192.03
318,018.49
294,176.85
17,862
304,974.68
204,377.08
372,901.51
335,686.78
19,000
304,432.28
221,090.85
389,481.11
361,343.91
20,000
298,970.38
196,024.83
450,730.78
427,683.60
22,000
304,213.88
166,404.50
474,971.98
482,016.63
24,000
323,805.50
178,161.89
485,366.36
540,481.13
24,750
330,256.60
133,593.49
610,894.00
639,886.88
*26,133
339,095.20
142,149.49
536,259.04
648,569.11
29,640
367,824.00
121,705.97
625,395.70
584,853.87
34,480
391,297.90
97,700.62
645,719.45
679,363.77
38,414
475,299.58
79,480.45
696,333.17
683,317.97
45,000
670,776.17
74,705.10
916,148.71
809,230.75
52,000
985,119.80
126,975.22
1,280,646.24
1,231,121.16
60,100
1,089,316.83
163,121.12
1,447,173.45
1,388,669.04
66,500
1,258,769.39
150,231.20
l,695i05.62
1,643,617.56
78,900
1,773,535.83
179,296.74
2,366,518.71
2,204,242.01
93,700
2,304,483.02
265,019.00
3,013,930.30
2,876,990.49
111,240
3,183,572.93
510,136.12
4,008,762.30
3,843,033.79
122,100
3,403,152.55
728,695.22
4,386,526.27
4,610,482.93
114,220
Total
$226,845,193.00
Population
114,220
From 1895 to 1905 Improvements were taxed at fifty per cent, of
value; from 1906 to 1909 at twenty-five per cent. From 1910 all Improvements were exempt from taxation.
* Dominion Government Census. ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
SCHOOLS
93
ENROLMENT AND AVERAGE ATTENDANCE FOR 1913
Avg.
Enrolment. Attend.
January  |     12,391 10,718.25
February      12,684 11,326.46
March    \     12>®M 11,153.36
April      12,526 11,097.53
May   : ,     12,110 10,781.24
June       11,539 10,489.15
August  , _     11,689 11,257.30
September        12,661 11,509.55
October        12,990 11,658.80
November      12,766 11,660.58
December   12,474 11,590.43
Enrolment for the month of October for each year since 1897:
Year Enrol. Year Enrol.
1898	
1899 '..
1900 :	
1901	
1902	
1903	
1904	
1905	
2724
1906	
  6437
3117
1907 -	
  7270
3393
1908	
7984
3710
1909	
  8845
4087
1910	
  9942
4416
1911	
 11385
4994
1912	
 12393
5609
\ 1913	
 12990
Number of Teachers on the Vancouver staff in December for
-each year since 1902:
Males.   Females.      Tl.
December, 1903   29 63 92
December, 1904   30 71 101
December, 1905   29 83 112
December, 1906   38 92 130
December, 1907   47, 103 150
December, 1908   58. 115 173
December, 1909   65 128 193
December, 1910   71 155 226
December, 1911   72 181 263
December, 1912  ,  93 220 313
December, 1913  J  91 246 337 SOttM
94
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
Special Instructors employed by the Board, 1913:
Instructors of Manual Training  14
Supervisor of .Manual Training    1
Instructors of Domestic Science  11
Supervisor of Domestic Science : j    1
Supervisors  of  Music ,    2
Supervisor of Primary Work     1
Supervisor of Drawing -.    1
Supervisor of Drill    1
Musketry Instructor  ,    1
Director of Night Classesi     1
Teachers in Night Classes  50-
Special Officers employed by the Board:
Municipal Inspector of Schools  1
Merical Health Officers  2
Nurses ,  4
Attendance   Officers  3
Number of Teachers holding the different grades of certificates:
University Graduate in Arts* or Science 112
Academic' Certificate      5
First-class  Certificate   :.. 132
Second-class Certificate  ,  83
Third-class Ge5||ficate     3:
Temporary Certificate      1
Commercial Specialist  .'. i    1
immm&m  KJ&K
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
PARK STATISTICS
SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURE, 1913
Total Expenditure    |||. $156,265.30
Appropriated as follows:
Maintenance—General Account $ 76,998.84
Improvements—General Account     10,175.85
 1 $. 87,174.69
Improvements—Capital Account—
By-Law No. 790 $   8,912.49
By-LawJNo. 882      1,269.31
By-Law No. 994 1    31,679.63
    41,861.43
Purchase of Land—
(Loan Expenses, etc.)
By-Law No. 883 $       50.00
By-law No. 995    27,179.18
    27,229.18
Total  ...'...'.  $156,265.30
Iff1. SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURE IN PARK SYSTEM
1887 to December 31st, 1913
Land Purchases ....;... $753,828.19
Improvements—By-Laws  ...  329,218.99
Improvements—General Account  ...    88,142.37
Maintenance—General Account  335,313.24
 $ 1,506,502.79
Balances in hand, December 31st, 1913—
Improvement By-Laws  $ 73,881.01
Park Purchase By-Laws j  539,671.81
 1     613,552.82
Grand Total  $2,120,055.61 GRANVILLE STREET, LOOKING  SOUTH FROM C.P.R.  DEPOT   98 VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
CHURCHES IN CITY OF VANCOUVER AND DISTRICT
CHURCH OF ENGLAND
Archdeacon of Columbia, Diocesan Executive Officer—
Ven. Edwyn S. W. Pentreath, D.D.
All Saints'—Rev. H. C. Lewis Hooper Victoria Drive and Pandora
St. Saviour's—Rev. Harold St. George Buttrum 1st Ave. and Semlin
Christ—Rev. C. C. Owen Georgia and Burrard
St. James'—Rev. H. Edwardes Gore and Cordova
Holy Trinity Pine and Gore Ave.
St. Mark's—Rev. A. H. Sovereign 2nd Ave. and Larch
St. Paul's—Rev. H. R. Grant ..14th Ave. and Burns
St. Paul's—Rev. F. A. P. Chadwick Jarvis and Pendrell
St. Luke's—Rev. Mark Jukes i River Road
St. Peter's—Rev. G. H.Caffin Westminster Ave. and 29th Street
St. Margaret's—^Rev. Wm. Bell Agnes Road, Cedar Cottage
St. Michael's-—Rev. G. H. Wilson Broadway W. and Prince Edward
St. John the Divine—Rev. Wm. Thomas Johnson Central Park
St. George's—Rev. Marcus H. Jackson..... Broadway and Laurel
Kerrisdale Rev. W. H. G. Battersill
BAPTIST CHURCHES
First—Rev. H. F. Perry Nelson and Burrard
Jackson Avenue—Rev. B. H. West Jackson and Pender
Mount Pleasant 10th Avenue and Quebec
Fifth Avenue—Rev. H. F. Waring 5th Ave. and Arbutus
Grandview—Rev. N. A. Harkness 1st Ave. and Salisbury Drive
Central—Rev. P. Clifton Parker , 10th and Laurel
Collingwood—Rev. David Long East Collingwood
Cedar Cottage—Rev. J. W. Leitch 22nd Ave. and Prince Albert
South Hill—Rev. W. H. Redmond 52nd Ave. and Frederick
Eburne—Rev. M. Vansickle Eburne
North Vancouver—Rev. A. J. Prosser North Vancouver ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
99
METHODIST CHURCHES
Wesley—Rev. J. C. Switzer Burrard and Georgia
Central—Rev. F. T. Langford Pender and Dunlevy
Grace—Rev. Wm. Elliott Burns and 16th Ave. East
Dundas  Street—Rev. R. Mcllroy Thompson Dundas  St.
Grandview—Rev. R. F. Stillman .-.	
Japanese Methodist—Rev. K. Kanazawa	
Kitsilano—Rev. R. Newton Powell 3rd and Larch
Mountain View—Rev. J. F. Betts	
Collingwood—Rev. B. H. Balderstone	
Mount Pleasant—Rev. Lashley Hall Ontario and 10th
Robson Memorial—Rev. E. Manuel Cedar Cottage
Scandinavian Methodist—Rev. Mr. Nanthrop	
Sixth Avenue—Rev. G. K. Bradshaw 6th Ave. and Fir
Trinity—Rev. A. M. Sanford 7th Ave., bet. Commercial and Victoria
Chinese Mission—Rev. Fong Dickman 529 Beatty
South Kitsilano—Rev. R. H. Stanton	
Ferris Road—Rev. John Pye	
Wilson Heights—Rev. Wm. Bolton	
'River Avenue—Rev. S. Cook	
CONGREGATIONAL
First—Rev. J. K. Unsworth Thurlow and Pendrell
Knox Cordova, between Columbia and Main
PRESBYTERIAN
St. Andrew's—Rev. R. J. Wilson Richards and Georgia
First—Rev. Wj. H. Fraser Hastings and Gore
St. John's—Rev. E. Leslie Pidgeon Comox and Broughton
Chalmers'—Rev. E. A. Henry Fairview
Mount Pleasant—Rev. W. Woodside Broadway and Quebec
Kitsilano—Rev. Mr. McKinnon 4th Ave., opp. Public School Hi    I
100
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
PRESBYTERIAN—Continued
Cedar Cottage—Rev. J. C. Madill Victoria Road, near Lakeview
Robertson—Rev. David James Salisbury Drive and Napier
Dundas—Rev. E. H. Lockhart Dundas and Garden Drive
Westminster—Rev. R. A. McRae Main and 24th Ave.
Central Park—Rev. T. R. Peacock Central Park
ROMAN CHURCHES
Holy Rosary—Rev. J. Welch, O.M.I Dunsmuir and Richards
St. Patrick's—Rev. Austin Bonner Quebec and 12th Ave.
Sacred Heart—Rev. J. F. McNeil Campbell and Keefer
St. Augustine's—Rev. A. Tavernier, O.M.I 7th and Arbutus
St. Joseph's—Rev. M. W. McKinnon Cedar Cottage
St. Andrew's—Rev. J. A. McDonald 49th Ave., near Fraser St.
St.-Paul's Chapel—Rev. F. Deatcher St. Paul's Hospital
LUTHERIAN CHURCHES
First Swedish—Rev. Rupert Swanson ...Princess and Dunlevy
Christ, German and Eng. Evangelical—Rev. O. T. Just	
----- Yukon and  10th
UNDENOMINATIONAL
Salvation Army—Adjt. Howell, Com. Officer Hastings and Gore
Scientist, First Church of Christ 1166 Georgia
Scientist, Second Church of Christ 1 421 Granville
First Unitarian—Rev. J. Pineo I.O.O.F. Hall, Pender and Hamilton
Bible Spiritualists—Mrs. Coon O'Brien Hall, Homer and Hastings
First Christian (Disciples)—Rev. M. A. Moss Woodland and 13th
London Mission to Seamen—Rev. H. Edward....Next to St. James, Gore
Central Mission Abbott St., near Waterfront
Central Christian—Rev. S. B. Calvert, A.R Fir and 11th W.
.__.. '■ aiagai ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
101
CONSULAR AGENCIES IN THE CITY
AMERICAN CONSUL-GENERAL
R.  E.  Mansfield;   Vice-Consul-General,  G.   Carlton  Woodward,
210 Pacific Building.
AUSTRIA-HUNGARY CONSUL
Baron Arthur Groedel, Rogers Building.
BELGIUM VICE-CONSUL
J.  F.  Whitehead,  519  Granville   Street.
CHILIAN CONSUL-GENERAL FOR CANADA
Hon. M.  P.  Morris, 319 Homer  Street.
CHINESE CONSUL
Chang Kang-en, 893 Broughton Street.
CONSUELDO-GENERAL DEL ECUADOR
John McQuillan, 812 Hastings Street West.
DANISH  CONSUL
W. A.  Ward,  344  Granville  Street.
FRENCH  CONSUL
Edmund Francis,  543  Granville  Street
IMPERIAL GERMAN CONSUL
A. F. von Etlinger, 543 Granville Street.
ITALY
A. J. Ferrera, Consular Agent, 970 Burrard Street.
JAPANESE IMPERIAL CONSUL
Y. A. Hori, 539 Pender Street West.
MEXICAN CONSUL
Jose Lozano, 619 Hastings Street West.
NETHERLANDS VICE-CONSUL
M. A. von Roggen, 206 Winch Building.
NORWEGIAN CONSUL
C. B. Stahlschmidt, Winch Building.
PERUVIAN CONSUL
Harvey C. White, Vancouver,  B.  C.
SPANISH VICE-CONSUL
Captain H. A. Mellon, 419 Cordova Street West.
SWEDISH VICE-CONSUL
R. V. Winch, Winch Building.
SWITZERLAND  CONSUL  FOR THE  PROVINCES  OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA AND ALBERTA
S.   Gintzburger.   Cambie   Street.    ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
105
PRELIMINARY   REVIEW   AND   ESTIMATE
OF   MINERAL   PRODUCTION   FOR
THE  YEAR   1913
This bulletin has been prepared before the receipt of the
official reports for the year 1913 of the Gold Commissioners
dnd Mining Recorders of the Province, and the customary-
returns of mineral production annually made by managers of
mines and reduction-works; consequently it must necessarily
be regarded as being simply a preliminary review of the progress of the past year, together with an estimate of the quantities and value of the several mineral products of the Province, which it is believed will prove to be approximately cor-
. rect.
The accompanying table shows an estimated mineral production during 1913 of a* total value of $30,158,793.
This production, estimated for 1913, has only once been
exceeded in the mineral history of the Province, i.e., by that
of 1912, which was of some $2,282,007 greater value, and
which is to be accounted for by the market prices of the
metals in 1913 being uniformly lower than in 1912, and by the
deterrent effect of labour troubles upon the production of the
Vancouver Island collieries—which more than account for the
difference found. As it is, the 1913 production stands second
on the list, exceeding that of 1910—the next on the list—by
$4,000,000.
m
CONDITIONS FAVOURABLE FOR PRODUCTION
IN 1913
Conditions during the year 1913 were, with the chief
exception of those bearing upon coal-mining on Vancouver
Island, generally favourable to a large mineral production,
and the results of the year's mining operations should, on the
whole, be regarded as satisfactory. It will be seen that copper
only of the lode metals was smaller in considerable quantity
than in 1912, and, since the average market price of that metal amm
106
VANCOUVER BOARD. OF TRADE
for 1913 was lower, there was a further corresponding decrease
in the value. The decrease in placer gold is more than compensated for by the increase in lode gold, and is accounted for
by less hydraulic mining having been done in Quesnel Division of Cariboo District.
In view of the fact that there were long-continued and
determined efforts made to prevent the operation of the coal
mines on Vancouver Island, except on terms the owners would
not agree to, it is surprising that the decrease in total quantity
of coal produced in the Vancouver Island District was not
greater than the returns show it to have been—namely, somewhat less than 600,000 tons; but the increases of Nicola and
Crows Nest Pass Districts, together amounting to 147,000
tons, reduced the loss in gross production of coal of the Province to approximately 450,000 tonsj The net coal production
—that is, after deducting the coal made into coke—shows a
larger decrease, since a greater amount of coal was converted
into coke, the production of which this year amounted to
285,123 tons—the largest coke production ever made in the
Province.
PROVINCE'S PROPORTION OF PRODUCTION
IN CANADA
British Columbia's proportion of the mineral production
of the whole of Canada continues to be comparatively large.
The aggregate value of the production of this Province to the
end of 1913 is, approximately, $460,000,000, but since the published official records of that of the whole Dominion do not.
include production prior to 1886, the present comparison must
be restricted to the period of 28 years—1886-1913. Placing
the aggregate for all Canada at $1,521,000,000 (which allows
for 1913 a Dominion total of $150,000,000, an.amount nearly
$15,000,000 greater than that of 1912), and British Columbia's
proportion for the same period at $395,000,000, it follows that
this Province has to be credited with about 26 per cent, of the
aggregate value of the mineral production of the whole of
Canada in the 28-year period under notice.
It is a striking fact, as indicating the substantial increase
in the value of the mineral production of the Province in
recent years, as compared with that of less than twenty years
ago, that nearly 35 per cent, of the $395,000,000 mentioned
above as the aggregate of production for 28 years is to be Annual report, 1913-1914
107
credited to the last five years, 1909-1913, while nearly 54 per
cent, was produced during eight years, 1906-1913.
MINERAL PRODUCTION FOR TWO YEARS,
1912-1913
The following table shows the quantities and value of the
several minerals produced in the year 1912, and the estimated
production in 1913. It may here be explained that the prices
used in calculating the estimated value of silver, lead, copper,
and zinc are the average prices for the year, as published in
The Engineering and Mining Journal, New York, less a deduction of 5 per cent, off silver, 10 per cent, off lead, and 15 per
cent, off zinc. 108
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
PRODUCTION OF VARIOUS MINERALS
BRIEFLY REVIEWED
In order to indicate in a general way the sources of the
various minerals mined in the Province and to give an idea
of some of the conditions that affected their production, and,
incidentally, brief information concerning the larger known
mineral deposits occurring in British Columbia, the next following comments are submitted.
Gold
No hesitation has been felt in estimating that the yield of
gold, placer and lode combined, has been larger than in 1912.
For placer gold, a decreased production is expected, taking the
Province as a whole, of about $15,500—although the Atlin
camp will show an increased production over last year; and
for lode gold $5,509,526 (equivalent to an increase of $187,-
000) has been taken as fairly representing the production of
this metal, so far as indicated by the advices received to date.
Dealing with these classes of gold-mining separately, it may
be observed:
Placer Gold.—Practically all the placer gold recovered in
the Province is obtained in the Cariboo and Cassiar Districts,
less than one-twentieth of the total coming from the remaining districts. An approximate apportionment is: From Cariboo District, $190,000; Atlin Division of Cassiar District,
$320,000; remaining parts of the Province, $30,000. It may
be that for both these districts a larger yield will be shown,
but this cannot be determined until after the final results of
the season's operations shall be known.
In the Cariboo District the gravel-washing season was
shorter than usual owing to a late spring, but the water supply
was very satisfactory during the first part of the season.
In the Barkerville Division the largest operators did a
little better than usual, though several of the smaller properties were not so successful.
In the Quesnel Division the large plants were not operated and the output was comparatively small, chiefly from
Keithley creek and a new hydraulic company at Moorhead.
The district will probably show a .decrease of over
-$40,000. ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
109
In the Atlin District the season seems to have been favourable, the olderproducers doing better than usual, while a
new company operating on Ruby creek began to make a very
substantial output. The output of the camp is expected to be
$30,000 better than last year.
As a result of serious prospecting, it seems probable that
several new creeks may be profitably worked in the near
future.
Renewed interest is being manifested in the Stikine-Liard
District, where the Boulder Creek Hydraulic Company has
had a fairly successful season, in a small way, with good prospects for the future.
The benches at Laketon are being tested by a drill, and
if satisfactory results are obtained a dredging plant is to be
installed; what success has attended this work is not as yet
known.
In the Omineca section a couple of companies have had
engineers making extensive tests of their ground, but the output from the district this year will be small.
Investigations are also being made as to the suitability of
the Peace river as dredging-ground.
At present there is no gold-dredging being carried on in
the Province; a dredge is, however, under construction on the
Quesnel river.
In the early spring of 1913 reports were circulated that
rich ground had been found on Silver creek, south of Teslin
lake, but these reports appear to have been unwarranted.
In the fall of the year an attempt was made to cause a
"rush" to Sibolla creek, south of Francois lake; it cannot be
learned that there was any justification for the reports circulated.
Though the Lillooet District has formerly always produced placer gold, it seems as if there would be little from
•there this year, possibly on account of the advent of the rail-
,way construction providing more profitable employment.
Considerable work in connection with placer-mining had
been done in the Similkameen District, although advices to
hand do not indicate any important production this year. BOM
110
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
Lode Gold.—Present information would- indicate a production of lode gold of about 266,547 oz., worth $5,509,526,
which would be an increase over last year of some 9,051 oz.,
worth $187,000. This increase comes from Rossland, Nelson,
Lillooet, and the Coast Districts.
The estimated production has been credited approximately as follows: Rossland, 135,300 oz.; Boundary, including
Osoyoos Mining Division, 103,300 oz., of which Camp Hedley
is credited with 38~300 oz.; Nelson District, 23,500 oz.; Coast
District, 3,000 oz.; Lillooet, 1,300 oz.
Taking the several districts of the Province in the order
mentioned:
The amount from Rossland came from the Consolidated
Company's mines to the extent of approximately 120,000 oz.,
and about 15,"000 oz. from the Le Roi No. 2.
In the Boundary District the largest producer was the
Nickel Plate mine at Hedley, in Osoyoos Mining Division,
included under the heading "Boundary," which recovered some
38,300 oz. of gold, worth $792,000 in the stamp-mill, from concentrates and cyanide treatment.
The Jewel produced about 4,000 oz. from stamp-milling.
Most of the remainder was obtained from the smelting of
copper-bearing ores; the Granby Company recovering some
40,500 oz., the British Columbia Copper Company nearly
19,300 oz., and the No. 7 almost 800 oz.
' In the Nelson District the production from the Queen has
been less than last year owing to labour troubles, the decrease,
however, being more than compensated for by the substantial
increase made by the Mother Lode, also in Sheep Creek camp.
The next most important producers were the Yankee Girl and
the Arlington.
In the Coast District the chief producer of lode gold was
the Marble Bay mine on Texada island, in which it is found
associated with copper-ores.
In the other large copper mine on the Coast, the Britannia, no gold is recovered. ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
111
It is likely that there was some lode gold produced in
the Atlin District, but no official information is as yet available, while unofficial reports' are at least contradictory. The
Coronation mine in the Lillooet Division worked part of the
year and produced over 1,300 oz. of gold.
It cannot be learned that the Portland Canal District
made any important production.
In the estimate no allowance has been made for gold
from the west coast of Vancouver Island, although it is possible that a little may have been produced.
The expectation of an output this year from the Surf
Inlet mines on Princess Royal island, was not realized, but
considerable development work was done during the year.
Silver
It would seem as though the amount of silver produced
this past year would be about 3,570,000 oz., which is the greatest production of this metal made since 1902, and, as compared with 1912, is an increase of over 437,000 oz.
This was produced approximately as  follows:   Slocan,
1,860,000 oz.; Ainsworth, 487,000 oz.; East Kootenay, 413,000
oz.;  Boundary, 380,000 oz.;  and Nelson,   160,000 oz.    The
three former districts show material increases and the latter,
two show decreases.
The Slocan thus produced over half the total silver output, and of this about two-thirds was from the Standard mine,
followed in importance by the Rambler-Cariboo and Van-Roi.
Other mines in this district shipped silver-bearing ores,
amongst which were the mines of the Consolidated Mining
and Smelting Company, and also the Slocan Star, Eastmont,
Surprise, and Reco.
In the Ainsworth District the largest production was
made by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company's
mines, followed in importance by the Utica, Bluebell, and
Silver Hoard.
In East Kootenay, of a total production of about 413,000
oz., the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company's mine, 112
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
the Sullivan, assisted by the company's St. Eugene mine, produced about 407,000 oz.
In the Nelson District the Consolidated Company's mines,
the Molly Gibson and Silver King, together produced 120,000
oz. out of the total of 160,000 oz., while in Rossland camp the
same company's mines produced nearly 78,000 oz. out of a
total output of about 105,000 oz., the Le Roi No. 2 producing
about 27,000 oz.
In the Boundary District, of the total estimated production of 379,000 oz., the Granby Company produced about 250,-
000 oz., the British Columbia Copper Company about 84,000
oz., and the No. 7 about 25,000 oz.; while the Union, Bounty
Fraction, Sally, and others contributed in lesser amount.
The Vancouver Island and Coast District is credited with
94,500 oz., of which the Britannia produced about 72,000 oz.,
and the Marble Bay 20,000 oz.
The Hazelton District for the first time enters the field as
an important producer, providing nearly 46,000 oz. of silver,
of which 41,000 oz. is credited to the Silver Standard mine.
Lead
Figures have been received from most of the larger shippers of lead-ore, giving their approximate productions for the
year, the last month having to be estimated as a probable
amount; the smaller shipments have been estimated on a
known tonnage received at the smelter, at the assay value of
former years.
It is possible that in some instances the figures sent in
are assay contents of the ore shipped and not lead actually
recovered, so the estimate of production given may prove
somewhat high, although it is considered that the 10 per cent,
deduction from the ,market price, taken in calculating the
value of- the product, will cover any excess of output claimed.
The total estimated production is put down at 54,206,000
lb., of which the Slocan and Ainsworth Divisions together are
credited with 31,000,000 lb., East Kootenay with 20,300,000
lb., and Nelson with 2,000,000 lb.   ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
113
The largest shippers in the various districts were as follows : In the Slocan, the Standard, 16,600,000 lb.; the Rambler-Cariboo, 2,200,000 lb.; and the Van-Roi, 780,000 lb.
In the Ainsworth Division, the Bluebell, 7,800,000 lb.,
and the Consolidated Company's mines, 1,300,000 lb.
In East Kootenay, the Consolidated Company's mines,
19,000,000 lb., and the Monarch, at Field, 1,000,000 lb.
In the Nelson District, the H.B. mine produced over 900,-
000 lb., and the Emerald, 800,000 lb.
The London price of lead having been for seven or eight
months of the year above that at which the Dominion Government bounty on lead ceases to be payable, it follows that the
total amount of bounty paid or payable on account of the 1913
lead production will be found to be comparatively small, so
that probably there will be from $500,000 to $600,000 of the
original appropriation of $2,500,000 still remaining unearned
by the lead-producers.
Copper
Although complete authoritative figures are not yet at
band, still enough have been received to show quite clearly
that the amount of copper recovered from the smelting of the
•ores of the Province during 1913 will fall very much short of
the production of 1912; the best advices available indicate
thaj the copper recovered this past year will amount to about
46,042,379 lb., which represents, as compared with 1912, a
decrease in amount of 5,414,158 lb.
The decrease in total value of this year's product is even
greater than the decrease in amount of the product would indicate, for this year's market price is slightly more than 1 cent
lower than in 1912, and this alone would on this year's product
account for a lessened value of $460,000.
The total decrease in value this year as compared with
1912 will amount to about $1,387,000.
Copper is the only metal that does not show an increase
•over the year 1912. While such is a fact, it is nevertheless
true that the 1913 .output is greater in amount than any other
year, with the exceptions of 1908 and 1912, in the history of
mining in British Columbia. 114
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
It might be further pointed out that 1912 was phenomenal as regards its copper production, inasmuch as in 1911 the
Boundary smelters were hampered by the shortage of coke,
due to strikes at the collieries, and at the mines development
was pushed ahead; as a result, the year 1912 found the mines
in an unusually good shape to make a large output, while the
mining companies were stimulated to do so by the high market price for copper.
It would therefore seem that this year's copper output is
in reality considerably above the average and denotes a steadily increasing production.
The tonnage of copper-bearing ore mined in 1913 was
nearly the same, being 2,302,000 tons; from which it is deduced that the average "copper-content" of a ton of ore was 21.75
lb. in the year 1912, and was only 20 lb. in 1913, which indicates that, owing to improved methods and consequently lower
costs of mining and smelting, ore of a still lower grade than
in former years was treated at a profit.
This gives hope that improved methods and means may
eventually be found to profitably treat the large bodies of ore
known to exist which are of too low a grade to allow of a
profit being made by present methods.
The production of copper has been credited to the various
districts about as follows: To the Boundary, nearly 29,000,000
lb.; Coast District, 14,000,000 lb.; Rossland camp, 2,200,000 lb.
As to the future, it would appear that the Boundary,
which now provides about 60 per cent, of our output of copper, is likely not only to hold up its prese'nt output, but to
steadily increase it; while the Coast District within a year or
so will be making at least three times its present output, due
to improved processes at the Britannia mine and the operation
of the Granby Company's plant at Observatory Inlet, where a
2,000-tbn-a-day smelter is now nearing completion, with
enough ore behind it, actually proved, to keep it running for
some years.
Zinc
The informal advices so far received from the producers
of zinc seem to indicate a production of zinc this past year
that is much higher than even the most sanguine had hoped ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
115
for, and until final statistical figures are available it can only
be hoped that the outputs claimed by the various shippers
have not been exaggerated.
It is a fact, however, and this may be the. explanation,
that large quantities of zinc-concentrates and ore which would
find a market in the United States have been stored and held
in anticipation of a change in the United States tariff, which
-would permit of zinc-ores entering that country at a much
lower Customs rate.
This change arrived this past fall, and it is said that it
makes a difference of several dollars a ton in favour of the
shippers; since then the stored-up zinc-ores have been rushed
over the Line.
Subject to future correction and to the remarks just made,
it is estimated that the output of zinc in 1913 will be approximately 7,100,000 lb., all of which, with the exception of 130,-
000 lb. credited to the Monarch mine, near Field, is expected
to have been produced in the Slocan. \
The Standard mine, of Silverton, is credited with more
than half the total output, while the Lucky Jim, Van-Roi,
Rambler-Cariboo, Surprise, and Noble Five contributed in a
lesser degree.
The laboratory experiments in electric smelting of lead-
zinc ores that have been made during the last two years under
the direction of the Mines Branch of the Dominion Department of Mines, having reached a sufficiently advanced stage,
arrangements have been made to experiment on a larger scale,
and for this purpose an electric furnace has been constructed
at Nelson, and G. C. Mackenzie, of the Mines Branch staff,
assigned to the duty of endeavouring to smelt Slocan ores in
sufficient quantity to demonstrate the commercial value of the
reduction process to be used. It is, as yet, too early to make
any statement as to the success or otherwise of the work that
is being: undertaken there.
Iron
Little, if any, progress seems to have been made toward
the utilization of the iron-ores known to occur in different
parts of the Province.    So far as information made public SM*
116
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
goes, there was no advancement in 1913 other than that more
development work was done on some of the deposits of iron-
ore.
Coal and Coke
Preliminary returns received show a gross production in*
1913 of about 2,577,000 long tons of coal, as compared with
nearly 3,026,000 tons in 1912. The quantity made into coke
was 440,000 tons, leaving 2,137,000 tons as the net production
of coal.. The quantity of coke made was rather more than
285,000 long tons, which constitutes a record in production of
coke in the Province, the highest previous year's output having been that of 1905, of. 271,785 tons. For purposes of comparison the following table is shown:
1913.
1912.
1911.
1910.
1909.
Coal, gross ....tons, 2,240 lb.
Less made into
2,576,886
440,192
3,025,709
396,905
2,297,718 3,139,235
104,656 339,189
2,400,600
394,124
'
Coal, net       "
2,136,694
2,628,804'|2,193,062J2,800,046
2,006,476-
Coke made       "
285,1231 264,333
1
66,005
218,029
258,703
When the year opened the Canadian Collieries (Duns-
muir), Limited, had succeeded in considerably increasing the
output from the mines of its Comox Colliery, notwithstanding
that the United Mine Workers of America had for several
months required its members to abstain from working in those
mines owing to the persistence of the company in its determination not to recognize that organization. Having got its-
production almost up to normal quantity at its Comox mines,
the company next gave its attention to its Extension mines,
at which a strike had also been declared by the union. Other
measures having failed to prevent progress being made at
Extension Colliery as well as at Cumberland (Comox Colliery), the United Mine Workers of America declared a strike
at all coal mines on Vancouver Island, with the result that the
miners of the Western Fuel Company, Nanaimo, had to violate their unexpired agreement with that company and cease ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
117
work. The strike also affected the mines of the Pacific Coast
Coal Mines, Limited, operating at South Wellington, Morden,
and Suquash, and of the Vancouver-Nanaimo Coal Mining
Company, working the Jingle Pot mine near Nanaimo. With
the exception of the last-mentioned company, the operators
continue to decline to accede to the demands of the United
Mine Workers of America, and the position at the close of the
year was that the Canadian Collieries Company was working
its Cumberland mines to full ordinary production capacity,
and its Extension mines to about the extent it was doing when
the general strike was called at the end of April; the Western
Fuel and the Pacific Coast Coal Mines Companies were working with comparatively small forces of non-union men, yet
were producing some coal; and the Vancouver-Nanaimo Company had all the union men it could find work for.
While the labour troubles at Vancouver Island mines had
caused a decrease in production of coal to the estimated extent
of approximately 596,000 tons, there were increases in Nicola
and Crows Nest Districts of about 57,000 and 90,000 tons,
respectively, which reduced the.decrease in the coal production
of the Province as a-whole to a net total of about 449,000 tons.
The gross production of the several districts was as follows:
Tons of 2,240 lb.
From Vancouver Island mines    962,620
From Nicola and Similkameen mines 262,768
From Crows Nest mines 1,351,498
Total quantity of coal produced 2,576,886^
Less made into coke   440,192 .
Net quantity of coal produced 2,136,694
Leaving out of account the present interruption to production at some of the Vancouver Island coal mines, the statement appears to be warranted that on the whole the coalmining industry of the Province is in a progressive condition.
That this is so demonstrated particularly by the considerable
developments of mines and large additions to plant and machinery made by three of the four companies operating on Vancouver Island. Some particulars of important development
work and new equipment now referred to were given in the
Annual Report of Minister of Mines for 1912. 118
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
In the Nicola field, the Inland Coal and Coke Company
made the largest output of coal of any in the district—about
116,000 tons, compared with 31,000 tons in 1912. No considerable addition to plant was made. The chief new development work done was driving a new slope—No. 5. High railway freight rates prevented the Nicola Valley Coal and Coke
Company from extending its market, so its output of coal was
comparatively small, about 110,000 tons, as against nearly 143,-
000 tons in 1912. In addition to continuing operation of mines
previously worked, the company opened Nos. 7 and 8 mines.
In No. 7, situated near the top of Coal Gully hill, the main
slope has been sunk 500 feet and is being extended; from this
a number of working-places have been opened off, giving the
mine a present output capacity of nearly 200 tons of coal a
day from a 16-foot seam of excellent coal. In No. 8 there is
a 6-foot 6-inch seam which is promising, but sufficient devel-
, opment has' not yet been done to determine its, value as a producer. The company could mine and ship 750 tons a day if
called upon, but there is not a present demand for so much.
Even the Canadian Pacific Railway Company's requirements
of coal are smaller now than in the past, as many oil-burning
locomotives have been substituted for coal-burners. The Diamond Vale Collieries Company increased its small output from
3,300 tons in 1912 to 6,300 tons in 1913, and the Pacific Coast
Colliery Company made a beginning with a production of 462
tons of coal.
There was little change in the Similkameen field. The
output of 28,800 tons made by the Princeton Coal and Land
Company was only a few hundred tons larger than in 1912.
The United Empire Company made little progress, its output
having been quite unimportant. The Columbia CoaJ and Coke
Company's property changed ownership, and its new owners
commenced to develop a different part of the property to that
in which the first management of the Columbia Company had
done much work without profitable result.
Both the Crows Nest Pass Coal Company and the Hos-
mer Mines, Limited, made a larger production of coal in 1913
than in 1912. The output of the first-mentioned company was
approximately 1,041,000 long tons of coal, gross, or, after
deduction of 333.000 tons made into coke, 708,000 tons net#
Its coke output was 225,480 long tons, as against nearly
219,000 tons in 1912. During the year the company developed
what is known as "B" seam, which lies 320 feet above No. 1 ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
119
-
seam of the Coal Creek measures, and thus provided for a
present addition of about 500 tons a day to the producing-
capacity of its Coal Creek Colliery. . At its Michel Colliery,
the company developed two new mines above the old workings of No. 8 on the north side of the valley, and in this connection a skip incline was constructed to convey the coal down
the mountain to the tipple level, the incline grade starting at
30 per cent, and increasing to 60 per cent, toward the lower
end. The skips or cages carry 8 tons of coal, and are easily
controlled by rotary multiple brakes over a distance of 1,280
feet in eighty seconds. A profitable production is expected
from these new openings in the ensuing year. Much prospecting work was done on the south side of the valley, where
a new seam was found about 150 feet above No. 3 seam. A
working section of about 10 feet of coal of generally good
quality was opened here. As indicating favourable working
conditions throughout, the last year, it may be mentioned that
the output of the company's Coal Creek Colliery exceeded
that of 1910 (1911 was not a full year as regards operation of
mines) by about 230,000 tons, while the quantity of coke made
at the ovens at Fernie was about 9,600 tons greater than that
of the previous record year, and nearly 44,000 tons higher
than the coke production of 1910.. There is promise of considerable improvement at both Coal Creek arid Michel Collieries in 1914, especially at the mines of the latter, and it is
hoped that the economic development work now in progress
at the Coal Creek mines will materially enhance the general
results.
Only a brief summary of the year's operations at the colliery of the Hosmer Mines, Limited, has been obtained. The
output of coal was about 237,500 long tons, gross. Approximately 107,000 tons were used in making coke, leaving a net
output of coal of 130,500 tons. The amount of coke made was
about 59,600 long tons. The increase for 1913 as compared
with 1912 was, therefore, in gross production coal, about
49,000 tons (or 14,000 tons net), and in coke 14,200 tons.
There was not any new mining development during the year.
Improvements and additions to the plant included double-
tracking "B" incline and adding another drum to the engine
operating the same; installing an 8-foot diameter Sheldon-
Keith wheel-fan for ventilating "No. 2 B" south mine; and
providing a steam locomotive for the rock bank and boiler-
coal. VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
At the Corbin Colliery, a fire, due to spontaneous combustion, necessitated the closing of No. 1 mine in April, and
it was kept closed throughout the remainder of the year. No.
4 mine was opened after No. 1 was closed; it is on a seam
which is really a branch off the No. 1 seam, and has a present
production of about 250. tons a day. No. 3 mine, known as
the "Big Showing," was provided with transportation facilities, the railway, to it from Corbin, eight miles in length, having been completed in the first half of the year. This mine
is situated nearly 1,000 feet higher than No. 1, which is near
the level of the valley. In No. 1 mine the coal-seam is nearly
vertical and varies greatly in size. W. W. Leach, of the Geological Survey of Canada, described it as varying from a
minimum thickness of 10 feet to a maximum of nearly 250
feet. This great difference, he said, may be due to compressed
monoclinal folding. At the upper mine the coal has been
stripped of the overburden near the top of the hill, and it is
shown in a synclinal basin about 370 feet in width, the thickness of the coal near the centre having been proved by drilling to be more than 100 feet. During the summer and autumn
coal in No. 3 mine was worked in open-cuts by a steam shovel,
and sent down the switchback standard-gaug'e, railway for
shipment. The snowfall being heavy, open-cut working is not
practicable in winter, but about 150 tons of coal a day is being
mined underground here. A Marcus screen has been purchased for this colliery, but it will not be put in until next
spring.
Of the new coalfields in various parts of the Province
there is little to report so far as concerns the probable early
production of coal. In the Upper Elk River District, so far
as known, there was not any advancement made toward the
utilization of the large quantity of coal occurring in that part
of the Province, which has been estimated by D. B. Dowling,
of the Geological Survey of Canada, as covering an area of
140 square miles, and containing approximately 14,000,000,000
tons of coal that can be mined. Until railway transportation
shall be provided, this important district will remain undeveloped. Neither in the northern part of Cariboo District nor
in the North Thompson River country, in both of which coal
is known to occur, is there present prospect of production.
Prospecting work done on coal-measures on Graham Island
of the Queen Charlotte group, has not yet resulted in any
production of coal worth mentioning. More development
work has been done on coal properties in parts of the Skeena ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
121
District tributary to the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, the
construction of which is now nearing completion, and some
attention has also been given to properties in Groundhog
basin, in the northern part of Skeena District, but the latter
is without transportation facilities, and not much progress has
been made.
Miscellaneous
No production of platinum in 1913 has been reported,
neither from Tulameen District nor from the vicinity of Nelson. Nor has anything more been heard concerning diamonds
from rocks in the Tulameen country, the earlier discovery by
the Geological Survey still remaining purely of scientific
interest.
Some drilling for oil in South-east Kootenay was done,
but as yet without results of commercial importance.
The demand for structural materials—stone, cement, clay
products, etc.—has not been so great latterly as in 1910 and
1911, so the value of the output of this class of non-metallic
minerals was probably lower in 1913, and in the absence of
data on which to base calculations no definite statement can
be made. The marble-quarry in the Ainsworth Mining Division was worked and marble was shipped from it. Near Victoria, on Saanich arm, a second cement-manufactory was(
started, and near Princeton a beginning to produce cement
was also made, but in neither case was a large output made.
The Vancouver-Portland Cement works at Tod inlet continued
to make an important production. The destruction by fire of
the large pottery-works at Victoria has added to the decrease
in production of structural materials, but this loss in output
is only temporary, the erection and equipment of new works
having been provided for.,'Mj| OMlft
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
NEW  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
THE BULKLEY VALLEY
The Bulkley River flows into the Skeena at Hazelton,
but what is known as the Bulkley Valley does not commence until after Moricetown is passed, about thirty miles
from the head of steamboat navigation. The Bulkley, as far
south as Moricetown, is confined to rocky canyons, and the
only- agricultural lands are two patches of prairie not far
north of that place. The Indians at Moricetown have good
gardens and grow good crops of potatoes and other vegetables. The surface soil is a rich sandy loam, with clay subsoil. Not more than two feet of snow is stated to fall in any
part of the valley, but cattle require to be fed from Christmas
until about April 10th.
The valley from Moricetown to Fraser Lake, a distance
of 100 miles, is practically all available for agricultural purposes. The natural vegetation is most luxuriant, and berries
of many kinds extremely prolific. Cottonwood, poplar, small
spruce, and birch form the principal timber, and there is
ample for all local purposes. Where the timber has been
burnt over, open prairie-like spots are frequent, with grass
sometimes reaching a height of 5 feet, mingled with peavine.
"Of its capacity as a fruit-growing. section there can be
no doubt, and with better and cheaper means of transportation there will be a great forward movement. The market
for fruit at the present time is very good, though limited,
but when the Grand Trunk Pacific is completed it will open
up the great market of the Prairie Provinces and the Northwest Territories, and prospective fruit-growers may rest
assured that they will then find a good market for all they
can grow for many years to come.
"The land taken on a whole is fairly easy to clear, and by
the use of stumping-powder large areas can soon be brought
into a fit state for planting."—From Official Bulletin No. 22,
published by the Provincial Government. ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
123
FORT  GEORGE
Fort George is situated at the junction of the Fraser and
Nechaco Rivers, about 450 miles north of Vancouver, 459
miles east of Prince Rupert, and 461 miles west of Edmonton. The strategic importance of this location was recognized
by the Hudson's Bay Company, those trail blazers of Canada's Westward March of Empire, who established a trading
post at this point over a hundred years ago.
The location of Fort George is an ideal one for a city,
from every standpoint of civic requirements. It fronts on
the Nechaco River, a large lake-fed stream, insuring a permanent supply of pure water. Its site is a level bench with
gravelly soil, with an elevation of about 70 feet over the
Nechaco River, affording easy drainage and obviating expensive filling and re-grading operations. There is a Government ferry across the Nechaco River at Fort George, and a
system of Government roads and trails, radiating in every
direction, gives access to the various districts adjoining and
will promote the rapid settlement and development of the
surrounding agricultural lands.
Between Fort George and the Fraser River, and fronting
on this and the Nechaco River, is the Fort George Indian
Reserve, which has been acquired by the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway, on which will be located their station and
yards, roundhouses, shops and other terminal facilities, and
a part of which they will likely use for townsite purposes.
Fronting on the Fraser River, and adjoining the Indian •
Reserve, to the south, is the old Hudson's Bay Post, where
are also located the British Government Land and other
offices for the Fort George District, and south of the Hudson's Bay Post, also fronting on the Fraser River, is South
Fort George, where has grown up quite an enterprising little
town.
Fort George has two banks, a trust company, post office,
telephone and telegraph office, school, two- churches, a hospital, two hotels, a number of restaurants, grocery, dry goods,
general merchandise and hardware stores, drug store, blacksmith shop, sash and door factory, saw mill and planing
mill, barrister, doctor, surveyors, and a number of other
business and professional lines are represented. 124
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
The Grand Trunk Pacific is under construction towards
Fort George, both from the east and from the west, and
should reach Fort George and be completed through to the
coast in 1914. The Pacific Great Eastern, to reach Fort
George from Vancouver, is also under construction from
the southern end. The right-of-way for the former railway
is cleared past Fort George, and grading operations will be
under way on both lines at Fort George early in the summer.
In addition to its railways, Fort George is afforded a
natural transportation system by the great rivers which converge there, these with their tributaries being navigable for
upwards of eleven hundred miles, and which will play an
important part in the development of this great centre.
The valleys of these various rivers contain vast areas of
rich land suitable for agricultural and pastoral pursuits, the
soil being silt or a clay loam. The-more important of these
rivers,- besides the main streams, the Fraser and Nechaco,
are the Mud or Chilacco, the Salmon, the Stuart, the Willow
and the Bear, all of which can be reached by boat or by the
road and trail from Fort George. Most of the land in the
Fort George country is more or less timbered, and there is
no prairie, although it has been burned over in parts and
there are occasional open meadows. Considerable settlement
has already taken place in the district, and the British Columbia Government is reserving for actual settlers all of its
unalienated lands there, which lands may be had under the
liberal pre-emption regulations of the Province. Privately
owned lands may be purchased at from $10.00 to $15.00 per
acre and upwards.
The Peace River district to the north arid north-east of
Fort George, whose natural outlet to the coast and to the
markets of the world will be via Fort George, also contains
vast areas of high-class agricultural lands, much of which are
open prairie or but slightly wooded.
There is plenty 'of rainfall in the Fort George district to
grow crops without irrigation, being about 25 to 35 inches
annually, but without an excess of moisture at any time of
the year. The climate, both winter and summer, is fine.
The summer days are long, warm and sunshiny, promoting
rapid growth of crops, and the nights are cool.    In winter ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
125
the. climate is tempered by the mild Chinook winds, the air
being dry and invigorating and the days clear and bright.
Wheat, oats, timothy, clover, alfalfa, potatoes, beets, turnips, carrots, cabbages, and even tomatoes, cauliflower,
watermelons and other tendef and care-requiring products,
have been successfully grown. Wild fruits, such as strawberries, raspberries, saskatoons, blueberries, etc., grow in profusion, and while no commercial fruits have been raised as
yet, there is little doubt that the hardier varieties of such
fruits as apples, pears, grapes, etc., can be successfully
grown.
An agricultural fair, showing products produced in the
Fort George district, was held at Fort George last fall, and
some of the exhibits were later brought down and shown at
the Provincial Exhibition at New Westminster, and later at
the International Dry Farming Congress at Lethbridge. Exhibits of agricultural products grown near Fort George were
also displayed at the Provincial Fair at New Westminster
during the two preceding seasons, and all these exhibits have
created widespread comment and universal praise at the size
and quality of the products.
That the Fort George district has a great future before it
as an agricultural district has been amply demonstrated, and
there is little doubt that it will in a few years hold a leading
position among the farming districts of the Province.
Fort George is reached by rail to Ashcroft, on the Canadian Pacific, thence by automobile to Soda Creek, 165 miles,
thence by river steamer to Fort George, 155 miles, during
the season of navigation, or by through stage when navigation is closed. Regular stages leave Ashcroft every Monday
and Friday morning,- and occasional special stages are run.
The fare from Ashcroft is $45.50 during navigation, or $62.50
by winter stage, exclusive of meals and lodgings, which are
50 cents each en route at road-hoUses, and 75 cents, each
for meals and $1.00 to $1.50 for berths on steamer. It is
now also authoritatively announced that after navigation
opens in the spring, passengers and freight- will be handled
by way of Edmonton and the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
to end of rail on the Fraser River, thence down the Fraser
direct to Fort George. 126
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
OMINECA DISTRICT
(Information Supplied by the Hazelton Board of Trade)
For many years Hazelton, situated on the Skeena River,
177 miles from Prince Rupert, has prospered as the point of •
supply for a large district o'f varied' resources, being the
administrative headquarters for Omineca District and the
head of navigation on the Skeena River. The Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway, traversing the valleys of the Skeena and
Bulkley, is being rapidly extended through the district, steel
having already penetrated twenty miles east of Hazelton, with
the probability that before the close of the present year trains
will be in operation to Burns Lake, on the eastern boundary
of Omineca District.
. Comprised in the district are large areas of good agricultural land in the valleys of the Skeena, Kispiox and
Bulkley Rivers, in the neighborhood of Babine, Decker,
Burns, Francois, and Ootsa Lakes. In the sections named
there are already many settlers, who have (especially in the
Bulkley Valley) cleared and brought under cultivation a large
acreage, and have effectually demonstrated the value of the
land, which is- admirably adapted to dairying and mixed
farming. The Bulkley Valley Agricultural Association and
Farmers' Institute, a progressive organization with a large
membership, is doing excellent work in the furtherance of
the agricultural interests of the district. Since the beginning
of railway construction the settlers have obtained high prices
for all their produce.
As a mining district, Omineca has long been regarded
as one of the most promising sections of British Columbia.
Recent developments confirm the impression that the mineral resources of this part of the Northern Interior are of
great importance. In the vicinity of Hazelton there are now
three shipping mines, producing silver-lead ore of high grade,
which is sent for reduction to smelters at Trail and Tacoma.
There are also properties of high grade copper ore and silver
lead ore in advanced stages of development, but not yet in a
position to ship. In the Hudson Bay Mountain, Telkwa,
Morice River and Babine sections of the district there are
many other properties which are likely to produce pay ore
as soon as transportation is available.
The anthracite coal measures of the Groundhog district,
on the headwaters of the Skeena, have attracted world-wide ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
127
attention.    A railway from Hazelton to Groundhog is projected.
In the historic Omineca River and, Manson Creek placer
camps there is renewed activity, several companies being now
engaged in hydraulic operations, from which good profits are
reported.
VERNON
(Information Supplied by the Vernon Board of Trade)
Vernon, B. C, has a population of 3,500, is the principal
city of the Okanagan and the seat of the Provincial Government Offices and Court Houses.
It is the supply centre for several rapidly growing towns
and has a large agricultural district within twenty miles of
the city. Its seven hotels are taxed to their capacity during
the summer months.
Electrical industrial power at an extremely low cost has
been generated, and manufacturers appreciate a practically
uninterrupted service. |||j|l
The City of Vernon grants generous concessions to bona
fide manufacturers, and an excellent water power; capable
of producing 20,000 horsepower, is now being developed by
the Canadian Northern Railway which ensures further industrial activity. fejk
Vernon has daily train connection on the Canadian
Pacific Railway main line, and the British Columbia Government has guaranteed the bonds for a branch line to be
built by the Canadian Northern Railway Company from Kam-
loops to Vernon, Lumby, and Kelowna, the same to be completed by the 1st July.
The Canadian Northern has also acquired a charter for
an electrical system radiating from Vernon. 128
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
One of the chief assets of the city is its equitable climate,
which in summer and winter is unsurpassed in Canada.
Vernon has the greatest fruit lands irrigation system in
Canada.
The electric light and water systems are municipally-
owned, and the tax rate is 17 mills with an added 5 mills as
school rates.
KELOWNA
(Information Supplied by the Kelowna Board of Trade)
The City of Kelowna has a population of 3,000 souls.
The district comprises about 65,000 acres of cultivable lands.
Of this, some 8,000 acres are already planted to fruit, and
12,000 acres utilized in mixed farming. The district is irrigated by up-to-date systems with concrete mains, pipes and
flumes, and the water stored in mountain reservoirs with
concrete works, or diverted at high levels from the many
mountain streams.
Apples are the main fruit crop, although prunes, plums,
pears,   peaches,   cherries,   and   small   fruits   are   extensively
Tobacco is now being largely cultivated in Kelowna and
manufactured locally into cigars.
The British North American Tobacco Company, Ltd.,
has a large cigar and tobacco factory. This company
grovvs its own leaf, and will during 1913 employ over 400
hands.
The fruit and produce shipments from this district have
increased from 174 cars in 1907 to over 700 cars in 1912, and
owing to the large acreage that will be bearing fruit in the
course of the next two or three years, these shipments must
soon be tremendously increased.
W
m ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
129
• Situated  here  is  a  large  fruit  canning  establishment,
whose output amounted, in 1912, to over 2,500 tons.
Kelowna has three banks, five churches, and three
public schools. The city owns and operates the electric
light, power, and water plants, and gives an efficient
service.
The assessed value of the city property has risen from
$750,000 in 1907 to $3,900,000 in 1912.
The climatic conditions of our city make it a most attractive residential district.
The mean average temperature is 46 degrees .Fahrenheit. The winters are not severe nor the summers excessively hot. SMflM
130
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
SYNOPSIS  OF  LAND   LAWS
CROWN LANDS
"Crown Lands" mean and include such ungrarited Crown
or public lands as are within, and belong to His Majesty in
right of the Province of British Columbia, and, whether or
not any waters flow over or cover the same.
TIMBER LANDS
Timber lands (that is, lands which contain milling timber to the average extent of 8,000 feet per acre west of the
Cascades—Coast Range—and 5,000 feet per acre east of the
Cascades—Coast Range—to each 160 acres), are not open to
pre-emption, purchase or lease.
By Order in Council, dated December 24th, 1907, the
Government placed a reserve on all timber lands undisposed
of at that date; consequently no more licenses to cut timber
will be issued until otherwise determined.
PRE-EMPTIONS
Crown lands, where such a system is practicable, are laid
off and surveyed into quadrilateral townships, containing
thirty-six sections of one square mile in each.
Any person being head of a family, a widow, or single
man over the age of eighteen years and being a British subject, or any alien, upon making a declaration of his intention
to become a British subject, may, for agricultural purposes,
record any tract of unoccupied and unreserved Crown lands
(not being an Indian settlement and not being timber land),
not exceeding 160 acres in extent.
No person can hold more than one pre-emption claim at
a time. Prior record of pre-emption of one claim and all
rights under it are forfeited by subsequent record or preemption of another claim. ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914.
131
. Land recorded or pre-empted cannot be transferred or
conveyed until a Crown grant has been issued.
Such land, until the Crown grant is issued, is held by
occupation. Such occupation must be a bona fide personal
residence of the settler or his family. |jp|
The settler must enter into occupation of the land within
sixty days after recording, and must continue to occupy it.
Continuous absence for a period longer than two months
consecutively, of the settler or family, is deemed cessation of
occupation; but leave of absence may be granted not exceeding six months in any one year, inclusive of two months'
absence.
Land is considered abandoned if unoccupied for more
than two months, consecutively.
If so abandoned, the land becomes waste land of the
Crown.
The fee on recording is $2.00 (8s.).
The settler shall have the land surveyed at his own expense (subject to the ratification of the boundaries), within
five years from the date of record.
After survey has been made, upon proof in declaration in
writing of himself and two other" persons of occupation for
two years from the date of pre-emption, and of having made
permanent improvements on the land to the value of $2.50
per acre, the settler, on producing the pre-emption certificate, obtains a certificate of improvement upon the payment
of a fee of $2.00.
After obtaining the certificate of improvement and paying for the land, the settler is entitled to a Crown grant in
fee simple.   He pays $10.00 therefor.
The price of Crown lands pre-empted is $1.00 (4s.) per
• acre, which must be paid in four equal instalments, as follows :  First instalment, two years from date of record or preemption, and yearly thereafter, but the last instalment is not
payable till after the survey, if the land is unsurveyed.
Two, three, or four settlers may enter into partnership
with pre-emptions of 160 acres each, and reside on one homestead.    Improvements amounting to $2.50 per acre made on VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
some portion thereof will secure Crown grant for the whole,
conditions of payment being same as above.
Coal and petroleum lands do not pass under grant of
lands acquired since passage of Land Act Amendment of
1899.
No Crown grant can be issued to any alien who may have
recorded or pre-empted by virtue of his declaring his intention of becoming a British subject, unless he has become
naturalized.
The heirs or devisees of the settler are entitled to the
Crown grant on his decease.
PURCHASES
Crown lands may be purchased to the extent of 640 acres,
and for this purpose are classified as first and second class,
according to the report of the surveyor.
Lands which are suitable for agricultural purposes, or
which are capable of being brought under cultivation profitably, or which are wild hay-meadow lands, rank as and
are considered to be first-class lands. All other lands, other
than timber lands, shall rank and be classified as second-
class lands. Timbered lands (that is, lands which contain
milling timber to the average extent of 8,000 feet per' acre
west of the Cascades—Coast Range—and 5,000 feet per acre
east of the Cascades—Coast Range—to each 160 acres), are
not open for sale.
April, 1911: "The minimum price of first-class lands
shall be $10.00 per acre, and that of second-class lands $5.0u
per acre":
Provided, however, that the Chief Commissioner may for
any reason increase the price of any land above the said
prices.
No improvements are required on such lands unless a
second purchase is contemplated. In such case the first purchase must be improved to the extent of $3.00 per acre.
When the application to purchase is filed the applicant
shall deposit with the Commissioner a sum equal to 50 cents ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
133
per acre on the acreage applied for. When the land is finally allotted, the purchaser shall pay the balance of the purchase price.
LEASES
Leases of Crown lands which have been subdivided by
surveys in lots not exceeding 20 acres,.may be obtained; and
if requisite improvements are made and conditions of the
lease fulfilled at the expiration of lease, Crown grants are
issued.
Leases (containing such 'covenants and conditions as
may be thought advisable) of Crown lands may be granted
by the Lieutenant-Goverrior-in-Council for the following purposes :—
(a) For the purpose of cutting hay thereon, for a term
not exceeding ten years;
(b) For any purpose whatsoever, except cutting hay as
aforesaid,   for   a   term   not   exceeding   twenty-one
WMi       years.
Leases shall not include a greater area than 1,000 acres.
Leased lands may be staked by an agent.
EXEMPTIONS
The farm and buildings, when registered, cannot be taken
for debt incurred after registration; and it is free from seizure up to a value not greater than $500.00 (£100 English).
Cattle "farmed on shares" are also protected by an Exemption Act. Pre-emptions, are exempt from taxation for two
years from date of record, and there is an exemption of
$500.00 for four years after record.
HOMESTEADS
The Government of British Columbia does not grant free
homesteads.
The fact of a person having a homestead in another
Province, or on Dominion Government lands in this Province, is no bar to pre-empting Crown lands- in British
Columbia. !$§k 134
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
DOMINION GOVERNMENT  LANDS
All the lands in British Columbia within twenty miles
on each side of the Canadian Pacific Railway main line are
the property of Canada, with all the timber and minerals
they contain (except precious metals). This tract of land,
known as the Raliway Belt, with its timber, hay, water powers, coal and stone, is now administered by the Department
of the Interior of Canada, practically according to the same
laws and regulations as are the public lands in Manitoba,
Saskatchewan, Alberta, and the Territories. Dominion Government Agencies are established at Kamloops and New Westminster. The Dominion Government also owns 3,500,000 acres
of land in the Peace River country, lying between the 120th
and 122nd meridians.
Any British subject who is the sole head of a family, or
any male of the age of eighteen years, may secure a homestead of 160 acres on any unoccupied land within the Railway Belt, on application to the local Land Agent, and on payment of a fee of $10.00. The homesteader must reside on the
land for six months in every year, and cultivate at least 15.
acres for three years, when he will be entitled to a free grant
or patent.
HOW TO SECURE A PRE-EMPTION
Any person desiring to pre-empt unsurveyed Crown lands
must observe the following rules:—
1. Place a post 4 or more inches square and 4 or more
feet high above the ground—a tree stump squared and of
proper height will do—at an angle or corner of the claim, and
mark upon it his name and the corner or angle represented,
thus:
"A. B.'s land, N. E. corner post" (meaning northeast corner, or as the case may be), and shall post a
written or printed notice on the post in the following*
form:
"I, A. B., intend to apply for a pre-emption record of
acres of land, bounded as follows:
Commencing at this post; thence north chains;
thence east chains; thence south chains;
thence west chains (or as the case may be).
"Name (in full),
"Date," ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
135
2. After staking the land, the applicant must make an
application in writing to the Land Commissioner of the district in which the land lies, giving a full description of the
land, and a sketch plan of it, this description and plan to be
in duplicate.   The fee for recording is $2.00.
3. He shall also make a declaration, in duplicate, before
a Justice of the Peace, Notary Public, or Commissioner, in
Form 2 of the "Land Act," and deposit same with his application. In the declaration he must declare that the land staked by him is unoccupied and unreserved Crown land, and not
•in an Indian settlement; that the application is made on his
own behalf, and for his own use for settlement and occupation, for agricultural purposes; and that he is duly qualified
to take up and record land.
4. If the land is surveyed, the pre-emptor must make
application to the Commissioner exactly as in the case of un-
surveyed lands, but it will not be necessary to plant posts.
5. Every pre-emption shall be of a rectangular or square
shape, and 160 acres shall measure either 40 chains by 40
chains (880 yards by 880 yards), or 20 chains by 80 chains
(440 yards by 1,760 yards') ; 80 acres shall measure 20 chains
by 40 chains; and 40 acres, 20 chains by 20 chains. All lines
shall run true north and south and true east and west.
' 6. When a pre-emption is bounded by a lake or river.
or by another pre-emption or by surveyed land, such boundary may be adopted and used in describing the boundaries of
the land.
7. Sixty days after recording the pre-emptor must enter'
into occupation of the land and proceed with improving
same. Occupation means continuous bona fide personal
residence of the pre-emptor or his family, but he and his
familv may be absent for any one period not exceeding: two
months in any year. If the pre-emptor can show good reason
for being absent from his claim for more than two months,
the Land Commissioner may grant him six months' leave.
Absence without leave for more than two months will  be
■looked upon as an abandonment of all rights, and the record
may be cancelled.
8. No person can take up or hold more than one preemption. 136
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
9. The pre-emptor must have his claim surveyed, at his
own expense, within five years from the date of record.
10. The price of pre-empted land is $1.00 per acre, to be
paid for in four equal annual instalments of 25 cents per acre,
the first instalment to be paid two years after record.
11. After full payment has been made, the pre-emptor
shall be entitled to a Crown grant of the land, on payment of
a fee of $10.00.
12. A pre-emption cannot be sold or transferred until
after it is Crown-granted.
13. A pre-emption cannot be staked or recorded by an
agent.
TAXATION H|j
Outside of incorporated cities, towns, and municipalities,
the taxation is imposed and collected directly by the Provincial Government, and expended in public improvements, roads,
trails, wharves, bridges, etc., in assisting and maintaining the
schools, and in the administration of justice.
The rates of taxation imposed by the latest Assessment
Act are as follows:—
On real property z/2 of one per cent, of assessed value
On personal property % of one per cent, of assessed value
On wild   land 4 per cent.
On coal land, Class A 1 per cent.
On coal land, Class B 2 per cent.
On timber land....:,:: 2 per cent.
On income of $2,000 or under l per cent.
On income of $2,000 and not exceeding $3,000 1% per cent.
On income over $3,000 and not exceeding $4,000....1^4 per cent.
. On income over $4,000 and not exceeding $7,000....2     per cent.
On income over $7,000 2J4 per cent.
Discount of 10 per cent, allowed if paid before June 30th,
and the following exemptions from taxation are granted:—
On personal property up to $1,000 (to farmers only).
Farm and orchard products, and income from farm.
On all incomes up to $1,000.
Si ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
137
On pre-empted land for two years from date of record,
and an exemption of $500 for four years after record.
In addition to above taxes, royalty is reserved on coal,
timber, and minerals. There is also a tax on timber, coal,
coke and minerals.
SETTLERS' EFFECTS FREE
Settlers' effects, viz.: Wearing apparel, books, usual and
reasonable household furniture and other household effects;
instruments and tools of trade, occupation, or employment;
guns, musical instruments, domestic sewing machines, typewriters, bicycles, carts, wagons, and other highway vehicles;
agricultural implements, and live stock for the. farm, not to
include live stock or articles for sale, or for use as a contractor's outfit, nor vehicles, nor implements moved by a
mechanical power, nor machinery for use in any manufacturing establishment; all the foregoing, if actually owned
abroad by the settler for at least six months before his
removal to Canada, and subject to regulations by the Minister of Customs: Provided that any dutiable articles entered
as settlers' effects may not be so entered unless brought by
the settler on his first arrival, and shall not be sold or otherwise disposed of without payment of duty until after twelve
months' actual use in Canada.
A settler may bring into Canada, free of duty, live stock
for the farm on the following basis, if he has actually owned
such live stock abroad for at least six months before his
removal to Canada, and has brought them into Canada within one year after his first arrival, viz.: If horses only are
brought in, 16 allowed; if cattle only are brought in, 16
allowed; if sheep only are brought in, 60 allowed; if swine
only are brought in, 60 allowed. If horses, cattle, sheep,
and swine are brought in together, or part of each, the same
proportions as above are to be observed. Duty is to be paid
on the live stock in excess of the number above provided
for. For Customs entry purposes, a mare with a colt under
six months old, is reckoned as one animal; a cow with a
calf under six months old, is also to be reckoned as one
animal. 138
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
BRITISH COLUMBIA OFFERS
To the Capitalist—The most profitable field for investment in the known world.
To the Manufacturer—A great wealth of raw materials.
Unsurpassed shipping facilities. Rapidly increasing markets
at home and in the new Provinces of Saskatchewan and
Alberta; Mexico, Australia, and the Orient.
To the Lumberman—Millions of acres of the finest timber land in the world. An ever-increasing demand for lumber
at home and abroad.
To the Fisherman—Inexhaustible quantities of salmon,
halibut, cod, herring, and other fish".
To the Fruit-grower—Many thousands of acres of land
producing all the hardier fruits, as well as peaches, grapes,
apricots, melons, nuts, etc.
To the Dairyman—Splendid pasture and high prices for
butter, milk, and cream.
To the Poultryman—A cash home market for poultry
and eggs at big prices.
To the Farmer—Large profits from mixed farming and-
vegetable growing.
To the Miner—Three hundred thousand square miles of
unprospected mineral-bearing country.
To the Workingman—Fair wages and a reasonable working day. ANNUAL REPORT, 1913-1914
INDEX
Page
Officers of the Board    2
Standing Committees     3
Membership Roll    4
. President's Address   27
Extracts from Minutes:
Memorial Presented to Hon.
J.  D.  Hazen,  Minister  of
Marine and Fisheries  39
Hon. J. D. Hazen's Reply to
above Memorial  42
Report of the Land  Settlement Committee   42
Agriculture in B. C.:
Home   Production   and   Imports     50
Comparative Values of Production   53
Lumber Industry:
Coast     Lumber     Manufacturers     54
Shipments    from    Hastings
Mills   1  56
Production of Lumber  57
Fishing Industry:
Salmon Pack by Canneries.... 58
Summary of B. C. Fisheries.. 60
Shipping  62
Immigration   66
Customs Returns:
Exports and Imports  67
Shipping, 1912-13   68
Shipping, 1913-14   69
Inland Revenue   70
Declared Exports to the United
States    71
Post Office Returns, 1893-1914.. 72
Banks in Vancouver  73
Banking Returns .., \  74
The City of Vancouver:
Land Registry   75
Building Permits, 1904-1913.. 75
City Property :  76
Balance Sheet  85
Assessment Statement, 1887-
1913   91
Public Schools   93
Location and Area of Parks.. 95
Park Statistics   96
Churches in Vancouver  98
Consular Agents  101
Failures in Canada:
From R. G. Dun & Co 102
From Bradstreets  103
Loans Effected in B. C. Since
Confederation    104
Extracts from Government
Bulletins:
Mining Industry, 1913 105
New British Columbia 122
Synopsis of Land Laws 130
ILLUSTRATIONS.
Canadian-Australian Royal Mail Steamer "Niagara" (Frontispiece)
Water Street, looking east, one year after the fire  16
Hastings Street, looking west, 1914  32
Second Beach, Stanley Park  48
Grand Trunk Pacific  Steamer  "Prince Rupert,"  B.  C.  Coastwise   -
Service   64
Marine Drive, Vancouver  80
Granville Street, looking south from C. P. R. Station  96
British Columbia Salmon Catch, showing 40,000 fish 112 

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