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Twenty-third annual report of the Vancouver Board of Trade. 1909-1910 Vancouver. Board of Trade 1910

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Array Twenty-Third Annual Report 
of the 
Vancouver 
Board of Trade 
1909-1910 
Vancouver, British Columbia 
Canada 
EVANS & HASTINGS 
PRINTERS 
123 HASTINGS ST., W., VANCOUVER, B. C.    Twenty-Third Annual Report 
of the 
Vancouver 
Board of Trade 
1909-1910 
Vancouver, British Columbia 
Canada 
EVANS & HASTINGS 
PRINTERS 
123 HASTINGS ST., W., VANCOUVER, B. C. OFFICERS.
PAST PRESIDENTS
1898-99.
1899-00.
1900-01.
1901-02.
1902-03.
1887-88..D. Oppenheimer
1888-89. .D. Oppenheimer (dec/
1889-90. .E. V. Bodwell (dec.)
1890-91. .R. H. Alexander
1891-92..John Hendry
1892-93..G. E. Berteaux (dec.)  1903-04.
1892-93..W. F. Salsbury 1904-05.
1893-94. .J. C. Keith 1905-06.
1894-95..G. M. Major 1906-07.
1895-96.. H. Bell-Irving 1907-08.
1896-97. . H. Bell-Irving 1908-09.
1897-98..Wm. Godfrey 1909-10.
. Wm. Godfrey
.C. E. Tisdall
. F. Buscombe
|j|. F. Burns (dec.)
.W. H. Malkin ~
.H. T. Lockyer
.H. McDowell
.A. B. Erskine
.R. P. McLennan
.W. J. McMillan
.E. H. Heaps
.H. A. Stone
OFFICERS FOR 1910-11.
PRESIDENT
EWTNG  BUCHAN
VICE-PRESIDENT
A. G. McCandLess
secretary
Wm. Skene
council
(|2 MARKED (*) BEING THE BOARD OF ARBITRATION)
* Alexander, R. H.
*Bell-Irving, H,
*Erskine, A. B.
*Godfrey, Wm.
*Heaps, E. H.
*MacKenzie, W. G.
*Malkin,W. H.
*McLennan, R. P.
* Ramsay, J as.
Rogers, Jonathan
Stewart, F. R.-
*Stone, H. A.
*Tisdall, C. E.
Von Cramer, D.
*Walker, Fred T. STANDING   COMMITTEES.
1910-11
THE  FIRST  NAME  ON  EACH  TO BE CONVENER
LEGISLATION
R. L. Reid, F. R. McD. Russell, C. E. Tisdall,
A. B. Erskine,       W. M. Griffin,       Alfred Shaw.
railway and navigation
W. G. Mackenzie,      John Hendry,       W. Dalton,
E. S. Knowlton,       A. K. Evans,       P. G. Shallcross.
FREIGHT RATES
H. A. Stone, R. P. McLennan, C. E. Tisdall, W. H. Malkin,
E. H. Heaps,    W. J. McMillan,    W. G. Mackenzie,
F. Buscombe,    Jas. Ramsay,    Geo. H. Cottrell.
TRADE AND COMMERCE
W. H. Malkin,    W. H. Ker,    W. Godfrey,    E. W. Leeson,
H. A. Stone, G. Woodward,  F. T. Walker,  H. T. Lockyer,
Gilbert Blair,    F. R. Stewart,    R. H. Alexander.
fisheries
H. Bell-Irving,      A. L. Hager,      W. H. Barker,
John Wallace.
lumber
R. H. Alexander, E. H. Heaps, J. E. Tucker, J.W. Hackett,
T. Kirkpatrick,    H. H. Spicer.
MINING
C. S. Douglas,    E. P. Gilman,    C. S. Gzowski,
A. C. Flumerfelt.
INSURANCE
E. H. Heaps, R. P. McLennan, W. H. Malkin,  H. A. Stone,
D. Von Cramer,    P. G. Shallcross.
port
C. G. Johnson,    R. H. Alexander,    S. F. Mackenzie,
F. W. Evans,    Thos. H. Worsnop.
ANNUAL REPORT AND FINANCE
Wm. Godfrey,  F. C. Cotton, C. E. Tisdall, F. T. Walker.
civic
Jonathan Rogers,    H. G. Ross,    C. S. Douglas.
BOARD ROOMS AND SECRETARY'S OFFICE
Molsons Bank Building, Hastings Street, Vancouver, B. C.  Annual Report, 1909-1910
Hastings St.
Hastings St.
Hastings Ro
Hastings St.
Homer St.
Hastings St.
Molsons Bid
Pender St.
Hastings St.
Alexander
Cambie St.
Water St.
Pender St.
Cordova St.
Hastings St.
Hastings St.
Hastings St.
Columbia At
Powell St.
Beattie St.
Pender St.
Hastings St.
Hastings St.
Homer St.
Seymour St.
Vancouver
Homer St.
Hastings St.
Pender St.
Water St.
Hastings St. Vancouver Board of Trade         Annual Report, 1909-1910 13
TWENTY-THIRD ANNUAL MEETING
OF THE
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
MARCH 8TH, 1910
 ••«	
PRESIDENT'S   ADDRESS
To the Members of the Vancouver Board of Trade:
Gentlemen :—
In reviewing your past year's deliberations, the subject
of freight rates is the most important that has engaged your
attention, and in' speaking of it, I would first wish to touch
on the great progress made in this City of Vancouver, in
justification of the enlarged scope and greater objects eon-
tended for in this connection by your Freight Rates' Committee.
The year 1909 will be remembered as the great turning
point in the history of the City; as the year in which the
Port and City of Vancouver, on account of their phenomenal growth and activity, gained universal recognition. The
City having advanced from one of progress and youthful
promise to a City certain of becoming not only one of the
greatest commercial highways and Coast Cities on the American Continent, Tbut a metropolis that will one day vie with
the largest city in the Dominion. These views are endorsed
by commercial experts, transportation directors, politicians
and financiers, whose outspoken opinions are backed with
broad knowledge and practical experience, and have stamped
Vancouver as being the economic western gateway for the
commerce of the Dominion between one hemisphere and another, and without a rival as a link in the direct chain of
strategic Imperial connections.
These widely recognized facts, combined with the enterprising and progressive spirit of the West and the general
prosperity of the Province, have been a stimulant to trade,
and have naturally created a still more active dealing in the
quickly advanced values of real estate, attracting investors,
and resulting by an increase of capital and by a liberal spending of gains in a much greater volume of profitable business
being done in every branch of trade.   It is true that part 14
Vancouver Board of Trade
is due to these extraordinary conditions which cannot last
always, and that wise merchants will consider the bearing
these changed conditions and speculative dealings will have
on future trade. Yet, the assured business and industrial
development in sight with the building of two additional
transcontinental railways, and that of the Chilliwack and
other railway extensions through the Province, warrant
the confidence that the coming year will show great strides
in advance of the past one in every respect.
As instances of the City's growth, I quote these particulars :—
The Post Office receipts for the current year are 25 per
cent, ahead of last year.
The population is 100,000, and, possibly, considerably
more.
Bank clearings for 1909 are 290 millions odd, compared
with 183" millions in 1908, and with 75 millions five years
ago.
Customs duties, which in 1900 were $900,000, are expected to reach 4 millions for the year ending March 31st.
The B. C. Electric Railway Co.'s receipts have increased
50 per cent, in one year, the directors authorizing an expenditure of 6 millions in extended services for 1910.
The number of real estate transfers in 1909 were 10,832
against 8,824 in 1908.
Building permits in 1909 were 7% millions; in 1908
they were 6 millions, and in 1904, 2 millions.
Revenue of the Vancouver Land Registry Office increased from $10,641 in 1900 to $148,000 in 1909.
The City's assessed value of lands and improvements
in 1900 was 19% millions; last year 72% millions, and this
year 106% millions.
Beyond these speaking figures is the brighter outlook
for manufactories in this City, and for extending the commerce of the Coast to interior and Prairie points. The
changed conditions in favor of both of these are the greatly
increased facilities for getting merchandise and raw materials by water to our City at very faVorable rates; and in
addition, in regard to manufacturing, is the fact that the
cost of living has increased so much in other manufacturing centres, as to dispel the great difference that did exist
in comparison with this City. There remains only the one
question, that of discriminating freight rates against us, Annual Report, 1909-1910 15
which discrimination, concisely, is, that to move a pound
or ton of freight other than natural products of the Province to points Eastward, it costs us on an average, and
roughly speaking, 50 per cent, more than it costs to move
the same freight the same number of miles Westward, from
Winnipeg, Montreal or other Eastern, cities.
Therefore, recognizing the certainty of a great future
for the City, you have wisely looked beyond our present
confined sphere of business operations, and put a right estimation of what future expansion will need, and what it is
our birthright to expect; by demanding that Vancouver
and the Western Ports of the Dominion be recognized as
having a right to the same privileges and consideration by
governments and railways, to enable them to expand and
extend their business Eastward to the heart of the Continent and abroad, by equal freight rates and Port facilities,
as has already been given to the Ports and Cities on the
Atlantic seaboard, to enable those cities to extend their
trade Westward. The justice of this view is more apparent
when we consider that this Province, as the youngest child
of the Dominion family, did not enter Confederation simply
to become an inactive and very profitable customer for the
favored Eastern manufacturers and farmers, to be tied and
confined by prohibitive freight rates, but with rights, to
receive from the head of the family or Federal Government
and from the transportation companies, the same proportion of watchful intent, the same share of assistance by public works and of commissions put in operation for that purpose, to enable us to develop our trade and industries, as
is given to the older children of the family. •
This principle which your Freight Rates Committee
is contending for is reasonable and of the greatest importance to the future welfare of the Province as a whole, and
I am sure you will not rest in your efforts until you have
fully accomplished your object, and until Vancouver is recognized as the Western gateway of the Dominion, as Montreal may be styled the Eastern; and that rates, both freight
and passenger, on our great transcontinental highways shall
be made from the Pacific eastward to a half-way point,
equivalent to those levied from the Atlantic Ports westward
for equal distances.
Tour Committee have already given due notice and outlined our claim before the Railway Commission, and will
present it when they sit here in April, and I trust the untir- 16
Vancouver Board of Trade
 ing efforts of that Committee will have their reward in favorable results.
The inequality of fares charged to commercial travellers in this Province, as compared with those charged to
travellers coming from Eastern Canada and travelling over
the same ground, is also made a special part of our application. When we consider that our rate is 3c. per mile
as against a special rate of l%c. to Eastern men, and that
it costs a traveller of a British Columbia merchant $240 to
travel 8,000 miles in our own Province as against $100 for
the same privilege to travellers coming from Eastern Canada, and that as there are over 800 B. C. travellers, this
Province is being sur-taxed over $100,000 per annum; then
we realize the injustice being done to our merchants and
industries.
CANADIAN   NORTHERN   RAILWAY.
In connection with freight rates, the Canadian Northern agreement was a matter of paramount importance to
the best interests of Vancouver, and while we heartily welcomed the advent of further transcontinental lines, particularly of the Canadian Northern as coming direct from
Northern Alberta to our City, the Board considered that the
Government, in giving such liberal financial aid to the Railway, should have inserted such terms in the guarantee
agreement as would insure a limitation of freight and passenger rates to the nearest possible equality with those
charged on other sections of the system. The Board, having
•first strongly urged this point upon the Provincial Government, were given an opportunity to meet the representatives
of the Canadian Northern Railway and the Government in
Victoria, at which eleven members, accompanied by two
delegates from the City Council, were present. Recognizing
the vital importance of this question to British Columbia's
future progress, the Board's view was urged in the strongest manner possible, and while we regret the Government
did not act on the lines suggested by your Committee, it is
claimed that control of freight and passenger rates has been
obtained.
How the arrangement made will eventually work out,
it is difficult to foresee, but we can only hope for the best'
and if that best is for the benefit of the commerce and industries of this Province, such benefits are chiefly due to the
action of this Board. Annual Report, 1909-1910 17
THE HARBOUR.
Regarding the Harbour, it is gratifying to note the
great increase in shipping entering and leaving this Port.
As instances of this, I mention that the China Mutual Line
brought 42,591 tons, as compared with 33,328 tons in 1908,
and took out 16,368 tons, as against 10,868 tons in 1908, a
total increase of nearly 50 per cent. The Canadian Mexican
Line, in exports and imports chiefly from England, handled
25,600 tons in ten monthhs. Our magnificent natural harbour is known as one of the cheapest in the world for shipping to enter; and a leading factor of your harbour considerations has been, and I trust, always will be, that this
desirable state of things should not be changed.
EXPORT OF GRAIN.
Regarding the export of grain, there has been shipped
to Mexico 200,000 bushels, and to Europe about 60,000 bushels. While this is much less than was anticipated, I am<
able to say that arrangements for the erection of an elevator
by a company, with independent water-frontage, is so far
advanced as to warrant the expectancy that they will be
able to handle this year's crop, when it is ready for shipment.
HARBOUR COMMISSION AND IMPROVEMENTS.
The question of the placing of Vancouver Harbour under
a Board of Commissioners, was made the object of a special
delegation to Ottawa by the Civic authorities in March last
—Messrs. W. W. B. Melnnes and F. Buscombe accompanying it as representatives of this Board. The deputation was
courteously received and was assured that the matter would
be carefully considered, and further that a survey of the
Narrows would be made and a dredge be put to work on the
fairway in False Creek.
Subsequently the Hon. Mr. Pugsley visited Vancouver
and agreed that the dredging and widening of the channel
in the First Narrows would be proceeded with, an appropriation of $200,000 having been recently made for this purpose, and further assurances were given as recently as last
week to our Vancouver member in the Federal House.
In December, the Harbour Commission question again
became active, and upon careful consideration by a Special
Committee, a report was accepted and adopted by the Board
"that under present circumstances the appointment of a
Harbour Commission is premature  and inadvisable."     A 18
Vancouver Board of Trade
Committee presented reasons for this view at several meetings of City officials and delegations from the Municipalities
interested, and the question was finally deferred and left
to the call of the Chairman (the Mayor of the City).
HARBOUR REGULATIONS.
It is satisfactory to be able to report that the new Regulations for the better conduct of traffic and safety to shipping in Vancouver Harbour were duly gazetted, and became
effective on 14th July last.
SHIPPING OF SEAMEN.
This vexed question, which seems fraught with so many
abuses, received considerable attention at the hands of a
Special Committee, whose report closed with the suggestion
"that the deputy shipping masters be done away with, and
the restrictions against parties supplying crews be repealed
or the introduction of a system of licensing by the shipping
masters on recommendation of the Board of Trade, so as to
contract with anyone who could supply the men."
I am pleased to be able to state on authority, that although the Board's suggestions have not yet been carried
out, that owing in a great measure to the appointment of a
new shipping master, who has strictly carried out certain
regulations, the abuses aimed at have been greatly mitigated; crews have been found when needed by the Sailors'
Institute, and while the present arrangements are not yet
perfect, crimping, so far as Vancouver is concerned, has
been practically done away with.
DEADMAN'S ISLAND.
One of the first subjects which engaged the attention
of the Board during the past year was the renewed attempt
made to obtain possession of Deadman's Island in perpetuity, by virtue of what is known as the Ludgate lease.
Following upon the stand taken by the Board in 1899,
strong opposition was presented through our Member in
Ottawa, and a Special Committee took up the question exhaustively and jointly with the Park Commissioners urged
the City Council to oppose the pretensions of Mr. Ludgate
at all points, and to preserve this valuable property for the
benefit of the public.
It is gratifying to know that the claim of the City to
possession of the Island as a part of Stanley Park, has re- Annual Report, 1909-1910 19
cently been affirmed by the Supreme Court of British Colombia.
GREAT   NORTHERN   RAILWAY.
The question of a proposed agreement between the City
and the G. N. Ry. Co., regarding the acquisition of certain
portions of False. Creek for terminal purposes, was considered at a Special Board Meeting, held on 27th August, on
which occasion Mr. A. E. Howard very clearly presented
the ease on part of the Railway Company.
Subsequently a resolution was adopted and forwarded
to the City Council, advocating that the City of Vancouver
should retain control of the bed of False Creek; that expert
advice be obtained as to the best means of dealing with the
whole question in the interest of the City, and that if the
riparian rights have to be acquired, that these should be
expropriated by the City.
LOCAL RAILWAY ACCOMMODATION.
The questions of re-establishment of the Agassiz train
on the C. P. R., and of regular service on the south bank
of the Fraser by the G. N. R., have been urged, and it is
pleasing to know that both are now in operation, as well
as a new daily train on the C. P. R. from and to Revelstoke.
FISHERIES  PROTECTION.
It is gratifying to know that an increase in the number
of cruisers is being provided for the more adequate protection of our most important deep sea fisheries, and that
the question of definite jurisdiction in Hecate Straits is also
under consideration.
PROVINCIAL HIGHWAYS.
A resolution was adopted advocating, to the Minister
of Public Works, Victoria, that steps should be taken to
connect the various sections of roads in the Province, so as
to form a continuous highway from the Coast to Alberta.
TWO-CENT POSTAGE WITH FRANCE.
A petition from the "Chambre de Commerce Franeaise"
of Montreal, urging the establishment of two-cent postage
between Canada and France, was endorsed as a further step
towards the introduction of universal penny postage. 20
Vancouver Board of Trade
SUNDRY  MATTERS.
Among others, the following subjects have received the
attention of the Board during the year:—
Reduction of freight rates to the Yukon.
United States lumber duties.
Daylight Saving Bill.
Coinage of Canadian gold coins, silver dollars and
nickels.
Suggestion to appropriate 500 acres of Point Grey reserve as part of University appropriation fund.
Suppression of professional gambling on race tracks.
The question of cold storage space on the Australian
mail steamers.
The necessity of a new City Hall.
Supporting the application to the Provincial Government that the proposed bridge over the Second Narrows
should be made a public utility as a road and railway bridge
accessible to all, and that the Government make an appropriation towards its construction, which application has now
been granted on the lines indicated.
And opposition to a second telephone system in the City.
ASSISTANCE TO THE NAVY.
At a Special Meeting, held 24th March last, the Board
put itself on record by telegraphing to Sir Wilfrid Laurier
•the opinion "that the Dominion of Canada should at once
offer to the Imperial authorities a sufficient sum to build a
modern Dreadnought of the strongest type."
LORD STRATHCONA.
The Board had the pleasure of presenting an address
to Lord Strathcona on the occasion of his visit to Vancouver
in August last, and of taking part in a banquet given to
his Lordship at the Hotel Vancouver, on 31st August. The
address, and his Lordship's reply, will appear in the Annual
Report.
GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC.
The Board had the pleasure of entertaining Sir Chas.,
Rivers Wilson, President Hayes and other leading officials Annual Report, 1909-1910 21
of that Company as their guests while passing through the
City, and received from them the assurance that after the
completion of their main line to Prince Rupert, a branch
from some convenient point will be built to Vancouver.
SIR THOMAS SHAUGHNESSY.
Your Council had the pleasure of a special interview
with Sir Thomas Shaughnessy, President of the Canadian
Pacific Railway Company, on 22nd September, at which the
principal subjects discussed were the building of elevators
or other provision for the storage and shipment of grain at
Vancouver; the desire of better freight rates from this
Coast, particularly to the Boundary Country'and Alberta;
and the question of assisting immigration to this Province
by the granting of more favorable transcontinental rates
for immigrants—all of which, the Council was assured,
would receive careful consideration, and in particular that
when the necessity arises the grain question will be amply-
provided for.
SEVENTH CONGRESS OF CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE OF THE
EMPIRE.
This Board was for the second time ably represented
. at the Congress by Mr. R. H. Alexander, who attended the
meetings in Sydney, N. S. W., and afterwards accompanied
the delegates to Melbourne and New Zealand. Mr. Alexander's interesting address to the Board, on 7th of December,
will be incorporated in the Annual Report, of which it will
form an important feature.
INDUSTRIES OF THE PROVINCE.
Re industries of the Province, of which full details will
be given in the Annual Report, I would briefly say that
Mining in 1909 (according to reports which are subject to
revision), notwithstanding strikes, want of coke, and legal
and financial difficulties, resulted in a production of $24,-
040,000, or about $200,000 in excess of 1908, and nearly
$850,000 less than the average of 1906, 1907 and 1908.
There was a considerable reduction in the market value of
Copper produced, which was more than made up in Coal
and Zinc. The legal difficulties of the Slocan Star Mine
being over, that district will show renewed energy; and various Boundary properties having been equipped with improved power and machinery, we may hope, that bar unforeseen drawbacks, 1910 will be a good mining year. 22
Vancouver Board of Trade
The Lumber produced in 1909 is estimated at 12 million dollars, which is equal to the best year in the history
of the industry, and the outlook for 1910 is so bright that a
considerable increase may be anticipated in all its many
branches, whose direct influence on the prosperity of the
Province is very far-reaching.
Mill owners complain that notwithstanding active business, that there has been little or no- margin of profit for.
them, but that.the retailer gets the lion's share, and in the
interests of this important industry it is desirable that without increasing prices, a reasonable proportion of profits
should be received by all engaged in it.
As to Fisheries, the total production is estimated as
likely to exceed that of last year; for Fraser River salmon
1909 was a "big run" year, but Canadian fishermen had
to contend not only with adverse weather and disappointing conditions, but the regulations and a closed period of
42 hours, which were observed—as against regulations and
a closed period of 36 hours on the U. S. side on Puget Sound,
which were not observed. The pack was 567,203 eases, as
compared with 877,136 cases in 1905, and 990,252 in 1901.
The Puget Sound catch was greater than in 1905. The new
regulations, framed by representatives of both U. S. and
Canadian Governments to govern fishing on both sides of
the line, will, we trust, be made law, and rigorously enforced,
to the permanent advantage of both countries and for the
propogation of the fish to the future benefit of the industry.
The Skeena River pack was also disappointing, being
only 140,739 cases, as compared with 209,177 in 1908, or an
average of 177,000 for 1906, 1907 and 1908. Federal regulations are blamed for this small pack, and no doubt when
proper representations are made, this year's experience will
lead to modifications of these, in the interests of the industry.
The total British Columbia salmon pack was 967,920
cases, or 200,000 less than in 1905, and 270,000 less than
1901. As the entire Pacific Coast catch is estimated at 5,-
000,000 cases, it seems conclusive that our canners are not
securing a reasonably fair proportion of the fish that should
come into our waters.
FRUIT INDUSTRY.
The Fruit Farms of British Columbia suffered considerably from severe frosts, but loss seriously than at first re- Annual Report, 1909-1910 23
ported, and as great headway has been made in new plantings, the future prospects of this growing industry are
most promising. The proposition to hold a Canadian National Apple Show in Vancouver this fall is deserving of
every encouragement it can be given, in the interest alike
of the City, the Province and the industry itself.
Tobacco is now being grown with reported good results
in the Okanagan.
RE MANUFACTURING.
The great developments of manufacturing industries in
the Province, roughly estimated by the Provincial Government at a production of 30 millions, is the most important
factor in the year's prosperity. New provincial industrial
companies were chartered during the year, with authorized
capital aggregating 48 millions, not including extra provincial companies, and after making a liberal allowance for
unlikely schemes, this shows an active interest in industrials.
The average resident knows so little of this development
that the pamphlet being prepared by the Tourist Association
which will embrace this question, will be of special interest
to us all; and it seems at this stage of the City's progress
desirable that a special branch of the Tourist Association,
or a new Industrial Development Association, should be
formed to carry on the special work of encouraging industries. In this connection, we may note that in the City of
Winnipeg a joint committee of the- City Council and Publicity Commissioner are preparing to announce special low
rates for electric power to manufacturers, there being under
construction a municipal plant for that purpose; Vancouver
cannot afford to be behind in such matters.
The important subject of Agricultural development was
again taken up in May last, on a paper being read showing
the desirability of practical action towards the preparation
of agricultural lands for settlement. After careful consideration, and as a necessary means to accomplish the object,
the following recommendation was urged by a Committee
on the Provincial Government:—"That the time has arrived
when steps should be taken to organize a Department of
Agriculture and Immigration, such department to have sufficient funds at its disposal to enable it to efficiently carry
on its work.'' I think it is a matter of regret that no action
has yet been taken by the Government in the direction suggested. Since that date the imports of agricultural produce
has increased from 7 to 11 millions.   I purposely make this 24
Vancouver Board of Trade
subject my last word to you, as it was also my first as your
President, and to again remind you how, as a Province,
we are chiefly dependent on our three great natural industries of Lumbering, Mining and Fisheries; and that while
the Province, and Vancouver in particular, is enjoying a
time of progress and prosperity, this is owing considerably
to conditions that must be partly classed as special and
unstable, and that there is evidence in our contentment of
neglecting to give due importance to that which is the foundation of prosperity—"AGRICULTURE"—taken in its
widest sense. The great increase in consumption as compared with that of production, in the interests of political
economy; the necessity of a reserve source of staple production; the desirability of securing food supplies nearer
home than at present, particularly in the interests of manufacturing, are good reasons why a portion of the splendid
surplus at the Government's control should be used in accordance with your recommendation.
It is true 4 million is to be devoted to public works;
$117,000 for agriculture, and a liberal allowance for surveys; but in the details of these no suggestion is made of
even endeavoring to find some practical means of encouraging settlement, by clearing lands, either owned or which
could be sold to settlers, or by any other means.
A recent article by Mr. R. E. Gosnell on this subject
ably sets forth, in his valuable opinion, the reasonable possibilities of the views urged by your Committee upon the
Government.
NEW BOARD ROOMS.
A Committee has been considering an improvement in
our Board of Trade quarters, and hopes at an early date
to put before you a proposal that, we trust, will meet our
requirements for many years to come, and have your approval.
Membership on the roll, March, 1909   163
New members      73
236
Two members of the Board, Mr. M. T. Quigley
and Mr. Thos. Foster, passed away during
the year, and four retired, leaving a present
membership of    230   Annual Report, 1909-1910 25
Number of Board Meetings, 15; average attendance, 30.
Number of Council Meetings, 15; average attendance, 10.
The increase in membership and average attendance,
and of interest in the work of the Board, have been well
maintained in comparison with increased values of mercantile interests and the subjects demanding the Board's attention.
I wish to specially thank the Vice-President for his able
and obliging support, particularly during my absence in the
summer; also the members of the Council and the Secretary, who have so materially assisted me in endeavoring to
carry out my work during the year.
HENRY A. STONE,
President. 26
Vancouver Board of Trade
SECRETARY'S  REPORT.
Financial Statement,  1st January to 31st  December,  1909.
RECEIPTS.
Balance in Bank and in hand, January 1st, 1909. $2,258 56
Dues collected    $3,725 00
Entrance Fees         790 00
Rent  of Rooms      202 50
Savings  Bank Interest        64 40
      4,781 90
Transferred from Special Account  125 45
Total  $7,165 91
EXPENDITURE.
Printing, Stationery and Binding $ 251 50
Postages and Sundries  168 06
Caretaker and Elevator  78 00
Electric  Light     17 12
Telegrams     140 64
Telephone    46 20
Advertising     58 05
File of three daily papers  76 50
Rent     300 00
Secretary      1,350 00
Total, Ordinary Expenses  $2,486 07
Special Expenses—
Delegates to Calgary Convention $ 225 00
Expenses   Railway   Commission,   including
Victoria and Seattle  416 70
Expenses re Insurance Bill  136 60
Contribution re Bill of Lading  150 25 .
Deputation re Agriculture  53 50
Re Selkirk Memorial  11 00
Re  Second Narrows Bridge  23 00
Australian Delegates    75 00
Other Visitors     16 00
      1,107 05
Annual Report (3,500 copies)—
Printing and Envelopes $   605 50
Photos and Half-tones      117 41
Postage           50 00
         772 91
Balance in Bank of B. N. A. and in, hand  2,799 88
Total  $7,165 91
BALANCE SHEET.
LIABILITIES—
31st December, 1909         NIL
ASSETS—
Balance in Bank and in hand $2,799 88
Dues in arrears  (good)      157 50
Rent outstanding          32 50
Furniture         100 00
Library  1,100 00
$4,189 88
A. B. ERSKINE, WM. SKENE,
ALFRED SHAW, Secretary.
Auditors.
L Annual Report, 1909-1910 27
EXTRACTS FROM  MINUTES
RE  DEADMAN'S   ISLAND.
Report presented at Board Meeting, held 4th May,
1909 :—
The Committee appointed by the Board, as per resolution of March 9th last, desires respectfully to report as follows:
The Order-in-Council authorizing a lease of Stanley
Park Reserve to the City was passed in 1887. The lease of
Deadman's Island was given to Mr. Ludgate on February
14th, 1899, and the second lease containing some amendments to the former lease to Mr. Ludgate, was made on
April the 4th, 1900. The lease is renewable avery 25 years,
the present rent being $500 per annum—the amount of rent
to be adjusted at the end of each twenty-five year period.
No privilege to assign the lease is given without the
consent of the Government, and the Government retains the
right of expropriation.
When Mr. Ludgate attempted to take possession of the
property ten years ago under his lease, the City authorities
resisted energetically, after which the matter was taken up
by the Province and the case came finally before the Privy
Council.
Legal opinion has been received by your Committee,
which goes to show that the Privy Council decided that the
rights to the Stanley Park Reserve' were vested in the Dominion, and further that the Island formed a part of Stanley
Park Reserve. It thus appears that the lease was granted
to Mr. Ludgate in error.
On the 19th inst., the Committee met the City Council,
along with the Park Commissioners. The resolution of the
Vancouver Board of Trade, dated February the 20th, 1899,
was submitted, also the resolution of the Annual Meeting of
the Board on March 9th, last.
Your Committee urged the City Council to take action
on the lines of the latter resolution, and further urged the
desirability of the City taking the best legal opinions on the
question. Whatever the results of the legal opinion might
be, the City Council was 'urged, as guardians of the public
interest, to make strong representations to the Government 28 Vancouver Board of Trade
to serve cancellation of the lease or transfer to the representatives of the City, to be held by them for public purposes, and generally to oppose the pretensions of Mr. Ludgate or his representatives at all points.
The Park Commissioners strongly urged similar views,
contending that the Island rightfully belonged to the City,
and that united action only was required to preserve this
valuable property for the benefit of the public.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Yours truly,
(Signed)    RICH. H. ALEXANDER,
C. GARDINER JOHNSON,
H. BELL-IRVING.
FREE   IMPORT   OF   U.   S.   LUMBER   UNJUST   TO   CANADIAN
MILLS.
Resolution adopted at Board Meeting, 6th July, 1909:—
"Whereas, according to the U. S. official returns, the
export of boards, deals and planks from Puget Sound to
Canada were, for 1907, $4,124,601, and for 1908, $4,132,110,
showing a large importation of rough lumber that rightly
should be supplied by Canadian mills;
"Be it Resolved, that the continued importation of
rough lumber is an increasing injustice to B. C, is contrary
to the spirit of Confederation, being a severe hindrance to
inter-Provincial trade, and is a stumbling block to a fair
exchange of products between the Western Provinces of
Canada;
"That the Secretary be instructed to send a copy of this
resolution to the Board of Trade, Winnipeg, Calgary and
Edmonton, and other Boards in the Northwest Provinces,
asking them to take this into consideration in conjunction
with the last resolution passed by this Board on the subject,
and to use their influence with the Dominion Government
to have this injustice put right by placing a duty of $2.00
per M. on rough lumber and 30c per M. on shingles. Further copies to be sent to the Ministers, the members for B.
C, and Mr. Templeman." Annual Report, 1909-1910 29
SEVENTH CONGRESS OF CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE OF THE
EMPIRE.
Resolutions adopted at Monthly Meeting held on 6th
July, 1909:—
COMMERCIAL RELATIONS BETWEEN THE MOTHER COUNTRY
AND HER COLONIES AND  DEPENDENCIES.
"That the Vancouver Board of Trade endorses the motion of the London Chamber of Commerce (England).
"Whereas, the Fourth and Fifth Congress of Chambers
of Commerce of the Empire expressed the opinion that the
bonds of the British Empire would be materially strengthened by a mutually beneficial commercial policy;
"Whereas, it is the opinion of this Congress that it is in
the interests of the Empire that steps should be taken towards consummating such an arrangement;
"Whereas, the Sixth Congress, held in London in 1906,
urged upon His Majesty's Governments in the United Kingdom and in the various colonies and dependencies the advantage of granting preferential treatment in their respective markets on a reciprocal basis, each to the other, the different parts of the Empire more rapidly developed and Imperial commerce thus increased;
"Be is therefore Resolved, that this Congress, whilst
re-affirming the foregoing, urges upon the Governments of
the Empire that they treat this matter as of present, practical importance, and that the organizations represented at
this Congress pledge themselves to press their respective Governments to take such action at the next Imperial Conference as will give effect to the principle advocated in this
resolution.''
DEFENCE OF THE EMPIRE.
To move as follows:—
"Whereas, the maintenance of the security and peace of
all parts of the Empire is the first duty of every citizen;
"And Whereas, it is desirable that each should personally be fitted to do his share;
"Therefore Be It Resolved, that this Congress is of opinion that some form of military or naval training should be
given to all the able-bodied youth of the Empire, and that 30
Vancouver Board of Trade
members undertake to urge upon their respective Governments the desirability of formulating schemes to carry this
idea into effect."
WEIGHTS, MEASURES AND CURRENCY.
To re-affirm the motion of this Board to the Sixth Congress : '' That it is advisable to adopt the Metric System of
Weights and Measures within the Empire, and that His
Majesty's Governments and the Governments of the self-
governing colonies be urged, to take the necessary steps to
make use of the Metric Weights and Measures compulsory,
and, further, to support the motion of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association: "That this Seventh Congress of
Chambers of Commerce of the Empire recommends the appointment by the Imperial Government of a Royal Commission who shall investigate, and, if possible, recommend a uniform system of weights, measures and currency to be adopted throughout the Empire."
EMIGRATION.
To repeat the motion of this Board to the Sixth Congress: "That it is desirable that Chambers of Commerce
throughout the Empire should lend their assistance in diverting the flow of British emigration and British capital to
British possessions instead of to foreign countries."
TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION.
To endorse the motion of the London Chamber of Commerce—"That an important development in the direction of
Imperial commerce would be facilitated by a reduction of
telegraphic charges within the Empire and that the respective Postal Departments of the various Governments be requested to bring forward a combined scheme for substantial reductions in telegraphic rates within the Emipre, so
that this matter may be treated apart from the Telegraphic
Conference.''
OPENING UP THE PROVINCE FOR SETTLERS.
Report of Special Committee appointed to interview the
Government in Victoria, accepted at Board Meeting, 10th
August, 1909:—
"Your Committee endeavored to impress upon the Government the. necessity of putting much more energy into the
encouragement of settlers and into the preparing of possible agricultural lands for settlement.   The fact that over Annual Report, 1909-1910 31
seven million dollars of farm produce is still imported, and
matters in connection therewith, were gone into, and the
possibilities of greatly extended commerce being open to the
Port of British Columbia, were discussed. The Premier assured the deputation that the suggestions of the Committee
would receive the attention of the Government.''
HIGHWAY FROM THE COAST TO ALBERTA.
Resolution adopted at Board Meeting, held on 5th October, 1909:—
"That the Provincial Minister of Public Works be advised that this Board of Trade strongly endorses the proposal to link up the various roads in the Province so as to
form a continuous highway from the Coast to Alberta, believing the same to be in the best interests of the development of the country."
HARBOUR COMMISSION.
Report of Special Committee on Harbour Commission,
adopted at Board Meeting held on 2nd December, 1909:—
The Committee appointed to report on the proposed
Harbour Commission and Act, beg to submit for your consideration the following views and motion:
That the majority views of the Board of Trade, as often
expressed by them, have been—
That Vancouver Harbour, i. e., Burrard Inlet, is a magnificent natural harbour which does not require much expenditure except such works as improving the First Narrows, which works are recognized by the Dominion Government as necessary to the general advantage of Canada, and
to be carried out by the Department of Public Works of the
Dominion.
That for many years to come private enterprise is likely
to provide for increased shipping, and that it is most desirable that this harbour should continue to be, as it is now,
one of the cheapest harbours on the Pacific Coast.
That the tonnage passing over the wharves of this harbour, other than those controlled by the C. P. R., is practically nothing, and that outside of port charges there is no
revenue in sight to warrant any of those expenses that a
Board of Harbour Commissioners would have to incur, and 32
Vancouver Board of Trade
that any increase of port charges would drive away instead
of encouraging it.
When, on April 6th, 1909, a resolution was passed by
the Board of Trade favoring a Board for Vancouver Harbour, it was understood that such a Board would have power
to acquire or control the C. P. R. wharves and foreshore.
We now learn that they could not do so, and this important
point entirely changes the question.
At that time also, the Honourable Minister of Public
Works was in favor of a Harbour Board for this Port, but
he, after personally inspecting the harbour itself, changed
his mind and did not advise it, on similar grounds to those
taken by our Board of Trade, as explained in the above
clauses.
In comparison made as to what the Montreal Harbour
Commission has accomplished, and what might be done by
such a Board in our harbour, one most vital point has been
overlooked, and that is that almost the entire harbour of
Montreal belonged to the Dominion Government and to the
City of Montreal, and this great property was handed over
to the Commissioners absolutely free of cost, and that the
total of 13 millions spent by the Commissioners was spent
on improving the facilities for handling freight and deepening and improving the channel of the St. Lawrence between Quebec and Montreal, and with 60 millions of tons
passing over the docks annually it has been a comparatively
easy and simple matter to keep charges low.
Whereas, in Vancouver, as elsewhere, it would be absolutely necessary for any Board to control the entire harbour, and supposing the C. P. R. property could be acquired,
without our venturing an estimate of its value, we can safely
say that no control of the harbour frontage of this City on
the south side of Burrard Inlet could be seciired with an
outlay of less than 50 millions, and if the water-frontages in
the Act before you for consideration were included, you
might double that sum, which is an impossible and absurd
proposition.
If possession were secured of the frontage between the
Hastings Mill and Coal Harbour alone, accommodation could
be given to as much shipping as goes to Montreal to-day, and
as much as is likely to come to Vancouver for many years;
and under the proposed Act of Harbour Control, the Board
could prevent the building of competing wharves at other Annual Report, 1909-1910 33
parts of the harbour to the injury of owners and to the detriment of the general development of our harbour.
We now have an inexpensive harbour for ships to call
at, and it is of vital interest to the City and Province to
keep it so, and it appears to us this desirable state of things
would be entirely altered if a Board were appointed at the
present time.
The urgent and necessary work of widening and deepening the First Narrows and all like works belong, as
acknowledged, to the Department of Public Works of the
Dominion of Canada, and should not be taxed upon the cost
of commodities or shipping entering our harbour, as they
would be in case of a Harbour Board being appointed.
The very important question of False Creek is, we think,
a matter to be treated entirely separate and distinct from
that of our natural harbour, Burrard Inlet.
These are a few of the points which lead us to think
it would be a disastrous mistake to have a Commission appointed for our harbour.
Your Committee therefore recommends:
That in view of the above considerations, it is advisable
to urge upon the Committee appointed by the Mayor, to ask
the Dominion Government to defer the appointment of a
Board of Harbour Commissioners for Vancouver until the
necessity for such a step is more apparent than at present,
.and until it can be shown that it will be in the interests of
the Port and people that such a Board should be appointed.
(Signed for the Committee)
H. A. STONE,
F. BUSCOMBE,
E. H. HEAPS,
G. H. COTTRELL,
THOS. H. WORSNOP. 34
Vancouver Board of Trade
SEVENTH CONGRESS OF CHAMBERS  OF
COMMERCE  OF THE  EMPIRE
Held in Sydney, N.S.W., 14th to 17th September, 1909.
REPORT OF  DELEGATE
Mr. President and Members of the Vancouver Board of Trade :
On my return from representing the Board at the Congress of Chambers of Commerce of the British Empire, held
at Sydney, I beg to give the following account qf my trip,
which, I trust, may be of some interest to the members of
the Board.
The trip was most interesting and enjoyable from first
to last, and the kindness and hospitality extended to the
delegates wherever we went was of the most lavish and
unstinted character, in fact, so many and varied were the
attractions placed before us for our information and amusement, that it was a strenuous undertaking to accomplish all
that was desired.
The party on board the Marama who had chosen the
"All Red Route," numbered (ladies included) over 40. At
Honolulu, where our stay was all too short, we were the
guests of the Honolulu Chamber of Commerce and the
Tourist Association, who took the party for automobile
drives around the city and a trip to a place in the hills,
called the "Pali," where a beautiful and extended view
can be had of the plain and sea coast far below. We touched
at Fanning Island, the Pacific Cable Station, and then at
Suva, Fiji Islands. The Fiji Islanders are a fine stalwart
race and walk with a swing as if the world belonged to
them. The wharf presented a very animated scene, being
crowded with the natives offering fruit, coral, etc., for sale;
the Fijian native ladies' attire was what I've heard called,
by their white sisters a "Mother Hubbard,'' of white or
bright colors, while the men wore chiefly a petticoat and
sunshine, the native police being distinguished by their
skirts being cut into a scolloped fringe at the bottom, with
the addition of a blue jacket and a swagger cane tucked
under the arm, like the spruce sergeant of a crack regiment.
They have enormous heads of fuzzy hair, and like others
we know of, are not always satisfied with its natural color,
so bleach it (they use lime instead of peroxide) to a bright
red, which presents a striking contrast to their very brunette Annual Report, 1909-1910 35
faces, and which, no doubt, is the extreme of Fijian fashion.
After a most enjoyable voyage of three weeks, we said
good-bye to the good ship Marama at Pinkenba, a few miles
below Brisbane, and after a short run by rail found ourselves fairly on Australian soil in the capital of Queensland.
Brisbane we found to be a busy, well built city of about
120,000, with numerous fine buildings and a lovely park,
extending along the river-front, bright with all the attractiveness of sub-tropical shrubs and flowers.
We had not been left in any doubt as to the heartiness of
an Australian welcome, as even before we landed, we were
met on the steamer by the President and Secretary of the
Brisbane Chamber of Commerce, who put in our hands the
programme arranged for Queensland. We landed on Sunday, and found that our arrival coincided with a civic celebration on the following day, in commemoration of the
fiftieth anniversary of the incorporation of Brisbane. I
think the Monday's programme may be interesting, as a
sample of our Australian experience. At 10:30 a.m. we
attended a reception at the Town Hall, at which the Mayor
and Aldermen welcomed us to Brisbane, and although the
hour was somewhat early, refreshments of various kinds
had not been forgotten; our protests regarding these were
overcome by a Queensland gentleman explaining that their
day commenced so much sooner than ours, that really it
was late in the afternoon.
At noon we had a sumptuous luncheon with the Chamber of Commerce; at 4 p.m., a garden party at the Exhibition
Gardens; at 7:30 a State banquet, tendered us by the Government of Queensland. At the close of this we had to go
back to our hotels, pack up and leave at 11:30 by special
train for Mount Morgan, some 400 miles northward. On
our way north we spent a forenoon at Bundaberg, and there
had a drive through fields of sugar-cane and pine-apples, and
were shown through a crushing mill and sugar refinery. At
Mount Morgan we were the guests of the mine-owners, and
we spent an interesting morning in the works. On our
return trip we visited Rockhampton, where the ladies of
the city entertained us at a garden party and' afternoon
tea in a beautiful grove of palms in the park, and a banquet
took place in the evening. The next day saw us at Gympie,
an important mining town where some of the mines were
inspected, and Brisbane was reached in the afternoon. The
next day we were the guests of the town of Ipswich, where 36 Vancouver Board of Trade
are situated the car and engine shops of the Queensland
railways, and other manufacturing is carried on.
En route to Sydney, a visit to Toowoomba, in the midst
of a pastoral and farming district, brought our tour through
Queensland to a close, which had been greatly enjoyed by all.
Although in the extreme north of Queensland the heat
is said to be too great for the development of the country
without the use of colored labor of some kind, the climate
of the portions we visited is a fine one. The State possesses
a very large area of fine land, and it should, I think, be a
favorite and attractive field for immigration.
On the route to Sydney we passed through a part of
the famed Darling Downs country, a large expanse of fertile
wheat lands.
It used to be a well-worn joke that on being introduced
to anyone in Sydney, their first question was, "Well, what
do you think of our harbor?" and. although there may now
be much more than the harbor to bring to the notice of a
visitor, I can fully agree with our Sydney friends in the
pre-eminence they give it, for nowhere have I seen one so
well suited for commercial purposes, and at the same time
of such an extent as to leave ample room for charming
residence sites on the shores of its beautiful bays. A busy
week was spent in Sydney at the conference, at which the
subject of Preferential Trade throughout the Empire was
strongly debated, the resolution being, however, finally
carried by a large majority, there being but nine votes
recorded against it; eight of which were from the United
Kingdom (chiefly Lancashire and Yorkshire), and one from
New Zealand. It was, however, somewhat of a disappointment that so many of the Australian chambers, including
both Sydney and Melbourne Chambers of Commerce, recorded a neutral vote. The analysis of the vote was as
follows; the total number of Chambers represented was 72,
entitled to 91 votes:
For Ag'st Neutral
Chamb. Votes. Chamb. Votes Chamb. Votes Chamb. Votes
U. Kr  28   39   16 24 6     8     6     7
Australia  22   25    16 16 0     0     6     9
Canada  9   10     9 10 0     0     0     0
New Zealand  998 8 1100
Africa  2     6     2 6 0     0     0     0
India  2     2     1 1 0     0     1     1
72   91   52   65     7     9    13   17 Annual Report, 1909-1910 37
The result was, therefore:
Fifty-two Chambers with 65 votes in favor.
Seven Chambers with 9 votes against.
Thirteen Chambers with 17 votes neutral.
So that both in the number of Chambers and in the
votes, those in favor of the resolution were over twice as
numerous as the dissentients and neutrals added together.
During our stay in Sydney the delegates were the
recipients of much hospitality and attentions, their evenings
being filled up with banquets, receptions and theatre parties,
etc. After the Congress, a few days were spent in excursions to different points. Newcastle, the centre of the coal
mining industry, was visited and an opportunity was afforded the delegates to see the process of sheep-shearing at one
of the large stations.
Melbourne was the next in the programme, and at
Albury, the point where the railways of New South Wales
and Victoria connect and transfer passengers and freight,
the delegates were entertained to a luncheon in the dining-
car of a special train by the Victorian Railway Commissioners, the Chairman of the Board being Mr. Thomas Tait,
a gentleman well known to many here through his former
connection with the Canadian Pacific Railway. I had the
pleasure of an afternoon chat with him while at Melbourne,
which was largely made up of kindly inquiries of his former
friends, and in spite of the very important and splendid
position he occupies, I think he has still a longing for the
land of the Maple Leaf, or I might even say that of the
Douglas Pine, so flattering were his remarks concerning
our own Province. We found Melbourne a magnificent city,
with wide streets throughout its whole area, with massive
and imposing buildings. It does not, however, possess such
facilities as Sydney does as a port, and did not impress me
as. being so full of commercial activity' as Sydney. One
possession they take great pride in is their race-course, which
they say is the finest in the world, and certainly the surroundings and arrangements at Flemmington are most perfect. At a banquet given us by the Melbourne Chamber of
Commerce, we had the pleasure of hearing the Prime Minister., the Hon. Alfred Deakin, as well as other speakers,
who warmly supported the idea of Imperial unity and trade
within the British Empire. During the stay in Melbourne
excursions were made to Ballarat and Bendigo. One matter
that may be of interest is the method adopted by Melbourne 38
Vancouver Board of Trade
regarding their street railways, which was explained to me
by the City Clerk in a general way. I understood from
him that the city constructed the railways, and issued deben-
tues to cover their cost. The city then rented the lines to a
company ]to operate for the life of the debentures, the rental
being the sum required to cover the interest and sinking
fund of the loan, so that the city is at no expense, and when
the debentures fall due the city will own the lines free of
debt. The Company operating the lines provides the motive
power and rolling stock, which the city is to take over at
a valuation when the term expires. I may not be accurate
in all the details, but the above was the general idea, and
may be of benefit to our own City in future arrangements.
Our next visit was to Launceston in Tasmania. We
left Melbourne in the afternoon and arrived at our destination about 8 a.m. We found Launceston a pretty town of
26,000 nestling on terraces on the hills surrounding the
mouth of the Tamar. We attended a reception with the
Mayor and Aldermen in the forenoon, and one with the
Launceston Chamber of Commerce in the evening. The next
day we visited an industrial exhibit, where we saw an exhibit of Tasmanian apples, which, however, in my opinion,
did not equal in appearance what British Columbia can produce; and then took a trip up what is known as Cataract
Gorge on the stream supplying their electric power plant.
This was a typical canyon with beautiful glimpses of scenery,
and, except for the difference in foliage might have been in
British Columbia. The city has turned part of it into a park,
which is indeed very attractive. An agricultural show took
place in the afternoon at which a fine lot of stock was exhibited. The raising of pedigreed stock is an important
industry in Tasmania, large prices for these being obtained
in Australia.
We left by rail at about 5 p. m. and arrived at Hobart,
at the south end of the Island, after a run of about five
hours. The country through which we passed is very prettily diversified, green and attractive.
Hobart, with a population of 41,000, is built under the
shadow of Mount Wellington, a mountain of over 4,000 feet,
and possesses a fine harbor and many fine buildings. A reception was given by the Mayor in the evening of our one
day in Hobart, in their fine Town Hall, and I would remark
tnat I was generally struck with the size and style of the
Municipal buildings in all the towns we visited.   They, with- Annual Report, 1909-1910 39
out exception, appeared to me to be superior to what we
would have in Canada in places of the same size, and in
every case contained a large hall for receptions, etc., in many
cases elaborately decorated. There is at Hobart, a large
fruit canning and jam making industry, as well as the trade
in apples. I heard of one firm that had arranged for freight,
room on steamers for the United Kingdom for 500,000 boxes
of apples.
Our party divided here, some returning to Australia,
and the rest of us taking steamer for New Zealand. We
left Hobart just before noon, and the trip between the
Islands at the mouth of the Derwent was very pretty, the
coast being indented with bays and inlets, reminding one of
British Columbia, and the wind and rain were quite chilly
enough to perfect the resemblance. The passage occupied
nearly three days, and we landed in our sister Dominion at
what is known as "The Bluff," and a short run by train
brought us to Invercargill. Here we attended a public
luncheon, and I proceeded to Dunedin, which appeared a
thriving, busy town of 36,000 inhabitants; it is surrounded
by hills with a considerable resemblance to part of Scotland.
It is a decidedly Scotch settlement,- taking its name from
the ancient one of Edinburgh, while most of its streets and
surroundings have also derived their names from the same
source. A run of nine hours and Christchurch was reached,
which is more typically English in its style. The country
is flat, and through it and the city winds the River Avon,
in many places completely overshadowed by willows. It is
surrounded by the Canterbury Plains, one of the most fertile districts in New Zealand, and the country from Dunedin
to Christchurch is most attractive, being well settled, the
farmhouses evidencing by their neatness and condition, that
the residents are doing well for themselves from the rich
green meadows that surround their dwellings.
The port of Christchurch is Lyttelton, and from there,
a night on a steamer brings one to Wellington, the Capital
of the Dominion, situated at the south of the North Island.
Its central position, being about half way of the length of
the Dominion, makes it an important and advantageous commercial distributing centre; it is well and solidly built, but,
as a townsite, seems cramped, and does not lend itself well
to expansion. Here we had the pleasure of an afternoon
garden party at the home of the Premier, Sir Joseph Ward,
who had just returned.   In the course of conversation he ex- 40 Vancouver Board of Trade
pressed himself as favorable to a renewal of the steamer service between New Zealand and Vancouver. From Wellington the Government had arranged for us a trip through the
Hot Spring district of Rotorua, in which tour we were accompanied by the Hon. Thomas Mackenzie, who did everything possible for our comfort and entertainment. The two
days at Rotorua were most interesting. The whole district
is full of geysers, hot springs and blow holes, from which the
steam rushes like the exhaust of an engine. There are several settlements of Maories near Rotorua, and we were present at the dedication of a new meeting house with full Maori
ceremonies, as well as an entertainment in the evening, which
consisted of Maori songs and dances.
In this district the Government is afforesting the bare
hills, great quantities of larch being planted. In this work
I was told the Government were making use of convicts under sentence for lesser breaches of the law. This system is
said to work well, the men have the freedom of the open air,
being in camp, are allowed tobacco, and I believe, a trifling
wage per day, which gives them something to start afresh
on the completion of their sentences. To be sent to one of
these camps is looked upon as a privilege, and attempts at
escape or infractions of discipline are said to be few, as they
result in the offender being returned to goal.
At Rotorua, the Government has erected a magnificent
bath-house and it is fast becoming a favorite health resort.
Rotorua is distant from Auckland about eight hours by rail,
which was my port of departure. With its suburbs it has
the largest population (82,000) in New Zealand, and possesses a fine harbor, round which we were treated to an
excursion. I saw a fine graving dock, which they were
enlarging, and at a new pier I saw them using concrete piles,
which aroused my interest, as promising immunity from the
teredo. On inquiry I found they used them 14 and 16 inches"
square, and made them in moulds where they were being
used. They were reinforced with four steel rods bent towards each other at the lower end of the pile, which was
moulded to the shape of a pyramid, and shod with iron.
The engineer told me that they were, allowed to harden for
30 days before being used, and then were driven as we do
wooden piles, a hammer of two tons weight with an eight-
foot drop being used, and that they were a complete success.
I should think they could be used to advantage in our own
port.   Annual Report, 1909-1910 41
Auckland is well built and is surrounded by an exceedingly pretty and attractive country. Its climate is, of
course, milder and warmer than further south, and the verdure and foliage more of a semi-tropical nature. At Auckland I met Mr. de Schryver, representative of the Canadian
Manufacturers' Association, who is doing all in his power
to promote trade between Canada and New Zealand, and
meeting with very fair encouragement and success, but is
badly hampered in his efforts by want of proper communication. From Auckland I took steamer to Suva, where connection is made with the Canadian-Australian Mail Steamers,
and connecting with the Makura, had a pleasant voyage
back to Vancouver.
I dare say you may think that entertainments of one
kind and another have figured very largely in the foregoing account, and no doubt they have, but I am rather
inclined to think that toward practical results, our tour was
if anything more serviceable than the Congress itself. After
all, the adoption of such a principle as Preferential Trade
is in the hands of the voters in the different communities,
-and this tour and the gatherings we attended gave us opportunities for ventilating the subject, both in public and by
informal talks and discussions, with the many people we
met, and to press home to the individual, views and arguments that had been only broadly stated at the Congress.
In Australia the Canadian delegates received able assistance from Mr. Larke and Mr. Ross, Trade Commissioners
for Canada in Sydney and Melbourne, who were unwearied
in their attentions to ourselves and in advocating a measure
of preference with Canada, if the country were not ready
for the scheme in its entirety. I found these gentlemen
most anxious in every way to increase the trade between
Australia and Canada, and I am sure fill their position with
both capability and zeal. Most of our friends from Great
Britain connected preference in trade with the doctrine of
Free Trade within the Empire, which I do not think was
viewed with favor in Australia. From all I could learn,
Australia is strongly imbued with the doctrine of "Australia
for the Australians," and will not accept any scheme which
will react to the detriment of the development of the Commonwealth in manufacturing, as well as pastoral and agricultural pursuits. I believe that the principle of protection
to industries within the Commonwealth has now been accepted, and that it has come to stay. In advocating distinctively preference with Canada, I put it that Canada did 42 Vancouver Board of Trade
not ask them to grant anything in its favor that would
injure any of their industries, that we believed in the principle of protection and that they were perfectly right if they
thought it conducive to their own interests to protect any
of their industries and manufactures by imposing a duty
sufficient to accomplish it, but urged that when the amount
of duty advisable for protection was ascertained, they should
put on a margin beyond, which they could rebate as a preference to Canada or other parts of the Empire. This was a
doctrine they could understand, and professed themselves
willing to support, and, in my opinion, is all we can expect.
One matter that seemed to me a drawback and a difficulty in their Interstate Railway Commerce was that the
railways are the property of each State and of different
gauges. Those in Queensland are 3.6; in New South Wales,
4.8%; in Victoria, 5.2%, and in South Australia, with the
exception of the line from Melbourne to Adelaide, 3.6. The
disadvantages of this must be evident, but each state is disinclined to be at the expense of making the change. It
appears to me there must be a change some day, and probably will result in the Commonwealth Government assuming
the ownership of all the railways and establishing a uniform
gauge throughout the Commonwealth. I may here say that
the delegates were most generously treated, each State giving them passes over their system.
There is no doubt that Australia and New Zealand are
both magnificent countries of great possibilities, and that
there are vast areas to be peopled and crying out for settlers,
but as far as my opinion goes, I do not think that at present
they offer to settlers the same opportunities for success that
our own country does. Most of the land that is available
for settlement by a man without means is what they call
"out back," and the great difficulty mentioned to me was
the lack of communication for getting in supplies or marketing the product. In Canada our railways are pushed ahead
of settlement and by their construction induce it, while there
I heard the complaint that the Government would not build
until the district was" sufficiently settled to furnish traffic
to pay for operation. It is easy to see under which system
settlement will the more readily flourish.
With respect to the so-called labor legislation, I had no
opportunity to go deeply into the subject, but my general
impression was that it is questionable whether it will prove
an unmixed blessing to the class it was intended to benefit. Annual Report, 1909-1910 43
The workingman certainly takes things easier and works
under easier and more pleasant conditions there than in
Canada, but it seemed to me to have a tendency to remove
the ambition and desire to rise above their conditions, and
at the same time to deter the investment of capital necessary
for the development of the country in enterprises and manufactures to furnish employment and wages to the increasing
army of workers.
In conclusion, let me refer to the "All Red Route."
From the experiences related by many of those who came
by Suez, it must grow in favor. One gentleman, a fellow
passenger to Australia by the Marama, who had been to
England to attend the Press Convention, told me he had
forfeited a part of his return passage money rather than
again experience the heat of the Red Sea. Passengers who
arrived just too late for the Congress, owing to a delay
occasioned by some disarrangement of the steamer's machinery, said that this unfortunately happened in the Red Sea.
The vessel being motionless, there was, therefore, no current
of air and that the heat was unbearable. There were two
fatalities from the heat, children, I believe, and that at one
time there were fourteen of the stewards laid out on the
upper deck under an awning, completely prostrated by the
heat. In contrast to this, the voyage across the Pacific,
owing to the trade winds, is most enjoyable, even in the
tropics. I found the vessels of the Canadian-Australian Line
comfortable, the officers most anxious for the comfort and
amusement of the passengers, the discipline good, the stewards attentive and the table all any reasonable person could
expect or require. I learned that both the boats I travelled
on had a reserve of unused power that could shorten the
passage; it was merely that the contract should require it
and the subsidy be sufficient to warrant the cost of increased
speed.
I am sure that this Board will recognize the importance
of this service to Vancouver and lend all its influence towards making it permanent and successful.
I have the honor to be,
Your obedient servant,
RICHARD H. ALEXANDER. 44 Vancouver Board of Trade
ADDRESS TO  LORD STRATHCONA.
-  in Board of Trade Rooms, 11th August, 1909.
May it please your Lordship,—
The members of the Vancouver Board of Trade desire to
express the pleasure which it affords them to welcome you to
the City of Vancouver.
Sensible of the honour thus conferred, they desire to
place on record their high appreciation of the valuable
services rendered by your Lordship to Canada and the
Empire at large, in the increase of commerce.
Intimately connected as you have been with the progress of the country, from ocean to ocean, the present position must be a source of great satisfaction to your Lordship.
The unparalleled expansion everywhere visible has been
made possible by the construction of the Canadian Pacific
Railway, in the promotion of which your Lordship took
such an important part, and no one can better appreciate
the comparison between the arduous methods of travelling
in early days, by bateau, canoe or dog team, and the present
luxurious accommodation of the transcontinental express.
Your Lordship's long connection with the honourable
Hudson's Bay Company, commencing, we understand, in a
minor capacity upwards of 70 years ago and still continuing
in your present occupancy of the position of governor, has
placed you in the closest relations with all conditions affecting Canadian trade, and will ever stand forth boldly on the
page of commercial hisjx>ry as an example of encouragement
to the rising generation.
The noble patriotism displayed by your Lordship in
providing for the formation and equipment of a regiment
for service in South Africa, will for all time be a bright
spot in the memory of all true Canadians.
In conclusion, the Board expresses the earnest wish that
your Lordship may still be long spared in health and
strength and that the Dominion and the Empire may continue to benefit by your counsel and advice.
Signed on part of the Vancouver Board of Trade,
EWING BUCHAN, Vice-President.
WM. SKENE, Secretary. Annual Report, 1909-1910 45
REPLY   OF   LORD   STRATHCONA.
Mr. President and Members of the Vancouver Board oj Trade,—
The address you have just done me the honour of
presenting, I accept with grateful thanks, and the welcome
you extend to me I very greatly appreciate.
It is well nigh twenty years since I last visited British
Columbia. Vancouver then was little else than a hamlet,
now with a population of 100,000; and not only so, but a
city which in beauty of situation, surroundings and in every
aspect is not exceeded by any other within the Dominion,
or, indeed, may we not say on the continent of North
America.
You refer in very pleasant terms to my connection with
the progress of the country from ocean to ocean,, and I feel
proud in having, for a period approaching three-quarters of
a century, been identified with and taken part in its industries and interests.
You make mention of my connection with the Hudson's
Bay Company, whose service I entered upwards of seventy-
one years ago, and I take much pride in having been associated with that great corporation, and through my immediate relatives. with the North-West Company, which ultimately coalesced with the Hudson's Bay Company in 1821.
The members of both corporations were indeed stalwart
men, capable of making their mark in any walk of life, and.
I think it is generally admitted that to them it is no small
measure due that the vast domain of Rupert's Land and this
wonderful Pacific country have been conserved to the
Mother Country, to the Dominion and to the Empire; an
inheritance, of which we may all well be proud, resolved,
as we are, that the Dominion shall be indissolubly united to
our loved Mother Country. .
It has also been my privilege, as you kindly remarked,
to have been associated with the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway, the pioneer railway of the Dominion
from sea to sea, and I am not a little pleased that to me was
assigned by my associates in that undertaking the completion of the road by driving the last spike at Craigellachie
on the 7th November, 1885. The progress of this Pacific
Province, then somewhat in irony, represented to be a sea of
mountains, is indeed almost beyond belief. 46
Vancouver Board of Trade
To my feeble efforts in having in a small measure contributed a very small quota to the Empire's forces during
the recent South African war, to which with so much indulgence you refer, I feel that where each and all in the Mother
Country and in His Majesty's Dominion beyond the Seas,
did their utmost to maintain intact the dignity and unity
of the Empire, it would be more than invidious to single
out the efforts of any one individual, not the less do I thank
you for your considerate words.
Let me add that it is with true pleasure I find myself
again amongst friends, old and new, who are unitedly determined to build up this magnificent country, to continue the
good work of their predecessors, so that it cannot be said by
those coming after them that they have not done their whole
duty to the State.
For the cordial welcome and address which with so
much kindness and consideration was conveyed to me by
His Worship the Mayor, and to which at the moment I so
imperfectly responded, and for the address you, Mr. President, have been good enough to hand me now, let me again
offer from the bottom of my heart my grateful thanks.
STRATHCONA.      52
Vancouver Board of Trade
SUMMARY OF SHIPMENTS OF LUMBER TO FOREIGN POINTS,
MADE BY THE HASTINGS SAW MILL,
IN THE YEAR 1909
Destination
Feet B. M.
Value
4,947,503
9,368,405
636,065
2,738,141
4,268,758
1,355,140
4,268,710
7,094,693
$ 79,428
119,159
10,095
49,815
56,762
20,145
46,401
90,395
Chile	
34,677,385
$472,200
SHIPMENT FROM CHEMAINUS (V. I.) SAW MILL IN 1909
Foreign    16,197,343 feet
Rail    15,684,842 feet
Local      4,648,681 feet
Total Shipment of Lumber   36,528,866 feet Annual Report, 1909-1910
Fishing Industry
53
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   SALMON
PACK BY CANNERIES-1909
T3
J3ISTRICTS AND
n
S^
CO
CO
Grand
CANNERIES
JA
«." c
P   CO
sis
O
Total
O
JB.H
OP-,
O
Fraser River Dist.—
Cases
Cases
Cases
Cases
Cases
B. C. Packers Ass'n	
187,745
294
5,569
193,608
A. B. C. Packing Co., Ltd..
74,853
100
1,034
75,987
J. H. Todd & Sons	
20,100
4,000
24,100
Canadian Can. Co., Ltd....
44,444
1,090
1,192
46,726
B. C. Canning Co., Ltd. . . .
27,340
1,826
29,166
Malcolm, Cannon Co., Ltd.
22,953
25
118
345
23,441
St. Mungo Can. Co., Ltd...
31,915
989
4,500
27,404
Northern Canning Co., Ltd.
12,409
674
13,083
Kildala Packing Co., Ltd..
22,281
436
22,717
Knight Inlet Can. Co., Ltd.
15,284
779
16,063
Unique Canning Co., Ltd . .
16,140
203
16,343
The Glen Rose Can. Co., Ltd.
9,807
9,807
Great West Pkg. Co., Ltd.
15,021
578
15 599
Burrard Canning Co., Ltd..
9,324
10
9,334
Eagle Harbor Can. Co., Ltd
11,054
452
11,506
M. DesBrisay & Co,, Ltd. .
31,578
10
731
32,319
Totals        	
542,248
1,428
1,987
21,540
567,203
Skeena River Dist.—
19,181
3,702
5,458
5,629
33,970
A. B. C. Packing Co., Ltd. .
12,185
3,540
3,965
882
20,552
J. H. Todd & Sons	
7,794
577
4,916
1,178
14,465
B. C. Can. Co., Ltd	
8,715
1,377
3,549
534
14,175
Kildala Packing Co., Ltd. .
9,790
751
1,222
632
12,395
Wallace Bros., Ltd	
14,637
1,748
2,910
2,365
21,660
Skeena River Com. Co., Ltd.
5,419
144
579
6,142
Cassiar Packing Co., Ltd.. .
10,200
630
6,100
450
17,380
Totals	
87,901
12,469
28,120
12,249
140,739
Rivers Inlet District.—
B. C. Packers Ass'n	
35,765
302
308
36,365
A. B. C. Packing Co., Ltd. .
9,986
185
10,171
J. H. Todd & Sons	
12,195
462
12,657
B. C. Can. Co., Ltd	
10,727
445
11,172
Kildala Packing Co., Ltd..
9,986
204
10,190
Strathcona Packing Co....
10,378
81
10,459
Totals	
89,027
587
1,400
91,014 54
Vancouver Board of Trade
FISHING INDUSTRY—CONTINUED
DISTRICTS AND
CANNERIES

Red and
White
Springs

Grand
Total
Naas River District.—
Pt. Nelson C. & S. Co., Ltd.
Kincoleth Packing Co., Ltd.
-7,964
11,812
8,470
673
1,578
126
2,514
116
959
2,066
1,363
3,389
13,217
14,829
12,944
Totals       	
28,246
2,337
3,589
6,818
40,990
Outlying Districts—
B. C. Packers Ass'n	
Kildala  Packing Co	
16,618
5,954
7,388
13,500
5,872
500
29,640
13,547
1,696
500
740
628
3,200
300
1,280
5,000
1,700
9,581
113
3,383
455
5,900
479
28,*635
6,695
13,971
Wm. Hickey Pkg. Co   ,
Quathiaski Packing Co... .
J.H. Todd & Sons   ..   (Est.)
14,300
7,607
500
40,540
15,726
Totals	
93,019
2,196
12,848
19,911
127,974
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT FOR TEN YEARS
PACKED BY DISTRICTS
1909
1908
1907
163,116
159,255
31,832
94,046
99,192
1906
1905
567,203
140,739
40,990
90,014
127,974
89,184
209,177
46,908
75,090
122,330
240,486
162,420
32,534
122,878
71,142
877,136
114,085
32 725
Skeena River	
Naas River	
83,121
60,392
Totals	
967,920
542,689
547,459
629,460
1,167,460
|pf
1904
1903
1902
1901
1900
128,903
154,869
19,085
94,292
68,745
237,125
98,669
12,100
69,390
56,390
327,095
154,875
23,218
70,298
50,496
990,252
126,092
14,790
66,840
38,182
316 522
128,529
18,238
75,413
46,711
Totals	
465,894
473,674
625,982
1,236,156
585,413
L Annual Report, 1909-1910
55
RECAPITULATION
OF THE YIELD AND VALUE OF ALL BRITISH COLUMBIA
FISHERIES FOR THE YEAR 1908-9
Kinds of Fish
Quantity
Value
Total Value
cases
lb.
brls.
lb.
lb.
((
ti
a
a
ct
566,303
3,624,631
428,500
8,994,000
1,254
795,000
17,512,555
44,965,200
181,600
613,300
11,900
383,900
164,300
630,000
8,000
180,000
556,100
3,789
8,650
1,700
218,631
42,850
449,700
12,540
79,500
"       fresh and frozen.   . .
"            "      pickled .
$4,287,590
875,652
Halibut	
Herring, fresh and salted ...
449,652
18,160
467,812
Oulachons, fresh and salted.
30,665
1,190
31.855
19,195
16,430
37,800
400
Trout	
Cod.             	
Shad	
"
9,000
27,805
Mixed fish	
11
sacks
cases
Oysters 128-lb.
12,758
8,650
8,160
Crabs, mussels, etc., shrimps
7,035
115,500
357,500
Fish Oil and Glue  	
.gals.
No.
No.
No.
142,480
4,954
5,220
33
84
56,646
108,988
3,015
10,895
2,352
Total for 1908-9	
$6,465,038
"      "   1907.8                       	
6,122,922
Increase
$342,116
HALIBUT    LANDED   AT   THE    PORT   OF    VANCOUVER,    FOR
YEARS ENDING 31ST MARCH.
11,799,000 lbs.
8,992,000 lbs.
9,450,000 lbs.
2,312.000 lbs.
3,396,000 lbs.
5,050,000 lbs.
From TJ. S. vessels, March 31st, 1908	
From TJ. S. vessels, March 31st, 1909	
From TJ. S. vessels, March 31st, 1910	
From Canadian vessels, March 31st, 1908
From Canadian vessels, March 31st, 1909
From Canadian vessels, March 31st, 1910
N.B.—These same Canadian vessels landed at
cold storage, New W 'minster, in 1908-9, about
and in the years of 1909-10, about	
2,500,000 lbs.
2,400,000 lbs.
Total in 3 years  45,899,000 lbs. 56
Vancouver Board of Trade
HARBOUR AND  SHIPPING
Vancouver, as will be seen from the Customs returns,
has shown a very marked increase in the volume of shipping
using her wharves during the past official year, the total
registered tonnage having been 6,456,838, as against
3,837,131 for 1908-9. The wharfage area has been greatly
added to, and the foreshore is being rapidly acquired to the
full extent of the harbour proper in Burrard Inlet and is
held at greatly augmented values.
Southward.— Two marked features have been in evidence,
viz.:
(a) The demand for grain in Mexico, to which country
10,395 tons of Alberta wheat and 1,578 tons of
barley were shipped during the four months from
January to April, and
(b) The growing importance of the Tehuantepec Eoute
for European freight.
Trans-Pacific.—The "Empress'* liners maintain their unbroken regularity and ply with full cargoes and pas-
enger lists. The improved Canadian-Australasian mail
steamers attain continually greater popularity, but still
larger vessels are required to develop the import trade,
which is now limited by want of greater cold storage
facilities.
Northward.—The activity in construction of the Grand
Trunk Pacific Railway, the building of the city of Prince
Rupert, the awakening development of the Queen Charlotte Islands and the mining activity on Portland Canal
at Stewart and elsewhere have greatly added to the
volume of coasting trade.
The following are the regular lines at present in operation:
The Canadian Pacific Royal Mail Steamship Line to China
and Japan, comprising the "Empress of India," "Empress of Japan,'' and "Empress of China," affords a
tri-weekly service, the auxiliary steamer "Monteagle"
making regular additional interim sailings.
The Atlantic "Empress" Liners "Empress of Britain" and
"Empress of Ireland," in conjunction with the "Imperial Limited," running between Vancouver and Montreal, complete the "Empress" route from Liverpool to   Annual Report, 1909-1910, 57
Yokohama and Hong Kong. The steamers "Lake Manitoba," "Lake Champlain" and "Lake Erie" carry
second-class and steerage passengers from Liverpool to
Montreal.
The Canadian-Australian Royal Mail Steamship Line, comprising the steamers "Marama," "Manuka" and
"Makura," gives a monthly service to Honolulu (Sandwich Islands), Suva (Fiji), and Sydney (New South
"Wales), with connections to Queensland, New Zealand
and Tasmania.
The Canadian Pacific Steamship  Company   {British  Columbia)
Service:
a. Vancouver-Victoria double Daily Mail'Service, in connection with the transcontinental railway, comprising
the steamers "Princess Charlotte," "Princess Victoria"
and "Charmer."
Triangular Service'.
b. In connection with the Imperial Limited and "Trans-
Canada Limited,'' the three-funnel, twin-screw steamers
"Princess Charlotte" and "Princess Victoria" make
a daily service to and from Victoria and Seattle.
c. The Northern Express Service, comprising the twin-
screw steamers, "Princess May'' and "Princess
Royal," sail weekly to Prince Rupert (Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway Co.'s Construction Terminal on Kaien
Island), 500 miles north from Vancouver, and to Skag-
way, Alaska, in direct connection with the White Pass
& Yukon Ry. and express steamers on the Yukon, passengers making the journey from Vancouver to Dawson
by this route in six days.
Coasting Service'.
d. The steamers "Princess Ena," "Amur," "Queen City"
and "Tees'' make regular sailings between Vancouver
and all coast points on the mainland and on Vancouver
Island, also making connections for Skidegate and other
points on Queen Charlotte Islands.
e. Steamer "Joan" carries mails and passengers daily to
and from Nanaimo, Vancouver Island. 53 Vancouver Board of Trade
f. SS. "Nanoose" and "Transfer" service, conveying railway freight cars and coal wagons in bulk between Vancouver and Ladysmith (Vancouver Island) for Victoria
and Nanaimo.
Ocean Steamship Company, Ltd., and China Mutual Steam
Navigation Company, Ltd.—From London, Glasgow and
Liverpool for Vancouver. Direct service to and from
the United Kingdom, via the Suez Canal, each 28 days,
comprising "Protesilaus," "Antilochus," "Ning Chow,"
"Bellerophon," "Teucer," "Keemun" and "Oanfa."
Pacific Coast Steamship Company.—Steamers "Governor,"
"President," "City of Puebia" and "Queen" sail every
fifth day to and from San Francisco.
Canadian-Mexican Pacific S.S. Co., Ltd. (subsidized by the
Canadian and Mexican Governments)—Steamers "Lonsdale" and "Henley" carry passengers and freight
monthly from British Columbia ports to Mazatlan, Man-
zanillo and Salina Cruz, in connection with the Tehuan-
tepec Ry. Co. and connecting Atlantic liners from
Puerto Mexico.
Grand Trunk Pacific Steamships.—
a. The three-funnel twin-screw steamers "Prince Rupert'*
and "Prince George" make weekly sailings from Vancouver to Victoria, Seattle, Campbell River, Alert Bay,
Swanson Bay, Prince Rupert and Stewart (Portland
Canal).
b. The SS. "Prince Albert" runs in connection with the
above from Prince Rupert to Masset and Skidegate
(Queen Charlotte Islands), also to Port Simpson and
Naas River points.
Union Steamship Company, Limited, of Vancouver, affords a
regular service to Prince Rupert, Stewart, Port Simpson,
Port Essington, Van Anda (Texada Island), Nanaimo,
Comox and Campbell River on the east coast of Vancouver Island, also the chief coasting points, logging
camps and canneries, their fleet being "Cariboo,"
"Camosun," "Cassiar," "Capilano," "Coquitlam" and
"Cowichan."
Terminal Steamship Co., Ltd., steamers "Baramba," "Britannia" and "Defiance" ply daily to and from Bowen Annual Report, 1909-1910 59
Island, Britannia Beach, Howe Sound, Belearra, Lake
Buntzen, Granite Falls and Indian River.
The Northern Steamship Co., of B. C. steamers "Cetriana"
and "Petriana" ply between Vancouver and Prince Rupert and Stewart, "Petrina" taking freight only.
Boscowitz Steamship Co.— Steamers "Vadso," "Venture"
and "St. Dennis" ply between Vancouver, Prince Rupert, Stewart and way points, carrying passengers and
freight.
Sechelt Steamship Co., Ltd.— Steamers "Belearra,'' "Tartar," "Sechelt" and "New Era" make daily sailings
from Vancouver to Sechelt, Jervis Inlet, Bute Inlet and
way points, also weekly to Ladysmith, Chemainus, Cow-
ichan, Sydney and the islands of the Gulf of Georgia.
Mosquito Fleet.—The local fleet of tugs and barges required
to tow logs and carrying supplies to and from the lumber mills and logging camps, and the fleet of fishing
boats and steamers employed in the salmon and deep
sea fisheries aggregate several thousand tons and are
constantly being increased.
Dry Dock.—Negotiations for this much-needed addition to
our port are still actively in progress. 60
Vancouver Board of Trade
TABLE OF DISTANCES FROM VANCOUVER, B. C.
Statute
Eastwards— Miles
Vancouver to Rossland, Kootenay    563
" to Calgary, Alberta    641
" to Edmonton, Alberta    833 ,
" to Regina, Saskatchewan 1,125
" to Winnipeg, Manitoba 1,482
" to Toronto, Ontario 2,769
" to Montreal, Quebec 2,906
to Quebec, Que 3,054
to Halifax, Nova Scotia 3,660
Nautical
Miles
Quebec to Liverpool, England 2,650
to Plymouth,        "       2,680
Halifax to Liverpool,        "       2,355
to Plymouth,        "       2,400
Westwards-
Vancouver  to  Vladivostock   (Russian   Terminus   of  the
Siberian railway)  direct , 4,460
Vancouver to Yokohama, Japan 4,270
Yokohama (via Nagasaki) to Dalny, Manchurian terminus
of Siberian railway, about 1,000
Yokohama to Shanghai, China 1,060
to Hong Kong, China 1,600
Hong Kong to Singapore 1,440
Singapore to Calcutta, India 1,630
to Madras    1,630
Southwards—
Vancouver to Moreton Bay, Queensland 6,510
" to Honolulu, S. 1 3,435
Honolulu to Suva, Fiji 2,760
Suva, Fiji, to Moreton Bay J 1,560
" to Sydney, N. S. W 1,770
to Auckland, New Zealand 1,170
Moreton Bay to Sydney    445
Vancouver to San Francisco, Cal    833
" to Mazatlan, Mexico 2,311
to Liverpool' (via Tehuantepec) 7,000
Statute
Miles
Vancouver to Seattle, Washington    178
" to Tacoma, "            219
" to Portland,  Oregon    405
" to San Francisco, Cal 1,177
Northwards-
Vancouver to Prince Rupert, by coast steamers    550
" to Skagway, coast steamer    891
Skagway to White Horse, Yukon railway    m
White Horse to Dawson, river steamer    450
Vancouver to St. Michael, by ocean steamer 2,660-
St. Michael to Dawson City, by river steamer 1690  62
Vancouver Board of Trade
PORT  OF  VANCOUVER,   B. C.
Fiscal Year  Endins  March  31st, 1910
Seagoing Vessels—Inwards with Cargoes
No.
Tons Reg.
Freight-
Crews
Tons Wg-t.
Tons Mst.
British	
Canadian...
178
649
525
362,752
'  580,667
371,332
128,083
24,481
81,347
87,219
2,687
10,319
15,917
33,599
21,529
Total
1,352
1,314,751
233,911
100,225
71,045
Seagoing Vessels—Inwards In  Ballast
British
45
62
96
125,799
78,525
46,943
3,290
4,845
2,278
Total	
203'
251,267
9,413
Seag
oing Vessels—Outwards w
ith Cargoes
British   	
Canadian... .
265
571
363
422,736
415,143
278,790
78,519
19,583
23,018
129,068
8,914
29,726
20,739
23,683
16,189
> Total
1.199
1,116,669
121,12b
167,708
60,611
Seagoing
Vessels—Outwards
in  Ballast
British   ....
145
185
231
173,735
60,382
109,082
343,199
12,669
3,34L
Total	
561
23,545
Coasting Trade—Inwards
5,684
359
1,290,297
344,055
93,493
Sailing Vsls..
2,102
Total	
' 6,043
1,634,352
95,595
Coasting Trade—Outwards
6,447
364
1,459,404
337,196
94,917
2,128
Total	
6,811
1,796,600
97,045
Grand Total
16,169
6,456,838
355,031
267,933
357,254 Annual Report, 1909-1910,
63
PORT   OF   VANCOUVER,   B.   C.
Fiscal   Year    Ending    March    31st,   1909
Seagoing Vessels—Inwards with Cargoes
No.
Tons Reg.
Freight
Crews
Tons Wgt.
Tons Mst.
British
Canadian . ..
Foreign	
156
473
564
270,755
326,257
458,438
86,264
15,179
69,500
76,683
1,826
32,724
12,735
22,997
28,977
Total
1,193
1,055,450
170,943
111,233
65,709
Seagoing Vessels—Inwards in  Ballast
British  	
32
213
95
80,138
73,344
82,545
2,352
Canadian ...
Foreign ....
4,979
2,833
Total	
340
236,027
10,164
Seagoing Vessels—Outwards with  Cargoes
British	
Canadian . ..
Foreign
Total.
191
498
442
1,131
324,273
322,242
425,186
72,147
13,388
35,361
.07
701
120,896
109,032
2,691
33,230
144,953
17,535
16,945
23,245
57,725
Seagoing Vessels—Outwards in  Ballast
British  ....
74
238
213
75,489
61,467
116,659
     	
6,423
5,230
Foreign ....
8,398
Total	
525
253,635
20,060
Coasting Trade—Inwards
4,492
303
901,677
289,426
77,783
Sailing Vsls.
1,722
Total
4,795
1,191,103
79,505
Coasting Trade-
-Outwards
4,589
300
1,031,509               	
78,224
Sailing Vsls.
1,693
Total
4,889
1,315,508     	
79,917
1
Grand Total    12,873
5,123,424 291,839
256,186
313,080  Annual Report, 1909-1910
65
BANKING RETURNS
VANCOUVER CLEARING HOUSE
Comparative  Statement of clearings for years  ending'
March 31st, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1910
1906-1907
1907-1908
1908-1909
1909-1910 •
April	
$ 9,102,435
$14,860,703
$13,680,223
$20,057,652
May  	
10,112,408
15,836,774
13,956,396
20,715,136
June	
10,252,571
15,578,149
14,725,316
22,073,266
July	
10,565,706
17,771,609
15,690,197
22,973,715
12,048,239
17,528,199
15,483,153
24,969,077
September..
11,910,710
18,017,423
16,991,346
28,935,000
October ..   .
13,961,545
18,856,037
17,502,569
30,918,956
November .
14,321,269
16,999,936
16,626,681
32,572,215
December . .
15,092,995
15,694,611
18,320,904
31,239,716
January	
13,402,453
13,992,301
16,407,127
29,331,224
February . . .
12,601,515
12,718,891
16,683,386
29,534,539
March	
14,587,073
13,395,469
20,884,698
35,415,061
Totals..
$147,958,919
$191,250,100
$190,951,996
$327,835,557
COMPARISON OF  BANK CLEARINGS  IN THIRTEEN CITIES,
1907,   1908,  1909, JANUARY TO DECEMBER
(Vancouver having now attained fourth place)
1907
1908
1909
$1,555,712,000
1,220,905,517
599,667,576
191,734,480
152,969,520
107,432,579
93,587,138
88,104,108
69,745,006
66,150,414
65,760,473
55,330,588
45,716,792
$1,467,315,031
1,166,902,436
614,111,801
183,083,446
154,367,756
111,812,551
90,232,246
72,329,688
64,815,227
66,435,636
56,885,041
55,256,013
38,406,510
$1,866,649,000
1,437,700,477
Winnipeg, Man	
Ottawa, Ont	
770,649,322
287,592,941
173,181,993
118,803,773
95,278,467
85,036,908
St. John, N. B	
99,053,662
72,404,500
62,093,335
70,695,882
52,367,651
$4,312,927,191
$4,142,133,382
$5,191,507,911
.-  Annual Report, 1909-1910 67
to United States
LIST OF EXPORTS  FROM   PORT OFiVANCOUVER
for Year Ended December 31st, 1909.
Automobiles	
Advertising Matter.
Apparel, Wearing...
Blocks, Fire  Clay..
Bones 	
Blood, Dried	
Brick, Fire	
Bark, Cascara	
Belting	
Bones, Crushed	
Books, Prof	
Bolts, Old	
Cheese 	
Coal, Bituminous...
Coffee 	
Castings   	
Cascara Sagrada	
Castorium, Beaver..
Coat,   Squirrel-skin.
Chickens 	
Dogs	
Distillate  	
Effects, Personal...
Equipment, Horse..
Furs 	
11,156 50
11 77
200 00
576 80
3,534 47
3,075 91
2,318 49
1,887 11
1,201 73
1,507 75
1,500 00
159 49
43.960 99
8,509 44
19,053 86
181 80
5,523 30
177 00
145 00
609 00
906 03
548 27
450 00
216 90
42,452 21
Fish.
Halibut, Frozen
Halibut,  Fresh
Sardines  	
Fish, Dried  	
Salmon, Frozen
" Canned ..
Cured ...,
" Fresh 	
Pickled   ..
Salt Fish Eggs	
"Canned Clams	
"      Lobsters   ..
"      Fish (not
classified)   .
Codfish 	
Sturgeon, Frozen..
Flour  	
Fruit—Pears  	
Fertilizer 	
Goods, Household..
Granite   	
Glue, Stock	
Gear Contractors...
Guano 	
Hides	
Horses	
23,995
23,938
920
539
4,904
17,438
34,471
6,628
52,780
54
5,017
509
1,901
448
410
54,170
7,498
1,748
157
366
257,772
16,442
64
40
75
50
34
22
65
20
86
00
15
50
395 50
1,107 00
5,753 40
20
20
80
36
45
07
75
85
05
10
Hoofs 	
Hooks, Fish	
Intestines, Hog	
Jewelers' Sweeps
Lumber.
Cedar 	
Spruce 	
Cottonwood 	
Hardwood    (un class!
fled)   	
Rough Cedar	
Squared Cedar	
Fir 	
White  Pine	
Clapboards	
Bevel Siding	
Shingles   	
Cedar Laths	
Logs, Cedar	
"      Spruce 	
Fir -.	
Ties, Fir	
"      Cedar   	
Bolts, Shingle	
Trap Piles, Fir	
Poles, Cedar	
Lime   	
Linen,  Laundried	
576 40
472 75
1,084 82
4,316 79
21,080 66
17,536 30
2,637 75
56
90
00
63
67
448
1,723
640
37,107
22,983
11,778 60
171,446 80
1,146,635 32
12,356 12
291,683 13
42,070 86
3,966
7,143
793
2,103
10,626 50
3,376 47
43,441 67
150 00
00
80
10
50
Liquors.
Unclassified    2,797 30
Whiskey    2,452 20
Champagne  333 00
Machinery.
Unclassified   1,677 75
Boilers, Old  572 50
Tools     ,      602 75
Brick Machine  '      265 35
Carding Machine.... 150 00
Mushrooms, Canned. 1,712 00
Marmalade   157 75
Molasses   4,617 64
"Millinery  110 51
Ore.
Gold    40,562 60
Silver  12,299 00
Copper  32,603 00
Gold Dust  2,200 00
Gold Slag  254 35
Gold Bullion  827,509 06 68
Vancouver Board of Trade
LIST OF  EXPORTS—CONTINUED
Oranges, Jap	
Onions 	
Oats 	
Oil, Olive	
Pianos 	
Patterns   	
Pitch   	
Potatoes   	
Printing Paper
(Newspaper)
Pictures  	
Papers, Business...
Peanuts  	
Potassium Cyandi..
Poles, Totem	
Pelariscope	
Quick Silver	
Rope, Wire	
Rabbits   	
Rice	
Syrup  ,
Shells	
Saw Bands	
Syrup 	
Sugar, Maple '.
Saws 	
Sankage 	
Sheep   	
Syphons 	
Scrap.
Rubber ....
Copper 	
Zinc   	
Iron   	
Car Wheels.
1,716 45
1,320 80
61,432 11
2,120 80
2,136 25
155 50
5,305 62
1,686 59
8,415 24
160 80
255 00
429 50
1,812 79
294 50
189 00
8,132 00
225 00
262 50
324 60
8,329 05
622 65
557 00
8,786 02
475 91
326 97
3,551 00
308 28
381 00
24'9 84
5,509 13
399 21
2,930 77
639 70
Tin  	
Steel Rails	
Brass  	
Unclassified	
Grease ..;	
Switches & Hair.
Tea	
Tar	
15
2
1
75
1
Tin, Pig      15
Tobacco         1
Tubing, Copper	
Tankage, Dried	
Tinplate 	
Turnbuckles and
Washers   	
Wool 	
Wire, Hollow	
540 70
196 35
196 90
041 83
,376 35
,157 74
280 47
,887 00
,223 32
014 30
479 86
,877 69
,400 00
116 00
,109 81
11 55
$3,695,543 09
Fresh Halibut caught
in American bottoms     322,614 40
Fresh Halibut shipp'd
from Alaska        6,521 50
Frozen Halibut,
shipped from
Alaska        5,483 80
$4,030,162 79
Returned   American
Goods $351,870 39
ORDINARY DUES OF A VESSEL IN VANCOUVER.
Hospital dues, per register ton -.  ;
Health Inspector's fee	
Harbor dues   	
Bill of health, outwards	
Pilotage, per foot (each way)	
Pilotage, per foot (steamers)	
Port Agency (according to size) $25 00 to
Discharge of ballast (usually done by ship's crew)
or per ton	
Harbor tonnage    10 00 to
Stevedoring—
General cargo or salmon, per ton	
Sugar, per ton	
Lumber and timber, per M feet, according to
the style of cargo and facilities of the ship..        90 to
Watering    %   15 00 to
02
00
00
00
00
50
100 00
25
20 00
45
25
1 00
20 00 Annual Report, 1909-1910 69
RATE OF TOWAGE.
Pilotage District of Yale and New Westminster.
The Ports of the Pilotage District of Tale and New
Westminster shall be as follows:
Port of Vancouver.
Port of New Westminster. |
Port of Tale and several landings on the Fra'ser River.
(1) The limit of the Port of Vancouver shall be inside
a line drawn from Point Atkinson to the red buoys on
Spanish Bank.
(2) The limit of the Port of New Westminster shall be
inside a line drawn between the outer buoys and north and
south sand heads at the entrance of Fraser River.
DUES.
For vessels entering or clearing from the Port of
Vancouver the rates of pilotage shall be as follows:
Vessels, under sail $4 00 per foot
in tow of a steamer  5 00      "
"        under steam   1 50      "
The pilotage from Cape Flattery or Royal Roads to a
line drawn from Point Atkinson to the red buoy on Spanish
Bank, and vice versa, is not compulsory, but if the services
of a pilot are required, he shall be paid the following rates:
For vessels under sail—
From Cape Flattery $6 00 per foot
"      Callum Bay     5 00
"     Beachy Head    4 00
"     Race Rocks or Royal Roads  3 00      "
For vessels under steam, or in tow of a steamer, the
following rates shall be paid:
From Cape Flattery $3 00 per foot
Callum Bay  2 50
"     Beachy Head     2 00
"     Race   Rocks   or   Royal   Roads,   vessels   under
steam    v  1 00
"     Race Rocks or-Royal Roads, vessels in tow of
*     a steamer    1 50
NEW WESTMINSTER
From the lighthouse on Fraser Sand Heads to New
Westminster:
For vessels under sail $4 00 perfoot
" in tow of steamer   2 00      g
" under steam     ^ ™ 70 Vancouver Board of Trade
From the lighthouse to Cape Flattery or Royal Roads,
and vice versa, the pilotage is not compulsory, but if the
services of a pilot are required, he shall be paid the following rates:
. For vessels under sail—
From Cape Flattery $6 00 per foot
"      Galium Bay   5 00
"     Beachy Head   4 00
"     Race Rocks or Royal Roads  3 00      "
For vessels under steam, or in tow of a steamer, the
following rates shall be paid—
From Cape Flattery $3 00 per foot
"      Callum Bay     2 50
"     Beachy Head     2 00
"     Race   Rocks   or   Royal   Roads,   vessels   under
steam    1 00
"     Race Rocks or Royal Roads, vessels in tow of
a steamer   1 50      "
Any fraction of a foot not exceeding six inches shall be
paid for as half a foot, and any fraction of foot exceeding
six inches shall be paid for as a foot.
SCHEDULE OF PORT WARDEN  DUES.
Privy Council, Canada.
At the Government House at Ottawa,
The 22nd Day of September, 1902.
Present:
His Excellency
The Governor-General-in-Council.
The Governor-General-in-Council, in accordance with
the Port Wardens' Act, Chapter 85, Revised Statutes of
Canada, is pleased to approve and doth hereby approve the
accompanying revised tariff of Port Warden fees proposed
to be levied at the Port of Vancouver, British Columbia.
(Signed)    JOHN J. McGEE,
Clerk of the Privy Council. Annual Report, 1909-1910 71
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE.
Molsons Building, Vancouver, B. C, Canada,
15th August, 1902.
In re
The Port Wardens' Act, Sec. 30, Chap. 85, Revised
Statutes of Canada:
Tariff of Port Warden fees to be levied at the Port of
Vancouver, B. O, as revised from Memorandum from the
Department of Justice, Ottawa, to the Deputy Minister of
Marine, dated August 5th, 1905.
1. For every survey and the certificate thereof by the port
warden and his assistant of the hatches and cargo of any
vessel, or the hull, spars or rigging thereof, or of damaged
goods, a fee of eight dollars, and a further sum of five
dollars, payable to each shipwright or other skilled person
employed by him.
2. For every valuation of a vessel for average, and every in
spection of a vessel intending to load:
(a) For a vessel not exceeding 500 tons, a fee of...$ 5 00
(b) For a vessel 501 tons and not exceeding 700 tons   7 50
(c) For a vessel 701 tons or over  10 00
3. For hearing and settling disputes of which the port warden
is authorized to take cognizance, and for the fees on
appeal to the Council of the Board of Trade:
(a) Providing the value of the thing or the amount
in dispute does not exceed $500.00, a fee of... .$10 00
(b) If exceeding $500.00, a fee of  20 00
4. For the inspection and superintendence of vessels
loading grain, provided that the total quantity of
grain in any one vessel is not less than 100 tons,
a fee of     5 00
5. Part cargoes of grain in sacks, not exceeding one
hundred tons in any one vessel     Free
(Signed)    WM. SKENE,
Secretary.
CUSTOMS OF THE PORT OF VANCOUVER.
Rates of Commission.
Amended schedule recommended by special committees-
and adopted by the Board (1896).
XV.    When no special agreement exists, the following
shall be collectable:
1. On purchase of stock, bonds, and all kinds of
securities, including the drawing of bills for
payment of same 2 % per cent. 72
Vancouver Board of Trade
2. On sale of stocks, bonds and all kinds of secur
ities, including remittances in bills and guarantee   2% per cent.
3. On the purchase and sale of specie, gold dust
and bullion      1 per cent.
4. On sale of bills of exchange, with endorsement.2% per cent.
5. On sale of bills of exchange, without endorse
ment    % per cent.
6. For endorsing bills of exchange when desired. .2% per cent.
7. On   sale   of   produce   and   merchandise,   with
guarantee  1% per cent.
8. On goods received on consignment and after
wards withdrawn  2% per cent,
9. On purchase and-shipment of merchandise, on
costs and charges     5 per cent.
10. For  collecting  and  remitting  delayed  or   liti
gated account    10 per cent.
11. For collecting freight money, on account col
lected   2% per cent.
12. For collecting general claims     5 per cent.
13. For  collecting  general   average—on the  first
$20,000 or any smaller amount     5 per cent.
14. For collecting general average—on any -excess
over $20,000     5 per cent.
15. On purchase or sale of vessels     5 per cent.
16. For entering and clearing vessels and attending
to the customs business of the ship         $25 00
17. For "Port Agency," attending to discharge of
cargo and transacting ship's business other
than entering and clearing at customs:
On vessels not exceeding 250 tons cargo  25 00
....". . with 251 tons, and not exceeding
500 tons cargo  35 00
" with 551 tons, and not exceeding
750 tons cargo  50 00
" with 751 tons, and not exceeding
1,000 tons cargo  75 00
" over 1,000 tons.  100 00
in ballast    10 00
18. For disbursements of vessels by consignees... .2% per cent.
19. For procuring freight or passengers 2% per cent.
20. For chartering vessels, on amount of freight,
actual or estimated, to be considered as due
when the "Charter Parties" or memorandum
of their conditions, etc., are signed     5 per cent.
21. For landing and re-shipping goods from vessels
in distress, on invoice value, or in its absence,
on market value     5 per cent
22. For receiving and forwarding goods—on invoice
amount    2% per cent.
23. For effecting marine insurance—on the amount
of premium        5 per cent.
24. The foregoing Commission to be exclusive of Brokerage and
every charge actually incurred.
25. Vessels to pay clerk hire and labor on wharf, sorting and
delivering cargo.   Annual Report, 1909-1910 73
THE CITY OF VANCOUVER.
The marked progress of the previous year has continued without interruption and in increasing ratio during
1909-10, as will be found by reference to the various returns
given elsewhere.
The transference of real estate has been very extensive
and values have been much enhanced, sales on Hastings and
Granville Streets having been made at from $2,500 to $4,000
per front foot, while the opening up of new suburbs at
Shaughnessy Heights and Point Grey to the south and west,
and of Hastings Townsite on the east, along with considerable activity in North Vancouver, have attracted much outside capital and added to the general business activity
and have raised the daily clearing house returns to over
$1,000,000.00.
The completion of the high level steel bridge on Granville Street, and the steel bascule bridge on Westminster
Avenue, and the block-paving of both these thoroughfares,
as well as the creation of the important new highway of
"Broadway" (formerly Ninth Avenue), traversing the city
from east to west through Mount Pleasant and Fairview,
may be noted as prominent among the improvements of the
year, while the duplication of the water supply by the
completed connection from Seymour Creek to Little Mountain Reservoir has increased the pressure and abundantly
provided against all contingencies for many years to come.
The fire brigade is admittedly the finest motor brigade
on the American Continent and is .kept up to the requirements of the situation.
Building has been, and is very active; several modern
office blocks are now under way, and apartment blocks,
rendered necessary to meet the demand for household accommodation, are becoming quite a feature between Granville
Street and Stanley Park.
Reinforced concrete is the popular material in use, with
facing of stone, or of brick with stone sills.
The railway activity foreshadowed in last report has
assumed more definite shape and much work has been
planned covering the next three or four years, the competition for traffic through the Port of Vancouver when the
Panama Canal is completed being prospectively very great;
other factors to be considered are the awakening in China, 74
Vancouver Board of Trade
and the more active development of this Province as well
as the neighboring Province of Alberta.
FINANCIAL   INSTITUTIONS.
By the addition of "The Traders Bank of Canada," the
list of Eastern banks has been raised to 14, while the newly
incorporated Bank of Vancouver will be opened in July.
The following are now located here:—
Canadian Bank of Commerce, Bank of Montreal, Bank
of British North America, Royal Bank of Canada, Imperial
Bank, Molsons Bank, Bank of Hamilton, Bank of Toronto,
Eastern Townships Bank, Bank of Nova Scotia, Dominion
Bank, Merchants Bank, Northern Bank, Union Bank, and
Traders Bank of Canada, Royal Trust Co. of B. O, Permanent Loan & Savings Co., National Finance Co., Ltd., Canada'
Permanent Mortgage Corporation, Torkshire Guarantee and
Securities Co., B. C. Trust Corporation, Ltd., Vancouver
Trust Co., Ltd., and others.
INDUSTRIES.
The lumber and shingle mills on the Coast have been
considerably increased both in number and capacity. A
very large number of new companies, covering a wide range
of enterprise, appear in the B. C. Gazette as having been
incorporated during the year, while as entirely new industries now in operation, may be mentioned: The Canadian
Pacific Sulphide Pulp Co., Ltd.; the B. C. Wood Pulp &
Paper Co., Ltd.; the B. C. (Oil) Refining Co., Ltd., and the
Paterson Manufacturing Co., Ltd. (makers of roofing felt,
etc.).
Active enquiries are now being made with a view to
the establishment of the iron smelting and steel industries,
than which nothing would give so much impetus to manufacturing generally in this city and throughout the entire lower
mainland district. Annual Report, 1909-19/0
75
MUNICIPAL   STATISTICS
(From the Official Report, 1909)
CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF VANCOUVER.
SUNDRY PROPERTIES (CAPITAL ASSETS)
Buildings and Lands—
Buildings
Lands
City Hall $
22,000 00
$  200,000 00
Free Library	
50,000
00
90,000 00
Old Police Station (not includ
ing site)	
2,000
00
New Police Station and Court
House	
46,800
00
18,500 00
Fire Hall No. 1, Cordova St. E.
22,000
00
21,500 00
t i       i
"   2, Seymour St...
32,000
00
15,000 00
it              c
'      "   3, Broadway E...
2,000
00
8,000 00
i (           i
"4, Broadway W..
1,500
00
7,250 00
a          i
-      "   5, Keefer St	
3,400
00
3,600 00
p           t
|   6, Nelson St	
17,500
00
7,000 00
a          c
'      1   7, 5th Ave. W....
7,500
00
3,000 00
tc          c
1   8, Cedar Cove...
7,500
00
3,500 00
it          i
f      1   9, Charles St	
7,250
00
2,000 00
a           c
1     "10,   13th  Avenue.
Fairview ...
6,800
00
3,000 00
Old Hospital and Cottage Hos
pital 	
10,800
00
125,000 00
Contagious Diseases Hospital...
2,000
00
11,000 00
City Pound, Front Street	
2,500 00
5,000 00
Incinerator	
36,000
00
60,000 00
Works Tard, Lots 1-11, Blk. 1,
D. L. 302	
3,000
00
120,000 00
Powell Street Park	
120,000 00
65,000 00
35,000 00
Cambie
South
Street Park	
200,000 00
20,000 00
60,500
00
245,000 00
Kitsilano Park, Lot 2, Blk. 26,
D. L. 192	
14,000 00
Kitsilai
10 Park, D. L. 526	
60,000 00
Carried Forward $   340,550 00 $ 1,464,850 00 76 Vancouver Board of Trade
SUNDRY PROPERTIES-CONTINUED.
Buildings Lands
Brought forward    $   340,550 00    $1,464,850 00
Mt. Pleasant Park, Lot D, Blk.
175, D. L.264a  20,000 00
Grandview Park, Lots 1-22, Blk.
137b, D. L. 264a  26,500 00
Lot 14, Blk. 64, D. L. 185  7,500 00
Lots 14-16, Blk. 65, D. L. 185.. 23,000 00
Lots 15-22, Blk. 66, D. L. 185.. 62,000 00
Pt. Lots 20-25, S. of R. of W.,
Blk. 1, D. L. 196 • 5,000 00
Lots 4, 7, 8 and 9, Blk. 3, D. L.
200a  28,000 00
Market and Wharf        57,000 00 60,000 00
Exhibition Buildings, Hastings
Park        30,650 00
Cemetery,    exclusive    of   part
given  by  Provincial   Government,   nominal   asset
only,   vide   By-law   454,
' $51,050 00.
High School        90,000 00
Model School        55,750 00
Central and old High School...       45,000 00
Dawson School        52,750 00
Strathcona School        32,750 00
Mt. Pleasant School        64,500 00
Fairview School        48,500 00
Kitsilano School        34,350 00
Roberts School        74,850 00
Seymour School        77,550 00
Grandview School        31,600 00
Maedonald School        33,300 00
Aberdeen School        45,000 00
Simon Fraser School        65,000 00
Alexandra   School,   Lots   1-26,
Blks. 160a, 264a        45,000 00
Grandview High School        25,000 00
School Site, Lot 1, Blk. 32, D. L.
192	
School Site, Lots 1-24, Blk. 164a,
D. L. 264a	
Carried forward    $1,249,100 00
65,000
00
40,000
00
350,000
00
85,000
00
60,000
00
60,000
00
21,000
00
65,000
00
40,000
00
30,000
00
25,000 00
23,000
00
24,500
00
25,000
00
22,500
00
12,750
00
13,000
00
$2,668,000 00 Annual Report, 1909-1910 77
SUNDRY PROPERTIES-CONTINUED
Brought forward.    $1,249,100 00    $2,668,600 00
School Site, S. 2-3, Blk. 135d,
D. L. 264a  15,000 00
School Site, Blk. 454, D. L. 526. 25,000 00
School Site, Blk. 366, D. L. 526. 18,360 00
Total $1,249,100 00   $2,716,960 00
Lands as per foregoing Details. $2,716,960 00
Buildings as per Foregoing Details   1,249,100 00
Water   Works,    Supplies    and
Equipment    2,597,206 86
Fire Hall Apparatus, Equipment and Supplies  170,953 40
School   Apparatus,   Equipment
and Supplies  69,587 69
Sewers and Septic Tanks $  884,432 00
Basement Drains        79,407 00
$63,839 00
STREETS—
Wood-Paved $ 885,033 00
Asphalt   173,000 00
Macadam   496,867 00
Cleared and Graded  618,630 00
Stone-Paved Streets  15,497 00
Stone-Paved Lanes  66,054 00
Brick-Paved Lanes  5,400 00
Stone and Concrete Crossings.. 188 00
SIDEWALKS—
Cement Sidewalks and Curbs. .$  451,706 00
Wooden Sidewalks ^ ...       77,826 00
2.260,669 00
529,532 00
890,200 00
Bridges   $ 875,300 00
Heatley Avenue Wharf  14,000 00
Slip at Gore Avenue  900 00
SUNDRY ASSETS—
City Hall Furniture $ 6,000 00
City Tools, Rollers, Logging Engine, Horses, etc        20,235 98 	
Carried forward   $. 26,235 98 $11,448,047 95 78 Vancouver Board of Trade
SUNDRY PROPERTIES-CONTINUED
Brought Forward $ 26,235 98 $11,448,047 95
Scavenging System, Plant and
Tools  10,840 85
Gaol Furniture and Equipment 5,534 05
Pound Keeper's Horse and Rig 150 00
Books in Free Library  15,000 00
Furniture and Book Stacks in
Free Library  2,800 00
Furniture,   etc.,   Old   People's
Home  300 00
Furniture, etc., Isolation Hospital   175 00
Park Tools, Swings and Seats.. 3,429 70
City Market Furniture and Fittings   130 00
  64,595 58
$11,512,643 53
EXPENDITURE.
Finance Committee $ 127,412 81
Fire and Light Committee  210,428 42
Police Committee  110,235 00
Health Committee  32,360 24
Parks Committee  27,397 75
Library Committee  12,025 45
School Trustees, including Sinking Fund and Interest on
School Debentures  306,893 06
Board of Works  287,970 26
    $1,114,722 99
Interest and Sinking Fund Provision for Debentures other
than   those   for   Water
Works and School Purposes 327,862 70
Adjustment of Unexpired Insurance   50 88
Over-expenditure   on   By - law
658, Police Patrol System.. 3,414 83
Carried Forward $       3,414 83    $1,442,636 57 Annual Report, 1909-1910 79
SUNDRY PROPERTIES-CONTINUED
Brought Forward $'     3,414 83    $1,442,636 57
Over-expenditure   on   By - law
658, Addition to Jail  1,457 93
  4,872 76
$1,447,509 33
Balance carried to Revenue Surplus   958 14
$1,448,467 47
INCOME.
General Taxes, 1909 (Collected
net)  $1,002,507 59
General Taxes, 1909 (Outstanding)         94,457 30
    $1,096,964 89
Local Improvement Taxes, 1909:
Paving $ 33,871 90
Cement Walks  15,674 70
Sewers  2,451 45
  51,998 05
Street Sprinkling Taxes, 1909.. 1,058 34
Government Grants  89,749 80
Sundry Licenses $ 81,496 20
Rentals   7,950 57
Fees and Receipts      114,988 47
 •        204,4^5 24
Interest on Commutations $ 141 15
School Trustees Credits  3,800 00
Parks Sundry Credits  320 00
  4,261 15
$1,448,467 47
4  Annual Report, 1909-1910
81
SCHOOLS.
Enrollment and Average Attendance.
Enroll.
January  8081.
February    8172.
March  . .• 8212.
April   8265.
May 8039.
June  7230.
1897
Av. Att.
..7024.46
..7186.84
..7091.87
..6'912.66
..6464.43
..6030.13
Enrollment for the month of October for each year since
Enroll.
Av. Att.
August 	
...7891..
..7108.25
September
...8553..
..7444.11
October  ..
...8845..
..7631.45
November
...8809..
..7804.11
December
...8476..
..7814.78
Year
1898.
1899.
1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
Enroll.
...2724
...3117
...3393
...3710
...4087
...4416
Year
1904.
1905.
1906.
1'907.
1908.
1909.
Enroll.
...4994
...5609
...6437
...7370
...7984
...8845
Number of teachers on the Vancouver staff in December
for each year since 1902;
Males Females Total
December,  1903	
 29	
   63	
 92
1904	
 30	
 71	
 101
1905	
 29	
 83	
 112
1906	
 38	
 92	
 130
1907	
 47	
 103	
 150
1908	
 58	
 115	
 173
1909	
 65	
 128	
 193
. Special instructors employed by the Board:
Manual Training  7
Domestic   Science  5
Supervisor of Music  1
Supervisor of Drawing  1
Supervisor of Drill, etc  1
Special Officers employed by the Board:
Medical Health Inspector \  1
Attendance Officers  2
Number of Teachers holding the different grades of
certificates:
University Graduate in Arts or Science 61
Academic Certificate  6
First Class Certificate - 58
Second Class Certificate 68
Specialist's Certificate  0  Annual Report, 1909-1910 83
CHURCHES IN THE CITY OF VANCOUVER.
Church of England.
St. James' Church Cordova Street East
Christ Church Georgia Street
St. Michael's Church Broadway and Prince Edward Sts.
St. Paul's Church. .. Jervis Street
Holy Trinity Church Eighth Ave. and Pine St.
All Saints' Church Cedar Cove
St. Mark's Church Second Ave. and Larch St., Kitsilano
§*& Presbyterian.
First Presbyterian Hastings Street East
St. Andrew's Church Richards Street
St. John's Church Comox Street
Mount Pleasant Quebec Street and Broadway
Chalmers Church Fairview
Cedar Cove Church Victoria Road
Kitsilano Church Fourth Ave. (Opposite Public School)
Robertson Church Salisbury Drive and Napier St.
Methodist.
Wesley Church Georgia Street
Mt. Pleasant Methodist Church Westminster and Broadway
Sixth Ave. Methodist Church Sixth Ave. and Fir St.
Central Methodist Church Pender Street E.
Dundas St. Methodist Church Dundas Street
Grandview Methodist Church Park Drive and Barnard St.
Mountain View Methodist Church	
Congregational.
First Congregational Church Georgia Street
Knox Congregational Church Cordova Street East 84 Vancouver Board of Trade
Baptist.
First Baptist Church. Dunsmuir and Hamilton Streets
Jackson Ave. Baptist Church Jackson Avenue
Mount Pleasant Baptist Church Westminster Road
Fairview Baptist Church Fourth Ave. and Maple St.
Central Fairview Baptist Church Tenth Ave. and Laurel St.
Fifth Ave. Baptist Church Fifth Ave. and Arbutus St.
Grandview Baptist Church First Ave. and Salisbury Drive
Mount Pleasant Baptist Church Tenth Ave. and Quebec St.
. , Roman Catholic.
Church of Our Lady of the Holy Rosary Dunsmuir Street
Church of the Sacred Heart Campbell and Keefer St.
St. Patrick's Church Twelfth Ave. and Quebec St.
Lutheran.
German Lutheran Church Prior Street
Y. M. C. A. Building Cambie Street
Salvation Army.
Headquarters   Hastings Street E. Annual Report, 1909-1910 85
CONSULAR   AGENCIES   IN   CITY.
BELGIUM.
J. M. Whitehead., Esq., Vice-Consul.
CHILE.
Hon. M. P. Morris, Consul-General.
ECUADOR.
Hon. John McQuillan, Consul General.
FRANCE.
E. Francis, Esq., Vice-Consul.
GERMANY.
Hon. A. F. von Ettlinger, Consul.
JAPAN.
Hon.  Chenosuko Yada, Japanese Imperial Consul.   ,
MEXICO.
Senor Manuel C. Fellez, Consul.
NETHERLANDS.
C. Gardiner Johnson, Esq., Vice-Consul.
NORWAY AND SWEDEN.
C. B. Stahlsmidt, Esq., Vice-Consul.
PERU.
R. H. Alexander, Consul.
SPAIN.
Capt. H. A. Mellon, Vice-Consul.
UNITED STATES.
Hon. Geo. N. West, Consul. 86
Vancouver Board of Trade
METEOROLOGICAL STATISTICS,   1905-9
OF THE THREE PRINCIPAL STATIONS ON THE PACIFIC COAST
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
(By the courtesy of E. Baynes Reed, Meteorologist, Victoria)
VANCOUVER,    B.C.
AVERAGE   TEMPERATURE
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
ened)
Apl.
48.3
May
53.0
June
59.4
July
64.1
Aug.
60.9
Sept.
56.0
Oct.
44.2
Nov.
41.8
Dec.
39.6
Year
1905  ...
(Stati
on Op
1906	
38.7
39.8
42.7
49.8
53.9
56.9
66.1
62.3
55.7
50.2
40.8
384!
49.6
1907	
27.3
37.6
39.5
45.6
55.6
58.9
63.7
60.7
37.1
50 4
44.6
39.4
48.4
1908	
38.1
38.4
41.6
46.5
51.2
58.0
63.5
61.9
54.1
47.9
45.5
36.1
48.5
1909....
29.2
39.2
41.4
45.0
51.4
58.2
60.5
59.6
56.5
49.6
42.4
33.9
47.24
HIGHEST TEMPERATURE
1905
71.0
68.7
76.7
75.9
76.5|86.6
81.389.8
80.0
82.4
72.9
72.8
60.0
69.4
62.7
57.3
50.0
51.4
86.6
19U6	
51.5
53.6
59.0
89.8
1907	
45.7
52.6
53.0
63.7
75.5
80.8 89.6
87.0
81.2
64.0
59.6
56.9
89.6
1908... ,.
48.1
49.8
55.7
77.2
65.6
79.887.2
92.2
70.3
65.4
59.5
49.7
92.2
1909....
51.0
51.5
58.0
60.9
71.1
78.0176.7
78.7
77.9
65.3
55.8
48.0
78.7
LOWEST TEMPERATURE
1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.
26.5
2.3
18.4
3.7
24.9
14.6
16.8
23.0
15.3
24.7
25.6
28.0
28.5
28.8
27.9
29.6
27.8
32.9
34.5
34.8
37.6
35.0
42.5
40.1
40.2
45.4
41.7
46.2
48.3
44.5
43.0
43.0
40.7
42.7
41.3
46.7
42.6
40.2
34.5
41.5
29.9
37.0
22.9
29.6
35.7
34.3
35.0
20.3
25.5
31.7
28.0
23.0
26.6
22.7
23.8
23.9
17.4
15.3
2.3
16.8
3.7
PRECIPITATION-RAIN
1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.
9.29
7.32
7.60
4.58
6.03
8.05
5.98
8.15
 1.212.20
2.371.04 3.58
2.39 4.13 1.44
7.14 2.61 4.41
4.14 1.30 3.76
2.53
3.04
1.43
1.86
1.69
1.99
0.45
1.70
1.59
2.45
2.09
0.83
1.36
1.15
1.43
9.09
8.87
4.51
1.46
2.23
4.98
7.60
1.76
6.77
7.06
4.18
8.25
13.23
13.69
15.66
6.70
6.78
7.96
8.41
4.16
58.13
55.28
62.37
56.61
SNOW
3.70
20.0
2.5
3.25
1.70
1906....
1907	
1908	
1909	
16.30
NO. OF RAINY DAYS ON WHICH .O
OR
MORE OF
PRECIPITATION
'  12
10
9
7
10
17
16
16
22
117
1906	
22
15
12
13
15
18
3
4
15
23
19
25
184
1907	
13
14
17
11
7
10
4
10
10
14
23
20
153
1908...
24
20
18
14
15
7
6
7
11
19
10
20
181
1909 ...
21
24
14
12
17
7
15
7
11
18
23
16
185
No. of days on which snow fell—Jan., 11.    Total, 11. Annual Report, 1909-1910
£/
METEOROLOGICAL STATISTICS—CONTINUED.
VICTORIA,    B.C.
AVERAGE TEMPERATURE
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apl.
May
June
July
Aug.
59.4
Sept,
56.3
Oct.
47.7
Nov.
44.8
Dec.
42.6
Year.
1905	
41.0
41.7
47.9
50.3
52.6
56.7
61.2
50.2
1906	
41.6
44.0
44.5
50.9
54.5
58.5
65.5
62.3
56.4
51.0
44.2
41.2
51.3
1907....
33.3
41.7
42.4
48.4
56.0
59.2
62.9
60.4
58.4
51.5
47.4
42.6
50.5
1908 ...
41.6
41.0
43.7
48.5
52.7
58.7
62.7
61.0
53.6
49.3
47.0
39.8
50.0
19.09...
32.5
41.3
43.6
47.3
52.1
58.0
59.6
59.5
57.1
50.4
44.2
36.7
48.53
HIGHEST
TEMPERATURE
1905	
55.0
56.4
68.0
71.0 72.2 68.784.2I78.4
75.0
58.0
59.2
50.7
84.2
1906....
53.1
55.2
63.0
70.7
72.4
77.5 88.580.5
71.7
69.8
56.1
52.5
88.5
1907	
48.2
53.1
57.0
67.2
76.7
78.287.178.1
84.7
68.0
58.4
56.1
87.1
1908.
49.3
51.2
55.2
73.2
66.2
79.4'83.283.7
75.2
67.0
62.9
52.0
83.7
1909....
50.0
53-5
55.8
60.471.7
1
75.878.076.4
80.9
68.6
55.1
49.0
80.9
LOWEST
TEMPERATURE
1905....
27.4
22.7
31.3
34.7
37.8
47.3150.546.9
44.4
33.5
27.9
27.8
22.7
1906....
26.2
31.0
21.2
32.6
38.2
12.451.1
45.4
42 2
34.0
30.4
28.3
21.2
1907....
14.8
25.5
28.7
32.2
38.0
43.4 46.743.7
40.2
35.5
36.3
30.4
14.8
1908....
26.2
23.7
27.2
32.9
39.7
40.0 44.2|47.4
34.9
31.2
31.9
28.3
23.7
1909....
7.4
28.2
30.5
32.0
34.3
42.2 44.9144.3
38.3
36.7
25.4
23.6
7.4
PRECIPITATION—RAIN
1905....
1906	
1907....
1908.
2.89
2.27
2.84
3.16
2.27
1.66
3.87
4.30
2.17
1.390.21
0.67.0.49
1.401.39
4.58 0.63
0.730.61
2.83
1.81
0.35
1.27
0.96
1.06
0.65
0.33
0.90
0.47
0.10
0.16
0.39
0.15
0.92
1.21
0.53
0.23
0.67
0.47
4.03
3.14
1.21
0.62
0.79
2.81
5.60
0.73
2.33
2.31
0.91
6.13
4.68
4.02
11.51
2^82
3.82
4.78
4.88
3.69
22.53
26.90
21.91
26.70
1909
2.68
27.31
SNOW
1906
2.9
4.9
.6
5.75
4.5
0.30
3.2
1907...
1908
0.7
.2
0^30
5.6
0.8
1909	
6.80
No. OF RAINY DAYS ON WHICH .Ol OR MORE OF PRECIPITATION
1905..   .
17
10
18
4
13
8
1
7
14
14
11
18
139
1906 ..
21
14
9
10
9
14
1
4
11
18
16
18
145
1907....
115
16
14
8
3
5
2
7
11
15
20
21
137
1908	
19
16
17
8
9
4
4
4
7
14
16
16
133
1909
19
19
9
5
10
6
I
3
7
15
21
10
131
No. of days on which snow fell—Jan., 10;   Feb., 1 ;    Dec
Total, 1.3. 88
Vancouver Board of Trade
METEOROLOGICAL STATISTICS—Continued.
Ror   PORT  SIMPSON,  B.C.,1905-8
And for Prince Rupert 1909
AVERAGE
TEMPERATURE
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
43.0
40.0
35.5
36.3
39.0
Apl.
44.4
45.0
42.9
41.0
40.2
May
49.9
50.6
51.3
45.5
46.6
June  July
Aug.
Sept.
Oc*.
Nov.
Dec.
Year
1905	
1906....
1907....
1908....
1909....
35.5
33.0
24.2
35.7
23.2
36.7
38.3
35.2
34.9
32.9
56.3'59.6
53.161.8
53.7:57.6
51.054.5
51.854.7
57.4
57.0
55.7
55.5
53.6
51.8
51.1
53.5
49.0
53.6
45.1
48.0
46.8
43.4
46.1
42.5
40.9
41.4
40.4
36.8
38.4
34.6
38.0
36.1
31.6
46.7
46.1
43.6
42.50
HIGHEST TEMPERATURE
1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.
45.0
39.5
38.4
51.8
43.6
53.0 57.5
48.0!53.2
52.3 45.0
47.2 45.9
45.8 52.1
64.0
76.0
77.0
77.8
79.9
65.6
54.3
56.3
48.6
58.0
71.9
69.3
72.8
69.4
59.3
63.3
54.3
42.3
60.4
68.0
73.3
76.0
71.2
68.9
58.5
54.0
54.2
68.5
65.5
71.0
72.8
73.0
60.3
59.6
50 3
46.9
57.2
65.0
66.2
64.9
64.0
75.2
64.0
53.8
48.5
79
72
73!
75.
LOWEST TEMPERATURE
1905	
23.0
20.0
29.3
26.6
34.2
39.3
44.8
40.3
39.0
30.5
16.2
22.0
16.2
1906 ..
8.0
26.3
23.4
31.1
32.4
40.0
45.5
45.7
37.0
32.8
30.4
15.8
8.0
1907....
4.8
8.5
25.0
30.4
32.6
40.2
46.5
42.5
38.5
32.0
31.5
22.5
4.8
1908....
21.7
19.6
19.4
29.9
31.9
35.4
43.9
41.4
32.6
22.9
26.3
20.2
19.2
1909	
2.0
0.6
31.4
28.8
33.9
37.1
41.8
43.7
42.3
31.8
17.0
12.4
0.6
PRECIPITATION—RAIN
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
2.16
9.92
.25
5.76
4.74
5.86 5.30
1.93 2.84
10.80 3.68
3.55 7.95
7.32
3.39
8.62
8.33|8.55|6.29
6.656.38
1.98
1 63
4.61
8.07
1.20
5.42
3.49
3.54
3.31
4.71
3.30
3.52
4.84
7.70
10.94
8.76
6.58
4.47
9.98
9.33
7.32
4.32
19.12
19.99
8.80
10.39
9.83
13.76
19.17
11.02
8.18
12.02
8.66
6.66
10.76
7.61
5.94
6.29
83.14
80.95
65.45
90.67
3.88106.67
SNOW
1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.
0.50
9.58
7.3
1.30
46.50
1.30
5.00
4.00
.70
6 50
13.00
.10
10.90
.15
3.80
7.35
1.80
15.33
24.60
6.05
71.25
No. OF RAINY
DAYS ON WHICH .Ol OR
MORE OF PRECIPITATIOh
1905....
11
16
21
18
18
9
12
25
21
24
23
25
223
1906....
23
10
12
26
15
25
12
20
25
28
22
23
241
1907....
7
20
18
16
10
12
11
19
16
25
23
24
201
1908	
21
17
20
21
21
16
19
15
24
21
20
21
236
1909....
14
16
26
16     16
13
21
23
25
27
19
10
226
No. of days on which snow fell—Jan., 11 ;   Feb., 4 ;   Nov., 5.    Total, 20.     Annual Report, 1909-1910'
91
The following gives strong   evidence   of the general increase of traffic:
PROGRESS OF THE B. C. ELECTRIC RY. CO., LTD.
June  30,
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.
1905.
1906.
1907
1908.
1909.
1910.
Miles of Road        No. of Passengers
in Operation Carried
40.80
42.25
46.00
48.00
51.75
69.00
76.23
78.94
97.74
17.00
5,336,310
6,136,374
7,364,289
8,869,486
10,352,451
12,395,582
16,281,766
21,328,180
25,183,739
33,340,326
(Estimated)
No.Employees
(approximate)
260
285
350
400
500
550
781
1,198
1,184
2,063
Water Power in use   20,000 h. p.
Surplus available Water Power   30,000 h. p.
Miles of Road now under construction—74.13, being- the road on south
bank of Fraser to Chilliwack.
N. B.—The above are inclusive details of the operations of B. C. E. Ry.
Co. for British Columbia.
The respective length of tracks being :
Vancouver District  37 miles
North Vancouver         9     "
New Westminster District         8
Inter-urban   lines   (including   Steveston   and
Eburne Branches)  40
Victoria, Vancouver Island,  District  23
Total      117 miles 92 Vancouver Board of Trade
NEW   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
The descriptions of New British Columbia contained in
the following pages are, for the most part, condensed from
reports of explorations by professional men who visited the
country several years ago in the service of the Dominion and
Provincial Governments. They may therefore be accepted
as authentic, free from exaggeration, and. unbiassed by
motives of personal interest; the experiences of later explorers and settlers furnishing confirmatory evidence of their
correctness. These reports are used in this Bulletin for
their value in conveying to the reader a general impression
of an immense area, detailed descriptions of which are impossible at the present stage of its development. This will
be more readily understood by reference to the following
estimate, made by the Surveyor-General, of lands open to
pre-emption, but not yet surveyed, in the Coast, Cariboo,
Cassiar, Lillooet, Northern Tale and Kootenay, and Queen
Charlotte Islands Districts:—
Acres,
Approximately.
Peace River  4,500,000
150-Mile House      576,000
Fraser River      672,000
Canoe River      192,000
Blaekwater River      134,000
Mud River        21,000
Nechaco River Townships      276,000
Lower Nechaco River        14,000
Stuart River      326,000
South end of Babine Lake      192,000
North end of Babine Lake        57,000
Bulkley Valley Townships        92,160
Kispiox River        78,800
Kitsumkalum  River      138,240
Naas  River ;        64,000
Porcher Island      116,480
Kitimat       204,800
Graham Island      348,640
Thompson River      153,600
Total   8,156,720 Annual Report, 1909-1910 93
In addition to the above, the following surveyed lands
are reserved for pre-emption:—
Acres.
Kispiox Reserve     19,354
Mud River Reserve     15,358
Euchiniko Reserve     48,033
Blackwater Reserve     27,605
Babine Lake Reserve     17,047
Porcher Island     37,153
Total   164,550
While all these vast areas are open to pre-emption, it
should be borne in mind that a considerable portion of the
land is not fitted to farming, as much of the country is
broken or mountainous, interspersed with fertile valleys and
lightly timbered prairies which, with the lower benches, or
uplands, can be cultivated to advantage. A large percentage
will be found more suited to stock-raising and dairying than
to general farming, the swamps producing large crops of
wild hay, while most of the higher benches and mountain-
slopes are covered with nutritious bunch-grass—an ideal
stock food.
On account of the difficulties of transportation, which
are being steadily overcome by the making of new roads
and trails, agricultural progress has been slow. In the
Bulkley Valley, for instance, one of the first districts to
attract settlers, there are only about two hundred pre-
emptors living on and improving their claims, while in the
country between Fort George and Fraser Lake there are
about seventy-five pre-emptors. In the whole country covered by this Bulletin the pre-emptions recorded in three
years past were as follows:—
1907.    1908.    1909.
I Coast District  172 517 558
Lillooet District     58 68 102
Kootenay District  172 164 146
Cariboo       42 62 95
Cassiar       6
Totals.   450 811 901
making a grand total of 2,162 pre-emptions, representing
335,920 acres. Assuming that all these pre-emptors are living on their claims, and estimating three persons to a family,
would give a resident population of 6,486, scattered over 94 Vancouver Board of Trade
this immense territory. It will therefore be readily understood that only a very small fraction of the country has
been brought under cultivation, and that it may be said
that farming is in the experimental stage, few, if any, of
these settlers having more than a few acres under crop, as
up to the present time there has been no incentive to farming
on a large scale, the local demand for farm products being
necessarily very limited. As railway construction proceeds,
however, farmers will find a ready market for all they
can produce, as several thousand men will be employed in
the work.
In addition to the land pre-empted, the following certificates of purchase have been issued:—
1907.            1908. 1909.
Coast District     295               678 1,681
Lillooet District     132               114 143
Kootenay District 1,421               702 704
Cariboo  District     147               195 451
Cassiar District       33                   3 22
Totals 2,028 1.692 3.001
A total for the three years of 6,721 certificates, representing between three and four million acres. Although a
great deal of this land has been acquired by investors who
are holding it for higher prices, a certain acreage is owned
by actual settlers who are residing on and improving their
properties, while others are waiting the advent of the railway before taking actual possession.
RAILWAY CONSTRUCTION.
The only railway actually under construction is the
Grand Trunk Pacific, and the work in progress is from
Prince Rupert, up the Skeena River Valley to a point near
Hazleton. The banks of the Skeena are rocky and precipitous, and the work is extremely difficult, being a succession of heavy rock-cutting and tunnelling. The work has
also been seriously retarded by the difficulty of forwarding
materials and supplies. This can only be accomplished
during the season of navigation on the Skeena, which is so
turbulent and unreliable that steamers are wrecked every
year, causing great loss of time and property. Contracts
have been let for the portion of the railway between Hazel-
ton and Bulkley Valley, also for the section west of Edmonton to Tete Jaune Cache, and it is expected that contracts Annual Report, 1909-1910 95
for the intervening sections (following the Fraser, Nechaco,
and Tako Rivers from Tete Jaune Cache to the Bulkley)
will be awarded in the near future. The company's contract with the Dominion Government calls for the completion of the road by 1911, but at the present rate of progress
this will be impossible; consequently the middle sections
need not except the railway for two or three years at the
earliest.
The Pacific Northern and Omineca Railway Company
has graded a portion of the road between Kitimat and the
Skeena River, but no announcement has been made as to
the completion of this railway.
The Canadian Northern Pacific is under contract to
extend its transcontinental main line from Yellowhead Pass,
following the Thompson River Valley to Kamloops; thence
down the Fraser Valley to a point at or near Vancouver,
and on Vancouver Island from Victoria to Barkley Sound.
The company undertakes to complete the road within four
years from June, 1910. This railway will give access to the
large expanse of country watered by the Upper Fraser and
North and South Thompson Rivers, in which extensive reserves have been made for pre-emptors.
The Portland Canal Short Line Railway Company is
building from Stewart, at the head of Portland Canal, along
the Bear River for thirty miles, and also proposes to build
up the American Creek for ten miles. This railway is
intended to facilitate mining work. There is practically
no farming land in its territory.
STEAMBOAT NAVIGATION.
During the season of navigation (generally speaking,
from May 1st to mid-November) light-draught steamboats
ply upon the Skeena, Fraser, Nechaco, and Stewart Rivers.
This season (1910) eight boats will be operated on the
Skeena and four upon the other rivers named above. The
Skeena River boats sail from Prince Rupert and Port Bssing-
ton for Hazelton, the head of navigation. The Fraser River
boats from Soda Creek for Fort George, Nechaco, Fraser
Lake, Stuart Lake, and Tete Jaune Cache. There is also a
steamboat running on the Thompson River from Kamloops
to Little Fork, sixty miles, and one on the Columbia River
from Revelstoke to La Porte, forty-five miles. 96 Vancouver Board of Trade
PRINCE RUPERT.
Prince Rupert, the Pacific terminus of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway ,is situated on Kaien Island, near the mouth
of the Skeena River, 550 miles north of Vancouver. Prince
Rupert Harbour is one of the best on the Pacific Coast,
roomy, land-locked, with a good depth of water and free
from shoals or obstructions. Three-fourths of the townsite
is owned by the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Company,
the Government of British Columbia owning the other one-
fourth. The city has been incorporated, but all the improvements—street-grading, sidewalks, sewers, water-works, etc.
—made up to the present have been at the joint cost of the
Government and the company.
In May and June, 1909, lots were offered for sale at
auction, and a million and a half dollars' worth were sold.
Since the sale the population has increased rapidly. It is
now estimated to be between three and four thousand, and
temporary buildings are being replaced by substantial permanent structures. The town is well supplied with hotels,
stores, banks, and other business establishments, schools,
churches, and a general hospital. There is a volunteer fire
brigade, equipped with modern appliances.
Prince Rupert is destined to be one of the most important cities in Western Canada, the terminus of a great transcontinental railway system and the outlet of a vast agricultural, mining, and lumbering district, now in course of
development. The completion of the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway from the Atlantic to the Pacific will assure the
prosperity of Prince Rupert, and place it well up on the list
of the world's most important seaports. The railway is now
built for 100 miles eastward from Prince Rupert, and contracts are let for the remaining portions of the main line in
British Columbia.
GENERAL  DESCRIPTION.
New British Columbia, which includes the great undeveloped valleys and plateaux of the Coast, Cassiar, Cariboo
and Lillooet Districts, is destined, in the not far distant
future, to rival the southern districts in population and progress, for it possesses within itself all that is essential to the
support of millions of people. The hindrance to its settlement
in the past—the almost total lack of transportation facilities—is being gradually overcome by the construction of Annual Report, 1909-1910 97
trails and wagon-roads, the establishment of new steamboat
routes, and—most important of all—the building of the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. This great transcontinental
trunk road, crossing Canada from Prince Rupert on the
Pacific to Moncton on the Atlantic, will give access to the
immense areas of agricultural land, magnificent forests, extensive coal-measures, and widely distributed deposits of
precious and economic minerals, which form the natural
wealth of New British Columbia, and without doubt the
marvellous changes which have taken place in Southern
British Columbia during the past decade will be repeated
in the north. The advance guard of industry is already
occupying points of vantage along the projected line of
railway, and the number of pioneers is being rapidly increased, but no substantial growth can be counted upon
until the rails are laid and trains running. Since the last
edition of this Bulletin was published considerable progress
has been made by the Provincial Government in providing
better means of travel. A trunk wagon-road has been built
from Hazelton to Aldermere, in the Bulkley Valley, to connect with the road running from Quesnel to the Nechaco
Valley, bridges having been built where necessary. The
work of subdividing the country into townships is being
done as rapidly as possible, over twenty parties of surveyors being now in the field.
The Central and Northern Interior of British Columbia
may be defined as lying between parallels 52 degrees and
60 degrees north latitude, bounded on the east by the
boundary of the' Province and on the west by the Coast
range of mountains. The land suitable for settlement may
be divided into three well-defined areas: (a) That part of
the Province lying to the east of the Rocky Mountains, commencing about latitude 54 degrees N. and running to the
northern boundary; (b) that section of the great intermon-
tane valley between the Selkirk and Rocky Mountains,
lying north of the Big Bend of the Columbia River; and
(c) the numerous valleys between the Selkirk and Coast
ranges of mountains to the north of the cross-ranges of
mountains that form the northern confine of the interior
plateau.
EAST OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS.
Very little is known of this enormous wedge-shaped
area, and what information is available concerns only the
southern half.   The drainage area of the Black and Nation 98 Vancouver Board of Trade
Rivers that, combining, form the Liard, near the northern
boundary of the Province, is a terra incognita. All present
knowledge is confined to the valley of the Peace River and
its tributaries, the Parsnip, Finlay, and South Pine. Of
the North Pine River, joining the Peace from the north
near the 120th meridian, nothing whatever is known.
THE INTERMONTANE VALLEY.
This forms one of the most important topographical
features of the Province. It crosses the international boundary from the south and runs parallel with the western
base of the Rocky Mountains, separating that range from
the Selkirks, for a distance of over 800 miles. Apparently
of very ancient origin, it is entirely independent of present
drainage systems and varies in width from two to fifteen
miles. Except for a short distance on the west bank of
the Parsnip River, it is enclosed by mountains running in
height from 3,000 to 6,000 feet, or more, above the valley.
That portion within the purview of this Bulletin includes
the drainage areas of the Canoe, Upper Fraser, Bad, Parsnip, and Finlay Rivers.
THE WESTERN VALLEYS.
These include the valley of the Homaltheo River, the
country between Chilco River and Tatla Lake, the Chilcotin
District, the Nechaco and Blaekwater Valleys, the country
along the east of the Bella Coola River, the fertile country
in the vicinity of Ootsa Lake, and the Bulkley and Kispiox
Valleys.
CHARACTER OF COUNTRY.
Much of the land included is suitable for agriculture;
but, in a general way, agricultural operations will be confined to grazing, dairying and stock-raising, although wheat
and other cereals can be grown in many localities. Feed is
present in profusion, the native fodder plants being pea-
vine, vetch, red-top, wild timothy, rye, and blue grass. These
cattle foods are luxuriant, rich, and nutritious, and many
reports state the pea-vine reaches waist-high when travelling
through it on horseback. In most localities cattle require
to be fed for a few weeks in winter, but abundant hay can
be cut for this purpose. Timber sufficient for local requirements is found everywhere.
AS A FRUIT COUNTRY.
The country is so sparsely settled that so far little
attention has been given to fruit-growing, but the evidence Annual Report, 1909-1910 99
at hand would lead to the conclusion that all the hardier
varieties of apples, pears, and plums, and all varieties of
small fruits, will succeed in many localities. Speaking of
the Coast District from Jervis Inlet to the Skeena River, Mr.
Maxwell Smith, Dominion Fruit Inspector, says: '' There is
little known of its capabilities, but. undoubtedly, it has a
few surprises in store for the future. Though in small
quantities as yet, apples, peaches, and grapes have been
successfully grown on the Skeena. The first apple trees
were planted at Hazelton in the spring of 1901, and fruited
in the fall of 1904." Apples of good quality have been
grown for years at Barkerville. A nursery has been established near the mouth of the Copper River, midway between Port Essington and Hazelton, and several settlers in
the interior valleys have planted young orchards, some of
which are reported to be doing well. At Meanskinisht, on
the Skeena River, forty miles south of Hazelton, A. S. Gray,
a pioneer fruit-grower of Kootenay, has set out a number
of young fruit trees, and declares, after two years' experience, he is convinced that fruit will do as well on the
Skeena as on Kootenay Lake.
BULKLEY VALLEY IN  1910.
The arable land in the Bulkley Valley, lying between
Moricetown and the Bulkley Summit, covers an area approximately 100 miles long and from one to ten miles wide.
The greater portion of this land is timbered lightly with
poplars, while the remainder is timbered with spruce and
black pine of medium size. The soil is principally a black
loam where the poplars are found, and a sandy loam among
the black pine; almost invariably the subsoil is clay.
The first settlement took place in the Bulkley Valley
in the spring and summer of 1904, although some ten men
had wintered there in 1903-04. In 1904 about twenty pre-
emptors took up land, built themselves cabins, and began
preparing their lands for cultivation. During the following
years settlers kept coming in until at the present time
(March, 1910) there are about 200 pre-emptors living in the
valley, who with their wives and families bring the population up to about 250.
Last year (1909) there was approximately 2,000 tons of
hay cut in the valley, of which about one-fifth was timothy,
the balance wild hay; 250 acres were planted in oats, 50
acres in barley and wheat, and about 200 tons of potatoes 100 Vancouver Board of Trade
were grown. This represents what was grown for home
use and the local market (which is limited); but this year
there will be a good demand for all the farm produce the
settlers can raise, as railway construction should be well
under way by the coming fall and winter. Hay realizes
about $40 a ton on the ranch, oats $100 a ton, and potatoes
from $50 to $80 a ton. Of course these prices will only hold
good during railway construction.
The amount of desirable land available for pre-emption
is very limited, and is mostly timbered with spruce or black
pine; but if a man hustles around off the beaten tracks he
could still locate a suitable pre-emption. All the best of the
land has been alienated, either by pre-emption or purchase.
Land can be purchased from individuals at prices varying
from $6 to $15 an acre, according to quality of land and
location. Intending settlers should get located in the valley
this year, so that they can get their land prepared, to take
advantage of good prices during railroad construction.
The easiest and cheapest way to Bulkley Valley is via
steamer to Prince Rupert and river-boat to Hazelton. There
is a stage from Hazelton to Bulkley Valley over a fair
wagon-road; the stage fare is $10. There are two road-
houses between Hazelton and Aldermere, one twenty miles
from Hazelton and the other forty-two miles from Hazelton,
so the traveller can go through without taking provisions
or blankets.
Fifty-six miles from Hazelton, in the heart of the Bulk-
ley Valley, are the twin towns of Aldermere and Telkwa.
At each place there is a well-equipped hotel and store where
one can purchase all kinds of groceries, clothes, hardware,
and farming machinery at coast prices, plus the freight
charges. There is also a post-office and telegraph-office at
Aldermere, besides other buildings.
There are two sawmills in the valley, one near Aider-
mere and the other at Thompson's ranch, fifteen miles up
the valley from Aldermere, where all lumber necessary for
building purposes can be secured at reasonable rates. The
Bulkley Valley boasts of one newspaper, the "Interior
News," published at Aldermere by Joseph Coyle and devoted to the interests of the Central Interior.
After six years' residence at Aldermere ranch, in the
Bulkley Valley, I have come to the conclusion that the Annual Report, 1909-1910 101
valley is well adapted for mixed farming and dairying, and
that with the advent of transportation facilities, in the
shape of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, the district will
be one of the best agricultural areas in the Central Interior.
CLIMATE OF BULKLEY VALLEY.
Highest temperature—1904, 90 degrees; 1905, 92 degrees; 1906, 98 degrees; 1907, 102 degrees.
Lowest temperature—1904-05, 18 degrees below zero;
1905-06, 29 degrees below zero; 1906-07, 38 degrees below
zero; 1907-08, 12 degrees below zero.
Greatest depth snowfall—-1904-05, 16 inches; 1905-06, 8
inches; 1906-07, 30 inches; 1907-08, 12 inches.
First snow—1904-05, November 16th; 1905-06, September 22nd; 1906-07, October 27th; 1907-08, November 1st.
Aldermere Lake frozen over—1904-05, December 3rd;
1905-06, December 10th; 1906-07, December 6th; 1907-08,
December 8th.
Bulkley River frozen in places—1904-05, January 9th;
1905-06, February 21st; 1906-07, February 15th; 1907-08,
February 6th.
Robins arrived—1905, March 10th; 1906, March 23rd;
1907, March 20th.
Bulkley River ice-jam gone out—1905, April 6th; 1906,
March 30th j 1907, April 21st.
Butterflies seen—1905, April 2nd; 1906, March 25th;
1907, March 30th.
Bluebirds arrive—1905, March 10th; 1906, March 26th;
1907, March 21st.
Grouse drumming—1905, March 29th; 1906, March 26th;
1907, April 1st.
Aldermere Lake open—1905, April 9th; 1906, March
28th; 1907, May 6th
Snowbirds arrive—1905, April 6th; 1906, March 28th;
1907, March 31st.
Ducks seen—1905, April 9th; 1906, March 30th-; 1907,
May 2nd.
Bumble-bees—1905, April 8th; 1906, April 3rd; 1907,
April 26th. 102 Vancouver Board of Trade
Swallows—1905, April 21st; 1906, April 14th; 1907,
May 8th.
Kingfishers—1905, May 3rd; 1906, April 14th; 1907,
May 6th.
Geese—1905, April 19th; 1906, April 15th; 1907, April
17th.
Swan—1905, April 19th; 1906, April 19th; 1907, April
18th.
Loons—1905, April 16th; 1906, April 19th; 1907, April
21st.
Snipe—1905, April 22nd; 1906, April 24th; 1907, April
26th.
From the foregoing one can form some idea of the
character of the seasons and the climate in this district.
Personally, I think the climate of the Bulkley Valley is
everything that could be wished for.
In the summers there is plenty of sunshine, and sufficient rain to nourish the crops; the frosts in summer are
not severe enough to do harm. It is true that some winters
the thermometer gets rather low; yet there is no wind, and
the cold is dry, hence it is not felt nearly so badly as a
damp cold attended by a wind. The soil on the average is
excellent and well adapted for farming. Cereals and all
kinds of vegetables do exceptionally well, and would compare favourably with cereals and vegetables produced elsewhere in the Province.
Besides the agricultural resources, there are large coal
deposits lying on the west flank of the valley; while in the
neighboring hills large deposits of copper-gold bearing
quartz claims have been located, and are in course of development. Any one of these resources would be the backbone
of any community, though they are at present lying practically dormant.
FORT GEORGE.
There is an area of 2,000 or 3,000 acres surrounding
Fort George that is suitable for agricultural purposes. Dr.
Dawson states that such crops as have been tried succeed
well, and the elevation is only about 30 feet above the
Fraser. Wheat and grain of all sorts can be grown successfully, as well as large potatoes of fine quality.   He notes Annual Report, 1909-1910 103
that potato-stalks, with the exception of the lower leaves,
were destroyed by frost on October 10th.
The lower part of the valley of Chilaco (Mud) River,
that flows into the Fraser at Fort George, is wide and flat-
bottomed, averaging about a mile in width. It forms a deep
depression in the generally level surface. There are a good
many stretches of open, grassy land, heavily timbered, with
tall grass; but generally the valley is heavily timbered.
These flats appear as if occasionally flooded, but the soil
is very fertile. Among the timber found were many large
trees. Douglas fir and Englemann's spruce sometimes
reached a diameter of three feet, while eottonwood was
found with a girth of five feet. In the vicinity of Double-
headed Mountain the valley is more contracted, probably
not more than half a mile wide.
CEREAL AND ROOT CROPS.
"At Quesnel grain crops are sown from April 20th to
the 1st of May; potatoes planted somewhat later. The grain
is harvested about the middle of August. Wheat, barley,
and oats are cultivated, and all succeed well, though the
two last are the most profitable, as they can be sold in
Cariboo without milling. Night frosts happen here occasionally in June, but are not usually severe enough to do
damage to potatoes, though sometimes checking them a
little. On one occasion, potatoes are known to have been
so completely frozen down as to prove a failure. The Hudson's Bay Company formerly cultivated a farm at Alexandria, between Quesnel and Soda Creek, on which, on certain
portions of the land, 40 bushels of wheat to the acre, by
careful measurement, were grown.
"At Fort George the season of growth for crops does
not differ materially from that of Quesnel, and grain of all
kinds may be ripened. The elevation here is 1,880 feet.
Winter is said to set in about the 1st of November, though
steady cold weather may not continue from that date. In
December and January there is often a few days' thaw.
In March the snow thaws in the sun every day, the thermometer falling below the freezing point at night. In
April the snow disappears, and by about the 20th of the
month the ground is fit to work. At Fraser Lake (2,225
feet) potatoes and other root crops are grown near the
Hudson's Bay establishment, and barley and wheat were
formerly cultivated, though it is  now found cheaper to 104 Vancouver Board of Trade
import flour. The Indians have little garden patches, with
potatoes, turnips, etc. At Stuart Lake (2,200 feet), near
Fort St. James, garden vegetables and root crops succeed
admirably, and potatoes and barley are grown in considerable quantity. I do not know whether wheat has been tried,
but, with proper care, it would no doubt succeed in mdst
seasons, if not invariably.
' "In all these places the complaint of summer frosts is
made. These usually happen in June, and may occur on
one night only, or on two or three nights, and are often
severe enough to touch potato-tops, and occasionally to harm
the plants considerably. It is said, however, that these
frosts have only occurred of late years, and that formerly
they were unknown. It hardly seems probable that any
great change in climate is taking place, and it is quite possible that, the necessity for farming having to a great
measure been done away with, sufficient care has not been
given to cultivation, or to the renewal of the seed, which
is apt gradually to deteriorate and lose the vigour necessary
for successful growth in northern latitudes. Nor are the
most judicious localities always chosen for the more delicate
crops, the lowest ground or that nearest the fort being often
selected, while higher slopes may be less exposed to frosts.
It is not probable that wheat will grow over the whole area
of the white-silt deposits of this region j but I think barley
would flourish over nearly the entire area, while wheat may
be successfully raised in chosen spots. The quality of the
grain seen at Fort Fraser was excellent."—Dr. Dawson s
Report.
There are a few settlers in the Fort George District,
but so far farming has been confined to raising small crops
of oats, barley, and vegetables. This year, owing to the
great influx of land-seekers, there will be a much greater
demand for all kinds of farm produce than can be supplied
by the settlers, and the bulk will have to be imported.
Northwest of Fort George the valleys of the Salmon and
Stewart Rivers have been reserved for pre-emptors. There
is reported to be considerable good farming and grazing
land in this reserve. To the north and east of that again
there is a large area of land adapted to grain-growing and
general farming. All kinds of vegetables do well and the
climate is quite as mild as obtains at Quesnel. The country
is richly mineralized, but not much prospecting has been
done.   Large deposits of mica are reported and colors of   Annual Report, 1909-1910
105
gold are found in all the streams.   Moose and other game
is plentiful and the rivers and lakes abound in fish.
Fort George is a Hudson's Bay post and post-office
situated at the junction of the Fraser and Nechaco Rivers,
320 miles north of Ashcroft and 320 miles southeast of
Hazelton, in the Cariboo District, on the projected line of
the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. The post was established
by Simon Fraser, discoverer of the Fraser River, in 1807.
The Hudson's Bay Company owns 97 acres of land surrounding the fort and fronting on the Fraser River. North
of this is an Indian Reserve of over 1,000 acres, having a
frontage of half a mile on the Fraser and two miles on the
Nechaco. Adjoining the company's land on the south is
what is known as "South Fort George," of which several
acres have been cleared and partly subdivided into building
lots. South Fort George has a bank, a sawmill, general
stores, a newspaper office ("The Fort George Tribune"),
and a steamboat landing. On the land lying south of the
landing is another general store, a barber-shop, and a few
other buildings. West of and adjoining the Indian Reserve,
about two miles from the Hudson's Bay Company's store, is
a townsite called "Central Fort George," subdivided into
lots but not cleared. On the Nechaco River, two miles and
a half from the Hudson's Bay Company's store and adjoining the Indian Reserve, is another townsite called "Fort
George," and a mile west of the store is still another subdivision known locally as "Bronger's."
The geographical position of Fort George, surrounded
by an immense area of agricultural, mineral, and timber
lands, naturally suggests it as a commercial and industrial
centre, but the exact location of the future town is not yet
fixed. During the coming summer a very considerable
volume of business promises to concentrate at Fort George,
and no doubt hotels, restaurants, and boarding-houses will
be established, but at present there is but scant accommodation for travellers.
The present population of Fort George is between fifty
and a hundred white men, and about 200 Indians on the
reserve. There are about seventy-five settlers between Fort
George and Fraser Lake, representing 12,000 acres in actual
occupation. With the opening of navigation the population
of the district is likely to increase very rapidly.
.  i 106 Vancouver Board of Trade
PRICES OF LUMBER AT FORT GEORGE.
Rougii common, up to 16 feet in length—
' From 1x4 to 1x12 $30.00
From 17 feet to 24 feet   32.50
From 25 feet to 36 feet  35.00
$1 additional for every 2 inches over 12 inches wide.
Siding—
1 side, 1 edge     3.00
4 sides     6.00
Dressing     5.00
Shiplap.  32.50
Main flooring, No. 1 edge   50.00
E. S. flooring—
No. 2   45.00
No. 3  40.00
Casings, per lineal foot * 03
Door and window jambs, water tabling and sill, flat grain,
per lineal foot 02%
E. S 03%
N.B.—The most direct route to Fort George is by
C. P. R. to Ashcroft, thence by stage and steamer 310 miles,
or bv wagon-road 320 miles. Single fare from Ashcroft,
$45.00.
GENERAL INFORMATION.
A pre-emption consists of 160 acres of Government
land, and may be taken up by a man of eighteen years, a
British subject (by birth or naturalization), or by a widow.
An alien must declare his intention of becoming a British
subject before he can enter for a pre-emption, and must
reside continuously in Canada for three years before he can
be fully naturalized.
Any person can purchase Government land up to 640
acres, but no more. The price is $5 to $2.50 per acre, according to the quality of the land.
Government land may be leased up to 1,000 acres, the
'yearly rental being fixed by the Lieutenant-Governer in
Council.
The Government of British Columbia does not grant
assisted passages or special passenger or freight rates to
settlers.
South African war scrip, issued by the Government of
Canada, is not accepted in payment for Provincial Government lands. Annual Report, 1909-1910 107
The Government of British Columbia will not reserve
tracts of land for colonies.
The Government of British Columbia does not employ
Land or Immigration Agents in the United States.
All timber lands not already disposed of are reserved
from sale, lease, or license.
There are no maps published showing all lands preempted, sold, leased, or otherwise occupied, nor the location
and extent of timber or coal lands. Blue prints or copies
of the official office maps may be had on application to the
Department of Lands, Victoria, B. C.
Many new townsites are being put on the market, and
the Government owns a one-quarter interest in them, but
that fact should not be accepted as proof of their value.
Ordinary business sense should suggest the advisability of
personal examination, or guarantee by a trustworthy agent,
before purchasing town lots.
This advice applies with equal force to the purchase
of agricultural lands offered for sale by individuals and
companies who, through cunningly worded advertisements,
strive to convey the impression that they are operating
under authority or with the approval of the Government.
The Government does not employ or authorize agents to sell
lands.
The Grand Trunk Pacific Railway has 100 miles graded
from Prince Rupert to the mouth of the Copper River, and
has let contracts for other sections which will extend into
the Bulkley Valley and westward from Edmonton to Tete
Jaune Cache. At the present rate of progress the road
will not be in operation for two or three years.
Payments for purchased lands are made as follows:
When the land staked by the purchaser or his agent is
unsurveyed a deposit equal to 50 cents per acre must accompany the application to purchase; the balance of the purchase money is payable six months after the application is
approved. The purchaser has to advertise at his own expense his notice of application to purchase, in the British
Columbia Gazette and a newspaper published or circulated
in the district in which the land is situated; he must also
have the land surveyed at his own expense. The time required for these preliminaries will not be less than ninety
days, and under some circumstances may be more—possibly
six to twelve months. 108
Vancouver Board of Trade
When surveyed land is purchased, 25 per cent, of the
purchase price is paid with the filing of application to purchase, and the balance in three equal annual instalments,
with interest at 6 per cent.
In former editions of this Bulletin people were warned
against rashly easting their lot in a region about which so
little is known, where travelling is difficult and means of
communication lacking, and that advice still holds good.
From all reports, there are large areas of fertile land well
suited to mixed farming, dairying, and cattle-raising, but
most of this land is far from markets, hard to get at, and so
isolated that, until the coming of the railway, those who.
make homes in that eountry must be prepared to "rough
it" and bear with all the inconveniences and privations
incidental to pioneer life. On the other hand, men accustomed to frontier life, and possessed of sufficient means to
establish themselves in advance of the railway, need have
no hesitation about going into a country where every man
able and willing to work is certain of a present livelihood
and a competency in the future.
METEOROLOGICAL.
Temperature
Annual
Rainfall
Annual
Snowfall
Highest
Lowest
Average
Inches
Inches
Beg. Fah.
Degf. Fah.
5 to 8
20
35lo60
120
85 to 95
82
—10 to—20
—28   .
34.2
8.15
74
88
—39
33.2
36.20
46
91.5
0
44.9
58.16
17.9
Port Essington	
121.10
68.5
Rivers Inlet	
105.66
42.8
84. i
16.1
46
30.4
59.4
78
20
46.2
Port Simpson	
71.26
34
74
15.6
46
Bulkley Valley	
16
90
—38
55
lobii
72.40
74
0.6
43 1
Annual Report, 1909-1910
109
MINERAL PRODUCTION  IN  BRITISH COLUMBIA.
(Extracts from the Report of the Minister of Mines, igog.)
METHOD OF COMPUTING PRODUCTION.
In assembling the output for the lode mines in the following tables, the established custom of this Bureau has been
adhered to, viz.: The output of a mine for the year is considered that amount of ore for which the smelter or mill returns have been received during the year. This system does
not give the exact amount mined during the year, but rather
the amounts credited to the mine on the company's books
during such year.
For ore shipped in December the smelter returns are
not likely to be received until February in the new year, or
later, and have, consequently, to be carried over to the credit
of such new year. This plan, however, will be found very
approximate for each year, and ultimately correct, as ore
not credited to one year is credited in the next.
In the lode mines tables, the amount of the shipments
has been obtained from certified returns received from the
various mines, as provided for in the "Inspection of Metalliferous Mines Act, 1897." In calculating the values of the*
products, the average price for the year in the New York
Metal Market has been used as a basis. For silver 95 per
cent., and for lead 90 per cent., of such market price has
been taken. Treatment and other charges have not been
deducted.
TABLE I.
TOTAL PRODUCTION FOR ALL YEARS UP TO AND INCLUDING 1909.
Gold, placer $ 70,673,103
Gold, lode •  55,277,687
Silver  29,850,586
Lead   23,259,255
Copper   •  55,871,893
Coal and Coke  102,904,261
Building stone, bricks, etc  9,093,100
Other metals   890,699
Total    $347,820,584 110 Vancouver Board of Trade
TABLE II.
PRODUCTION FOR EACH YEAR FROM 1890 TO 1909 (INCLUSIVE).
1852 to 1889 (inclusive) $ 71,981,634
1890  •  2,608,803
1891   3,521,102
1892   2,978,530
1893 .... •  3,588,413
1894   4,225,717
1895   5,643,042
1896  •  7,507,956
1897   10,455,268
1898   10,906,861
1899   12,393,131
1900  •... 16,344,751
1901   20,086,780
1902   17,486,550
1903   ,17,495,954
1904 .. •  18,977,359
1905   22,461,325
1906   24,980,546
1907   25,882,560
1908  • :  23,851,277
1909   24,443,025
Total  • $347,820,584
PROGRESS OF MINING.
The value of the mineral products of the Province for
the year 1909 amounts to $24,443,025, which, while it is less
than that of 1906 and 1907, is still considerably greater than
that of any previous year.
The tonnage of ore mined in the Province during the
year 1909, exclusive of coal, was 2,057,713 tons, a decrease
from the preceding year of 25,893 tons, or 1.24%.
This total tonnage was produced by the various districts
in the following proportions:—Boundary, 71.03% ; Rossland,
11.55%; Fort Steele, 7.28%; Coast District, 1.92%; all other
districts, 8.22%. Annual Report, 1909-1910
111
The number of mines from which shipments were made
in 1909 was 89, and of these only 52 shipped more than 100
tons each during the year, while but 32 shipped in excess of
1,000 tons each. Of these latter, 8 were in the Nelson Mining
Division, 5 in the Boundary District, 5 in the Ainsworth Division, 4 in the Slocan District, 3 in the Coast District, 3 in
the Trail Creek (Rossland) Division, 2 in the Fort Steele Division, 1 in the Trout Lake Division, and 1 in the Queen
Charlotte Division. \
The following table shows the number of mines which
shipped ore during the year 1909; the districts in which they
are situated, and the tonnage produced in each district, together with the number of men employed, both above ground
and underground:—
Table Showing Distribution of shipping
MINES
IN 1909.
Tons of
Pre
Shipped
No. of
Mines
Ship'ng
No. of
Mines
Ship'ng
over ioo
tons in
1909
Men Employed in
these Mines
Below
Above
Total
Cassiar :
Atlin, Skeena and Queen
4,269
149,680
20
97,698
36,814
28,306
237,656
1,750
430
1,461,533
2
2
2
16
16
22
7
4
2
9
1
2
6
12
11
3
2
2
8
7
126
196
224
517
40
6
579
65
150
72
85
84
160
16
5
247
72
East Kootenay :
Windermere-Golden ....
West Kootknay :
382
198
281
308
677
LlLLOOET	
56
11
Yale:
826
39,557
7
5
121
105
226
Total	
2,057,713
89
52
2,048
989
3,037
In explanation of the table it should be said that, in its
preparation, a mine employing twelve men for four months
is credited in the table with four men for twelve months, so
that the total given is less than the actual number of individuals who worked in the mines during the year. 112
Vancouver Board of Trade
STATISTICAL   TABLES.
Referring to the preceding tables of the mineral production of the Province, the following is a summary of their
contents:—
Table I. shows the total gross value of each mineral product mined in the Province up to the end of 1909, aggregating $347,820,584. From this table it will be seen that coalmining has produced more than any other separate class of
mining, a total of $102,904,261; followed next in importance
by placer gold at $70,673,103, and third by copper at $55,-
871,893.
The metal gold, obtained from both placer and lode mining, amounts to a value of $125,950,790, the greatest amount
derived from any one mineral, the next important being coal,
the total gross value of which, combined with that of coke,
is $102,904,261, followed by copper at $55,871,893, silver at
$29,850,586, and lead at $23,259,255.
Table II. shows the values of the total production of the
mines of the Province for each year from 1890 to 1909 (inclusive), during which period the output has increased nearly
ten-fold, and has now reached a production, for the past
year, valued at $24,443,025, or more than double what it was
in 1898. The value of the total products of the mines of the
Province up to the end of 1909 is $347,820,584.
It will be seen that, although coal-mining has been a
constantly increasing industry during this whole period of
twenty years, lode mining did not begin, practically, until
1894, since when it has risen with remarkable rapidity,
though not without interruption, until it reached, in 1906,
the $17,000,000 line, and the total production nearly reached
the $26,000,000 line.
Table IV. gives the quantities in the customary units of
measure, and the values, of the various metals or minerals
which go to make up the grand total of the mineral production of the Province, and also, for the purposes of comparison, similar data for the two preceding years.
The table shows that there has been a decrease in the
production of placer gold of some $170,000, and at the same
time a decrease in the output of lode gold of $358,790, making a total decrease of $528,790 in the production of the
metal.   Annual Report, 1909-1910 115
Table IV. gives a statement in detail of the quantities
and value of the different mineral products for the years
1907, 1908 and 1909. As it has been impossible as yet to collect accurate statistics regarding building stone, lime, bricks,
tiles, etc., these are estimated.
The average selling prices taken this year in the calculation of value of product are the same as those used last year;
that for coal being $3.50 and for coke $6 per ton of 2,240
lbs. The prices used in calculations prior to 1907 were $3
and $5, respectively.
More detailed statistics as to the coal production of the
Province and of the separate districts are given elsewhere
in this report.
Table X. compares graphically the output of mineral
products in British Columbia with that of similar products
in all the other Provinces of the Dominion, and shows that
in 1909, British Columbia produced in the minerals shown an
amount equal to over 67.8 per cent, of all the other Canadian
Provinces combined.
The amount of silver produced this year was 2,532,742
ounces, having a gross value of $1,239,270, a decrease from
the preceding year of 98,647 ounces, and in value of $82,213,
due chiefly to decreased productions in the Fort Steele,
Slocan and Rossland Districts.
The table shows an output of lead in 1909 amounting
to 44,396,346 pounds, valued at $1,709,259, which is an
increase over the production of the preceding year of
1,200,613 pounds of lead.
The production of copper this year was 45,597,245
pounds, valued at $5,918,522, a decrease in amount of
1,677,369 pounds, or about 3.5%. The value of the product
was less than that of the preceding year by $321,727—a
decrease of 2.1%.
Table V. shows the proportions of the total mineral productions made in each of the various districts into which the
Province is divided.
It will be noted that this year, as the two preceding
years, the Tale (Boundary) District has the honour of first
place on the list. The Coast District comes second, and is
followed by West Kootenay District (for many years our
greatest producer).   Bast Kootenay takes fourth place.   The 116 Vancouver Board of Trade
Coast and East Kootenay Districts owe a considerable percentage of their outputs to the coal mines situated within
their limits, whereas, in the other districts, the production
is almost entirely from metal mining.
Table VIIL contains the statistics of production of the
coal mines of the Province. The total amount of coal mined
to the end of 1909 is 29,629,025 tons (of ,2,240 lbs.), worth
$92,010,796. Of this, there was produced in 1909 some
2,006,476 tons, valued at $7,022,666. In these figures of coal
production, the coal used in making coke is not included, as
such coal is accounted for in the figures of output of coke.
The amount of coal used in making coke was 394,124 tons,
from which was made 258,703 tons of coke, having a value
of $1,552,218, an increase over the preceding year of 11,304
tons, or 4.5%, with an increase in value of $67,824. "While
258,703 tons of coke were actually made, only 251,504 were
sold; 7,199 tons being added to stocks at the mines.
COAL.
The coal production of British Columbia in 1909 was
chiefly mined by three companies—the "Wellington Colliery
Co. and the "Western Fuel Co. on Vancouver Island, and the
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co. in Bast Kootenay—these companies producing about 88% of the total coal mined.
Of the smaller collieries of the Coast District, the Pacific Coast Coal Mines, at South "Wellington and Suquash,
V. I., mined about 70,000 tons of coal, and the Nicola Valley
C. & C. Co. about 62,210 tons, while the Vancouver-Nanaimo
produced about 10,000 tons, and the Diamond Vale Co. about
1,700 tons.
In the East Kootenay field, the Hosmer and Corbin Collieries each produced about 60,000 tons of coal during the
year; neither of these collieries is as yet in full operation.
A new colliery was opened at Princeton, in the Nicola
Valley District, by the Vermillion Forks M. & D. Co., during
the last month of the year, and shipped a few tons of Jignitie
coal.
The Pacific Coast Coal Co., as well as equipping its South
"Wellington Colliery with direct railway connection with salt
water and a shipping port, has opened up a new colliery at
Suquash, from which it has already mined about 2,000 tons
of coal. Annual Report, 1909-1910
11'
The old Gilfillan Colliery at Nanaimo is now being operated by Henry Biggs—an individual—who is producing coal
in a small way.
About 60% of the gross coal output of the Province was
mined in the Coast District, and about 72% of the coal, sold
as such, was from that .district.
Of coke, however, the Coast District only produced
about 5% of 42ie total amount made during the year, and of
this over half was added to stock.
The gross output of the coal mines of the Province for
the year 1909 was 2,400,600 tons (of 2,240 lbs.), of which
5,782 tons were added to stock, making coal disposed of
2,394,818 tons.* Of this gross amount, 998,494 tons were sold
for consumption in Canada, 678,137 tons were exported to
the United States, and 63,509 tons were exported to other
countries, making the total amount of coal sold 1,740,140
tons.
In addition to the sales, there was used in making coke
394,124 tons of coal, while 260,554 tons were consumed under
colliery boilers, etc. From the 394,124 tons of coal were produced 258,703 tons of coke, of which amount 7,199 tons were
added to stock and 142 tons were used under colliery boilers,
leaving the net coke sales of 251,362 tons. Of this amount,
210,884 tons were sold for consumption in Canada, while the
remainder, 40,478 tons, was exported to the United States.
The following table indicates the markets in which the
coal and coke output of the Province was sold:—
COAL
Sold for consumption in Canada.. (Tons—2,240 lbs.)
"     export to United States..
"      export to other countries.
Total for District	
COKE
Sold for consumption in Canada.. (Tons—2,240 lbs.)
"     export to United States..
"      export to other countries.
Total for District	
Coast
District.
862,088
324,748
63,609
1,250,345
5,493
Crow'sNest
Pass
District
6,493
136,406
363,389
489,796
206,391
40,478
246,869
Total for
Province
993,494
678,137
63,609
1,740,140
210,884 .
40,478
261,362 118
Vancouver Board of Trade
TABLE   VIII.
COAL AND COKE PRODUCTION PER YEAR TO DATE.
Ybaks
1836
1892
1893
1894
1895
1896
1897
1898
1899
1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
COAL.
Tons (2,240 lbs.)
Value
91   6,545,375 $20,017,649
   826,335  2,479,005
   978,294  2,934,882
  1,012,953  3,038,859
   939,654  2,818,962
   896,222  2,688,666
   882,854  2,648,562
  1,135,865  3,407,595
  1,306,324  3,918,972
  1,439,595  4,318,785
  1,460,331  4,380,993
  1,397,394  4,192,182
  1,168,194  3,504,582
  1,253,628  3,760,884
  1,384,312  4,152,936
  1,517,303  4,551,909
 1,800,067  6,300,235
  1,677,849  5,872,472
  2,006,476  7,022,666
Total  29,629,025 tons
$92,010,796
COKE.
1895-98 	
1899   34,251
1900 •  85,149
1901   127,081
1902   128,015
1903   165,543
1904   238,428
1905    271,785  1,358,925
1906    199,227   996,135
1907    222,913  1,337,478
1908    247,399  1,484,394
1909    258,703  1,552,218
54,396  $ 271,980
  171,255
  425,745
  635,405
  640,075
  827,715
  1,192,140
Total   2,032,890 tons
$10,893,465  120 Vancouver Board of Trade
COAST   COLLIERIES.
The coast collieries mined in 1909 1,476,735 tons of coal,
of which 5,346 tons were added to stock, making 1,471,389
tons distributed from these collieries in 1909. This amount
was distributed thus:—
Sold as coal in Canada  862,088 tons
Sold as coal in United States.  324,748 tons
Sold as coal in other countries   63,509 tons
Total sold as coal  1,250,345 tons
Used under companies'
boilers,  etc  192,-384 tons
Used in making coke  28,660 tons
1,471,389 tons
The total coal sales of the coast collieries for the year
show, as compared with the sales of the previous year, an
increase of 202,053 tons, equivalent to 19.3%.
The consumption of coal in that portion of British Columbia served by the coast collieries shows in 1909 an increase
of 44,124 tons, equal to 6.1% over the preceding year, while
the amount sold for export to countries other than the
United States also shows an increase of 33,626 tons, equal to
112.5%. Export sales to the United States in 1909 show an
increase of 24,303 tons, or 8.08%. The smaller sales in 1908
were attributable to the California oil-fuel competition and
imported Oriental coal.
GOLD.
PLACER GOLD.
The production of placer gold during the past year was
about $477,000, as nearly as can be ascertained, which is
$170,000 less than was produced in 1908, being a decrease of
26%. Placer mining is entirely dependent upon the water
supply, which in turn depends upon the snowfall of the previous winter and the character of the spring weather—variables upon which it is impossible to forecast—and the
conditions this past season have not been favorable.
There is no question but what, in the known placer
camps of the Province, most of the more easily available deposits have been worked out, leaving only those the operation of which called for greater capital and plant, with
greater attendant risks and less security of immediate profits.   Annual Report, 1909-1910 121
In the Atlin District the Atlin Consolidated Mining Co.'s
plant was again idle this past season, being under process of
alteration to a design dictated by experience obtained.
The Pine Creek Power Co. (Ruffner's holdings) was unfortunate in that the dam, constructed at the outlet of Surprise lake to conserve the water for the season's supply,
broke, and not only was the water lost, but much damage
was caused to the plant by the sudden flood. The dam has
been replaced by a more substantial structure, and it is expected that the satisfactory returns looked for last season
will only have been deferred until 1910.
McKee creek is now entirely controlled by one company, and while a very fair return was obtained this year,
there is good reason to hope for better in the future.
In the Dease Lake District, the Berry Creek Co. again
failed to do any further work, and very little gold was obtained in that section of the Province.
In the Omineca District, the excitement of the previous
season over placer-gold finds on the Ingenika river and Mc-
Connell creek, proved to be without foundation, and no product was obtained from these. In the Manson Creek section,
one of the mines produced about $10,000 worth of gold, but
the other properties were not successful.
In the Cariboo District, none of the deep-drifting enterprises have made a success and all are practically at a standstill. A concentration of various interests into larger companies, with the consequent concentration of water rights,
has enabled better plants to be installed, and although there
is a small output this year, the larger plants are almost ready
for work and should prove their utility during the coming
season.
In the Quesnel Division, the plant at Bullion has been
idle, but J. B. Hobson is putting in a new plant in the Spanish
lake direction, while H. W. DuBois is establishing a very extensive hydraulic plant at 20-Mile creek, on Quesnel river,
the water for the operation of which is being brought over
from Swift river. It is not probable that either ol these
plants will be producing gold until 1911. 122 Vancouver Board of Trade
GOLD FROM LODE MINING.
The value of gold produced from lode mining in the
Province during the year 1909 was $4,924,090, a decrease, as
compared with previous year, of $358,790, or 6.75%. This
decrease is due to a reduced tonnage and output in the Boss-
land camp, which is only partly compensated for by increased
production in the Nelson, Boundary, and Coast Districts. The
greatest increase in output has been in the Nelson District,
where the output this year is nearly $100,000 greater than
during the preceding year, and is now 50% greater than it
was in 1907. There was also an increased gold production
in the Coast District, amounting to about $80,000 greater
than the preceding year, due to a renewal of mining on Tex-
ada Island. The Boundary District made an increase of
$35,000 in its gold output this year, despite the fact that the
tonnage of ore mined in the district was lower than last year.
About 86.5% of the lode-gold output of the Province was
recovered from the smelting of copper-bearing ores; the
remaining 13.5% was obtained from stamp milling, etc.
The only large stamp mill in operation is at the Nickel
Plate mine, at Hedley, in the Osoyoos Mining Division, which
milled some 31,000 tons of ore, and produced from amalgamation, concentrates, and cyaniding some 16,200 ounces of
gold. A couple of small stamps were at work in the Sheep
Creek camp, of Nelson Mining Division, working an exceptionally rich ore.
SILVER.
The total amount of silver produced in the Province during the year 1909 was 2,532,742 ounces, valued at $1,239,270,
a decrease in amount, as compared with the previous year, of
98,647 ounces and in value of $82,213; about 98.2% of the
total silver was produced from ores in which it was found
associated with lead, the remainder being obtained from copper-silver ores.
The Slocan District—including the Ainsworth, Slocan,
Slocan City, and Trout Lake Mining Divisions—produced
about 50% of the total Provincial output of silver this year,
and the Fort Steele Mining Division about 23%, all from
argentiferous galenas.
\i Annual Report, 1909-1910,
123
LEAD.
The lead production of the Province for the year 1909
was 44,396,346 lbs. of lead, having a market value of $1,-
709,259, showing, as compared with the previous year, an
increase in amount of 1,200,613 lbs. of lead, or 2.8%, and an
increase in value of $76,460, or 4.7%.
The average market price of this metal for the year 1909
was a little higher than for the previous year.
The lead production is this year, as usual, derived chiefly
from the Fort Steele Mining Division, as is shown in the following table:—
Fort Steele M. D. produced.. . : 27,023,252 lbs.
Ainsworth
Slocan
Nelson
Trout Lake
All others...
.10,298,343
. 4,976,199
.  1,097,069
976,601
24,882
44,396,346
ead:
: 60.86% of total
23.19
11.20
2.47
2.23
.05
100.00
COPPER.
The amount of copper in ores mined in the Province in
1909, and smelted during the year, was 45,597,245 lbs. fine
copper, valued at the average New York market price for
copper at $5,918,522. These figures do not take into account
smelter charges or deductions.
As compared with the preceding year, there is, therefore,
a decreased production in amount of 1,677,369 lbs., and in
value of $321,727. There is a slight increase in the Boundary
District and in the Nelson Mining Division, with a heavy
falling off in the Rossland Mining Division and in the Coast
Districts.
The following table shows the production of the various
districts for the years 1907, 1908 and 1909 :—
1907 1908 1909
Yale (Boundary) Dist. 31,521,550 lbs. 40,181,790 lbs. 40,603,042 lbs. =89.04%
Rossland               "       5,080,275 " 5,042,244 " 3,509,909 " 7-70"
Coast & Cassiar   "       3,757,967 " 1,987,337 " 1,297,722 " 2.84"
Yale-Kamloops    " 36,120"          	
Nelson                   "          434,222 " 53,243 " 186,572 " 0.42"
Other Districts     " 2,586"           	
40,832,720 "   47,274,614 "   45,597,246
100.00 124 Vancouver Board of Trade
The average assays of the copper ores of the various
camps, based upon the copper recovered, were as follows:—
v Boundary, 1.41%; Coast, 1.5%; and Rossland, 0.75%.
OTHER   MINERALS.
IRON ORE.
There has been no iron ore mined in the Province this
past year, other than that necessarily mined in development
work, and none of this has been shipped, the reason being
that there is no iron blast-furnace in operation within the
district, and, consequently, no market for iron ore.
ZINC ORE.
There has been a comparatively small quantity of zinc
ore produced this past year, although the industry has not
been neglected. The total amount of zinc ore and concentrates produced and sold during the year was about 10,000
tons, ranging from 38 to 48% zinc. The only distinctly zinc-
mining in the Province is at the Lucky Jim, in the Slocan
Mining Division, where about 4,700 tons of 48% zinc ore was
produced.
In the Ainsworth Mining Division, the Whitewater produced about 1,600 tons of 38% zinc concentrates, from an
ore consisting of mixed galena and zinc blende, and the
"Whitewater Deep produced about 3,000 tons of 43% zinc
concentrates from a similar ore. The zinc concentrates from
both these mines carried an appreciable amount of silver,
ranging from 15 to 25 ounces to the ton.
The Monitor and Ajax made small shipments of concentrates rather low in -zinc, amounting to 325 tons.
Other properties produced zinc concentrates, but they
were not sold this year in time to enter into this year's figures; among these is the Canadian Metal Co.'s plant at
Riondel, where the concentrates produced were between 35
. and 40% zinc. The price offering for this grade of concentrates was so small as to leave little margin of profit, so the
management is experimenting with a process for making zinc
oxide, for which a better price can be obtained.
The Canadian Zinc Co.'s electro-thermic smelting plant
at Nelson has remained idle, but there is a chance that this
•  coming year renewed experiments may be tried to perfect
the process. Annual Report, 1909-1910 125
PLATINUM.
While platinum is found in many of the alluvial gold
workings, where it can be saved as a by-product, the saving
of it in a small way is attended with so much trouble that
it has been practically neglected and no appreciable production made.
BUILDING STONE.
Excellent building stone of various sorts is found in
abundance in almost every part of the Province, but the fact
of its widespread distribution has, however, been somewhat
against the establishment of large quarrying industries, as
a sufficient local supply could always be obtained, and, except within reach of the larger cities, few regularly equipped
quarries have been opened.
On the Coast, chiefly between Vancouver Island and the
Mainland, there are several well-equipped quarries taking
out granite, sandstone, and andesite, all of excellent quality.
These quarries supply the stone building material of the
Coast cities, and also export to the United States.
A detailed description of the more important quarries
was given in a previous report of this Bureau.
MARBLE.
In the interior of the Province, the Canadian Marble &
Granite Company opened a marble quarry on the line of the
Lardo-Trout Lake Railway, about eight miles from Lardo,
and took during 1909 block marble which, when sawed into
slabs, amounted to some $30,000 in value. This company
formerly shipped the rough blocks of the marble which were
elsewhere sawn into slabs, etc., but during the past year the
company has been busily engaged in erecting at the quarries
large and well-equipped dressing-works, so that by next season the marble will leave the works in the finished state. During this period of construction the product shipped from the
quarry has been comparatively small.
The Nootka Marble Quarries, on Nootka Sound, on west
coast of Vancouver Island, that were opened up last season,
have not made any very important shipments, and information as presented by the report of directors indicate that
some $3,000 worth of marble is on hand at the quarry, but
does not show that any sales were made. The mine and
quarry have not been operated since July, 1909. «
126 I Vancouver Board of Trade
RED BRICK.
The demand for brick is rapidly increasing with the
growth of cities, in which fire-proof building construction is
demanded, but the manufacture does not seem to have kept
pace with the demand, as large importations of brick have
been made from Puget Sound points. A special report by the
Provincial Assayer, published in last year's Report, shows
that there are unlimited clay deposits available, but that the
brick-yards of the Province are for the most part worked on
rather primitive lines, and that the price of even the cheapest class of red brick is such as to invite serious competition
from concrete in building operations. The actual figures of
production cannot be obtained from the manufactures for
publication, but, as nearly as can be estimated, the number
of red brick produced in the Province during the past year
was about 40,000 M.
FIRE BRICK AND FIRE CLAY.
The fire-brick plant at Comox has not been in operation. The Vancouver Fire-clay Co.'s plant at Clayburn has
been somewhat remodelled, and is now producing a brick of
much higher class and of more uniform grade. The deposits
consist of clays of various qualities—described in last year's
Report—and the product varies from a superior quality of
common or building brick up to a good quality fire-brick
and fire-tile.
POTTERY AND DRAIN PIPE.
The B.C. Pottery Works at Victoria West derives its supply of fire-clay from the coal-mines of the Wellington Colliery Co., and manufactures drain and sewer pipe, chimney
tiles, etc., the sales for the year being estimated at considerably over $100,000.
LIME.
The manufacture of lime is conducted in a small way at
a large number of points in the Province, but only on the
Coast has any attempt been made at more extensive operations. In the neighborhood of Victoria, on Esquimalt harbor, Raymond & Sons have three kilns in operation, and
there are kilns on Saanieh Inlet. On Texada Island—in addition to the old plant at Marble Bay—a new and extensive
plant is being erected at Blubber Bay, The limestone being
used is of exceptional purity, but in some instances the limestone beds are cut by igneous dykes which have to be rejected, and this somewhat increases the costs of quarrying. Annual Report, 1909-1910 127
PORTLAND CEMENT.
The only company manufacturing cement in the Province is the Vancouver Portland Cement Co., with works at
Tod Inlet, on the Saanich arm, about twelve miles from Victoria. The capacity of these works at present is about
300,000 barrels a year, and this past year the company manufactured about 238,000 barrels of cement, valued in the
neighborhood of $360,000. The raw materials, limestone and
clay, are quarried on the company's property adjoining the
works.
PETROLEUM AND OIL SHALES.
In the Flathead valley of East Kootenay, where seepages of oil occur and* where a great number of locations of
oil claims have been taken up, no serious attempt has as yet
been made to prove the value of the claims, and. the district
is no further advanced than it was four years ago.
In the vicinity of Sooke, Vancouver Island, some oil locations have been made, but have yet to be proved of value.
Nothing further has been heard of the oil-bearing shale
deposits in the vicinity of Harper's Camp—to. develop which
a company was formed in Vancouver—and no further development has taken place on the property.
A deposit of oil shales has been found on the North
Thompson river, which carries a fair percentage of oil, and
it is probable that in the near future serious attempts will
be made to prove the value of the deposits from a commercial point of view.
CRUSHED ROCK AND GRAVEL.
Concrete construction has become so extensive on the
Coast that companies have been formed to supply suitable
material for such work. Near the entrance to Vancouver
harbor a company has opened up a quarry in a granite rock,
and has erected a crushing and sizing plant and bins for the
manufacture of crushed rock for concrete-making and for
road-making in Vancouver. Near Victoria, two or three
gravel companies have been formed for supplying washed
sand and gravel, properly screened to size; at least one of
those companies has installed a system of mining the gravel
by hydraulic streams and carrying the product to the screens
by the water. 128
Vancouver Board of Trade
INDEX
Page.
Officers of the Board    2
Committees, 1910-11    3
Membership Roll     4
President's Address  \  13
Secretary's Report  26
Extracts from  Minutes  27
Congress in Sydney, N. S. W.
Report of Delegate  34
Address to Lord Strathcona.... 44
Lumber Industry:
Strength of B. C. Timber  47
Coast Lumber Manufacturers.. 48
Shipments from Hastings Mill 51
Shipments  from  Chemainus.... 52
Fishing Industry:
Salmon  Pack by  Canneries.... 53
Comparison-for 10 years  54
Summary of B. C. Fisheries....' 55
Halibut Catch   55
Harbour and Shipping  56
Distances from Vancouver  60
Customs Returns :
Exports and Imports  61
Harbour Dues   62
Illustrations :
In Stanley Park	
Vancouver Harbour 	
Wholesale  Produce   Section	
Granville  and  Hastings	
Hastings  and  Cambie	
Trans-Pacific Wharf	
Hastings Street West	
Loading Grain  for Mexico	
High Level  Steel Bridge	
Sugar Refinery 	
Page.
Inland Revenue, 1909-10  64
Banking Returns, 1906-1910  65
Post Office Returns  66
Exports to United States   67
Expenses of Vessels in Vancr  68
Port Warden Dues  70
The City of Vancouver:
General   73
City Property  75
Statement, 1887-1909   80
Public Schools   81
Churches in Vancouver  83
Consular Agencies   85
Meteorological Statistics :
Vancouver,  1905-9  86
Victoria, 1905-9  87
Port Simpson and Prince
Rupert   88
Failures in Canada:
"Dunn  & Co."  89
"Bradstreets"   90
B. C. Electric Railway Co  91
Extracts from Government
Bulletins :
New British Columbia  92
Mining Industry, 1909  98
 ( Cover)
 : (Frontispiece)
24
40
56
72
88
104
122   

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