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Twenty-ninth annual report of the Vancouver Board of Trade. 1915-1916 Vancouver. Board of Trade 1916

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Array Twenty-Ninth 
Annual Report 
of the 
Vancouver Board 

1915-1916 
Vancouver, British Columbia 
Canada 
EVANS   &   HASTINGS    LIMITED,   PRINTERS   AND   BOOKBINDERS. VANCOUVER,   B. C    Twenty-Ninth 
Annual Report 
of the 
Vancouver Board 

1915-1916 
Vancouver, British Columbia 
Canada 
EVANS   &   HASTINGS    LIMITED,   PRINTERS   AND   BOOKBINDERS. VANCOUVER,   B. C OFFICERS
PAST PRESIDENTS
1887-88—D.  OPPBNHEIMER
1888-89—D.  OPPENHEIMER  (dec.)
1889-90—E.  V.  BODWBLL  (dec.)
1890-91—R.   HT ALEXANDER
1891-92—JOHN HENDRY
1892-93—G.  E.  BERTEAUX   (dec.)
1892-93—W.  F.   SALSBURY
1893-94—J. C. KEITH
1894-95—G.  M. MAJOR
1895-96—H.   BELL-IRVING
1896-97—H.   BELL-IRVING
1897-98—WM.  GODFREY
1898-99—Wm. GODFREY
1899-00—C.  E.  TISDALL
1900-01—F.   BUSCOMBE
1901-02—F. F. BURNS (dec.)
1902-03—w. h. malkin
1903-04—h. t. lockyer
1904-05—h. Mcdowell
1905-06—a. b. erskine
1906-07—R.   P.   McLENNAN
1907-08—W. J.  McMILLAN
1908-09—E.  H.  HEAPS
1909-10—H. A.  STONE
1910-11—EWING BUCHAN
1911-12—A. G. McCANDLESS
1912-13—A. B.  ERSKINE
1913-14—HON. F. CARTER-
COTTON
1914-15^-JONATHAN  ROGERS
1915-16—JONATHAN ROGERS
OFFICERS FOR 1916-17
N. THOMPSON
B. W. GREER
W.   A.   BLAIR
President
Vice -President
Secretary
COUNCIL
(12 marked * being the Board of Arbitration)
*BEAZLEY,   E.   H.
*BECK,   A.   E.
*BLAIR,   GILBERT
*BUSHBY,  G.  G.
*COTTREEL,  G.  H.
♦CUNNINGHAM, J.  .
*FLETCHER,   T.  W
*GODFREY,  WM.
HANBURY, J.
KELLY, R.
*MALKXN, W. H.
*PETERS, F. W.
RAMSAY, JAS.
*SPENCER,   C.
*TISDALL,  C.  E.
DATES OF REGULAR MONTHLY MEETINGS, 1916-17
COUNCIL
12.15 p. m. Thursday
April   6
May     4
June     8
July    ■  6
August     3
September    7
October   5
November     9
December   _  5
January     4
February   8
March     8
FULL BOARD
8 pm. Tuesday
April    11
May    :  9
June   \  13
July     11
August   8
September    12
October    10
November     14
December    12
January     9
February     13
March     13 STANDING   COMMITTEES, 1916-17
The First Name on Each List to be Convenor.
LEGAL AND LEGISLATIVE
A. E.  BECK
G.  A.   CAMPBELL
P. DONNELLY
J.  H. GRIFFITH
B. H. BEAZLEY
I;    ■u'SCOMBE
G.  G.  BUSHBY
J. EADIE
N. HARDLE
A. G. HARVEY
J. A. HARVEY
E.  F   HELLIWELL
J. K.  MACRAE
J. P.  NICOLLS
P.  G.  SHALLCROSS
SIR C. H. TUPPER
HARBOUR   AND   NAVIGATION
G.   H.   COTTRELL
E.  J.  COYLE
J.  A.   CUNNINGHAM
W.   DALTON
J.  E.  ELLIOTT
E. W. HAMBER
W. H. MALKIN
J.  BEVERIDGE
C.  P.  COLES
T. W. B. LONDON
E. J.  LEVESON
C. SPENCER
W.   DICK
GORDON DRYSDALE
J. A. FLETT
R. KELLY
W.   H.   BARKER
H.   BELL-IRVING
W. H.  GREENWOOD
J.  HANBURY
F. L.  BUCKLEY
PAUL DAY
E. W. HAMBER
GILBERT BLAIR
A. B   BUCKWORTH
C. E.  CARTWRIGHT
H. K. DUTCHER
WILLIAM GODFREY
A E. BECK
GILBERT BLAIR
G. G.  BUSHBY
J.  RAMSAY   ,
J.  J.  BANFIELD
D. CRAMER
C. E.  TISDALL
ARTHUR LINEHAM
J.   B.   MATHERS
G.  E.  MACDONALD
T. W. FLETCHER
J. J. BANFIELD
B. A.   CUNLIFFE
J.  N.  ELLIS
J. A. CUNNINGHAM
E. BUCHAN
J. W.  CLARK
F. W. PETERS
E. G. BAYNES
G. G. BUSHBY
J.  R.  DAVISON
A.  B.  ERSKT^p;--
E. A. HAGGEN
J.  C. IRONS
R. KELLY
T. W. B.  LONDON
N.  McLEAN
TRANSPORTATION
R.  KELLY
C. F. LAW
E. J. LEVESON.
G.   E.  MACDONALD
W. G.  MACKENZIE
TRADE  AND  COMMERCE
r. p. Mclennan
j. d. mcneill,
J.  RAMSAY
J.  FYFE  SMITH
RETAIL   MERCHANTS
J.  N.  HARVEY
H.  T.  LOCKYER
W.  C.  STEARMAN
FISHERIES
A.  L.  HAGAR
E.  LIPSETT
J.  B. MATHERS
LUMBER
W.   H.  HARGRAVE
E. C. KNIGHT
M. S. LOGAN
C. H. NICHOLSON
B. G. D. PHILLIPS
H.  PYBUS
P. G. SHALLCROSS
A.   WALLACE
J.   P.   D.   MALKIN
A. G. McCANDLESS,
W.  G. PATRICK
H.  PIM
W. D. POWER
W.  H.  WALSH
C. SPENCER
H.   A.   STONE
JONATHAN STOREY
H.   G.   WHITE
W. J. BLAKE WILSON
W. H. WALSH
F. W. WELSH
W.  C. WOODWARD
F.  MILLERD
A. L. RUSSELL
R. V. WINCH
J. D. McCORMACK
C.  McRAE
J. FYFE SMITH
MINING
•  E.  A.  HAGGEN
A.  E. HEPBURN
C.  F. LAW
MEMBERSHIP
P.  DONNELLY
T.   W.  FLETCHER
R.  KELLY
W. H.  LECKIE
INSURANCE
T.  W.  GREER
W.  HEPBURN
LAND SETTLEMENT
C.  McRAE
M. H. NELEMS
JOHN NELSON
CIVIC
R. H. GALE
J. N. HARVEY
W: HEPBURN
GRAIN
C. P.  COLES
J.  E.  HALL
W. H. KER
BUILDING  AND   FINANd
D. R   CLARK
3. V. HOLT
NEW INDUSTRIES
W.  LEEK
E. W. LEESON
J. B. MATHERS
E. W. LEESON
rONATHAN ROGERS
A. H. WALLBRIDGE
J. P. D. MALKIN
\. C. STEVEN
A. J. T. TAYLOR
A. H WALLBRIDGE
P. PARSONS
W. J. TWISS
W.   C. WOODWARD
F. W. PETERS
JONATHAN ROGERS
A. SHAW
H. A. STONE
M. McBEATH
A. G. McCANDLESS
E. ODLUM
J.   RAMSAY
T.   W.   B.   LONDON
C..J. McNEELY
A. L. RUSSELL
A. G. McCANDLESS
R.  J.  POTTS
A.  SHAW
A.  J.  T.  TAYLOR
A. WALLACE
F. WILKINSON
:M,I                  Annual Report,   1915-/9/6
TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL MEETING
OF THE
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
MARCH  14th, 1916
PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS
To the Members of the Vancouver Board of Trade:
Gentlemen:—
It is my privilege for the second time to address your
annual meeting, as President of the Board of Trade. One
year ago I referred to the terrible war in which Canada, as
part of the Empire, was involved. There yet seems to be no
indication of an early peace. In this great catastrophe the
destruction of life and property becomes greater each succeeding month. Such a condition but increases the determination
of the Empire, and her loyal dependencies to leave nothing undone that will tend to eventually overthrow Prussian despotism.
We are uncomplainingly bearing the burdens incident to this
great war, and with the motherland, her dominions and her
allies, we are positive that we will emerge triumphant.
To enable us to bear this financial burden-and to quickly
recover from the effects of the war, it is necessary for us,
nationally, provincially and individually, to practice economy,
and to call into productiveness more of our natural resources.
Canada shows a favorable change during the past year,
with respect to the balance of trade, but this, you will understand, is abnormal. Our excess of imports, over exports in
1913 was over three hundred million dollars, while our exports
during 1915 exceeded our imports by nearly two hundred million dollars. This excess of exports is more than the amount
of interest payable abroad, and places our Dominion in a
unique position, economically. This position is bound to change
after the war, and as our own Province is not so affected as 20
Vancouver Board  of   Trade
the other parts of the Dominion in this abnormal production,
the readjustment will not be so great. I believe British Columbia
will recover quickly, and readily attain its proper place on a
strong and stable base. This can only be accomplished though,
through sound legislation, and the proper handling of our great
natural resources. These resources should be maintained for
the benefit of the people of the Province. Aliens or outsiders,
or even our own people, should not be allowed to monopolize
the basic sources of our national wealth. I refer especially to
the timber, iron, coal and-our latent-water power, all of which
are found In abundant quantities, convenient to each other,
with ready transportation facilities. To exemplify the above
statement I would make special reference to our iron deposits.
Hematite, magnesite and bog iron are found to exist in tremendous quantities in British Columbia. It is anticipated that
in no distant future blast furnaces should be established somewhere in Lower British Columbia. This would usher in other
large industries of which iron is the basic commodity of consumption. If some alien organization should obtain the control
of our deposits of iron, a monopoly would thus be created,
which would stifle the cheap development of that resource, as
well as place the control of that industry outside of the Empire.
I am of the opinion that steps should be taken to conserve
our deposits of iron and possibly coal where they have not
already been alienated for the benefit, first of the Province, and
second, for the Empire at large.
This can be accomplished by bringing in legislation preventing the selling or tying up of these resources for speculative purposes, and by making provision for the working of
same on a royalty basis only.
It is a well known fact that about seventy-five per cent, of
the iron deposits in the United States is practically controlled by
one corporation, which corporation exported iron and steel to
the value of about one million dollars per day, during 1913, and
unless some such conserving legislation is enacted in our Province, it is not beyond possibility that this same corporation
may soon have control of our deposits also. This, outside of
a patriotic view, would be especially deplorable, as British
Columbia possesses the only great deposits of iron on the
Western Coast of America.
Your Mining Committee has prepared a detailed statement of the iron deposits of the Province, and submitted the
same to the Minister of Mines, with the request that he issue- Annual Report,   1915-1916
a pamphlet dealing especially with those deposits. Like reference could be made to the other natural resources referred to,
but time prevents my dealing with them in detail.
I stated one year ago that we in Canada cannot continue
to increase our indebtedness indefinitely; that we must increase
our exports and reduce our imports to the lowest necessities, in
order to convert the balance of trade in our favor. I stated
above that that favorable balance has been obtained, but I
regret our Province has contributed little toward that end.
We are still importing millions of dollars' worth of foodstuffs,
and other products, which should be grown at home. The
new Farmers' Credits Bill may be conducive to some extent to
ameliorate this condition. However, until such time as ■ our
resources are developed and a settlement of our vast areas is
obtained, we must still remain "hewers of wood" and "drawers
of water."
Business generally throughout the Province is in as sound
a condition as could be expected, although credits have been
curtailed. The almost complete cessation of the building industry in the Province, with the allied industries which follow
construction, has been more marked in 1915 than in former
years. However, we have every reason to be optimistic of the
future. War, the scarcity of money, the lack of ships, economic
depression or whatever cause, cannot destroy the unbounded
natural resources of our Province. Our wealth of mines,
timber, fish and agricultural possibilities still exist, the wise
development of which will place British Columbia in a position
that may well be the envy of any other part of the Continent.
I wish briefly to review the condition of our leading industries in the Province.
Lumber
The chief contributor to the wealth of British Columbia
is the lumber industry. During the past year not more than
half our mills were in operation. The price of logs as well as
of lumber dropped to the lowest point obtained for years. The
output diminished from that of over a billion feet in 1914, to
less than eight hundred million feet in 1915. There has been
a recent increase in prices for both logs and lumber, and now
many large logging companies are beginning operations, and
mills are beginning to cut, which have lain idle for months.
This condition of the industry was not occasioned through lack
of demand, as much as through the great lack of bottoms to 22
Vancouver Board of  Trade
carry the commodity to the markets of the world. There seems
to be a likelihood of the immediate building of ships in this
Province which will, no doubt, tend to relieve this situation.
So our lumbermen look with a great deal of hope that the
year 1916 may yet become a very profitable one. Your council
discussed with the Premier of Australia on his recent visit to
this coast, the matter of establishing a preferential duty be-.
tween Canada and that country on sawn timber and, although
he did not say such an agreemeent would immediately eventuate,
he held out promises of earnest consideration. If a fair preferential duty is obtained with Australia, we consider the lumber
situation will be relieved immediately, and our Province will
have a preferred market of 240,000,000 feet placed at its
disposal.
Mining
The mining industry has produced over thirty million
dollars in value during 1915, and it is evident the people of
this Province are becoming alive to the importance of this great
industry. Foreign capital is responsible for almost all development, and the proving up of such deposits as have shown
improvement during 1915. This should not bte the case.
Local capital heretofore has looked askance at mining investments, and the prospectors and miners of the Province have
turned to the United States where the mining industry is considered a legitimate and profitable field for exploitation.
Your Board petitioned the Provincial Government some
time ago to make a separate portfolio for the Mines Department, and we are pleased to know our request has been complied with.
Agriculture
We are still importing a little less than twenty million
dollars' worth of food products in British Columbia. The
agricultural production of the Province during the year
amounted to thirty-one million dollars. This shows an improvement over former years, and although our agricultural
imports decreased nearly eight million dollars during the past
year, the population of the Province has also depreciated considerably, which will account for part of this depletion.of imports. The settling of our lands with practical farmers is the
only solution for much of this condition. A land settlement
policy which would meet the situation would appeal strongly
to this Board.   The fruit harvest of 1915 was much in excess Annual  Report,   1915-19/6
23
of former years and a better price obtained for the full output.
The markets of England, South Africa and Australia, outside
of the home consumption, is at present able to absorb the production. The Okanagan District shipped over three thousand
carloads of all kinds of fruit in 1915, which is much in excess
of the amount shipped out in any one year previous.
Fishing
The fishing industry still maintains its position as one of
the greatest producers of wealth in the Province. The catch
of salmon provided 1,133,381 cases in 1915. This is the largest
catch since 1905, exclusive of that of 1913, exceeding even those
of any of the big year runs since that date. The prices obtained
during the year were good, but delivery has been delayed owing
to the scarcity of tonnage. The halibut phase of this industry
is in a flourishing condition, and British Columbia is fast taking its place as the headquarters of the halibut industry on
the Pacific Coast. The catch increased during the year 1915
over 100 per cent. Over three million dollars are invested
in the halibut trade in British Columbia, and with the rapid
increase in the production of that class of fish the halibut industry will soon take its place alongside salmon as a producer
of wealth. Outside of salmon and halibut, a large field for
development appears open in the fishing industry in this Province. Herring, cod, smelts, sturgeon and other fish are
abundant in the waters adjoining our coast. These latter fish
caught and landed in a green state during the year 1915
amounted in value to over a million dollars.
Local Statistics
Local statistics indicate an improvement during the latter
part of 1915 over that of 1914. The revenue of the Post Office
during the twelve months ending December 31, 1915, was
$515,000, as compared with $505,000 the previous year. The
Customs collections at the port of Vancouver were $4,699,715
during the last calendar year, about $500,000 less than during
1914, but during the latter part of 1915 there were large
monthly increases in the returns in comparison-with those of
1914. The building returns depreciated during 1915 nearly
three million dollars, the total value of the building permits
issued during 1915 being $1,578,693. The bank clearances for
the year 1915 were $281,575,949, compared with $420,251,718
during 1914.
Your Board has passed through one of the busiest years
of its history.    Your Council and Committees have had one 24
Vancouver Board  of   Trade
hundred and thirty-eight meetings, and many of the leading
business men of the city have given ungrudgingly of their time
treating with the large number of questions which were placed
before them.   I will refer to a few of those subjects briefly, viz.:
(a) The appointment of a commercial agent to visit the
West Indies and the South American republics in the interest
of ■ reciprocal trade. Your Board, with that of the Victoria
Board of Trade, was instrumental in having Mr. H. G. White
appointed as a commissioner for that work, and in a few weeks
a pamphlet prepared by Mr. White will be issued by the Government, which no doubt will be of practical value in helping
to extend the trade of this Province.
This pamphlet will show that large markets exist in the.
West Indies, Brazil, Argentine, Chile, and other Southern
countries, for apples, potatoes, lumber, and other commodities
of this Province. During Mr. White's visit to those countries
in 1915 large orders were obtained, but owing to the fact that
no ships were available to send our goods to those countries,
no immediate benefits resulted from his investigations.
(b) Your Board has always maintained that the appointment of a Canadian Customs officer at NeW York would tend
to relieve the shipping condition of this Province, and would
contribute to a large extent to the supply of traffic on railroads
already heavily bonused by British Columbia. During the
past week we have been advised from Ottawa that early and
final action will be taken on this matter, and we have good
hopes that our contentions will be favorably considered.
(c) A lengthy report on the docking facilities of Vancouver and recommendations dealing with the same. .
(d) The recommendations of a special committee to the
Federal Government of a duty on fuel oil, not for manufacturing purposes.   This was defeated by the full Board.
(e) The procuring of eight hundred hospital suits for
convalescing Canadian soldiers.
(f) The collection of information and data relative to the
establishing of an iron and steel industry on this coast.
(g) A report to the Government of the feasibility of settling 30,000 acres of reclaimed land in and around Sumas
Lake.
(h) A report on certain amendments to the Vancouver
City Charter. Annual Report,   19/5-19/6
25
(i)   Recommendations to the Provincial Government in
conjunction with the Victoria Board of Trade and the British
Columbia   Manufacturers'   Association   treating  with   aid  to i
ship-building.
(j) An exhaustive report, made to the Minister of Marine
and Fisheries on pilotag'e charges at this port.
(k) The appointment of a Russian Consul at Vancouver,
and scores of subjects of lesser importance.
Your. Board has more than held its own financially during
1915, and sixty new members have joined the association during
the year.
Your Council invested $3,000 of the Board's reserves in the
Canadian war loan.
It will be interesting for you to know that forty-six of
our members have joined the overseas regiments sent from
British Columbia. Some of them have already given their
lives for our freedom. Some also are wounded, and others
prisoners in Germany.
In closing, I must express to the members of the Council,
the Full Board, and the Secretary and his staff, my hearty
appreciation for their willing co-operation in the work of the
Board, and I bespeak for my successor a full share of confidence and support in the onerous, but important, duties
devolving upon him as President of the Vancouver Board of
Trade.
) 26
Vancouver Board of  Trade
AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS FOR YEARS 1915-1914:
HOME PRODUCTION
1915 Value
Live  Stock   $ 8,797,875
Meats       1,864,673
Poultry Products     1,464,720
Dairy Products     3,034,340
Fruit and Vegetables     4,450,492
Fodders, Grain and Mill Stuffs    9,443,298
Miscellaneous           314,523
Indians (output of Indian
Reserves)         1,502,980
Total  $30,872,901
1914 Value
$ 8,770,152
1,202,600
1,814,229
3,012,000
4,220,140
9,336,949
1,459,204
$29,815,274
IMPORTED FROM CANADIAN PROVINCES
■^4
1915 Value
Live Stock    $ 3,006,619
Meats     2,414,195
Poultry Products        810,403
Dairy Products     2,366,136
Fruit and Vegetables        362,695
Fodders, Grain and Mill Stuffs    4,365,440
Miscellaneous    .' 6,504
Indians (output of Indian
Reserves)    ■ :....-
Total     $13,331,992
1914 Value
$ 5,458,139
2,831,001
753,268
2,751,321
8,114,726
$19,908,455
IMPORTED FROM POINTS OUTSIDF/CANADA.
1915 Value
Live Stock $     105,078
Meats        502,754
Poultry Products         137,590
Dairy Products      1,081,663
Fruits and Vegetables     \ 554,792
Fodder, Grains and Mill Stuffs     538,846
Miscellaneous  20,440
Indians (output rf Indian
Reserves)   	
1914 Value
$ 336,661
828,676
670,713
,731,730
780,229
936,661
1,
Total ....$ 2,941,163
$ 5,284,670    30 Vancouver Board of  Trade
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  SHIPMENTS  FOR THE  YEAR  1915
U.  K.  & Continent     38,113 M Ft.
Australia     5,912 "
New   Zealand     643 "
Africa     5,329 "
China    l   3,426 "
Japan   :  1,584 "
South America W. C. ...-.  301 "
South Sea Islands   1,395
Eastern  Canada     3,555
Atlantic Coast     6,461 "
California     1,374
Hudson's   Bay     1,321
69,413 M Ft.
APPROXIMATE FIGURES OF PRODUCTION, SHIPMENTS
AND STOCKS OF LUMBER
For Year 1915—Compared with 1914-
Million Million
Feet Feet
1914 1915
Coast Mfrs      540 428
Mountain Mfrs     235 155
Spruce   Mfrs.,   Alberta & Saskatchewan (estima'd)    125 140
Pine  Mfrs.   (estimated)        150 100
1,050 823
Lumber Shipments—By Rail—
Coast   Mfrs  338 300
Mountain Mfrs  210 262
Spruce Mfrs., Alberta & Saskatchewan (estim'ed). 135 160
Pine  Mfrs.   (estimated)     100 120
Local Sales, Coast Mfrs  170 98
953 940
Foreign Shipments—By Water—
Coast  Mfrs        46 36
989 1,010
Imported from the United States into the Four
Western Provinces—
Lumber          79 15
Lath          13 1
Shingles    *       11 4
Stocks on hand 31st December—
Coast  Mfrs  245 205
Mountain Mfrs  241 136
Spruce Mfrs., Alberta & Saskatchewan (estim'd). 90 80
Pine Mfrs.  (estimated)     150 •   75
726 496  Vancouver Board of  Trade
Fishing Industry
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   SALMON
PACK BY CANNERIES-I9I5
DISTRICTS AND
CANNERIES
Socke)Tes
Red and
White,
Springs
Chums
and Pinks
Cohoes
Grand
Total
Fraser River Dist.—
Cases
Cases
Cases
Cases
Cases ■
B. C. Packers Ass'n	
35,006
4,692
44,676
6,926
91,300
A. B. C. Packing- Co., Ltd. . ..
6,609
921
9,890
330
17,750
J. H. Todd & Sons	
2,462
3,180
660
1,257
9,601
3,779
2,476
2,157
15,199
10,373
3,134
1,325
3,297
1,374
9,130
Great West Pkg-. Co., Ltd.   .
2,754
1,322
4,613
1,516
10,205
M. DesBrisay & Co	
3,145
1,011
6,286
323
10,765
Jervis Inlet Canning-Co., Ltd.
4,021
1,548
7,413
264
13,246
Gosse-Millerd Can. Co., Ltd.
--*3j©8&
2,860
-21,-861
•     9,505
47,259
Steveston Canning Co., Ltd'.
1,970
3,197
167
5,334
Defiance Packing- Co., Ltd. .
5,071
77
9,638
2,809
17,595
St. Mung-o Can. Co., Ltd....
3,590
2,100
7,165
4,863
17,718
Eag"le Harb'r C'ng". Co., Ltd.
1,701
20
4,152
1,194
7,067
The Graham Co. (Scott Can'g-]
3,374
1,127
11,516
210
16,227
Totals	
89,040
18,920
147,084
34,114
289,168
Skeena River Dist.—
29,875
2,988
30,696
12,051
75,610
A. B. C. Packing- Co., Ltd. . .
18,692
4,161
22,819
4,155
49,827
J. H. Todd & Sons	
10,894
687
11,712
5,710
29,003
21,130
Kildala Packing- Co., Ltd...
10,894
730
6,244
3,262
9,153
1,828
8,432
1.460
20,873
Skeena River Com. Co., Ltd.,
6,307
. 1,062
5,585
1,036
13,990
Cassiar Packing" Co., Ltd... .
8,647
761
8,780
1,293
19,481
16,247
1,426
9,921
1,706
29,300
Canadian Fish & Cold Stor-
ag*e Co., Ltd	
5,844
1,630
9,158
1,517
18,149
116.553
15,273
113,347
32,190
277,363
Rivers Inlet District.—
47,183
/ 167
835
516
48,701
A. B. C. Packing Co., Ltd .
15,697
•382
5,566
3,860
25,505
J. H. Todd & Sons	
17,072
17,779
16,296
- «
1 j 203
77
1,797
28
44
2,739
21,608
B. C. Can. Co., Ltd	
18,010
dgyfiala Packing Co., Ltd. . .
16,417
Wallace Fisheries, Ltd	
16,323
I 193
81
16,'597
Totals	
130,350
1,022
' 8,351
7,115
146,838
• Annual  Report,   1915-1916
FISHING INDUSTRY—CONTINUED
33
DISTRICTS AND
CANNERIES
Naas River District.—
B.C. Packers' Association ..
A. B. C. Packing- Co., Ltd...
Kincoleth Packing Co., Ltd.
M. DesBrisay & Co	
Totals .
Outlying Districts—
B. C. Packers Ass'n	
A. B. C. Packing- Co., Ltd...
Kildala  Packing Co., Ltd..
Clayoquot Sd. Can. Co. Ltd..
Quathiaski Canning Co. Ltd.
J.H.Todd & Sons (Esquimalt)
Wallace Fisheries, Ltd	
John Wallace	
' Gosse-Millerd C'g Co.(B-Bella)
Draney Fisheries, Ltd	
Goletas Fish Co., Ltd	
Nanaimo Canning Co., Ltd..
Preston Packing Co., Ltd.
Totals	
Districts, Totals 1915—
Fraser River	
Skeena  River	
Rivers Inlet	
Naas River	
Outlying	
Totals	
Sockeyes
Red and
White
Springs
Chums .
and Finks
1
Cohoes   1
Gran d
Total
Cases
Cases
Cases
. Cases    j
.'Cases '
8,85-2
1,175
7,035
2,006!
19,068
16,668
2,031
11,621
2,295
32,615
8,727
490
7,604
5,306
22,127
5,102
5
19,695
5,564
30,366
39,349
3,701
45,955
15,171
104,176
24,385
2,503
12,240
11,378
50,506
252
23,054
3,913
27,219
928
125
7,097
964
9,114
8,500
700
3(10
9,500
3,097
379
16,388
10,474
30,338
2,090
9,700
10,130
9,400
31,320
46,166
6,081
7,824
1,490
61,561
3,016
8,166
2,108
13,290
1,380
49
24,599
. 4,045
30,073
9,623
288
15,933
4V988
30,832
133
15
2,544
2,846
5,538
1,180
1,180
48
5,930
6,460
12,438
100,750
19,188
134,605
58,366
312,909
89,040
18,920
147,094
34,114
289,168
116,553
15,27?
113.347
32,190
277,363
130,350
1,022
8,351
7,115
146,838
39,349
3,701
45,955
15,171
104,176
100,750
19,188
134,605
58,366
312,909
476,042    58,104 449,352  146,956 1.130.454
PACKED  BY  DISTRICTS   PREVIOUS  YEARS
1914
1913
1912
1911
1910
328,390
237,634
94,890
109,052
341,073
732,059
164,055
68.096
173,921
254,258
137.697
3111,344
254,410
65,684
101,06,6
22 i,461
223,148
222,035
39,720
Skeena Rive	
53,423i      71,162
336,268     359,538
129,398
147,900
Totals	
1,111,039
1.353.901     996.576
948^965
.762,201
: 34
Vancouver Board of  Trade
PACKED BY DISTRICTS PREVIOUS YEARS-Continued
1909
1908
1907
1906
1905
567,203
140,739
40,990
91,014
127,974
89,184
209,177
46,908
75,090
122,330
163,116
159,255
31,832
94,064
99,192
240,486
162,420
32,534
122,878
71,142
877,136
114,085
32,725
83,122
60,392
Totals	
967,920
542,689
547,459
629,460
1,167,460 Vancouver Board of  Trade
35
RECAPITULATION
Quantities and Values of all Fish caught and landed in a Green
State, for the Whole Province of British Columbia for the
year 1915-16.
Salmon  cwts.
Lobsters	
Cod	
Haddock 	
Hake and Cusk 	
Pollock	
Herring  	
Mackerel  	
Shad	
Alewives   	
Sardines   	
Halibut   	
Soles  	
Flounders   	
Skate   	
Smelts   	
Oulachons	
Tom Cod	
Octopus  	
Swordfish  	
Albacore 	
Oysters  	
Clams 	
Quahaugs (used fresh) . . brls.
Crabs, cockles, etc cwts.
Whiting     I
Squid (bait fish)    brls.
Scallops   brls.
Launce     "
Quantity
1,150,942
438,906
1,937,084
554,986
379,978
131,246
1,533,572
163,428
6,170
85,018
317,825
333,354
3,665
5,181
2,077
65,696
2,779
43,361
111
14,719
13,355
20,507
54,515
2,042
5,726
143
5,207
6,673
700
$
Value
5,911,707
2,623,644
3,348,462
809,588
314,219
129,319
1,345,609
598,786
34,358
80,930
434,488
1,720,112
13,469
5,452
.    2,328
357,339
13,351
9,422
730
64,300
32,114
97,751
77,238
4,099
15,644
407
20,610
14,946
155
$18,080,577
HALIBUT   LANDED   AT   THE   PORT   OF   VANCOUVER    FOR   YEAR
ENDING 31st   MARCH,   1916:
From U. S. A. Vessels, March 31st, 1915       577,250 lbs.
Prom U. S. A. Vessels, March 31st, 1916     6,742,224 "
From Canadian Vessels, March 31st, 1915     6,012,504 "
From Canadian Vessels, March 31st, 1916     5,178,851 " 56 Vancouver Board  of  Trade
TRADE AND COMMERCE COMMITTEE REPORT
The Trade and Commerce Committee of the Board held
eleven meetings during the year, and took up matters of the
imposition of freight rates, aid to the lumber industry, and in
conjunction with the Harbour and Navigation Committee, the
matter of shipping, and the supplying of vessels for the carrying trade of this Province, and many other subjects of great
interest to our citizens.
This Committee also in conjunction with a like Committee of the Victoria Board of Trade, prevailed upon the Government to send a trade representative to the West Indies
and South America during the year. Mr. H. G White, at
the Board's recommendation, received the appointment as
Trade Commissioner for those countries.
He spent several months investigating what goods could
be supplied to" those countries, as well as what return freight
might be expected in return from those countries.
Owing to the absence of bottoms to do business between
British Columbia and the above countries, nothing- of practical benefit immediately followed his visit, but a great deal of
information was collected by Mr. White, that will be of service'
to manufacturers and shipping interests in British Columbia
in the future. This information will be published in pamphlet
form by the Government at an early date.
W. H. MALKIX,
Chairman.
REPORT OF THE MINING COMMITTEE
The Mining Committee of the Board held fourteen meetings during the year, and -was instrumental in prevailing upon
the Finance Minister at Ottawa to grant the right of giving
New York exchange for Dominion Government Assay cheques
at this port. The gold from the Yukon and British Columbia,
since the outbreak of war, had been placed practically in the
United States, owing to the fact that Xew York exchange
was obtainable for the same.    This condition of affairs was Annual Report,   1915-1916
37
remedied through the  committee,  by the  Hon.   Mr.  White,
Minister of Finance.
The Committee also supplied information to Mr. David
Carnegie, representative of the War Office in England, Dr.
Wilson, of the Dominion Mining Department, and Dr.
Stansfield, of McGill University, constituted a committee by
the Dominion Government looking into the practicability of
constructing a zinc and copper smelter in British Columbia,
with respect to labour, power, fuel, cost of living, amount of
blast copper available in the Province, as well as the amount
of zinc ore produced within British Columbia, and many other
matters treating with this subject.
This committee also supplied the Minister of Mines with
a detailed statement with respect to iron mines, and prospects
of this Province, which the Minister has stated will be published in pamphlet form after being investigated by a competent engineer of his department.
The subject of the construction of iron blast furnaces at
this coast has been dealt with during the year, and the following information compiled. This information will be of great
service to intending investors and is given in detail below:
We believe that the time has come when energetic steps
should be taken to establish an iron and steel industry in this
Province, and in support of this we beg to submit the following information:
British Columbia imported in 1912 approximately
120,000 long tons of iron and steel, having a gross value of
approximately $2,000,000.00. This Province has abundant sup.-
plies of raw material for the manufacture of all the iron and
steel required for British Columbia, and the adjacent provinces
and-states, there being no-iron and steel works on the Pacific
Coast between Alaska and Mexico, and west of the Rockies,
so that the industry established here would have this field for
its market. The committee has information that the Russian
market will be of great importance' in the developing of the
export trade in iron and steel.
In a paper read before the American Institute of Mining
Engineers, Mr. C. C. Jones stated that the ores of this coast
carry from four to ten per cent, more iron than the standard
Lake Superior iron ores, that the bulk of the tonnage,is within
Bessemer limit for phosphorus, and there is no cost of drying 38
Vancouver Board of  Trade
before transportation, thus saving ten per cent, on the freight
charged on Lake Superior ores. He estimates the present
market for iron and steel products on the Pacific Coast to be
923,000 tons per annum, and states that if cast: iron pipe, oil
pipe, railway steel and shipbuilding are undertaken, the amount
of iron and steel required will be approximately 2,000,000 tons
per annum. He points out that the cost of iron ore delivered
on the coast will amount to $3.50 to $4.50 per ton, as against
$8.17, the present cost of Lake Superior ores delivered at the
Eastern works.
The cost of producing pig iron in British Columbia has
been estimated by Dr. Lindeman at $16.00 per ton, by Seaver
at $12.25 per ton, and by Wilmot at $12.00 to $17.00 per ton,
according to quality. The cost of producing pig iron at Iron-
dale, Washington, is $13.75 per ton. The average cost of
pig iron at Pittsburg is $15.30 per ton, as given by Judge
Geary before the Steel Commission of the United States. The
present cost of United States pig iron in Vancouver is $27.50
per ton, and of Eglington (England) '$33.00 per ton. The
price of this, under normal conditions, would be $22.50 and
$27.00 per ton respectively.
The cost of a one hundred ton per day unit .blast furnace,
including rolling mill, converting plant and coking plant
would be approximately $1,800,000.00.
In our opinion a steel plant capable of supplying the local
market and the immediate export trade could be put down here
at a capital of approximately $5,000,000.00, and we recommend that the Provincial Government be approached to assist
ih some tangible way any bona fide company that would establish such a plant here.
While the Committee is fully alive to the importance of
establishing an iron and steel industry in British Columbia, we
do not feel justified in recommending that the Board endorse
any particular corporation, or scheme.
N. THOMPSON,
Chairman.
Other standing committees of the Board had many meetings during the year, but space does not permit of a detailed
statement treating with their deliberations. Annual Report,   1915-1916
39
ENLARGED CANADIAN TRADE INTELLIGENCE
Under the arrangement made by the Minister of Trade
and Commerce with Sir Edward Grey in July, 1912, the
Department is able to present the following list of the more
important British Consulates whose officers have been instructed by the Foreign Office to answer inquiries from and
give information to Canadians who wish to consult them in
reference to trade matters.
.Brazil:
Bahla, British Consul.
Rio   de   Janeiro,   British   Consul
General.
Chile:
Valparaiso,   British   Consul
General.
China:
Harbin,  British Consul.
Colombia:
Bagota,   British   Consul   General.
Ecuador:
Quito,   British   Consul  General.
Egypt:
Alexandria,   British   Consul
General.
France:
Havre,   British   Consul   General.
Marsaeilles,   British  Consul
General.
India:
Calcutta,    Director   General   of
Commercial   Intelligence.
Netherlands:
Amsterdam,   British  Consul.
Panama:
Colon,  British Consul.
Panama,   British   Vice-Consul.
Peru:
Lima,  British  Vice-Consul.
Portugal:
Lisbon,   British  Consul.
Russia:
Moscow,   British  Consul  General.
Petrograd,    British   Consul.
Vladivostock,  British Consul.
Odessa,   British   Consul   General.
Spain:
Barcelona, British Consul
General.
Madrid,   British   Consul.
Sweden:
Stockholm,  British  Consul.
Switzerland:
Geneva,   British  Consul.
Italy:
Genoa,   British   Consul   General.
;  Milan,  British Consul.
Uruguay:
Monte   Video,   British   Vice-
Consul.
Mexico:
Mexico,   British   Consul   General.
Venezuela:
Caracas,   British  Vice-Consul. 40
Vancouver Board of  Trade
PORT  OF  VANCOUVER,   B. C.
Fiscal Year  Ending  March 31.ST, 1915
Seagoing Vessels—Inwards with Cargoes
No.
Tons Reg-.
Freight
Crews
Tons Wg-t.
Tons Mst.
British	
Canadian...
238
468
428
561,153
646,962
433,835
308,326
32,858
293,573
110,730
122
29,072
19,380
27,432
16,172
Total,.,.'.
1,134
1,641,950
634,757
139,924
62,984
Seagoing
Vessels—
Inwards 1
n  Ballast
British	
100
228
76
'   94,175
96,873
38,036
7,207
4,305
935
Total	
404
229,084
12,447
Seagoing Vessels—Outwards with  Cargoes
British . .
Canadian.
Foreign..
Total
346
167
314
827
570,778
231,205
299,488
'1,101.471
79,903
29,058
52,190
161,151
95,934
515
39,453
135,902
29,846
9,760
12,950
52,556
Seagoing Vessels—Outwards in  Ballast
British  ....
Canadian . . .
78
260
186
173,539
225,595
172,424
571,558
4,721
10,066
Foreign ....
4,367
Total	
.524
19,154
Coasting Trade—
Inwards
Steamers....
7,089
534
2 835,935
477,442
159,129
Baaques ch .
2,636
Total	
7,623
3,313,377 .
161,765
Coasting Trade—Outwards
Steamers....
7,432
534
3,011,835
478,288
153,108
Barques
2,644
Total	
7,966
3,*490,123
155,752
Grand Total
18,478
10,347,563
795,908
75,826     464,658 Annual  Report,   1915-1916 41
PORT   OF   VANCOUVER,   B.   C.
Fiscal   Year   Ending   March   31st.   1916
Seagoing Vessels—Inwards with Cargoes
No.
Tons Reg.
Freight
Crews
Tons Wgt.
Tons Mst.
British  	
Canadian .. .
Foreign ....
199
560
465
444,115
801,386
497,794
128,064
64,871
412,980
92,049
117
53,127
14,441
29,812
16,423
Total     , . .
1,224
1,743,295
.    605,915
145,293
60,675
Seagoing Vessels—Inwards in  Ballast
British	
30
130
97
49,239
23,088
47,997
1,927
Canadian . . .
Foreign- ....
1,119
1,559
i Total	
257
120,284
4,605
Seagoing Vessels—Outwards with Cargoes
British	
Canadian ...
Foreign
Total.
424
116
275
815
694,314
163,574
300,723
78,073
24,205
106,040
1,158,611
208,318
100,520
11,921
27,633
140,074
32,938
6,202-
11,090
50,230
Seagoing Vessels—Outwards in  Ballast
British
73
142
282
119,152
45.357
242,065
,
4,484
1,271
Foreign ....
6,272
Total
497
406,574
12,027
Coasting Tra
de—
Inwar
ds
7,337
409
2,698,372
363,474
149,544
Barques ch .
1,948
Total
7,746
3,061,846
151,492
Coasting Trade—Outwards
Steamers ...
Barques ....
7,643
412
3,087,146
364,441
153,969
1,953
Total
'   8,055
3,451,587
155,922
Grand Total    18,594
9,942,197
814,233
285,367
434,951 Vancouver Board of  Trade
SHIPPING
The following are the regular lines in operation:—
The Canadian Pacific Ocean Service Line, comprising the
Canadian Pacific and Allan Atlantic Steamers, "Empress
of Britain," "Missanabie" and "Metagama." The "Melita"
and "Minnedosa" are at present under construction, and
when completed will be placed on this run.
The Allan Boats are: The S.S. "Scandinavian," "Corinthian,"
"Sicilian," "Pretorian," and "Carthaginian."
The Canadian Pacific Trans-Pacific Steamers to China and
Japan and Manila, comprising the "Empress of Russia,"
"Empress of Asia," "Empress of Japan," and "Monteagle."
The Canadian-Australasian Royal Mail Steamship Line,
(operated by the Union S.S. Co., of New Zealand, Ltd.,)
comprising the new steamer "Niagara," and "Makura"
gives a four-weekly service to Honolulu (Hawaiian
Islands), Suva (Fiji), Auckland (N. Z.), and Sydney
(Australia), with connections to all other New Zealand,
Australian and Tasmanian ports. This Company also
operates cargo steamers twice monthly from Vancouver
and other Pacific Coast ports to New Zealand and Australian ports.
The Canadian Pacific 'Railway Company's British Columbia
Coast Steamship Service:
The following are the regular lines at present in operation :—
Vancouver-Victoria double Daily Mail Service in connection with, the transcontinental railway, comprising "Princess Charlotte," "Princess Adelaide," "Princess Alice,"
and "Princess Mary."
In connection with the trans-continental trains, the three-
funnel, twin-screw steamers "Princess Charlotte" and
"Princess Victoria" make double daily service to and
from Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle.
The new Steamer "Princess Margaret," built for the above
.lines, has been taken over by the Admiralty.
The S.S. "Princess Patricia" operates a summer months'
double daily service between Vancouver and Nanaimo. Annual Report,  1915-1916
• S.S. "Charmer" plys between Vancouver, Nanaimo, Union
Bay, Comox, and Powell River, making three trips
weekly.
S.S. "Princess Alice" and S.S. "Princess Sophia" sail
every week to Skagway, calling at Alert Bay, Prince
Rupert, Port Simpson, Wrangell and Juneau.
The steamer "Princess Ena," carrying freight, makes
regular sailings between Vancouver and all coast points
on the mainland and on Vancouver Island, also making
connections for Skidegate and other points on Queen
Charlotte Islands.
The S.S. "Princess May" operates weekly to Prince Rupert
and Granby Bay.
The S.S. "Princess Maquinna" makes a weekly service
between Victoria and West Coast of Vancouver Island,
going to end of "island every alternate trip.
S.S. "Queen City" makes six trips weekly between Vancouver, Victoria and Gulf Island ports.
Tugs "Nanoose," "Qualicum" and "Nitinat," tow car ferry
barges, Transfers Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4, conveying railway
freight cars between Vancouver, Esquimalt and Vancouver and Newport.
The Ocean Steamship Company, Ltd., and China Mutual
■ Steam Navigation Company, Ltd.—Local Agents, Dod-
well & Company, Ltd., operate The Blue Funnel Line
direct from London, Glasgow and Liverpool to Vancouver via the Panama Canal each 28 days. Owing to the
war and the closing through slides of the Panama Canal,
this service has been suspended.
Harrison Direct Line—Local Agents, Balfour, Guthrie & Co.—
operates between United Kingdom ports and Vancouver.
This line has also been temporarily suspended, owing to
existing conditions.
Pacific Coast Steamship Company.—Steamers "Governor" and
"President" sail every week to and from San Francisco.
Grand Trunk Pacific—The three-funnel, twin-screw steamers
"Prince Rupert" and "Prince George," and S.S. "Cheloh-
sin" make tri-weekly sailings to Seattle, Victoria, Vancou- 44
Vancouver Board  of  Trade
ver, and Prince Rupert.   "Prince Rupert" makes a weekly
sailing to Ketchikan, Wrangle, Juneau and Skagway.
Union Steamship Company, of B. C, Ltd., of Vancouver
affords a regular service to Prince Rupert, Granby Bay,
Port Simpson, Port Essington, Lund, Van Anda (Texada
Island), Nanaimo, Comox and Campbell River, Powell
River, also the chief coasting points, logging camps and
canneries, their fleet being "Chelohsin," "Cheakamus,"
"Camosin," "Cassiar," "Cowichan," "Comox," "Coquit-
lam," "Venture" and "Prince Albert."
The Terminal Steam Navigation Company, Ltd., operates
daily between Vancouver and Howe Sound, S.S. "Ballena"
from Vancouver to Newport and connecting with the
Pacific Great Eastern .Railway. The S.S. "Bowena" to
Bowen Island, and the S.S. "Britannia" to Bowen Island
and way points.
East Asiatic Line—Local Agents, C. Gardiner Johnson & Company, has been temporarily suspended owing to the war.
Halibut Fleets—The New England Fish Co. operate out of
Vancouver in the halibut fishing the S.S. "Kingfisher,"
S.S. "Manhattan," S.S. "New England" and the auxiliary
schooner "Knickerbocker."
The Canadian Fishing Co., Ltd., operate the S.S. "Celestial
Empire," S.S. "Flamingo," S.S. "Kingsway" and the
schooners "Pescawha," "Emma H.," "Carlotta G. Cox"
and "Borealis."
Russian Volunteer Fleet—Local agents, Canadian Pacific Railway, is expected to resume a service into Vancouver after
the war. During the past year this fleet has carried nearly
40,000 tons of freight from this port to Vladivostok.
The Maple Leaf Steamship Company of New York—the sailings of this line have been seriously interrupted during this
year owing to slides in the Panama Canal.
Mosquito Fleet^The local fleet of tugs and barges required to
tow logs and for carrying supplies to and from the lumber
mills and logging camps, and the fleet of fishing boats and
steamers employed in the salmon and deep-sea fishing,
aggregate several thousand tons and are constantly being
increased.    48
Vancouver Board of  Trade
ANNUAL DECLARED EXPORT RETURN.
Statement Showing Quantities and Values of Declared Exports
From Vancouver, B. C", Canada, to the United States of
America during the year ended December 31st, 1915:
Articles
Animals—
Horses   	
Miscellaneous
Unit of Quantity.    Quantities.
Number
81
195
Total  animals   	
Total Animal  Products
Values.
$     13,546
25,210
.$     38,756
.$   535,509
Automobiles       Number	
Bonds           "        	
Brewers' Grits       Pounds 4,698,
Building Material—
Fire Brick   	
Fire Clay  	
Iron and Steel  .. .
I Lime   	
Lime  Rock  	
Miscellaneous    .. .
Tc
Total   Building   Material.
Bullion—■
Gold ..
Silver   .
1
10
600
745
251
426
023
500
Ounces  180.
   64
747
255
$  29,553
1,461,349
122,792
28,708
"2,608
12,131
12,388
10,623
3,916
.$  70,374
$2,739,516
35,144
Cascara Bark      Pounds    293,426
Coal       Tons              1,324
Diamond   Drilling   	
Drugs  and  Sundries   	
Drygoods and Wearing Apparel  	
Empties       Number        5,279
Exhibit, (articles for)   	
Explosives       pounds      85,784
Films   (Motion   Pictures)   Lin. Ft        4,000
Fish,  Fresh—
Halibut       Pounds   1,173,471
Salmon           "  13,425,038
Fish, Frozen—
Halibut       Pounds    437,437
Herring           "      524,958
Miscellaneous           "              17,238
15,833
7,128
l,412v
2,223
6,483
1,522
61,834
9,230
1,000
107,309
183,299
32,640
16,187
2,218   Vancouver Board of  Trade
49
Articles
Salmon
Sturgeon  
Unit of Quantity.    Quantities.
276,478
 17,682
Values.
16,811
3,695
Total Fresh  Fish    $   362,159
Fish, Preserved-
Herring   	
Miscellaneous
Salmon—
Salted   	
Canned    	
Pounds 1,541,722
"        27,445
.1,280,926
48,000
Total Preserved Fish
Total Fish  	
$   81,506
2,783
116,913
3,811
.$   205,013
.$   567,172
Furniture   	
Glass   (window)       Pounds.
Glycerine           "
Oats, Wheat and Rye.. Bushels..
Hardware—
Electrical   	
Miscellaneous   	
40,587
47,975
16,560
3,215
2,355
6,222
18,530
2,494
5,729
Total Hardware    $
8,223
H. H. Goods & Pers. Eff'ts Pkgs.
Jewelry   	
13,920
285,631
153
Junk—
Aluminum        Pounds.
Metal   	
Paper           "
Rags, Rope &c	
Rubber           "
82,227
804,959
751,900
697,582
356,560
32,228
63,131
3,090
16,574
21,369
Total Junk   $   136,392
Liquors—
Sparkling      Doz. Pts..
Still       Gallons.
186
4,264
2,296
9,689
Total Liquors   $    11,985
Machinery—
Contractor's   Outfits
Electrical    	
Miscellaneous   	
14,077
4,106
5,565
Total Machinery    $    23,748 50
Vancouver Board of  Trade
Articles
Unit of Quantity.   Quantities.
Or
Antimony    .'. Tons
Copper,   Blister           "
Copper Matte         "
Copper Ore          "
22
14,995
4,018
44,494
Values.
& 2,200
6,101,781
1,752,943
1,480,195
Concentrates—
Gold       Tons
Zinc           "
Jewelers'   Sweeps   	
Platinum,  Crude    Ounces.
3,687
640
±m
407,889
38,203
2,907
1,568
Total Ore  $9,787,686
Paper Mill Equipment
1,194
Provisions—
Beans       Bushels.
Canned  Goods   	
Cheese       Pounds.
Coffee	
Corn,  Manchurian       Bushels.
Currants       Pounds.
Eggs       Dozen.
Flour      Barrels.
Fruits—
Apples       Bushels.
Pears   	
Miscellaneous   	
Meats—
Beef       Pounds.
Ham and Bacon         "
Mutton and Veal	
Pork   	
2,284
6,001
1,826
3,658
1,384
14,142
2,069
1,164
1,110
12,443
1,023
34,260
5,874
10,910
64,890
5,573
8,984
113
342
254
42,679
$       3,497
10,039
1,434
128,138
13,935
34,024
4,529
Total Meats $.  23,395
Milk, preserved  Pounds    328,953
Miscellaneous   	
Molasses     Gallons      22,593
Nuts     Pounds       67,035
Olives     Gallons        1,212
Olive  Oil          "          667
Rice     Pounds 4,900,021
Tea           "      140,512
7,911
4,754
2,793
3,352
1,118
1,175
194,875
46,606 Articles
Annual Report,   1915-1916,
Unit of Quantity.   Quantities.
Vegetables—
Cabbage       Pounds..
Onions        Bushels..
Potatoes           fe
Turnips       Pounds.
33,388
1,345
39,295
216,530
Rails, Steel Tons
Rubber      Pounds.
Skates      Pairs
Sulphur       Pounds.
Tin   ....'	
771
.2,380,869
787
. 200,000
10,881
Wood Manufactures-
Logs   	
M Ft      98,522
Lumber—
Ceiling   M Ft.
Flooring           "
Hardwood—
Re-export   	
734
3,874
46
Miscellaneous—
Lath   	
Moulding   	
Miscellaneous   	
Pickets           M         24
Staves   and   Head'gs Sets        154,066
"          6,462
Lin. Ft 2,403,476
Total Miscellaneous
51
Values.
348
1,381
25,050
1,695
Total Vegetables    $    29,474
J    18,204
1,010,580
1,191
2,129
3,261
$   895,344
13,950
84,570
3,805
20,608
8,990
1,190
613
20,155
51,556
Rough and Dressed   M Ft.
Siding         "
Silo Stock  	
39,844
24,288
3,874
874,436
573,435
107,726
Wood Manufactures of—
Paper       Pounds 47,319,178
Piling      Lin. Ft       318,669
Poles           " .-       447,364
Pulp         Pounds    9,453,880
Shingles           M           1,256,804
Shingle Bolts       Cords	
Spars       Lin.  Ft.        . 4,198
1,002,527
31,623
47,417
203,620
3,790,763
15,915
Total   $25,1.41,633 52
Vancouver Board of  Trade
BANKS   OF VANCOUVER
-iU
(-'.
The sixteen Chartered Banks established in Vancouver
have in addition 38 branches, making a total of 54. These are:
Bank Capital Reserve
Bank of Montreal  .$16,000,000 $16,000,000
Canadian Bank of Commerce....  15,000,000 12,500,000
Royal Bank of Canada (including
Traders' Bank)      11,560,000 12,560,000
Bank of Nova Scotia     5,859,100 10,692,740 '
Imperial Bank of Canada     6,755,265 6,755,263
Bank of Toronto     5,000,000 6,000,000
Dominion Bank of Canada       6,754,960 6,410,760
Merchants Bank of Canada     6,754,960 6,410,760
Molsons Bank     4,000,000 » 4,800,000
Bank of Ottawa      3,888,730 4,388,730
Bank of Hamilton        3,000,000 3,500,000
Union Bank of Canada     5,000,000 3,300,000
Bank of British North America..    4,866,666 2,774,000
Quebec Bank       2,500,000 1,250,000
Northern Crown Bank        2,723,490 300,000
Standard Bank of Canada     3,000,000 4,053,140
v^f Annual Report,   1915-1916
BANKING RETURNS
53
VANCOUVER CLEARING HOUSE
Comparative   Statement  of clearings  tor  years  ending
March 31st,. 1913, 1914, 1915, 1916
1912-1913
1913-1914
1914-1915
1915-1916
April	
$52,324,013
$54,383,263
$39,900,365
$21,295,868
May  	
55,979,196
54,445,(195
38,089,799
22,669,043
June	
53,781,824
49,389,201
37,467,108
22,500,450
July	
53,840,212
51,411,870
38,574,409
23,712,152
55,929,324
47,435,329
33,598,185
24,246,715
September..
53,896,987
51,812,940
34,324,654
24,360,842
October .
59,492,120
51,891,335
31,165,702
24,596,929
November .
60,815,185
47,711,848
28,519,737
26.324,641
December ..
55,434,815
47,810,950
25,189,573
25,70:f,746
52,431,327
41,353,351
24,842,677
21,974,554
February . . .
50,641,407
34.054,576
19,489,666
21,002,208
47,535,145
41,714,259
21,833,220
25,216,415
Totals..
$652,10.1,555
$573,414,017
$369,995,095
$283,603,563
COMPARISON OF BANK CLEARINGS IN FOURTEEN CITIES,
1912, 1913 and 1914, 1915, January to December
1912
1913
1914
1915
$2,845,479,000
$2,876,118,000
$2,631,350,000
$2,628,122,428
2,170,230,376
2,181,281,507
2,012,953,966
1,885,956,257
Winnipeg....
1,537,817,524
1,634,977,237
1,370,960,806
1,530,683,124
Vancouver. ..
645,118,837
606,899,710.
420,951,718
281,575,949
Ottawa	
244,123,453
207,667,008
209,662,599
211,636,519
275,492,303
248,715,948
201,669,873
169,758,599
158,760,185
165,674,745
165,873,241
158,325,906
Hamilton ....
158,127,435
177,946,610
148,886,812
151,420,271
Halifax  	
100,466,678
105,347,636
100,280,108
104,414,595
183,544,238
176,977,074
121,663,271
76,677,926
St. John	
88,969,218
82,447,747
78,259,921
77,533,868
Edmonton ...
220,727,617
213,053,418
157,308,686
105,834,554
84,526,961
90,720,752
86,024,238
89,774,787
Regina	
115,727,648
132,087,457
98,205,541
87,122,611
Totals ..
$8,829,103,523
$8,902,914,849
$7,804,050,780
$7,558,837,396
1  Annual Report,   1915-1916
55
CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF VANCOUVER
MUNICIPAL STATISTICS
Schedule  "C,"  Supplementary to  Balance  Sheet,  December  31st,   1915
SUNDRY PROPERTIES (CAPITAL ASSETS)
Buildings and  Lands:
City  Hall    $
Free  Library   	
Old Police Station  (not including site)	
New Police Station  	
Fire Hall No. 1, Cordova Street East	
" I     2, Seymour Street  O
"3, 12th Avenue and Quebec St.
4, 10th Avenue, Fairview  	
5, Keefer  Street   	
"       "     6,  Nelson  Street   	
■     7, 5th Avenue, Fairview  	
"8,   Cedar   Cove   	
9,  Charles  Street,  Grandview..
'    10,  13th Avenue,  Fairview   ....
"   11, St. Catherine & 12th Avenue
'12, 8th Avenue and  Balaclava..
"13, Burns St. and 25th Avenue..
|   14, Cambridge and Slocan Sts...
"15,  Nootka and  Strathcona Rd.
Fire  Hall  Site,  cor.  Granville and  Broadway
Fire Hall Site, Broadway, Mt. Pleasant	
Juvenile  Home,   Lots   19   and  20,   Block  349,
D.   L.  526    ■	
Old Hospital and Cottage Hospital   	
Gontagious Diseases Hosp'l, Hastings T'nsite
City Creche   	
City Pound,  Front Street   	
Crematory,  Dufferin  Street   	
Incinerator,   Union   Street   	
Works Yard, Lots 1 to 11, Blk. 1, D.L. 302..
New Incinerator,  Cambie  Street Yards	
Works Y'd, Lots 11 and 12, Blk. 344, D.L. 526
Parts S. of R/W Lots 20/25, Blk. 1, D.L. 196
Lots 4, 7, 8 and 9, Blk. 3, D.L. 200a	
Market and  Wharf	
Exhibition Buildings, Hastings Park	
Cemetery,   exclusive   of   the   part    given    by
Provincial Government (nominal asset only,
vide  By-law 454)    $100,000.00
New Cemetery, Burnaby  	
Police   Sub-Station,    Lots    14-15,    Blk.    112,
D. L. 301   	
Buildings
22,000.00
50,000.00
1,500.00
317,000.00
22,000.00
32,000.00
20,700.00
16,500.00
3,400.00
17,500.00
7,500.00
7,500.00
7,250.00
6,800.00
9,500.00
9,500.00
8,800.00
8,800.00
8,800.00
1,500.00
9,500.00
7,500.00
62,500.00
49,500.00
36,000.00
3,000.00
51,000.00
62,250.00
355,000.00
2,250.00
Lands
325,000.00
190,000.00
43,000.00
53,000.00
42,500.00
7,500.00
7,000.00
7,500.00
12,500.00
5,500.00
7,000.00
4,200.00
5,500.00
4,500.00
5,500.00
4,500.00
5,000.00
1,700.00
35,000.00
22,500.00
8,000.00
350,000.00
50,000.00
22,700.00
5,000.00
12,500.00
100,000.00
200,000.00
4,000.00
15,000.00
60,000.00
125,000.00
295,500.00
8,000.00
n
■*ip. 56
Vancouver Board of  Trade
SCHEDULE  "C"—Continued
Buildings  and  Lands: Buildings
Police Sub-Station, Lots 9-10, Blk. 268,
D. L   526     $ 2 °™.00
Police Sub-Station, Lots 7-8, Blk. 35, D.L. 184 3,600
Old People's Home and Temp'ry Jail, Hast'gs 59,000.00
Cambie   Park     800.00
Clark Park     17,150.00
Oppenheimer   Park     750.00
McLean  Park     8,500.00
Strathcona   Park     7,850.00
English Bay Beach and Alexandra Park    91,200.00
Tatlow   Park     4,800.00
Kitsilano Beach Park (old portion)  9,500.00
Kitsilano Beach Park (under option C.P.R.). 5,500.00
Kitsilano   Beach   Park    (partly    leased    and
partly under option from C.P.R.)  17,700.00
Robson   Park     5,200.00
Victoria   Park     "  4,850.00
Douglas Park (sundry lots Blk. 159d, D.L.
264a)	
Woodland  Park     2,300.00
Templeton   Park     2,000.00
Garden   Park     1,250.00
Sunnyside   Park     5,100.00
McBride Park    6,150.00
Granville Park (under option from C.P.R.) 1. 4,550.00
Stanley  Park     335,000.00
Hastings   Park     50,300.00
Pandora Park     9,000.00
Connaught   Park    '
Lot 14,'Blk. 64, D. L. 185 	
Lots 14 to 16, Blk. 65, D. L. 185	
Lots  15-22,  Blk. 66,  D. L. 185           4,800.^^
High School, (King Edward)     286,000.00
High  School   (Britannia)     223,000.00
Model   School     57,500.00
Central, Old H. S. and School Bd. Offices  93,000.00
Dawson   School     207,000.00
Strathcona School  (old)   .'  66,000.00
Strathcona  School   (new)     87,500.00
Mount  Pleasant  School     63,500
Fairview   School      47,000.00
Kitsilano   School       33,000.00
Lord   Roberts   School     75,000.00
Seymour   School      75,000.00
Grandview  School     30,500.00
McDonald  School     32,000.00
Aberdeen  School     43,000.00
Simon Fraser School     63,000.00
Alexandra   School     76,000.00
Lands
11,500.00
7,750.00
27,400.00
600,000.00
75,000.00
-250,000.00
165,000.00
80,000.00
500,000.00
40,000.00
110,000.00
45,000.00
40,000.00
36,000.00
75,000.00
68,000.00
41,500.00
38,300.00
126,000.00
137,750.00
12,500.00
45,000.00
100,000.00
125,000.00
42,000.00
65,000.00
750,000.00
200,000.00
125,000.00
125,000.00
115,000.00
112,500.00
70,000.00
60,000.00
60,000.00
45,000.00
40,000.00
50,000.00 Annual Report,. ^9/5-1916
SCHEDULE  "C"—Continued
Buildings  and  Lands: Buildings
Lord Nelson School       $123,600.00
Cecil  Rhodes   School         101,000.00
Lord Tennyson  School         140,500.00
Henry  Hudson   School         129,000.00
Florence Nightingale School        142,000.00
General   Gordon   School   	
Livingstone School   	
Laura Secord  School   	
Charles  Dickens  School   	
Old Government School (D. L. 301)	
Hastings   School   	
70,000.00
66,000.00
62,000.00
66,000.00
1,000.00
65,000.00
Franklin School   	
Beaconsfield  School   (old)   	
Beaconsfield  School   (new)   	
Bayview  School   	
School Site, Block 106, D. L. 540 ..
School Site, Block 360D, D. L. 526..
School Site,  Blk. 70, N. W.  %  Sec
H. T. S. S	
School Site, Lot 18, Blk. 24, D. L. 264a
9,000.00
1,000.00
68,000.00
58,500.00
30,
,4,536,400.00
Land as per Foregoing Details  .. .."	
Buildings as per Foregoing Details  	
Water Works, Supplies and Equipment:
Capilano   Creek:   Cost   of   clearing   right-of
way, making road,  dam,  tunnels,  etc.,  settling basin and intake, steel mains, wooden
mains,  and  land  connected  with  system.
Stanley  Park:    Mains,   Reservoir  and  Stand-
pipe.
City of Vancouver: Mains, Hydrants, Meters,
services,    etc.,    submerged    mains,    valves,
telephone line.
Seymour Creek:  Cost of lands and right-of-
way,   making   road,   steel   bridge,   settling
basin, intake, C. P. R. crossing, steel mains
wooden mains,  valves,  water  record, clearing   reservoir   site,   wharf   and   warehouse,
and land connected with system.
Little Mountain Reservoir   5,082,125.81
Supplies   on  hand,  valves,   hydrants,   fittings,
tools, and general equipment           53,948.29
Fire Hall Apparatus Equipment and Supplies:
No.   1 Fire  Hall     $ 40,707.50
"     2    "        "     50,148.06
3    "        "     22,418.35
2,000.00
5,136,074.10 58
Vancouver Board of  Trade
SCHEDULE  "C"—Continued
Buildings and  Lands:
No.   4 Fire Hall  	
9    "        "...
10 "        "   .. ..
11 I        "   ...
12 I "...
13 " "...
14 "        "    ...
15 I " ...
Machine Shop .. .
Spare Auto  Parts
Fire  Alarm  System   .
Police Department:
Equipment   	
Patrol Signal System
Buildings
$     20,455.38
16,360.47
14,762.54
13,492.64
10,870.25
14,438.16
7,063.89
3,267.20
5,873.87
3,428.06
3,662.33
7,971.03
3,315.65
6,256.60
$   244,491.98
88,838.20
26,373.65
52,389.45
Oranamental  Street Lighting    $     90,990.00
School Apparatus and Equipment (Estimatedi):
Aberdeen   	
Alexandra   	
Bayview   	
Beaconsfield   	
Cecil  Rhodes   	
Charles  Dickens   	
Central and School Board Office
Dawson   	
Fairview   	
Florence Nightingale  	
Franklin   	
General Gordon 	
Grandview  	
Hastings   	
Henry  Hudson   	
I Kitsilano   	
Laura Secord   	
Livingstone   	
Macdonald	
Model	
Mount Pleasant  	
Nelson   	
Roberts   	
Seymour	
2,920.10
3,655.16
1,620.59
l,562'.ll
3,544.97
2,118.03
7,400.00
8,000.00
3,165.88
3,589.33
1,000.00
2,222.15
2,640.70
2,795.22
3,386.05
3,447.44
1,911.51
2,262.71
2,618.75
4,061.72
4,354.54
4,049.62
5,013.35
5,305.04
Lands
$     333,330.181
.   78,763.10
90,990.001] Annual Report,  1915-1916
SCHEDULE "C"—Continued
Buildings and Lands: Buildings
Simon Fraser    $ 42522.35
Strathcona  *. ffi"  5,813.23
Tennyson   	
King Edward High    l s,::s 1.40
Britannia High   11,21 :;.oo
Children's Aid ;  552.00
Pre-vocational Equipment    15,000.00
Manual Training Equipment  16,000.00
Domestic Science Equipment    11.000.00
Miscellaneous    11,000.00
Sewers and Septic Tanks   $3,558,854.06
Basement Drains          66,987.04
Streets and Lanes:
Wood Paved, Asphalt- and Bitulithic $ 4,83^782.66
Macadam  Streets     786,488.02
Cleared and Graded Sffeets   2,311,579.81
Stone Paved Streets   11,857.02
Stone Paved Lanes    120,539.72
Concrete  Paved Lanes    5,925.35
Macadam  Lanes     70,681.37
Plank Roadways     314,972.13
Cleared and Graded Lanes   120,485.55
:"Hassam and Granitoid  Pavements     201,638.30
Asphalt Macadam Pavements  ....."  8,197.22
IStreet   Extensions     841,980.00
Sidewalks:
Cement Walks and Curbs  $1,321,941.89
Wooden Sidewalks         129,349.52
Bridges, Wharves, Etc.:
^Bridges and Viaducts    $2,139,514.10
\ Heatley Avenue Wharf    8,266.86
Gore Avenue Slip     531.45
Salsburv Drive Slip     1,681.59
FBalsam Street Slip     4,294.44
Bidwell Street Slip    291.60
Rock Crushing Plant, Wharf and Bunkers.. 20,843.21
Ferry Subway     38,841.03
Sundry Assets:
City Hall Furniture and Law Library $ 11,500.00
Board of Works Tools, Equipment, etc  20,388.28
Street Cleaning Tools and Equipment   23,262.72
ICity Stables Equipment, Horses, etc  43,361.42
9,633,127.15
1,451,291.41
2,214,26458 60
Vancouver Board of  Trade
SCHEDULE  "C"—Continued
Buildings  and  Lands: Buildings
Rock Crusher, Rollers, Steam Shovel, etc $ 19,700.00
Scavenging Tools and  Equipment     7,431.64
City  Garage   Equipment  and  Autos     8,324.00
City Analyst Equipment  1,250.00
Pound-Keeper's  Horse  arid   Rig     340.00
Furniture and Book Stacks in Free Library .. 2,800.00
Books,   Free   Library     40,000.00
Furniture, etc., in Old People's Home   2,250.00
Furniture,   etc.,   in   Creche     2,700.00
Furniture, etc., in Isolation Hospital    1,300.00
Ambulance Rig, Horses and Supplies  1,394.15
Electrician's   Department,   Instruments,   etc... I 1,455.50
Industrial Commissioner's Office Furniture  .. 300.00
Furniture, etc., in Juvenile Court   2,100.00
Park T"bols, Roller, Crusher, Seats, etc  9,866.32
Park  Office   Furniture     592.00
Health  Office  Furniture     700.00
City Market Furniture and Fittings  125.00
Lands
201,141.03'
$34,698,500.13 Annual Report,   1915-1916
61
STATEMENT OF DEBENTURES AND STOCK
31st December, 1915
Showing Amounts Maturing Each Year
Year
General
City's Proportion of Local
Improvements
Total
Property Owners' Proportion
of Local
Improvements
Grand
Total
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
193
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1955
59,500.00
385,000.00
264,000.00
90,000.00
230,000.00
165,000.00
145,000.00
155,000.00
589,759.20
569,592.00
70,000.00
12,000.00
250,000.00
80,000.00
80,000.00
155,500.00
244,000.00
350,000.00
572,500.00
990,000.00
585,000.00
133,000.00
397,000.00
207,900.00
818,000.00
417,600.00
727,800.00
29,432.75
58,000.79
8,333.40
5,317.10
177,095.45
868,958.07
625,097.78
151,861.96
372,018.77
299,999.62
396,839.66
62,874.19
16,635.06
2,372.12
23,909.69
171,523.06
41,155.87
5,264.56
21,870.20
22,100.00
14,288.35
4,893.56
3,328.25
9,333.00
62,782.08
10,500.35
$25,743,151.20 $ 3,465,785.69
88,932.75
58,000.79
8,333.40
5,317.10
177,095.45
1,253,958.07
889,097.78
151,861.96
462,018.77
529,999.62
561,839.66
207,874.19
171,635.06
592,131.32
593,501.69
171,523.06
41,155.87
5,264.56
21,870.20
70,000.00
34,100.00
264,288.35
84,893.56
80,000.00
158,828.25
253,333.00
350,000.00
635,282.08
990,000.00
595,500.35
2,133,000.00
1,397,000.00
2,207,900.00
2,818,000.001
6,417,600.00|
4,727,800.001
79.
90
164
14
277
1,279
949
200
415
315
514
96
94
18
158
852
189
10
30
,011.25
707.86
576.25
,921.76
,002.08
,915.18
,556.00
,238.35
,230.53
745.37
429.98[
,109.82
,572.21
021.89
,591.22
898.05
,674.07
,883.62
,529.11
,940.60!
44,200.00
23,576.65
8,578.33
6.171.75
18,667.00
133,958.45
21,000.70
165,931.48
116
137
98
164.
19,
455.
2,533,
1,838.
352,
877.
845,
1,075.
304,
265
610
752
1,024
231
15
52
70
78
287
93
80
165
272
350
769
990
616
2,133
1,397
2,207
2,818
6,417
4,727.
165
944.00
708.65
,909.65
921.76
319.18
010.63
514.07
336.13
092.49
764.14
429.60
949.48
446.40
656.95
,722.54
,399.74
,197.13
,039.49
,793.67
810.80
000.00
300.00
865.00
,471.89
,000.00
000.00
,000.00
,000.00
,240.53
000.00
501.05
,000.00
,000.00
900.00
,000.00
600.00
800.00
931.48
$29,208,936.89 $ 6,203,639.56|$ 35,412,576.45 1
62 Vancouver Board- of  Trade
CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF VANCOUVER
General Balance Sheet as at December 31st, 1915.
Capital Assets
Sundry Properties, as per Schedule "C," (page 11)     $34,698,500.13
Gen'l Hospital, Advances to 31st Dec, 1914..$ 831,804.26
General Hospital, Advances during 1915        80,579.91
Advances upon Capital Account for Local Improvements, etc., in anticipation of Debenture Issues as per contra Schedule "P,"
(page   43)    $   518,552.02
Advances to Revenue covered by Revenue
Assets  outstanding     1,487,635.79
912,384.17
2,006,187.81
Local Improvement Taxes Assessable, being that portion
of Sinking Fund to be contributed during term of
By-laws by property owners benefitted towards repayment of Local Improvement Debentures      ( 3,784,637.09
Sinking Fund Assets, as per Schedule "B," (page 10)        4,027,429.25
Current Assets
Treasurer's Cash Balance        $
Bank of B. N. A., Special Account, "Contractors'   Deposits"          $ 9,546.78
Treasurer's Cash, Special Account, "Contractors'  Deposits"     10.00
$45,429,138.45
294,147.33
Revenue Receivable:
General Taxes, Arrears to 1912 . .$122,487.10
General Taxes, Arrears for 1913.. 253,287.49
General Taxes, Arrears for 1914.. 819,824.70
Gen'l Taxes, Arrears for 1915.. .1,408,568.70
9,556.78
Local Improvement Taxes:
Pavm't Taxes, Arrears to 1914..$   127,665.52
Pavm'tTaxes, Arr'rs  for  1915..     288,868.91
Sewer Taxes, Arrears to 1914..$      1,701.28
Sewer Taxes, Arrears for 1915.. 2,516.22
Cement Walks Taxes, Arrears
to   1914  $     31,298.51
Cement Walks Taxes, Arrears
for   1915           51,585.25
Street Sprinkling Taxes,
Arrears to 1914   	
$2,604,167.99
416,534.43
4,217.50
82,883.76
.$       2,253.02
Carried  Forward        $45,732,842.56 Annual Report,   1915-1916
63
Brought  Forward        $45,732,842.56
Street Sprinkling Taxes,
Arrears for  1915    1        3,746.88
 $       5,999.90
Ornamental Lighting Taxes,
Arrears to 1914    $      7,657.64
Ornamental Lighting Taxes,
Arrears for 1915         15,962.51
Water Rates Arrears   	
Scavenging Fees Arrears   	
Incinerator  Fees Arrears   	
B. C- E. R. Company's Percentages	
B. C.  E. R. Company's  Bridge Rentals.
Cemetery  Fees  Arrears   	
23,620.15
53,088.07
1,511.65
98.45
7,555.10
2,000.00
244.50
Advances: Emergency Funds:
School Trustees   	
Park  Board   	
City Market  	
Relief  Department   	
3,000.00
50.00
1,000.00
350-00
Reserve Fund for Redemption of Treasury Notes.
Sundry   Debtors   	
Stores on Hand, as per Inventory 	
Insurance Unexpired   	
3,137,423.73
64,497.77
4,400.00
300,816.03
239,319.52
130,408.53
9,812.35
$49,619,520.49 Vancouver Board of  Trade
STATEMENT OF DEBENTURES AND STOCK
31st December, 1915
Capital Liabilities
Debentures and Stock as per Schedule "A," (page 8):
General  Debentures    $ 9,571,851.20
General Registered Stock     16,171,300.00
$25,743,151.20
Local  Imp'm't  Debentures   (City's   Propo'n)    3,465,785.69
$29,208,936.89
Local    Improvement    Debentures    (Property
Owners'  Proportion)        6,203,639.56
Advances for Expenditure on Local Improvements, etc.,
repayable upon issue and sale of Debentures (Schedule "P," page 43)   	
Capital Surplus (including increase of valuation of Real
Assets as per report of Assessment Commissioner,
31st  December,- 1915)   	
Current Liabilities
Sundry Creditors:
Warrants approved for payment  	
Amounts withheld on contracts, etc	
199,129.80
106,105.81
Bank of British North America   	
Water  Consumers'  Deposits    5
Cemetery Fund Reserve (See page 61)	
Cemetery Fund Interest  	
Debenture Interest Coupons Unpaid  	
Tax   Sale   Fund   	
Land   Redemptions   	
Tax  Suspense Account    i	
Water Rates Suspense Account 	
Reserve against Scaveng'g Fees ar'rs (contra)
Market  Reserve   	
Salary War Assessment Fund (see page 62)..
Suspense  Account   	
License Fees  (1916)  collected in advance....
80.00
22,047.97
855.85
12,942.75
6,102.92
1.35
2,678.02
574.15
300.00
750.00
1,650.02
197.02
10,078.00
School Trustees, Balance of Appropriations forward.
Park Board  Capital Account   	
Advances from Capital, as per contra 	
Contractors'  Deposits   	
$35,412,576.45.
518,552.02
9,498,009.98
$45,429,138.45
305,
,194,
235.61
982.21
58
29
,487
9
258.05
854.02
500.00
635.79
556.78
Carried  Forward        $48,515,160.91 Annual Report,  1915-1916
Brought   Forward         $48,515,160.91
Treasury Notes (see Reserve Fund contra)  832,000.00
Revenue Surplus:
Water,   after   Adjustments   as   at   31/12/14,
Surplus    $627,453.23
General,  after  Adjustments  as  at  31/12/14,
Deficit          298,994.25
General   Revenue,   1915   (Deficit). .$137,016.59
Water Works Revenue, 1915
(Surplus)           80,917.19
Net Deficit for 1915  Annual Report,   1915-1916
SCHOOLS
ENROLMENT AND AVERAGE ATTENDANCE FOR  1915
Enrolment
January  13,127
February     13,878
March     13,745
April     13,436
May    13,026
June  12,584
August     12,789
September     13,264
October     13,183
November     13,047
December     12,549
Av. Attendance
12,218.66
12,843.06
12,603.34
12,460.66
11,975.87
11,741.3
12,096.2
12,162.49
11,913.75
11,781.11
11,539.67
Enrolment for the month of October for Each Year since 1897:
Year Enrolment
1898 2724
1899 3117
1900 3393
1901 3710
1902 4087
1903 4416
1904 ...4994
1905 5609
1906 6437
Number of Teachers on the Vancouver Staff in December
for Each Year since 1902:
Males Females Total
December, 1903      29 63 92
December, 1904      30 71 101
December, 1905       29 83 112
December, 1906    38 92 130
December,  1907      47 103 150
December,   1908      58 115 173
December,  1909      65 128 193
December, 1910      71 155 226
December, 1911      72 181 263 .
December,  1912      93 220 313
December, 1913      91 246 337
December, 1914  102 260 362
December,  1915      88 266 354
Year Enrolment
1907   7370
1908    7984
1909    8845
1910    9942
1911 11385
1912 12393
1913 12990
1914 13313
1915 13183 68
Vancouver Board of  Trade
Special Instructors Employed by the Board, 1915.
Instructors of Manual Training    16
Supervisor of Manual Training    1
Instructors of Domestic Science    12
Supervisor of Domestic Science    1
Supervisors  of  Music     2
Supervisor of Primary Work    1
Supervisor of Drawing    1
Supervisor   of   Drill     1,
Musketry   Instructor     1
Director of Prevocational and Night Classes  1
Teachers in Night Classes   39
Special Officers employed by the Board:
Municipal Inspector of Schools   1
Medical  Health   Officers     2
Nurses    4
Attendance   Officers     3
Number of Teachers holding the different grades of certificates:
University Graduate in Arts or Science  108
Academic  Certificate     9
First-Class   Certificate     123
Second-Class   Certificate     104
Third-Class  Certificate     5
Commercial Specialist    1
Drawing Specialist   -...;;,  1
Oral     1
Temporary   2  70
Vancouver Board of  Trade
PARKS
SUMMARY EXPENDITURE IN PARK SYSTEM
1887 to December 31st, 1915
Land   Purchases    	
Improvements:
By-law       $ 401,438.06
Transfer from Park Purchase
Account,   1915            11,774.21
General   Account         127,057.99
Dominion Government Grant,  Brockton  Point  Improv't  Scheme,  1915.. ft 12,000.00
Special Fund  (Relief 1915)            48,388.53
Maintenance  and   Operation—General  Account....
Balances in hand December 31st, 1915:
Park   Improvements—By-laws $      1,661.94
Park Purchases—By-laws         388,010.27
894,045.79
600,658.79
469,552.35
$ 1,964,256.93
389,672.21
Grand Total  $2,353,929.14
SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS FROM PARK UTILITIES SINCE
DIRECT OPERATION BY PARK BOARD—1913:
Prior  to   1915         $
Receipts, 1915:
Bath  Houses    $13,389.05
Refreshment   Pavilion        7,498.25
Brockton  Point  Grounds        357.20
Grand Total
46,491.82
21,244.50
$       67,736.32
SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURE, 1915:
Total   Expenditure    $152,033.73
Less Grant from Dominion Government towards Brockton Point Improvements   Scheme       12,000.00
Classified as follows:
$     140,033.73
Civic Funds
General  Revenue Account   .
Operation of Parks Utilities
(Offset by Earnings)   .. ..
.$ 52,255.11
18,430.53 Annual Report,  1915-1916
Capital Account:
By-law No.  882    $    2,295.01
By-law No. 994           6,890.34
Anticipated By-law consolidating unexpended balances under By-laws
Nos.  795,  883  and  995      11,774.21
$20,959.56
Special Funds
General Improvements
by Relief Work paid
" for out of War Assessment on Civic Salaries:
1914    $  2,265:8^
1915       26,834.72
 •    $29,100.53
General Improvements by Relief
work  paid   for   by   Relief   Department  of  City            19,288.00
Grand Total   	
Summary
Improvements: Capital Account   (By-laws)     $20,959.56
Improvements: Dominion
Gov. Grant, Brockton
Point Improvement
Scheme       12,000.00
 '     $     32,959.56
Improvements: Civic Funds..  $12,060.95
Improvements: Special Funds.  48,388.53
  60,449.48
Maintenance and Operation, Civic  Funds	
Grand Total 	   Vancouver Board of  Trade
CHURCHES IN CITY OF VANCOUVER AND DISTRICT
CHURCH OF ENGLAND
Archdeacon of Columbia, Diocesan Executive Officer—
Ven.. Edwyn S. W.  Pentreath,  D.D.
All Saitits'—Rev. H. C. Lewis Hooper Victoria Drive and Pandora
St. Saviour's—Rev. Harold St. Geo. Buttrum 1st Ave. and Semlin
Christ—Rev. C. C. Owen   Georgia and Burrard
St. James'—Rev. H. Edwards  Gore and Cordova
Holy Trinity—Rev. H. Beacham  Pine and Gore Ave.
St. Mark's—Rev. A. H. Sovereign  2nd Ave. and Larch
St. Paul's—Rev. H. R.  Grant. - 14th Ave and  Burns
Si Paul's—Rev. H. G. King.  „ _.Jarvis and Pendrell
St. Luke's—Rev. O. J. Nurse   River Road
St. Peter's—Rev. G. F.  CafHn„._ Westminster Ave. and 29th Ave.
St. Margaret's—Rev. Wm. Bell g Agnes Road, Cedar Cottage
St. Michael's—Rev. G. H. Wilson Broadway W. and Prince Edward
St. John the Divine—Rev. Wm. Thomas Johnson Central Park
St. George's—Rev. Marcus H. Jackson Cor. 14th W. and Laurel
St. Mary's   Rev. W. H. G. Battersill
St.   Augustine's—Rev.    D'Arcy  1  Eburne
UNDENOMINATIONAL
Salvation Army—Brigadier W. H. Green  Hastings and Gore
Scientist, First Church of Christ -. 1166 Georgia
Scientist, Second Church  of Christ 421 Granville
First Unitarian—Rev. G. C Sharp I.O.O.F. Hall, Pender & Ham'n
First  Christian (Disciples)—Rev. M. A. Moss Woodland  and  13th
London Mission to Seamen.. Next to St. James', Gore Ave.
Central Mission _ _ Abbott St., near Waterfront
Central Christian—Rev. S. B. Calvert, A.R  Fir and 11th W.
METHODIST  CHURCHES
Wesley-
..Burrard and Georgia.
Central—Rev.  F. W.  Langford 4e—- Pender and Dunlevy
Grace—Rev. A.  N.  Miller Burns and 16th Ave.  East
Dundas Street—Rev.  R.  Mcllroy Thompson  ..Dundas St.
Grandview—Rev. F. G. Lett    !	
Japanese Methodist—Rev. K. Kanazawa ;3f^~- 502 Powell St.
Kitsilano  _ „„ 3rd Ave. and Larch St.
Mountain View—Rev. J. W. Davidson . j	
Collingwood—Rev. W. E. Jones  SL '.	
Mount Pleasant—Rev. W. J. Sipprell -. Ontario and 10th
Robson Memorial—Rev. E. Manuel _______.Cedar Cottage
Scandinavian   Methodist—Rev.   Mr.   Nanthrop . .—
Sixth Avenue j_i_L_ 6th Ave. and Fir
Trinity—Rev. O. M. Sanford—7th Ave., bet. Commercial and Victoria
Chinese  Mission—Rev.  Fong Dickman 529  Beatty
South Kitsilano—Rev. W. Gordon Tanner ,	
Ferris  Road—Rev.   John   Pye .	
Wilson Heights—Rev. Wm. Bolton...._._™l~  1340—43rd Ave.  E.
River Avenue—Rev. Wm. Pearson .,   East of Fraser Annual Report,  1915-1916
75
BAPTIST  CHURCHES
First—Rev. Dr. Campbell Nelson and Burrard
Jackson Avenue Mission Jackson and Pender
Mount Pleasant—Rev. A. F. Baker 10th Avenue and Quebec
Fifth Avenue—Rev. H. F. Waring 5th Ave. and Arbutus
Grandview—Rev. N. A. Harkness 1st Ave. and Salisbury Drive
Central—Rev. Geo. R. Welch :_10tn and Laurel
Collingwood—Rev. David Long East Collingwood
Cedar Cottage—Rev. J. W. Leitch 22nd Ave. and Prince Albert
Broadway West—Rev. F. G. West Cor. Broadway & Waterloo St.
South Hill—Rev. W. H. Redmond : 52nd Ave. and Frederick
Eburne—Rev.   M.   Vansickle Eburne
North Vancouver—Rev. A. J. Prosser North Vancouver
Ruth Morton Memorial^Rev. J. W. Litch 27th Ave. E.
CONGREGATIONAL
First—Rev. J. K. Unsworth Thurlow and Pendrell
Knox—Rev. A. K. McLennan Cordova, bet. Columbia and Main
Kitsilano—Rev. A. E. Cooke Cor. 11th Ave W-'and Columbia.
Grandview—Rev. W. E. Schlichter  _ Woodland Drive
PRESBYTERIAN
St. Andrew's—Rev. R. J. Wilson  Richards and Georgia
First—Rev. W. H. Fraser   Hastings and Gore
St. John's—Rev. E. Leslie Pidgeon Comox and Broughton
Chalmers'—Rev.  E. A. Henry. --Jl~ Fairview
Mount Pleasant . Broadway and Quebec
Kitsilano—Rev. A. D. MacKinnon   Vine St., Cor. 3rd Ave.
Cedar Cottage—Rev. J. C. Madill Victoria Road, near Lakeview
Robertson—Rev. David James Salisbury Drive and Napier
Dundas—Rev. A. Macaulay Dundas and  Garden Drive
Westminster—Rev. J. R. Craig .. ii Main and 24th Ave.
Central Park—Rev. T. R. Peacock ~M. Central Park
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCHES.
Holy Rosary—Rev. W. P. O'Boyle, O.M.I Dunsmuir and Richards
St. Patrick's—Rev. Maurice Power ;—Quebec and 12th Ave.
Sacred Heart—Rev. J. F. McNeil ;  Campbell and Keefer
St. Augusine's—Rev. A. Tavernier, O.M.I  7th and Arbutus
St. Joseph's—Rev. M. W. McKinnon  Cedar Cottage
St. Andrew's—Rev. Father Malone 49th Ave., near Fraser St-
St. Paul's Chapel—Rev. F. Deatcher ; St. Paul's Hospital
Our Lady of gbrrows—Rev. A. N. Mayer 2676 Pender E.
LUTHERIAN  CHURCHES
Church of the Redeemer—Rev. B. A. Sand—Pr. Edward cor. 8th E.
Evangelical Christ Church—Rev. O. T. Just..... 369—10th Ave. W.
Swedish Evangelical—Rev. C. R. Swanson 435 Princess Ave. Vancouver Board of  Trade
CONSULAR AGENCIES IN "THE CITY.
AMERICAN CONSUL GENERAL
Hon. R. E. Mansfield, 744 Hastings Street West
vice consul general   .
G. Carlton Woodward, 744 Hastings Street West
BELGIUM   CONSUL
J. M. Whitehead, 779 Thurlow Street
BRAZIL  CONSUL
S. J. Emanuels, 411 Pender Street West
CHILIAN  CONSUL GENERAL FOR CANADA
Hon. M. P. Morris, 850 Hastings Street West
CHINESE  CONSUL
Li Shu Yuen, Fairfield Building.
DANISH   VICE   CONSUL
W. A. Ward, 207 Hastings Street West.
ECUADOR CONSUL GENERAL
Hon. J. MacQuillan,, 1028 Barclay Street
FRANCE—ACTING  CONSULAR  AGENT
E. Chevelier, 470 Granville Street.
HONDURUS CONSUL
R. R. Maitland, 470 Granville Street
ITALIAN   CONSULAR  AGENT
Nicola Massi, 222 Harris Street
JAPANESE CONSUL
Karachi Abe, 525 Seymour Street
MEXICAN VICE CONSUL
Hon. M. P. Morris, 850 Hastings Street West
NETHERLANDS  CONSUL
M. A. Van Roggen, 318 Cambie Street
NORWEGIAN  CONSUL
C. B. Stalschmidt, 739 Hastings Street West
PERUVIAN CONSUL
Harold G. White, 319 Howe Street
IMPERIAL  RUSSIAN  CONSUL
Constantine Ragosine, 719 Jervis Street
SWEDISH  VICE  CONSUL
C. B. Stalschmidt, 739 Hastings Street West
SWITZERLAND   CONSUL
for the Province of British Columbia and Alberta
S. Gintzburger, 122 Hastings Street West  Vancouver Board of  Trade
BUSINESS  FAILURES   IN   CANADA  AND   NEW  FOUND-
LAND BY PROVINCES—AS REPORTED BY BRAD-
STREETS, 1915.
No. Assets Liabilities
Ontario          702 $ 3,090,896 $ 5,803,574
Quebec        784 5,310,137 12,426,112
New Brunswick         54 151,624 276,357
Nova Scotia        70 513,936 881,891
Prince Edward Island           3 44,982 52,381
Manitoba    :      284 1,126,948 3,333,573
Alberta        216 976,886 1,903,616
Saskatchewan        265 1,024,646 2,784,987
British Columbia        243 2,334,495 4,526,614
Yukon Territory                 	
New Foundland            5 127,500 246,189
Total 2626 $13,527,566 $32,235,294 Annual Report,   1915-1916
79
PRELIMINARY REVIEW AND ESTIMATE
OF
MINERAL PRODUCTION FOR THE YEAR 1915
This bulletin has been prepared before the receipt of the
official reports for the year 1915 of the Gold Commissioners
and Mining Recorders of the Province, and the customary
returns of mineral production annually made by managers of
mines and reduction-works; consequently, it must necessarily
be regarded as being simply a preliminary review of the progress of the past year, together with an estimate of the quantities and value of the several mineral products of the Province,
which it is believed will prove to be approximately correct.
The accompanying table shows an estimated mineral production during 1915 of a total value of $29,299,584. It will be
seen that the total value of the production of 1915 as estimated
is some $2,910,739 greater than that of 1914, which, considering the times, must be regarded as a very encouraging showing.
The year 1915 opened under very inauspicious conditions
as far as mining was concerned; the war had only gotten fairly
started, and at that time the final issue was in doubt, while the
duration of the conflict was then quite unknown.
Under these circumstances it is not to be wondered at
that the metal market was so uncertain that producers felt
timid as to the future, particularly as the opening months of
the year saw the prices of all the metals, except zinc, much
below normal.
Apparently no one foresaw or appreciated the trend of
modern warfare, with its unprecedented use of artillery, nor
realized the tremendous amounts of metal that would be consumed thereby.
How great this consumption of the metals has been can
scarcely be appreciated when expressed in figures, but some
conception of the enormous expenditure of metals can be
obtained from a calculation published by the Mining and
Scientific Press, and based upon French official statements,
that 4,500,000 shells were used by the section of the French
Army in Champagne during a four days' bombardment along
a twenty-mile front.
The editor, T. A. Rickard, calculates that these shells contained about 18,000,000 lbs. of copper, 30,000,000 lbs. of lead,
m
■\A <■>■ 80
Vancouver Board of  Trade
.and 8,000,000 lbs. of zinc. To apply these quantities to the
total output of British Columbia made during the year 1914, it
will be seen that the year's output of copper would have lasted
that small section of the French Army about ten days, the
lead-output for seven days, and the zinc-output for slightly less
than the four days.
The close of the year 1914 found many of the mines closed
down and most of the large producers restricting their output
under a common agreement to so do.
Then came the enormous demand for shells of all sorts,
from all the Allies, necessitating the use of an amount of copper, lead, zinc, and other metals which soon depleted the stocks,
so that by May and June the prices of the metals began to soar,
and all the mines that were in a position promptly to supply
the demand were pushed to make as great an output as possible.
These higher prices for metals continuing throughout the
remainder of the year, stimulated the mineral production very
greatly and rendered the margin of profit on production much
higher.
It seems to have been generally considered that these
higher prices were only war prices, and that, at the close of
hostilities, the value of metals would drop at least to normal,
if not below. Consequently, as the duration of the war was not
expected to be very long, those mines not prepared to make a.
production in the near future could not expect to profit by
higher prices, and, as capital was in demand for other purposes,
the amount available for development was very slight.
The result has been that actual producers increased their
outputs, but few new ones began a production, so that the
amount of new development done throughout the year has been
less than normal.
In British Columbia the recruiting sergeant has found such
ready response from the prospectors and miners that prospecting is practically at a standstill and is left to those too old to
be accepted for military service or otherwise disqualified.
Of all the metals produced in British Columbia, silver
was the only one the price of which was not raised by the war,
for the reason that it is not used in war materials, despite the
old saying that "wars are won with silver bullets." On the
contrary, the price of silver fell off very considerably;-in 1913
the price of silver in New York varied between 63 and 57.8
cents, averaging for the year 59.8 cents; in 1914 the average   Annual Report,   1915-1916
81
price for the year was 54.8 cents, while for 1915 the average
price for the year was only 49.7 cents.
This low price of silver acted as a deterrent to production
in many of the silver-lead mines of the Slocan, Ainsworth, and
Nelson Divisions, the ores of which contain, on the average,
about twice the value in silver that they do in lead.
To show the effect of this drop in silver values in these
Divisions, using the lead produced as an indicator, as the proportions of lead and silver are fairly constant in our galena
ores, Ainsworth produced in 1915 only about one-third as
much lead as in 1914, Slocan produced about 90 per cent, (but
here the ores of the larger properties carry so much zinc that
there was a profit in that metal), while in the Nelson Division
the lead output in 1915 was only about half that of the previous
year.
The output of silver in 1915 is estimated as being $255,703
less than in the preceding year.
The various metals and their production are reviewed in
detail later in this report, but it might be noted here that the
following table shows the gross value of the metallic minerals
recovered as being $20,895,696, which represents an increase
over last year of over $5,000,000, a percentage increase of'
about 33 per cent., which is certainly a matter of congratulation.
It might further be pointed out that the metalliferous output for 1915 would appear to be the greatest in the history of
mining in the Province, being more than 10 per cent, greater
than in the former record year of 1912.
With the exception of silver, which has already been commented upon, all the other metals show a material increase.
Coal, however, shows a very heavy falling-off—about $925,000;
while building materials, etc., appear to indicate a decrease of
$1,352,917, or nearly 50 per cent, of the previous year's output.
These two latter items are not an index of mining, properly
speaking, but are influenced by the general industrial and financial state of the Province, as they are to all intents and purposes for home consumption and not for export.
The features of the year are the very great increases in
the copper and zinc productions, and, as the prices of both
these metals seem to show no indication of serious decrease,
while the present developments of the properties give reason
to expect further large increases in 1916, there is every cause 82
Vancouver Board  of   Trade
Wit
to believe that the coming year will be a record one as far as
the metalliferous mines are concerned.
It is to be noted that this past year the value of the copper-
output is practically 50 per cent, of that of the gross metalliferous production of the Province.
It is a matter of congratulation also that zinc is now being
refined ih the Province—as described later—and there is every
prospect that within a short time copper will also be refined
"fi^Se, thus enabling us to ship these products in a marketable
form.
MINERAL PRODUCTION FOR TWO YEARS, 1914-1915
The following table shows the quantities and value of the
several minerals produced in the year 1914, and the estimated
production in 1915. It may here be explained that the prices
used in calculating the estimated value for 1915 of silver, lead,
copper, and zinc are the average prices for the year, as published in The Engineering and Mining Journal, New York,
less a deduction of 5 per cent, off silver, 10 per cent, off lead,
and 15 per cent, off zinc.
Gold,   placer
Gold   lod   Oz.
Total   gold
I
|
Production, 1914
Quantity    Value
Estimated Production, 1915
Quantity      Value       Increase Decrease
II                 I I!                 I
$     565,00011 |$ 745,000||?   180,000].
II                  I II                   I
247,170'     5,109,0041      244,3781    5,051,293|| $     57,711
li
|$ 5,674,004|| |$ 5,796,293||$   122,289
II I II
Silver    ...    oz.l[3,602,180|    1,876,73611 3,434,393 1,621,0331!	
Lead        lb.|50,625,048     1,771,877  45,990,372 1,917,799 1     145,922
ill  i I li
Copper   .,    lb.145,009,699
Zinc
lb.
,866,467
II
255,703
T'l vlu M'tal's
Coal,
tons,   2,2401b
Coke,
tons,   2,2401b.
Building
Materials,   etc.
1,810,967
234,577
6,121,319 57,905,4881 10,006,06811 3,884,749
II       I,        II
346,125 13,817,808 . 1,554,503 1,208,378
II \ I
 : II I II	
II I II
$15,790,06111 |$20,895,696||$5,105,635
II
6,338,385||1,546,664    S,413,324|| $   925,061
II                  I                    II
1,407,462||     248,424     1,490,544 |       83,082	
II                  I                    II I
2,852,917|| I    1,500,000||    1,352,917
II I
Total Value     ||               I
of Production11 |$26,388,825|| |$29,299,564||$2,910,739 .
II I u i Annual Report,   1915-1916
83
PRODUCTION OF VARIOUS MINERALS BRIEFLY REVIEWED
In order to indicate in a general way the sources of the
various minerals mined in the Province, and to give an idea
of some of the conditions that affected their production, and,
incidentally, brief information concerning the larger known
mineral deposits occurring in British Columbia, the next following comments are submitted.
GOLD
Placer Gold.—The estimated recovery of placer gold for
1915 is' $745,000, of which practically all is obtained in the
Cariboo and Cassiar Districts, only about one-tenth of the total
coming from the other districts. An approximate apportionment as follows: From Cariboo District, $312,000; Atlin,
Division of Cassiar District, $355,000; Stikine and Liard,
$30,000; remaining parts of the Province, $48,000. It may
be that a larger yield will be shown, but this cannot be definitely
stated until after the final returns of the season's operations
shall have been received.
The output of placer gold is larger this year than it has
been since 1907, and will probably be about $180,000 greater
than that of last year. This comes as an agreeable surprise, for
the snowfall of the winter of 1914-15 was unusually light, and,
as this is the principal source of the water supply, it was anticipated that the quantity of water available for hydraulicking
would fall short of the usual quota.
In hydraulic mining it has been pretty well demonstrated
that the gold output is in direct proportion to the number of
days in which water was available for piping, hence there
seemed- little hope for even a normal production of placer
gold during the season of 1915.
The Weather Bureau, however, as though in compunction
for the niggardly amount of snow provided, so arranged the
spring weather that the snow melted very gradually—not much
faster than the water could be used—while the absence of
spring freshets prevented the great waste of water usual at
such times. Subsequent summer rains in the Cariboo District
also very much assisted in keeping up the water supply.
The shortage of work general throughout the Province
during the early summer caused a greatly increased number
of men, both whites and Chinese, to undertake small placer
operations; this was particularly noticeable in the districts
adjacent to Quesnel and Quesnel Forks.
ST*'" 84
Vancouver Board of  Trade
. During the summer months the unusually low water exposed bars on the Fraser and Thompson Rivers which are seldom excessible, and these were worked in numerous places by
Indians and Chinese, with good results.
In the Barkerville section of the Cariboo District the larger
hydraulic companies made a greater output than usual, while
an increased number of individuals appear to have been working in a small way; this is also true of the Quesnel and Quesnel
Forks sections, which report much larger amounts of gold
recovered than has been the rule for some years past.
This is accounted for by the general shortage of other
work throughout the northern part of the Province, which
caused many men to once more take up placer mining, even if
it only produced wages.
No authentic news has as yet been received from the
Omineca District, where considerable work has been going on,
most of which, however, is of a preparatory nature, and it is
not expected that any great output has been made this year,
probably not more than about $12,000 all told.
.In the Atlin District the shortage of water was very noticeable, some of the companies being so short as to be only
able to work effectively for half the season. On the other hand,
some of the companies were evidently working in richer
ground; it is not known whether this was by good luck or by
intentionally attacking only the richer parts, in an attempt to
compensate for the water shortage.
Very little summer rain fell and its absence was much felt
during the latter part of the seasOn. Notwithstanding these
drawbacks, it would appear that a somewhat increased production was made in this district.
In the Liard-Stikine District the Boulder Creek Hydraulic
Mining Company had a successful season, taking out about
$20,000 from its ground on Thibert Creek. Ball and Finn and
Mitchell Brothers, working in the same vicinity, made small
outputs. .
Four different partnerships were at work on Dease creek,
with success enough to at least pay wages.
This year some gold was taken out of the Tahltan River
by Indians and others working in the river-bed.
It is to be noted this year that two or three parties were.
working down the Liard River, at McDame Creek, and on
Rosella Creek, a section that has been practically abandoned
-of late years. Annual Report,   1915-1916
85
The Similkameen and Tulameen Rivers produced more
gold this year than for some years back and give promise of
again being a factor in the placer gold industry.
Vernon District also yielded some gold from hydraulic
operations in Siwash Creek.
Yale Mining Division made an unusually good output,
owing to the very low water in the rivers exposing the bars.
The Fort Steele Mining Division made a better output than
for some years past.
Lode Gold.—The quantity of lode gold produced seems to
have been less than in any of the last three years. The output is
estimated at $5,051,293, as compared with $5,109,004 in 1914,
a decrease of $57,711. The chief reason for this decrease is
a very heavy decline in the output of the Nelson Division and
a lessening of the outputs in the Boundary and Coast Districts.
To offset this there were increases in Omineca, Skeena, and
Trail Creek Divisions.
The amount of the total decrease is so small that, when
the full returns are received, the balance may be changed to
the other side, and so, speaking approximately, it may be said
that lode-gold productions in 1914 and 1915 were the same.
The gold production of the various districts is estimated
to have been approximately as follows:—
'■ Oz.
Rossland   141,979
Boundary        82,199
Nelson       9,338
Skeena       5,080
Coast        2,869.
Omineca        1,539
All others       1,374
The production in the Rossland District shows an increase
of 3,411 oz. as compared with 1914, which is accounted for
by an increase in the tonnage shipped.
The Boundary District shows a decrease of 2,709 oz., as
compared with 1914. The Granby Company's mines made an
increase of about 8,000 oz., but the British Columbia Copper
Company, the Jewel, and the Union show decreases respectively
of about 5,000, 4,300, and 800 oz.
The Nickel Plate production is expected to have been
about the same as the previous year—viz., 38,000 oz.    The 86
Vancouver Board of  Trade
other properties in this district only contribute small amounts,
and of these the Carmi and Dividend-Lakeview produced less
than last year.
A reduction of about 7,000 oz. is estimated for the-Nelson
District, or nearly 46 per cent. This decrease is mainly due
to a falling-off in the production of the Mother Lode mine on
Sheep Creek, where the cyanide-mill was only operated a short
time owing to the exhaustion of the developed ore reserves at
the mine. The mine is at present closed and the future plans
of the company are not known.
The Queen mine, on Sheep Creek, made about the same
output as the previous year, and it is said that development
work on the lower levels is proving satisfactory in showing
the continuation of the ore-shoots.
The Second Relief, near Erie, milled more ore than in
1914, and the Granite-Poorman, near Nelson, again entered
the list of producers, being operated by leasers.
The Yankee Girl mine, at Ymir, did not ship any ore, but
a low-level tunnel was driven into the vein and drifting was
commenced on it. This work is now progressing and good
ore is being found. It is probable that a mill will be erected
on the property in the near future.   .
The production of gold from the Skeena District is practically all from the Hidden Creek mine, at Anyox. The increased tonnage mined at this property accounts for the increased gold production in this Division of 72 per cent.
The Coast production shows a slight decrease due to the
smaller output from the Marble Bay mine.
The Omineca production comes almost entirely from the
Rocher Deboule mine, near Hazelton, which is a new property
that only commenced shipping this year. The ore is a high-
grade copper ore, carrying low gold and silver values.
About 21 per cent, of the gold production of the Province
comes from the milling of auriferous quartz ores and 79 per
cent, from the smelting of copper ores carrying gold and silver.
SILVER
The quantity of silver produced seems to have been about
3,434,393 oz., worth $1,621,033, a decline from the production
of 1914 of 167,787 oz., and $255,703.
Unlike the other metals, silver declined in price owing to
the effect of the war on the market.    Unfortunately for the Annual Report,   1915-1916
87
producers, ,this metal is not used for munitions or war material
of any kind. The decline in the price of silver is best seen
by comparing the average yearly prices for the last three years,
which were:—
1913 . 59.8 cents an oz.
1914 54.8 cents an oz.
1915 49.7 cents an of?;*;
It is encouraging, however, to see that the market price is
now improving, as, having started at 48.8 cents in January
and dropping to 47.2 cents in August, it increased to 54.97
cents in December.
The chief demand for silver comes from the Far East, and
as there were some disturbances in China, the demand was less
than usual. Silver for use in the arts was less in demand in
Europe than in former years, as a result of the war. On the
other hand, there was a greater demand for silver for coinage
purposes.
The approximate production of the various districts is
estimated to have been as follows:—
Oz.
Slocan and Slocan City  1,799,092
Fort Steele  481,258
Ainsworth 331,408
Boundary  306,714
Skeena  169,382
Trail Creek 159,102
Omineca .\    80,165
Coast      69,240
All others ^     38,032
Total 3,434,393
Of these, Slocan, Fort Steele, Boundary, Skeena, and Trail
Creek all show small increases, while all the others show slightly
decreased productions. The heaviest falling-off is in the Nelson
Division, which only produced about 14,227 oz. in 1915, as
compared with 150,401 oz. in 1914. The silver production of
this district in 1914 was mainly from the Silver King and
Molly Gibson mines of the Consolidated Company, both of
which were closed during the year 1915.
The Slocan District again leads all other districts, by a
large margin, in silver production, having produced this year 88
Vancouver Board  of  Trade
slightly over 52 per cent, of the Provincial output. The
Standard, at Silverton, made the largest individual output, with
nearly 850,000 oz., followed by the Surprise with nearly
300,000 oz., the Silverton Mines with 180,000 oz., the Rambler-
Cariboo with 175,000 oz., and the Mountain Con with 90,000
oz. Many other smaller properties shipped, the total number of
shipping mines in the district being about thirty.
The smaller production from the Ainsworth Division is
due to the closing down of the Highland mine and a lessened
output from the Bluebell, which latter was only operated during
the last half of the year. The largest producer in this section
was the No. 1 mine, owned by the Consolidated Company, followed by the Spokane-Trinket, Cork-Province, and the Bluebell.
In  East  Kootenay  the  only  important producer is the
Sullivan mine   of   the   Consolidated   Company,  from which
474,000 oz. was obtained.    Small amounts come from the St..
Eugene, owned by the same company; the Monarch, at Field;
and the Silver King, in Windermere.
Over 60 per cent, of the Boundary production comes from
. the Granby Company's mines at Phoenix.    Other mines contributing to a small degree were the Union, in Franklin Camp;
the Sally, at Beaverdel; the Mother Lode, in Dead wood Camp;
and the Jewel-Denero, in Long Lake Camp.
The silver production from Trail Creek comes from the
smelting of the gold-copper ores of Rossland camp, which carry
about y2 oz. of silver to the ton.
The Skeena production comes almost entirely from the
Granby Company's Hidden Creek mine, at Anyox.
The Omineca production shows a decline of about 40 per
cent, as compared with the previous year, but a very considerable increase in the number of small shippers is an encouraging sign for the future.
Figures regarding. the Coast production are as yet only
approximate, but it is believed that a considerable decrease will
have been made. The silver from this district is all obtained
from the smelting of copper ores carrying low values in the
precious metals, and is not, therefore, very important.
About 78 per cent, of the total Provincial output of silver
comes from the treatment of silver-lead-zinc ores and 21.5 per
cent, from the smelting of gold-copper ores carrying silver. Annual Report,   1915-1916
89
LEAD
• The total amount of lead produced in 1915 is estimated to
be about 45,990,372 lb., valued at $1,917,779. This represents,
as compared with the previous year, a decrease in the quantity
of the metal produced of 4,634,676 lb., but, owing to the higher
market price prevailing in 1915, the value of this year's product is some $145,922 greater than that of the previous year.
The diminished quantity of output occurs chiefly in the
Ainsworth Division, which produced over 5,000,000 lb. less than
last year, due to the fact that the Highland did not work at all
and the Bluebell only worked during the latter part of the year.
The Nelson Division this year only produced half as much
lead as last year.
East Kootenay, on the other hand, produced 2,000,000 lb.
more in 1915 than in the previous year, its gross lead production being 26,798,377 lb. if of this amount the Sullivan mine is
credited with 26,320,000 lb., which represents over 57 per cent.
Ainsworth Division produced this year only 2,873,306 lb.,
of which the Bluebell is credited, with 1,603,000 lb., and the -
Cork-Province with 715,000 lb., the remainder of the production being contributed by some dozen smaller properties,
of the Provincial output.
The Slocan District produced about 14,791,795 lb. of lead,
which is 442,115 lb. less than last year. The principal contributors to this 1915 production were the Standard with
8,480,945 lb., the Surprise with 2,323,377 lb., the Rambler-
Cariboo with 1,543,351 lb., and the Slocan Star, which is expected to have put out 1,168,000 lb., while the Ruth-Hope,
Silverton Mines, and others added their share.
Nelson Division is expected to have put out about
1,017,488 lb. of lead, of which the Emerald is supposed to have
contributed over 900,000 lb., and the Leadville over 71,000 lb. '
The only other Mining Division making any important
lead output was Omineca, which produced about 320,000 lb.,
of which the Sunrise is responsible for 66,000 lb., and the
Silver Standard for 55,000 lb.
Trout Lake Division produced less than 140,000 lb. of lead.
COPPER
The amount of copper estimated to have been produced
during the year 1915 is the largest in the history of copper-
mining in the Province, amounting as it does to 57-,905,488 lb., 90
Vancouver Board of  Trade
•> V
worth $10,006,068; the highest previous production, made in
1912, was 51,456,537 lb., valued at $8,408,513.
The production as estimated for 1915, compared with that
of the previous year, shows an increase in quantity of 12,895,789
lb'., and in value of $3,884,749.
Owing to the heavy demand for war purposes, principally
for brass to be used in shells, the market price of copper increased steadily during the year. The year opened with copper
at about 12.7 cents a pound in the New York market, and at
the end of December it was 22.25 cents; the average price for
the year was 17.275 cents, as compared with an average price
of 13.6 cents in 1914. This higher market value of the metal
assisted materially in raising the value of the copper produced,
thereby greatly stimulating production.
The large increase in quantity of copper produced this
year is due to a greatly increased production from the Granby
Company's Hidden Creek mine, at Anyox, on Observatory
inlet, and to a return to a nearly normal output from the
Boundary District. A slight decrease is anticipated from the
Britannia mine, due to a shut-down for some time owing to a
snowslide; but this decrease is more than made up by the output from the Rocher Deboule mine, in the Omineca Division.
Nelson Division shows a considerable decrease, which is, however, more than compensated by an increase from the Trail
Creek Mining Division.
The copper production from the several districts is expected to have been approximately as follows :—
LB.
Skeena Division 21,861,340
Boundary District 17,520,334
Southern Coast District   10,736,086
Trail Creek Division      4,616,776
Omineca Division     2,822,000
All "other districts         348,952
The big mine and smelter of the Granby Company at
Anyox were operated continuously throughout the year, and
the tonnage treated was gradually increased, until, at the end
of the year, 2,000 tons a day was being smelted. The ore reserves of this mine are very considerable and are given in the
annual report of the company for the fiscal year ended June
30th, 1915, as amounting to 9,620,612 tons, with an average Annual Report,   1915-1916
91
copper content of 2.19 per cent. The Granby Company this
year produced from its mines in Skeena and Boundary 65.4
per cent, of the Province's copper production.
Another important producer of copper in the northern
portion of the Province is the Rocher Deboule mine, near
Hazelton. After developing for a couple of years this property
commenced shipping in June, and by the end of the year had
shipped 17,000 tons, carrying 2,788,000 lb. of copper, besides
gold and silver values.
. In the Boundary District the Granby Company's mines at
Phoenix and smelter at Grand Forks were operated to nearly
full capacity since the end of January. The recovered copper
content of the ore, however, was less than in any previous
year, and this fact, together with a slightly lessened tonnage,
accounts for a smaller copper output than in the years 1912 and
1913; in 1914 the smelter was closed for about one-third of
the year, and so the output was less than in any of the years
previously mentioned.
The explanation of the lowering of the grading of the
Granby Company's ore is that an electrically driven shovel
was used to clean up the pillars which had been blasted down
in the large "glory-hole," and that thereby a larger proportion
of waste rock was included in the ore, which was justified by
the shovel reducing the operating costs in .this part of the mine.
The British Columbia Copper Company, which operates
the Mother Lode mine at Deadwood, and a smelter at Greenwood, was, in former years, another large producer of copper
in the Boundary District. During the last two years, however,
this company's production has declined very materially. At the
smelter one furnace was operated during the last half of 1915
and a production of about 1,500,000 lb. of copper was made.
The ore bodies at the Mother Lode are, apparently, nearly exhausted, but the company has developed a large tonnage of
low-grade copper ore at Copper Mountain, in the Similkameen
Division, the treatment of which, it is anticipated, will be begun
in the near future.
Exact figures regarding the output of copper ore from
the Britannia mine are not yet available, but it is believed that
.a production of about 10,000,000 lb. of copper will have been
made, which is about 2,000,000 lb. less than in the previous year.
This decrease is mainly due to the disastrous snow and rock
slide which, last spring, cleaned out the upper workings and
ill 92
Vancouver Board of  Trade
killed a number of men, necessitating a close-down for some
months, during which time ore shipments were suspended.
The company has during the past year doubled its milling
capacity, and, as its ore reserves are said to be very large, it
should in the future make a larger yearly output than ever
before.
Some crude ore is shipped from this mine, but the major
portion goes through the mill, which is a water concentration
plant, followed by an oil-flotation treatment of the tailings from
the former/ and has a capacity of 2,000 tons a day. The concentrates and crude ore are smelted at the Tacoma smelter.
The copper mines on Texada Island made a smaller output than in 1914, the Marble Bay production being expected to
be about two-thirds that of the previous year; the smaller mines
did very .little.
For the first-^time in some years, copper ore was shipped
from Vancouver Island; this was from the Willow Grouse, at
Sooke, near Victoria, which made an output of 86,000 lb. of
copper.
The Trail Creek copper production comes from the mines
of the Consolidated Company, and the Josie group of the Le Roi
No. 2 Company the ores from which are smelted at Trail.
These ores are, in reality, gold ores carrying y2 to 1 per cent,
of recoverable copper, and are more valuable for their gold
contents. The output this year shows an increase of 836,940
lb., which is accounted for by the increased tonnage treated.
Development work is always kept well ahead in these mines
and a long future life for them is now well established.
The copper production of the Nelson Mining Division has
been, in former years, chiefly from the Silver King and Queen
Victoria mines. The former mine was closed during the year,
while the latter was only operated for a short time by leasers.
About 35,000 lb. of copper was produced, which is also the
total for the Division.
Copper mining is now the most important form of mining
in the Province, and this year it practically equalled in value
the entire total value of the other lode minerals produced, and
exceeded, considerably, the value of the coal and coke production. It forms 49.7 per cent, of the total value of metalliferous
mines and 34 per cent, of the total mineral production. In the
Working of the large, low-grade copper deposits and the sub- Annual Report,   1915-19/6
93
sequent smelting of the ores produced, a great number of men
are employed and a large proportion of the money value is
retained in the country in the payment of wages and purchase
of supplies.
All the copper ores carry small amounts of the precious
metals, and therefore any increase in the copper production also
increases the output of gold and silver. The high price of
copper during the past year has stimulated prospecting and the
development of copper claims, and there is no doubt that the
Provincial output will steadily grow in future years.
At the copper smelters in the Province the only important
development was the installation of copper converters at the
Consolidated Company's smelting works at Trail, which will
soon be in operation. Until now the copper matte from Trail
has been converted to blister copper at Tacoma. The question
of refining the blister copper produced in the Province has been
considered during the past year by some of the larger companies and also by the Government, and it is possible that a
copper refinery may be established in the near future.
ZINC
The quantity of zinc shown to have been produced in 1915
amounted to 13,817,808 lb., having a value of $1,554,503. These
figures are so very much higher than have ever before occurred
in the zinc production of the Province that comparisons ^are
almost out of the question.
The former highest recorded productions were in 1909,
when 8,500,000 lb. of zinc was produced, worth $400,000, and
in 1914, when the production was 7,866,467 lb., valued at
$346,125. It will be seen, therefore, that this year's output has
been, in value, about four times as great as that of former
record years.
This is one of the instances where the war has been a help,
the zinc mining interests having reaped a harvest that was not
expected.
The price of spelter in the New York market averaged,
for the year 1913, 5.65 cents a pound; for the year 1914 it
averaged 5.21 cents; but for the year 1915 it averaged 13.23
cents; while the average for the month of June, 1915, was 21.2
cents, and for the month of December, 1915, the average price
was 15.39 cents. 94
Vancouver Board of Trade
It can readily be seen that such a very great increase in
the market value of the metal would not only serve as a
stimulus to the zinc miner to get to market every ton of ore he
possibly could, but would also permit the mining of many ore
bodies which, at the normal price of zinc, could not have been
handled at a profit.
One trouble was that there was not enough smelter capacity on this continent to supply the demand for the metal, and
these smelters were soon so overstocked with ores that they
ceased to accept ore except on outstanding contracts.
The supply of ore brought out by these conditions was so
great that such smelters as were equipped to handle it only
bought at a very large margin of profit, so that the zinc miner
did not make as great profits as the increased market price
of the metal would seem to indicate.
Of the total output of 13,817,808 lb., about 8,822,880 lb.
came from the Slocan District, 3,127,209 lb. from Nelson Division, 1,376,000 lb. from Ainsworth Division, and 491,719 lb.
from East Kootenay.
The largest producer in the Province was the Standard, in
Slocan Division, which is credited with 3,778,857 lb., followed
by the *H. B., in Nelson Division, with 2,387,514 lb., and the
Silverton Mines, Slocan, with 1,385,859 lb.; while the Zincton
mine, in Nelson District, produced 739,695 lb.; the Silver
Hoard, in Ainsworth, 660,000 lb.; the Lucky Jim, in Slocan,
640,000 lb.; and the Rambler-Cariboo, 540,660 lb.
A description of the electrolitic zinc plant, which is now
under construction at Trail, will be found in the notes on the
Trail Creek Mining Division.
OTHER MINERALS
No iron ore has been used or shipped from the Province
during the past year, and, as far as can be learned, but little
prospecting or development work has been done on iron claims.
A small quantity of crude placer platinum has been recovered on the Tulameen River, in the Similkafneen District, estimated at about $2,000 in value. This was obtained from placer
gold workings being carried on, and the results are considered
encouraging.
Prospecting for petroleum by means of boreholes has been
in progress in South-East Kootenay, on the Queen Charlotte Annual Report,   /9/5-19/6
Islands, and elsewhere, but oil in commercial quantities has not
yet been encountered.
Considerable interest has been evinced during the past
year in molybdenite deposits, owing to the high price of this
mineral, caused by demands for war purposes. This mineral,
which is a sulphide of molybdenum, is used in the manufacture
of special high-grade steel for guns. The actual output of
molybdenite during the year was confined to a shipment from
the Molly group, on Lost Creek, in the Nelson Mining Division,
which was sent to the Henry E. Woods Ore Concentrating
Company, Denver, Colorado; this shipment amounted to 24
tons and contained by assay 12.26 per cent, of molybdenite.
Some development work was done on the property and it is now
under lease and bond to a Vancouver syndicate, which intends
to erect in the spring a small concentrator. The market requirements are such that a molybdenite ore must be concentrated
up to 85 or 90 per cent, molybdenite (MoS2) before it is marketable. The Lost Greek property has several thousand tons
of from 2 to 4 per cent, ore, so that, with a suitable mill, a small
production could be maintained.
Another property, on Alice Arm, in the Skeena Mining
Division, controlled by J. D. Ross, of Seattle, is reported to
have a large showing of molybdenite, and it is said that a mill
is being erected on it which will soon be producing
day of high-grade concentrates. Other prospects in the Nelson,
Kamloops, and Lillooet Mining Divisions showing some molybdenite have been investigated, but as yet none of them have
assumed any great importance.
Molybdenite ore, concentrated so as to contain 85 to 90
per cent, of that mineral, is now worth from $2,500 to $3,000
a ton, delivered in England or New York.
Antimony is another metal which greatly advanced in
price owing to demands for war purposes. Its principal use
in. war material is to harden the lead bullets used in shrapnel.
During the war the price advanced from about 18 to 55 cents a
pound for the best brands, and from 16 to 39 cents for the
ordinary brands of antimony.
Antimony usually occurs in nature as stibnite, the sulphide
of antimony, and is a common mineral in British Columbia,
occurring in association with lead and zinc ores. It does not,
however, as a rule, occur in large quantities, but attempts are
now being made in a few places to sort it out from its associated 96
Vancouver Board of  Trade
minerals. Two cars of antimony ore are reported to have been
shipped from the Alps-Alturas property on a fork of Carpenter
Creek, in the Slocan Mining Division; this ore was shipped to
Scotland and carried from 50 to 55 per cent, antimony.
Reports of small shipments from other claims have been
heard, but details have not yet been secured.
A deposit of hydromagnesite near the town of Atlin was
worked to some extent this year by Armstrong and Morrison,
of Vancouver. It is known that a few hundred tons was
shipped, but details regarding the shipment have not yet been
received. This occurrence of magnesite was fully described
by the Provincial Mineralogist in the Minister of Mines' Report
for 1904.
The uses to which the mineral is put are for the manufacture of refractory brick, for furnace-linings, etc.; in the manufacture of paper stock by the sulphite process, and as a nonconducting covering for steam boilers and pipes.
COAL AND COKE
It is estimated that the gross production of coal was
1,960,804 long tons, of which 414,140 tons was made into coke,
leaving the net production at 1,546,664 tons. These figures
show a decrease, as compared with 1914, of 205,624 tons gross
and of 264,303 tons net. The quantity of coke made was about
248,424 tons, which is an increase of about 13,847 tons as compared with 1914. For purposes of comparison the following
table is shown:—
1               J               1               1
Est 1915     1914         1913          1912         1911
1910
Coal,
gross   tons,   2,240 lb.
Less    made    into
coke,   tons,   2,240 lb.
1,960,804 2,166,428
414,140]   355,461
1
2,570,760'
433,277
3,025,709
396,905
2,297,718
104,656
3,139,235
339,189
1
Coal, net tons, 2,240 lb.|l,546,664
1,810,967
1                1
2,137,483 2,628,804 2,193,062
1                1
2,800,046
Coke  madet'n 2,240 lb.|   248,424
234,577
1                1
286,045    264,333      66,005
1               1
218,029
In these figures the output for the month of December has
had to be estimated, consequently the final figures may vary
from them slightly. Annual Report,   1915-1916
97
Summarizing the Provincial production of coal, the following table shows the estimated output:—
From Vancouver Island Collieries 1,009,779
Tons of 2,240 lb.
From Nicola and Similkameen Collieries. ..     101,060
From Crowsnest District Collieries      849,965
Total quantity of coal mined  1,960,804
Less made into coke (calculated)      414,140
Net Quantity of Coal produced   1,546,664
In addition to the above net production of coal, there was
made the coke production shown in the following table:—
Tons of 2,240 lb.
From Vancouver Island Collieries       9,246
From Nicola and Similkameen Collieries  nil
From Crowsnest District Collieries    239,178
Total   . . .•    248,424
As will be seen from the above figures, the net coal production this year is expected to have been some 264,000 tons
less than it was in 1914, and less than it has been for the last
eight years.
The consumption of coal in the Province during the past
two years has been sadly interfered with by the war, through
its retarding or stopping of many industries; this has had a
reflex action on the transportation lines, which are the largest
consumers of coal.
The market for the Coast Collieries was seriously affected
by the diminished sales of bunker coal to ocean steamers as a
result of war conditions on the Pacific Ocean steamer trade.
The competition of fuel-oil has been keenly felt, and the
adoption of this fuel by the three transcontinental railways for
use in British Columbia has removed a steady and growing
market for coal.
Coke.—The total production of coke this year, amounting
to some 248,424 tons, is an increase over that of 1914 of some
13,850 tons "(2,240 lb.) despite the fact that the Hosmer plant
—which last year made an output of over 34,000 tons of coke—■
was closed down. j This total production, while not as great as
for the years 1912 and 1913, is nevertheless 10 per cent,
greater than the average output for the last ten years. 98
Vancouver Board  of   Trade
The high market price of copper has kept the copper-
smelting plants of the Interior very busy, with a consequent
increased demand for coke, while, on the Coast, the copper-
smelting plant of the Granby Company as Anyox has occasioned the restarting of the Canadian Collieries coke ovens at
Comox, where this past year 9,246 tons of coke was made.
VANCOUVER  ISLAND   COLLIERIES
The Vancouver Island Collieries made a gross coal output
of 1,009,779 tons of coal, or about 62,000 tons less than in 1914.
Western Fuel Co.—This company mined this past year
about 411,470 tons of coal, an increase over the previous year
of about 100.000 tons; for this increase the Nanaimo Colliery
is to be credited with 72,000 tons and the new Reserve Colliery
with 28,000 tons; this latter colliery is situated about five miles
from Nanaimo and has this year become a producer.
The Nanaimo Colliery, in the City of Nanaimo, is entered
by No. 1 or Esplanade shaft, which is connected by underground workings with a shaft on Protection Island and another
on Newcastle Island. The workings are at a depth of from
600 to 1,200 feet and are very extensive, including a large
submarine area. The coal workings are in the Douglas seam
and also in the Newcastle seam, which lies some 70 feet deeper;
this property has been in operation since 1881.
The Reserve Colliery is a new property in which operations were begun in 1910 by sinking shafts to a depth of about
1,050 feet, to the Douglas seam, in the centre of a 2,500-acre
area of virgin coalfield; the coal seam has a thickness of 14 feet
of good coal. Two shafts were put down( 350 feet apart,
and connected underground by a rock tunnel. The general
installation of plant and of the shaft bottom is probably the
most modern and nearest to perfect in British Columbia.
Ventilation is secured by two 90-inch Sirocco fans, rope-
driven from a 24 x 30-inch engine. The tipple is of thoroughly
modern design, capable of handling 2,000 tons of coal in nine
hours.
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Ltd.—This company is
the successor of the Wellington Colliery Company, formerly
owned by the Dunsmuir interests, and operates two colleries,
one situated at Cumberland, seventy miles north of Nanaimo,
and the other at Extension, about six miles south-west of
Nanaimo.
The Comox Collieries, situated around Cumberland, are
connected by a standard-gauge railway with the seaboard at Annual Report,   1915-1916-
99
Union Bay, where are situated the loading piers and also a
coal washery and a battery of coke ovens, which latter, after
several years of idleness, have again been started to supply
coke for the Anyox copper smelter.
The mines operated during recent years are the Nos. 4
and 7 slopes and the Nos. 5, 6, and 8 shafts.
There has not been much change in the plant since 1913,
when electric power was substituted for steam and much new
machinery and mine and railway equipment put in. Since this
extensive equipment has been completed, the market conditions have been such that the demand for coal has not been
sufficient to admit of the mines being worked at anything
approaching full time. The output in 1913 was over 500,000
tons, but it is only expected to be about 260,000 tons this past
year, a decrease from last year of some 134,000 tons.
At the company's Extension Colliery four mines have
been in operation in recent years, and here conditions seem
to have been more favourable, an output of about 165,000 tons
having been made in. 1915, which is an increase of 35,000 tons
over that of the preceding year.
A standard-gauge railway connects this colliery with the
harbour at Ladysmith and also with the E. & N. Railway,
and here a coal washery, extensive docks, and storage-bins
have been erected.
. Pacific Coast Coal Mines, Ltd.—This company operates a
property at South Wellington, near Nanaimo, and also one at
Morden. The production from the former property was seriously interfered with by water breaking into it from an adjacent abandoned and flooded mine, so that the output this year
is about 25,645 tons less than last year.
The Morden mine began to produce this year, making, an
output of 22,500 tons, which practically offsets the decrease at
South Wellington.
There was mined this year about 127,500 tons of coal,
only 3,145 tons less than the previous year. This output is,
howeyer, far short of the 1911 output of 208,116 tons, showing
that this company, like others, has suffered from the unfavourable market conditions for the last few years.
The company is also developing and equipping a colliery
at Suquash, on the northern part of Vancouver Island, which
is not as yet producing.
Vancouver-Nanaimo Coal Mining Co.—This company
operates the New East Wellington  Colliery, or Jingle  Pot 00
Vancouver Board of  Trade
mine, as it is locally called, situated two miles from the City
of Nanaimo, and is working the Old Wellington seam, of
which, however, the company has only a small area; the exhaustion of this is quite within sight, as all the working places
have reached the boundaries and the work now consists of
extracting the pillars. The output in 1915 was about 46,034
tons, as compared with 107,158 tons in 1914.
NICOLA AND SIMILKAMEEN  COALFIELDS
These coal fields produced in 1915 about 101,060 tons of
coal, as against 138,531 tons in 1914, a falling off in output of
37,471 tons, which must be attributed to a limited local market
and apparently high freight rates to the Coast.
In the Nicola District three companies produced coal in
1915—viz^ Middlesboro Colliery, Inland Coal and Coke Company, and the Pacific Coast Colliery Company—making a joint
output of 88,385 tons of coal, as against an output of 114,546
tons in 1914.
The Middlesboro Colliery is estimated to have produced
this past year 54,500 tons of coal, a decrease of only 6,205 tons.
The Inland Coal and Coke Company is credited with having mined 32,820 tons of coal, a decrease of 20,461 tons.
The Pacific Coast Colliery Company is developing its
property, but managed to produce 1,065 tons, an increase of
505 tons over the previous year.
In the Similkameen section the only company credited with
a coal production is the Princeton Coal and Land Company
at Princeton, which, in 1915, mined 12,675 tons, a decrease
from the previous year of 6,860 tons.
The Coalmont Colliery did not produce coal in 1915; this
property has been taken over by a Vancouver syndicate and
is still under development.
Here again lack of market has been the trouble, due to
lack of direct railway communication, but this is now at least
partly remedied, as during the past year the Kettle River
Valley Railroad has been built, passing through Princeton,
and giving direct communication with the Boundary District
and connection, via Merritt for the present, with the Coast.
This should greatly enlarge the available market, while the
railway itself will consume a large amount of coal.
The Princeton coal is lignitic in character, and, while
not better than other coals for steam purposes, is very popular
as a domestic fuel. Annual Report,   1915-1916
101
EAST KOOTENAY  COALFIELD
There were only two companies producing in this field in
1915—the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, operating collieries
at Coal Creek (Fernie) and at Michel, and the Corbin Coal
and Coke Company, with its colliery at Corbin.
The Hosmer mines, owned by the C. P. R. Natural
Resources, was closed in 1914 and has been at least temporarily
abandoned.
The closing down of this colliery, which in 1913 mined
217,528 tons of coal and made 59,671 tons of coke, makes a
great difference to the coal output for the district, and particularly so as the Canadian Pacific Railway, which formerly
consumed most of the coal from this colliery, now obtains its
fuel supply from a colliery in Alberta.
There was mined in the district in 1915 some 849,965 tons
of coal, of which approximately 397,035 tons was used in making coke—of which 239,178 tons (2,240 lb.) was produced,
leaving the net coal production as 452,930 long tons.
In 1914 the gross coal mined was 955,183 tons; the net
coal production was 599,722 tons and the coke produced
amounted to 234,577 tons.
This shows for 1915, as compared with 1914, a decrease
of 105,218 tons of gross coal mined and a decrease of 146,792
tons of net coal produced, but an increase of 4,601 tons in the
production of coke.
This increase in the coke produced indicates that the coke
demand formerly supplied by the Hosmer mines is now being
filled by the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company.
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co.—This company worked in
1915 eight mines at its Coal Creek Colliery and four at its
Michel Colliery. Coke ovens were operated at both Fernie
and Michel. Its gross output of coal was 797,010 tons, against
778,403 tons in 1914, an increase of 18,607 tons. The quantity
of coke made was 239,178 tons, as compared with 199,866 tons
in 1914, an increase of 39,312 tons, which more than compensated for the loss of production at ttje. Hosmer ovens, which
in 1914 made 34,711 tons.
Of the eight mines operated at Coal Creek in 1915, that
known as No. 1 East, one of four on the south side of the
valley, was the largest producer. It is at an elevation of 90
feet above the central tipple and 800 feet east of it. It was
opened by means of a rock tunnel, which cut the coal at 215
1
Mm 102
Vancouver Board of  Trade
feet from the entry. Both main and counter tunnels were
driven 3,500 feet towards the south. The cost of-upkeep of
the return airway having been excessive, owing to pressure
of the upper part of the large seam (the airway had been
driven in the lower part of the seam), the timbers were drawn
and the top coal to the main roof was dropped. The roof is
of hard sandstone, so no timber is required to keep it up; the
permanent air course now provided will cost little to keep it
in good order. Late in the year there was installed an endless
rope haulage system, operated by an engine placed outside
the mine, to deliver the coal from inside the mine right to
the central tipple.
Much good work has also been done in the company's
mines at Michel Colliery, which, like Coal Creek, is now in
shape for production on a much larger scale than in past years,
large new coal areas having been opened. Of the four mines,
in operation, that known as New No. 8 is most noteworthy.
No. 8 seam has been redeveloped above old No. 8 workings,
sealed off on account of fire. Two tunnels have been driven,
and from these a four-ways system of levels is projected, the
two lower now well on the way, and Nos. 3 and 4 being developed by the advancement of backway incline raises that are
being driven. A three-track tramline connects with a Phillips
cross-over tipple, at the head of a gravity incline, down to the
enless haulage system, thence to the main tipple. A pair of
counterbalanced 7-ton skips operated from two 8-foot drums,
controlled directly from the top loading station and automatically loading and discharging, are capable of handling, under
active working conditions, 300 tons of coal an hour. The
extension of coal-producing operations into the large field
here entered constitutes one of the most important recent developments at the Michel Colliery.
Corbin Coal and Coke Co.—This company operated two
mines at its Corbin Colliery in 1915—namely, No. 4 mine,
located near the Tipple, and No. 3 mine, a short distance to
the south.
The company mined in 1915 about 52,955 tons of coal,
a decrease, as compared with the previous year, of 21,357 tons.
No. 4 mine is situated between No. 1 mine (not worked
this year) and the tipple; the workings are in what is known
as the Prirne seam, which stands nearly vertical, and are on
the room-and-pillar system, the levels being connected by
raises. I Annual Report,   1915-1916 103
Three new tunnels, opened on the seam at a-higher elevation, are connected by a surface incline to the tramway below,
leading to,the tipple.
This mine produced in 1915 from underground workings
about 28,745 tons of coal.
No. 3 mine, also known as the "Big Showing," is worked
partly underground and partly by an open-cut on the surface.
The underground workings are carried on by the room-and-
pillar system, the surface workings, which can only be operated
when there is little or no snow to interfere, is an open quarry,
a light surface burden having been removed. Here the coal
is broken by ordinary quarrying methods, loaded by hand into
1-ton bottom dump cars, which are trammed a short distance
and dumped direct into the railroad cars.
The output of this mine this past year was about 24,210
tons.
STRUCTURAL  MATERIALS, ETC.
The output during 1915 of all structural materials, such
as cement, lime, building stone, sand and gravel, brick, and
other clay products, shows a considerable decrease from that
of the previous year. This is due to the cessation of building
operations, especially in the Coast/Vcities, which commenced
to decline early in 1914, and was almost entirely suspended
during 1915; to a large extent this depression in the building
trades is owing to the conditions brought on by the war.
The output for 1915 is estimated at $1,500,000, as against
$2,852,917 in the preceding year and $3,398,100 in 1913. The
diminution of production has been general in all kinds of
material, with the exception of rough building stone, which
shows a gross production for 1915 valued at $275,000, or nearly
three times what it was the previous year; this is accounted
for by the use of several thousand tons of large granite blocks
for the Government piers at the ,Outer Wharf, Victoria. The
outputs of sand and gravel and of brick show heavy decreases,
and the cement production is only about one-half what it was
in 1914. As far as can be learned, none of the gypsum companies or marble quarries made any appreciable output.
About 90 per cent, of the -output of structural materials
is made in the Coast District, and practically alt of this is used
in the Coast Cities.
-Ifar 104
Vancouver Board of  Trade
SYNOPSIS OF LAND LAWS.
CROWN LANDS.
"Crown Lands" mean and include such ungranted Crown
or public lands as are within, and belong to His Majesty in
right of the Province of British Columbia, and whether or
not any waters flow over or cover the same.
TIMBER LANDS
Timber lands (that is,' lands which contain milling timber to the average extent of 8,000 feet per acre west of the
Cascades—Coast Range—and 5,000 feet per acre east of the
Cascades—Coast Range—to each 160 acres), are not open to
pre-emption, purchase or lease.
By Order in Council, dated December 24th, 1907, the
Government placed a reserve on all timber lands undisposed
of at that date consequently no more licenses to cut timber
will be issued until otherwise determined.
PRE-EMPTIONS .
Crown lands, where such a system is practicable, are laid
off and surveyed into quadrilateral townships, containing
thirty-six sections of one square mile in each.
Any person being head of a family, a widow, or single
man over the age of eighteen years and being a British subject, or any alien, upon making a declaration of his intention
to become a British subject, may, for agricultural purposes,
record any tract of unoccupied and unreserved Crown lands
(not being an Indian settlement and not being timber land),
not exceeding 160 acres in extent.
No person can hold more than one pre-emption claim at
a time. Prior record of pre-emption of one claim and all
rights under it are forfeited by subsequent record or preemption of another claim.
Land recorded or pre-empted cannot be transferred or
conveyed until a Crown grant has been issued.
Such land, until the Crown grant is issued, is held by
occupation. Such occupation must be a bona fide personal
residence of the settler or his family.
The settler must enter into occupation of the land within
sixty days after recording, and must continue to occupy it. Annual Report,   1915-1916
105
Continuous absence for a period longer than two months
consecutively, of the settler or family, is deemed cessation of
occupation; but leave of absence may be granted not exceeding six months in any one year, inclusive of two months'
absence.
Land is considered abandoned if unoccupied for more
than two months, consecutively.
If so abandoned, the land becomes waste land of the
Crown.
The fee on recording is $2.00 (8s.).
The settler shall have the land surveyed at' his own
expense (subject to the ratification of the boundaries), within
five years from the date of record.
After survey has been made, upon proof in declaration in
writing of himself and t\vo other persons of occupation for
two years from the date of pre-emption, and of having made
permanent improvements on the land to the value of $2.50
per acre, the settler, on producing the pre-emption certificate,
obtains a certificate of improvement upon the payment of a
fee of $2.00.
After obtaining the certificate of improvement and paying for the land, the settler is entitled to a Crown grant in
fee simple.   He pays^lO.OO therefor.
The price of Crown lands pre-empted is $1.00 (4s.) per
acre, which must be paid in four equal instalments, as follows:
First instalment, two years from date of record or pre-emption, and yearly thereafter, but the last instalment is not payable till after the survey, if the land is unsurveyed.
Two, three, or four settlers may enter into partnership
with pre-emptions of 160 acres each, and reside on one homestead. Improvements amounting to $2.50 per acre made on
some portion thereof will secure Crown grant for the whole,
conditions of payment being same as above.
Coal and petroleum lands do not pass under grant of
lands acquired since passage of Land Act Amendment of 1899.
No Crown grant can be issued to any alien who may have
recorded or pre-empted by virtue of his declaring his intention of becoming a British subject, unless he has become
naturalized. 106
Vancouver Board  of  Trade
The heirs or devisees of the settler are entitled to the
Crown grant on his decease.
PURCHASES.
Crown lands may be purchased to the extent of 640 acres,
and for this purpose are classified as first and second class,
according to the report of the surveyor.
Lands which are suitable for agricultural purposes, or
which are capable of being brought under cultivation profitably, or which are wild hay-meadow lands, rank as and are
considered to be first-class lands. All other lands, other than
timber lands, shall rank and be classified as second-class lands.
Timbered lands (that is, lands which contain milling timber
to the average extent of 8,000 feet per acre west of the Cascades—Coast Range—and 5,000 feet per acre east of the Cascades—Coast Range—to each 160 acres), are not open for
sale.
April, 1911: "The minimum price of first-class lands
shall be $10.00 per acre, and that of second-class lands $5.00
per acre":
Provided, however, that the Chief Commissioner may for
any reason increase the price of any land above the said prices.
No improvements are required on such lands unless a
secord purchase is contemplated. In such case the first purchase must be improved to the extent of. $3.00 per acre.
When the application to purchase is filed the applicant
shall deposit with the Commissioner a sum equal to 50 cents
per acre on the acreage applied for. When the land is finally
allotted, the purchaser shall pay the balance of the purchase
price.
LEASES
Leases of Crown lands which have been subdivided by surveys in lots not exceeding 20 acres, may be obtained; and if
requisite improvements are made and conditions of the lease
fulfilled at the expiration of lease, Crown grants are issued.
Leases (containing such covenants and conditions as may
be thought advisable) of Crown lands may' be granted by the
Lieutenant-Governor-in-Council for the following purposes:—
(a) For the purpose of cutting hay thereon, for a term
not exceeding ten years; Annual Report,   1915-1916
(b)  For any purpose whatsoever, except cutting hay as
aforesaid, for a term not exceeding twenty-one years.
Leases shall not include a greater area than 1,000 acres.
Leased lands may be staked by an agent.
EXEMPTIONS
The farm and buildings, when registered, cannot be taken
for debt incurred after registration; and it is free from seizure up to a value not greater than $500.00 (£100 English).
Cattle "farmed on shares" are also protected by an Exemption Act. Pre-emptions are exempt from taxation for two
years from date of record, and there is an exemption of $500.00
for four years after record.
HOMESTEADS
The Government of British Columbia does not grant free
homesteads.
The fact of a person having a homestead in another Province, or on Dominion Government lands in this Province, is
no bar to pre-empting Crown lands in British Columbia.
DOMINION GOVERNMENT LANDS
All the lands in British Columbia within twenty miles
on each side of the Canadian Pacific Railway main line are
the property of Canada, with all the timber and minerals they
contain (except precious metals). This tract of land, known
as the Railway Belt, with its timber, hay, water powers, coal
and stone, is now administered by the Department of the
Interior >of Canada, practically according to the same laws
and regulations as are the public lands in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, and the Territories. Dominion Government Agencies are established at Kamloops and New Westminster. The Dominion Government also owns 3,500,000 acres
of land in the Peace River country, lying between the 120th
and 122nd meridians.
Any British subject who is the sole head of a family, or
any male of the age of eighteen years, may secure a homestead of 160 acres on any unoccupied land within the Railway Belt, on application to the local Land Agent, and on payment of a fee of $10.00. The homesteader must reside on the
land for six months in every year, and cultivate at least 15
acres for three years, when he will be entitled to a free grant
or patent. , 108
Vancouver Board  of  Trade
HOW TO SECURE A PRE-EMPTION
Any person desiring to pre-empt unsurveyed Crown lands
must observe the following rules:—
1. Place a post 4 or more inches square and 4 or more
feet high above the ground—a tree stump squared and of
proper height will do—at an angle or corner of the claim, and
mark upon it his name and the corner or angle represented
thus:
"A. B.'s land, N. E. corner post" (meaning northeast corner, or as the case may be), and shall post a
written or printed notice on the post in the following
form  : I
"I, A. B., intend to apply for a pre-emption record of
acres of land, bounded as follows:
Commencing at this post; thence north chains;
thence east chains; thence south chains;
thence west chains (or as the case may be).
"Name (in full),
•     "Da||,"
2. After staking the land, the applicant must make an
application in writing to the Land Commissioner of the district in which the land lies, giving a full description of the
land, and a sketch plan of it, this description and plan to be
in duplicate.   The fee for recording is $2.00 .
3. He shall also make a declaration, in duplicate, before
a Justice of the Peace, Notary Public, or Commissioner, in
Form 2 of the "Land Act," and deposit same with his application. In the declaration he must declare that the land staked
by him is unoccupied and unreserved Crown land, and not
in an Indian settlement; that the application is made on his
own behalf, and for his own use for settlement and occupation, for agricultural purposes; and that he is duly qualified
to take up and record land.
4. If the land is surveyed, the pre-emptor must make
application to the Commissioner exactly as in the case of
unsurveyed lands, but it will not be necessary to plant posts.
5. Every pre-emption shall be of a rectangular or square
shape, and 160 acres shall measure either 40 chains by 40
chains (880 yards by 880 yards), or 20 chains by 80 chains
(440 yards by 1,760 yards) ; 80 acres shall measure 20 chains
by 40 chains; and 40 acres, 20 chains by 20 chains. All lines
shall run true north and south and true east and west. Annual Report,  1915-1916
109
6. When a pre-emption is bounded by a lake or river,
or by another pre-emption or by surveyed land, such boundary may be adopted and used in describing the boundaries of
the land.
7. Sixty days after recording the pre-emptor must enter
into occupation of the land and proceed with improving same.
Occupation means continuous bona fide personal residence
of the pre-emptor or his family, but he and his family may be.
absent for any one period not exceeding two months in any
year. If the pre-emptor can show good reason for being
absent from his claim for more than two months, the Land
Commissioner  may grant him  six months'  leave.    Absence
'without leave for more than two months will be looked upon
as an abandonment of all rights, and the record may be cancelled.
8. No person can take up or hold more than one preemption.
• 9.    The pre-emptor must have his claim surveyed, at his
own expense, within five years from the date of record.
10. The price of pre-empted land is $1.00 per acre, to be"
paid for in four equal annual instalments of 25 cents per acre,
the first instalment to be paid two years after record.
11. After full payment has been made, the pre-emptor
shall be entitled to a Crown grant of the land, on payment of
a fee of $10.00.
12. A pre-emption cannot be sold or transferred until
after it is Crown-granted.
13.    A pre-emption cannot be staked or recorded by an
agent.
TAXATION.
Outside of incorporated cities, towns, and municipalities,
the taxation is imposed and collected directly by the Provincial Government, and expended in public improvements, roads,
trails, wharves, bridges, etc., in assisting and maintaining the
schools, and in the administration of justice. 110
Vancouver Board of  Trade
The rate of taxaton imposed by the latest Assessment
Act are as follows:—
On real property x/z of one per cent, of assessed value
On personal property. .x/z of one per cent, of assessed value
On wild  land    4 per cent.
On coal land, Class A  1 per cent.
On coal land, Class B 2 per cent.
On timber land    2 per cent.
On income of $2,000 or under   1 per cent.
On income of $2,000 and not exceeding $3,000 1*4 per cent.
On income over $3,000, not exceeding $4,000 1% per cent.
On income over $4,000, not exceeding $7,000 2 per cent.
On income over $7,000   %% per cent.
Discount of 10 per cent, allowed if paid before June 30th,
and the following exemptions from taxation are granted:—
On personal property up to $1,000 (to farmers only).
Farm and orchard products, and income from farm.
On all incomes up to $1,000.
On pre-empted land for two years from date of record,
and an exemption of $500 for four years after record.       •
In addition to above taxes, royalty is reserved on coal,
timber, and minerals. There is also a tax on timber, coal,
coke and minerals.
SETTLERS' EFFECTS FREE.
Settlers' effects, viz.: Wearing apparel, books, usual and
reasonable household furniture and other household effects/
instruments and tools of trade, occupation, or employment;
guns, musical instruments, domestic sewing machines, typewriters, bicycles, carts, wagons, and other "highway vehicles;
agricultural implements, and live stock for the farm, not to
include live stock or articles for sale, or for use as a- contractor's outfit, nor vehicles, nor implements moved by a
mechanical power, nor machinery for use in any manufacturing establishment; all the foregoing, if actually owned
abroad by the settler for at least six months before his removal
to Canada, and subject to regulations by the Minister of
Customs: Provided that any dutiable articles entered as settlers' effects may not be so entered unless brought by the settler on his first arrival, and shall not be sold or otherwise-
disposed of without payment of duty until after twelve months'
actual use in Canada.  112
Vancouver Board of  Trade
INDEX
Page
Officers of the  Board  2
Standing   Committees  3
Membership   Roll  4
President's   Address  19
Agricultural   Products  26
British  Columbia  Loans.... 27
Lumber Industry
Coast Lumber Manufactures 28
Foreign Shipments of
Lumber  30
Production of Lumber  30
Lumber Shipments from
Pacific Coast  31
Fishing Industry
Salmon   Pack   by   Canneries 32
Summary  of  B. C.   Fisheries 35
Committee Reports
Trade  and  Commerce  36
Mining  36
List of British Consulates
Abroad  39
Shipping
Port of Vancouver  40
Steamship   Lines  42
Customs Returns
Exports and Imports,
1908-1916  45
Page
Inland Revenue Returns,
1910-1916  46
Post  Office  Returns,
1895-1916  47
Declared Exports to the
United  States from B. C. 48
Banks in Vancouver  52
Banking   Returns  53
The City of Vancouver
Land  Registry,  1909-1915... 54
Building   Permits :. 54
City  Property  55
Statement of Debentures
and Stock  61
Balance  Sheet  62
Assessment  Statement,
1887-1915  66
Public Schools-and Statistics 67
Park   Statistics  70
Churches   in   Vancouver.... 74
Consular   Agents  76
Failures in Canada
From R. G. Dun & Co  77
From   Bradstreets  78
Extracts from Government
Bulletin,' Mining Industry
1915  79.
Synopsis of Land Laws....  104
ILLUSTRATIONS
Frontispiece—Dominion   Government   Immigration   Building,
Vancouver, B. C.
J. Hanbury & Co.'s Lumber Mill   16
Plant of American Can Co. Ltd., VanflrJIWU, B. C
Packing House, P. Burns & Co. Ltd.;
    4tH
ftLnc{Jlfiypg&IOT OF^0
BRITISH COUJMH4J
AUG 2 9 1952S
THE LIBRARY!

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