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Twelfth annual report published by the Board of School Trustees City of Vancouver for the year ending… Vancouver School Board 1914

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   Twelfth Annual 
REPORT 
PUBLISHED BY THE 
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 
CITY OF VANCOUVER 
For the Year Ending December 31st, 1914 
THE MAINLAND PRESS 
VANCOUVER, B.C. INDEX
Attendance :—
Average (School)
List of Officers ... ... ^H
Of Trustees
Beacohsfield School (Illustration) ...
Board of School Trustees :—
Year 1914 (Illustration)
List of, 1886 to 1914
Britannia High School (Illustration)
Brydon-Jack, Dr. F. W. (Illustration)
Capital Expenditure Account, 1914
Chairman's Address
Electrical Plant, Night School (Illustration)
Enrollment and Average Attendance
Guard of Honor, Cadet Corps
Laing, G. A. (Illustration)
Medical Staff, (List of)     ... ... ^M
Meetings and Retirements, School Trustees
Municipal Inspector and Staff (Illustration)
Night School, Modelling Class (Illustration)
Reports :—
Attendance...
Building and Grounds Committee
Management Committee
Medical Inspection and School Nursing
Medical Officer
Municipal Inspector of Schools
Prevocational and Night Classes
School Sports
Secretary    ...
Supervisor, Domestic Science
Drawing
Manual Training
Music ...
Physical Culture and Cadets
Primary Work ...
Regimental Band, Cadet Corps
Revenue Account, 1914
Revenue Expenditure, Analysed   ...
Salary Schedule   ...
Schools :—
Beaconsfield (Illustration)
Britannia, High (Illustration)
Name, Location, Principle and Telephone
Night, Modelling Class (Illustration)
Standing Committees and Officials...
Supervisors, List of
Teachers :—
Domestic Science
List of
Manual Training
Upton, G. (Illustration)
Value School Property, Estimate  ...
Ventilating System (Illustration)  ...
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...                                  ■ • •
82
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• • •                            • • •
81
...
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6-7
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• ••                                 • • •                                 • •
28
94-95
.    8 to 11
74
82
54
72
• • •                              • • >                              ■
90
5
47
...
76
79-80
• • •                                     • • •                                    •
17-18
• ••                                     •••                                     • •
. 12 to 16
. 34 to 45
. 29 to 33
. 23 to 26
. 72 to 77
7ft
/ o
96-97
70-71
49-50
68-69
51-52
. 55 to 65
66-67
58
92-93
• • •                            ...
98-99
91
20
22
83
76
• • •                               • * *                              •
5
...
90
89
.. 84 to 89
89-90
96
100
...
31  \ VANCOUVXIC BOAR D ^ZCHQOO
R'RU/TEE^
Management Committee
5. THOS. DUKE
4,    A. C STEWART
6. MRS. McNAUGHTON
Chairman :
1.    WM. H .P. CLUBB
Building Committee;
2. FRED W. WELSH
3. J. R. SEYMOUR
7.    J. J.  DOUGAN BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
mHHI 1915 i-'':B>m:A'iX3
Retire December 31st, 1915.
Mrs. P. McNaughton.    Dr. F. C. McTavish.    Fred W. Welsh.    J.  R. Seymour.
Retire December 31st, 1916.
A- C.  Stewart. A.  M.  Harper. C.  Sangster.
EXECUTIVE   BOARD.
1915.
Chairman Fred W.  Welsh
Chairman, School Management Committee A.  C.  Stewart
Chairman, Building and Grounds Committee J. R. Seymour
Chairman,  Finance  Committee A.   C.   Stewart
STANDING  COMMITTEES.
School Management. Building* and Grounds.
A. C. Stewart,  Chairman. J.  R.  Seymour,  Chairman.
Mrs.  P.  McNaughton. A. M. Harper.
Dr. F.  C. McTavish. C.   Sangster.
Finance.
A.  C.  Stewart,  Chairman.
J.   R.   Seymour.
Fred W.  Welsh.
The Chairman of the  Board is  ex-officio  member  of all  Committees.
DATE  OF MEETINGS.
Btoard Third Wednesday in each month, at 8 o'clock p.m.
Management Committee Tuesday preceding the 2nd Wednesday, at 8 p.m.
Building Committee Thursday preceding the  3rd Wednesday, at 3 p.m.
Finance Committee Wednesday before Board meeting
All meetings for the transaction of school business are held in the
School Board Office Building, corner Hamilton and Dunsmuir Streets; and
all correspondence to officials  should be addressed to the same building.
OFFICIALS.
1915.
Municipal Inspector of Schools J.  S.  Gordon,  B.A.
Secretary and Accountant Gerald  Upton
Chief Clerk   (Gone to  the  front) S.   D.   Gardner
Clerk   Harold  Hicks
( Miss A.   Balfour
Stenographers  < Miss L. Judge
( Miss D.  Chaffer
Building Superintendent J|_ F. J. Giles
Grounds Superintendent F. A. A. Barrs
( James Inglis
Attendance Officers  < N. Jensen
(        W.   Godfrey BOARD  OF SCHOOL  TRUSTEES
Front 18S6 to 1914 inclusive
1886-1887.
Dr.  D.  B.  Beckingsale,  Secretary
J. B. Henderson
D. B. Charleson
1887-1888.
John Devine, Secretary
G. 1.  Wilson
W. J. McGuigan, M.D.
Wm.  Brown
A. G. Johnson
G.  F.  Baldwin
1888-1889.
G.   I. Wilson
John Devine
C.   W.  Murray
Wm.  Brown
A.  H.  B.  Macgowan, Secretary
G. F. Baldwin
1889-1890.
G. I. Wilson
Chas. Whetham, M.A.
C.   W.  Murray
Wm. Brown
A.  H.  B.  Macgowan,  Secretary
G.  F.  Baldwin
1890-1891.
Appointed by the Lieut.-Governor.
J. M. Browning
G.   I.  Wilson
Henry Collins
Appointed .by  the  Council.
Wm. Brown, Chairman
A. H.  B*.  Macgowan, Secretary
C.  W.   Murray
G. F.  Baldwin
1891-1892.
Appointed by the Lieut.-Governor.
B. Springer
G.   I.   Wilson
Henry Collins
Appointed by the Council.
Wm. Brown, Chairman
A.  H. B.  Macgowan,  Secretary
C. W.   Murray
G. F. Baldwin
1892.1893.
Wm. Brown
A. H. B.  Macgowan,  Secretary
Henry Collins
G.  I. Wilson, Chairman
Wm.  Templeton
G. R. Gordon
1893-1894.
A. H. B. Macgowan, Chairman
C.  W.  Murray,  Secretary
John McAllister
Wm. Templeton
C. C. Eldridge
G. R. Gordon
1894-1895.
A.  H. B.  Macgowan, Chairman
C. W. Murray, Secretary
W.  D.  Brydone-Jack,  M.D.
Wm.  Templeton
C. C. Eldridge
G.  R.   Gordon
C.  F.  Foreman
1895-1896.
Wm. .Templeton,' Chairman
C.  C. Eldridge
G.  R.  Gordon
C. F. Foreman
A.   II.   B. Macgowan
C. W.  Murray, Secretary
W. D. Brydone-Jack, M.D.
1896-1897.
G. R. Gordon, Chairman
Wm. Templeton
C.  < J.  Eldridge
J.  J.  Logan
W.   ).  McGuigan, M.D.
W.  D.  Brydone-Jack,   M.D.
C. W. Murray, Secretary
1897-1898.
C.  C.  Eldridge,  Chairman
Mrs. C. Reid
Wm.  Brown
Jas. Ramsay
W.  J.  McGuigan,  M.D.
W. D. Brydone-Jack,  M.D.
C. W. Murray, Secretary
1898-1899.
W. D. Brydone-Jack, M.D., Chairman
W. J. McGuigan, M.D.
C. W. Murray, Secretary
C. C. Eldridge
"Mrs. C. Reid
Wm.   Brown
Jas. Ramsay
1899-1900.
C. W. Murray, Chairman
G. R. Gordon
J. J. Banfield
J.  J. Logan
Jas. Ramsay
W. D. Brydone-fJack, M.D.
W. J.  McGuigan, M.D.
1900-1901.
C. W. Murray, Chairman
W. J. McGuigan, M.l>
Thos.. Duke
G. R. Gordon
J. J. Banfield
J.  J. Logan
Jas. Ramsay BOARD  OF SCHOOL  TRUSTEES
From 1886 to 1914 inclusive
1901-1902.
C.
W
Murray
, Chairman
w
J.
McGuig
an,
M.D.
Th
OS.
Duke
G.
R.
Gordon
t
J.
J.
Banfield
W. D. Brydone-Jack, M.D.
James Ramsay, Chairman from 1st
July, 1902, to 31st December,  1902.
1902.1903.
J.  J. Banfield, Chairman
Thos. Duke
Jas.  Ramsay
W. J. McGuigan, M.D.
G.  R.  Gordon
W. D.  Brydone-Jack, M.D.
D.  Donaldson
1903-1904.
Thos.   Duke,  Chairman
D.  Donaldson
W. J.  McGuigan, M.D.
Jas.  Ramsay
William Clubb
J.  J. Dougan
W.  B.  McKechnie,  M.D.
1904-1905.
W. B.  McKechnie, M.D.,
William Clubb
Jas.  Ramsay
J. J. Dougan
Thos. Duke
R. P. McLennan
J.   B.   Ferguson
Chairman
Wm.  H. P. Clubb,
Jas.  Ramsay
W. B. McKechnie,
Thos. Duke
R. P. McLennan
J.  B.  Ferguson
Victor Odium
1905-1906.
Chairman
M.D.
1906-1907.
R.   P.
McLennan,   Chairman
W.  H.
P. Clubb
James
Ramsay
W.  B.
McKechnie,  M.D.
Thos.
Duke
J.  J.  Dougan
V. W.  Odium   (Jan.  to Oct.)
Charles Hope  (Oct. to Dec.)
1907-1908.
Chas.  E.  Hope,  Chairman
R.  P.  McLennan
W. H.  P. Clubb
W.  E. Flumerfelt
Thos.  Duke
J.  J. Dougan
W. D. Brydone-Jack, M.D.
1908-1909.
J. D. Breeze,  Chairman
Chas.  E.  Hope
W.  H. P.  Clubb
W. E.  Flumerfelt
Thos. Duke
W.   D.   Brydone-Jack,   M.D.
J.  J.  Dougan
1909-1910.
W.   E.   Flumerfelt,   Chairman
W.  H.  P.  Clubb
Thos.  Duke
W. D. Brydone-Jack, M.D.
J. J. Dougan
Geo. Dyke
J. D. Breeze
1911.
W.  D.  Brydone-Jack,
W.   E.   Flumerfelt
W. H. P. Clubb
Thomas Duke
A.  C.  Stewart  (Jan.  to
J.   J.  Dougan   (Sept.  to
Geo. J. Dyke
J.  D.   Breeze
M.D.,  Chairman
Aug.)
Dec.)
Chairman
1912.
W.  D.  Brydone-Jack, M.D.
Thos.  Duke
J.  J. Dougan
Mrs.  P.  McNaughton
Wm.  H.  P.  Clubb
Geo.   J.   Dyke
W. E.  Flumerfelt
1913.
W.  D.   Brydone-Jack, M.D.,   Chairman
Thos. Duke
J. J. Dougan
Mrs.  P.  McNaughton
Wm. H. P. Clubb
Geo.   J.  Dyke   (Jan.   to  May)
W. E.  Flumerfelt
1914.
P.
Wm.  H
Nov.)
Thos. Duke, Chairman
Fred W. Welsh
A.   C.   Stewart
Mrs.  P. McNaughton
J.  R.  Seymour
J. J. Dougan
Clubb, Chairman  (Jan.
(Dec.)
to 8
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
CHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS.
Vancouver, B. C, January 13th, 1915.
Mrs. McNaughton and Gentlemen :—
It is with a mixture of feeling that I am now giving you my annual
address, as I am in the first instance taking the place of one who was a very
highly respected member of this Board, Mr. Wm. H. P. Clubb, who owing
to general conditions now existing has been affected in the same way that
I personally shall be at the end of this year, that is to say, much as we have
always appreciated and taken an interest in the affairs of this Board, the
time has come through general depression, that we are forced to unwillingly
give our entire time to personal interests in our particular business. I think
I can speak for Mr. Clubb along the same lines as I would for myself. We
have both served on the Board of School Trustees for a great number of
years, one might almost say that we constitute fathers of the institution as
now represented by this Board, as same was only in its infancy when we
first had the honour of representing the citizens hereon some fourteen years
ago, and naturally, it is no idle statement to say that we feel very severely
this parting of the way; one consolation being that perhaps both Mr. Clubb
and myself may be further honoured by representation at some future time.
The past year has been eminently satisfactory in every department of
the Board's affairs. A great deal has been accomplished by the various
Committees and I wish to point out to the general public that although hard
times have visited this city, the same as everywhere else, owing to che war,
I do not think they will find an institution that is more up-to-date and in
perfect running order, which will be well able to withstand such depression
as now existing for some considerable time to come.
Thanks to your Building Committee the excellent handling of the business transacted by them and the earnest efforts they have put into their
undertakings, showing the soundest judgment in their decisions, they have
brought the buildings and grounds into a state of perfection that is second
to no other School Board in the Province.
The Management Committee have likewise put into their work hearty
co-operation, handling the affairs in such a way as only those who had a
perfect knowledge, a sympathetic feeling and unselfish interest could do,
producing the desired result in a perfect organization of teachers and staffs,
productive of the best elements of education.
Taking the affairs of the Board generally, the public I do not think
are aware of the very large undertaking it actually consists of. - w^e have
now thirty schools under our control, which naturally means a very large
number of employees.    The point I wish to make here is, that we as a BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Board can conscientiously say there is not an institution of a like nature in
Canada today that is working more in uniformity than ours. Our organization is as good as one could possibly desire. We have, as you are aware,
grown from a very small body to a large one in a very short period of some
1 0 to 15 years, and when an organization grows at such a rapid rate, it
nearly always at one stage of its life suffers from weakness of some kind.
Fortunately, we have passed this period, having profited materially by such
experience and have now settled down as a smoothly working and united
institution, which after conditions begin to pick up, must and will have a
very bright future.
The present depression forcibly brings to our mind the necessity for
future retrenchments, and I think you will agree with me that all the members
of this Board have that in view for the coming year. I feel, as no doubt
you do, that everything possible along these lines will be done, and again
the general public I believe will appreciate the fact that such steps will in
no way impair the efficiency of our schools, or work detriment to our property. Without taking undue credit to ourselves, I do not think there are
many Boards in British Columbia that will feel the strain of this less than
Vancouver will, which is highly creditable to you gentlemen as members of
this Board, to the officials and all other employees.
A subject that has frequently occurred to me in connection with educational work has been very vividly brought to my attention by the conditions brought about through the war, namely, the dependencies and responsibilities that we as citizens have on our shoulders in connection with our
fellow men who are in the employ of this Board, more especially as teachers.
A man or woman taking the profession of teaching does so, in the great
majority of cases, with the intention of making it a life long study, and
many have served this Board faithfully and conscientiously for numbers
of years, until their usefulness in any other service or occupation has become
null and void. Did it ever occur to you gentlemen that we as Trustees,
who are responsible to the public for getting the best results from our
teachers, have not so far considered what is to become of such teachers
who are, after many years of faithful service, forced to resign from various
causes? I think this matter should be taken up very carefully by all institutions like our own with a view of providing for such contingencies. At
the present moment there is neither an organization, a fund, or a benefit
association to which any retired teachers, who by force of circumstances,
might be a dependent, can appeal to. At the same time the teachers are
putting their hands into their pockets with the greatest of good will to aid
their fellow citizens. It is not a big undertaking. If you will look up the
records of our own Board, as far as I can recollect, none of our employees
of long standing have as yet retired from active service, but the time will
come when some will, and the matter of providing an annuity for these,
would only be a fair and equitable recognition of their faithful services.
I will not dwell on this matter further.    If the new Board was to take this 10
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
in hand and accomplish something of benefit along these lines, I as a retiring
member, would feel that my last wishes as here expressed have borne fruit.
(The general financial condition of our Board I am glad to say has
been well taken care of, and your decision not to place before the city any
by-laws for 1915, is only one more proof of your sound judgment and spirit
of willingness to work in harmonious conjunction with the City Council.
It would have been perhaps very satisfactory if the Model School could
have been reconstructed, the King Edward School grounds thoroughly laid
out, Block 70 brought to completion, and various other undertakings, but
no doubt, each of these items will receive proper attention when local conditions warrant the issuing of further by-laws.
A matter that has been brought very prominently before the general
public of late is the question of civic salaries. I know that some of you
gentlemen may not agree with my views on this subject, but I cannot help
but express as Chairman of this Board, and very emphatically at that,
my opinion that the salaries now paid by the Vancouver Board of School
Trustees are in no way excessive for the conscientious and valuable services
we are receiving in return thereof. It is all very well for certain citizens
to say that we as a Board could employ teachers for half what we are
paying, or even 75% of what we are paying. I have no hesitation in
endorsing such statements as perfectly correct, but I would like to know
what education the children would get from such cheap labour. The
same applies to our officials. We no doubt could get officials to work
for the Board and glad to be able to for 50% less than we are paying our
officials, but do you mean to tell me, or do you think the public could prove
to me, that our affairs would be in such excellent condition as they are if
we were to listen to people advocating such a policy? When this Board
obtains the services of competent and honest employees, they should keep
them, and we as members of this Board, are to be the sole judges as to
the remuneration of these people. I venture to say that we have not an
employee in our service today who would not under normal conditions earn
as much elsewhere as we are paying them. In many instances they have
spent perhaps the better part of their life in such occupation. It is a very
small sphere that the civic employee is able to exist in. If there is one thing
I regret, gentlemen, it is the fact that I shall not be here next year to uphold
my opinion in person, although I shall not refrain from doing everything
I can in other ways to deal justly with civic employees. The teachers and
staff of our institution have been doing admirable work in connection with
voluntary assistance towards the poor and needy cases of this city. There
is nothing in this world more commendable than such actions, than the helpful hand given by these people in cases of distress.
In conclusion, gentlemen, I wish to thank you one and all for your
earnest and unfailing efforts given in the past to the welfare and benefit of
the Vancouver Board of School Trustees, and it is with regret that I
have to announce my separation from this institution as an active member. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
11
Mr. Clubb is not here himself tonight to express his regrets, but knowing
him as well as I do, and you also knowing him for what he is, one of our
best citizens, I think the Board cannot be too high in praise of his services
rendered during the past 1 1 years. I had the honour to be appointed
Acting Chairman for the balance of his term which was approximately two
months. It would have given me great pleasure to have had Mr. Clubb
at least finish out this year and address you instead of myself. Credit is
due to the able manner in which you as members have ably carried on
the work appointed you by the citizens, and also great satisfaction must be
expressed at the faithful and conscientious services rendered by the employees of this Board.
Respectfully submitted,
^H^^^^^^P THOS. DUKE,   ^^^^H
Chairman, School Board. 12
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
REPORT OF THE MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE.
Vancouver, B. C, December 31st, 1914.
Mr. Chairman, Mrs. McNaughton and Gentlemen :-
I beg to submit the following report on the work of the Management
Committee for the year ending December 31 st, 1914:
School Accommodation.
The opening of a new eight-room addition to the Henry Hudson
School, corner of Cypress and Cornwall Street, in January, 1914, permitted us to do away with temporary accommodation there of an unsatisfactory character and gave us six spare rooms. This, we trust, will make
ample provision for the school population in that section for some years.
The new Bayview School of eight rooms at the corner of Collingwood
Street and Sixth Avenue completed and opened August, 1914, relieved
the overcrowding at the General Gordon School, where three classes up
to this time had been taught in temporary quarters consisting of inferior
wooden buildings, lacking in both lighting and ventilation facilities. This
leaves four more rooms to meet the demands of this growing section of the
city.
The recent completion of the new Beaconsfield School at the corner
of Twenty-first Avenue and Clinton Street, in the southern portion of Ward
VII., Hastings Townsite, gives that portion of the city eight modern class
rooms and in addition two Domestic Science rooms to take the place of three
small inferior frame class rooms, the only school accommodation hitherto
in that part of the city. This building should meet the requirements of the
southern portion of Ward VII. for a number of years.
It is a matter of regret that a few residents in the southeast corner of
Ward VII., who are of the opinion that a little over a mile is too long a
walk for their children to this school, still persist in requesting the Board to
maintain the old frame class rooms, when their children by a little exertion
would have a modern, up-to-date school with all the advantages of graded
classes and ultimately the benefit of instruction in Manual Training and
Domestic Science. These latter subjects cannot be handled except where
special equipment is provided and this is an impossibility in the old frame
class rooms now replaced by probably the best constructed and best equipped
school in the city.
We regret the Board's inability during the past year to provide additional school accommodation in Ward VIII., D. L. 301. At present
there is only one unoccupied room in all that district. As this is a rapidly
growing section of the city the problem of furnishing increased school accommodation will have to be faced in the near future. The same is also true of
the Model School District and also of the Grandview. In the latter district relief has been given by cutting down the area and placing the children in adjoining schools, but this is at best but a temporary expedient which will
necessarily very soon exhaust itself by crowding the adjacent schools.
In both districts, Model and Grandview, an attempt has been made
for some years to relieve the congestion by the erection of temporary wooden
buildings and these are frequency found to be unsatisfactory from the
standpoint of lighting and ventilation. Were the financial situation otherwise than it is at the present time, the problem of increased school accommodation in Ward VlIL, Model and Grandview districts, should be
attended to during the year 1915. Owing to the congestion of the latter
district and notwithstanding all that has been done to relieve it by the use
of temporary buildings and paring down the size of the school area attached
to this school, conditions are such that the Board may be obliged to face
the problem of erectng an eight or ten room building to be completed by
the latter part of August, 1915.
School Work.
There was an idea prevailing towards the close of the year 1913 that
the city's population was decreasing. The Management Committee found,
however, when the schools were graded in February, 1914, and a fresh
influx of six-year-old pupils was admitted, that the school population was
678 in excess of that of February, 1913. This necessitated an increase
of fifteen to the teaching staff, giving a total of 352 for the first term of the
current year.
Again, after the results of the high school entrance examinations
became known in the early days of August, it was found that the list of
successful candidates was the largest in the history of the city. This
presented another problem with but little time to meet the exigencies of the
case. In the high schools alone there was an increase of 322 pupils or
32% over the previous year. This necessitated a net increase in the high
school teaching staff of five additional teachers, notwithstanding the fact
that the average size of the classes was considerably increased.
To make provision for this unusual increase in the number of high
school students it was found necessary to reiaovate six class rooms in the
old Dawson School and open two second year and four first year classes
for ordinary high school work. Notwithstanding this unlooked fo<r increase,
we are pleased to be able to report that when the schools re-opened the last
Monday in August everything was in readiness to receive the pupils and
every facility possible provided for them to prosecute their work for the
term. In addition to the accommodation furnished in the old Dawson
School to carry on ordinary high school work, one class room has been
fitted up as a sewing room and two others for Manual Training.
In connecton with the additional work in Manual Training and
Domestic Science in this school and the difficulty of obtaining qualified
teachers for this work, it is very gratifying to be able to state that the
Supervisors of Manual Training and of Domestic Science, Mr. S. Northrop
and Miss E. Berry, have their work so well organized and planned as to be 14
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
able to take charge personally of the additional classes in these particular
subjects now being inaugurated in the old Dawson School. In this respect
we are doubly fortunate, for not only does it save money to the Board, a
consummation much to be desired in present circumstances, but it also
insures good work and teaching of a high order by experts in their own
respective spheres. We are thus enabled to give first class high school
facilities to the people in this part of the city.
Prevocational Classes.
This is a novel and rather interesting experiment in school work in
this city. For many years it has been a burning question with school authorities how to prolong the school days of boys and girls of fourteen years and
over who from many causes were either unable or unwillng to undergo
the grind necessary to fit them for entrance to high school. These were
leaving school each succeeding year ill equipped to take up the battle of
life in our highly competitive and complex civilizaton. In June last, before
the schools closed for the holidays, our Municpal Inspector took this matter
up with the principals and learned that probably 1 60 of these pupils were
then in our schools. It was in order to induce them to remain a year or two
longer in school that we planned for them with the consent of the Education
Department a modified course of study of a practical character, the better
to fit them to take their places as useful citizens, and took the necessary steps
to open classes for them in August. Further particulars regarding the work
of these classes will be fourd in the report of the Director of Night School
Classes and Prevocational Work.
In addition to the increase in work along the lines indicated above the
opening of a new Manual Training centre at the General Gordon School
and another at Hastings School in August last has brought these requisites
within easy reach of all Intermediate and Senior Grade boys in the city.
The new Domestic Science centres equipped in Hastings, Bayview and
Beaconsfield Schools offer similar facilities to girls for the study of household duties.
Medical Work.
The work of medical inspection during the year was, as formerly, carefully attended to by Dr. F. W. Brydone-Jack and his assstant, together
with his staff of four nurses.
The experiment of having a free dental clinic in connection with the
medical inspection of children has been sufficiently encouraging to warrant
your committee recommending not only a continuance of this work, but an
extension of it durng the coming year, but we fear financial conditions will
preclude the possibility of further increased expenditure along this line
for the present.
Playground Supervision.
Supervised play during the holiday months of July and August
entailed an expenditure of $1500. There were engaged in this work in
all ten supervisors of playgrounds, two general supervisors, besides one man BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 15
and one woman for each of the four grounds. We found this year that the
grounds were not as well patronized as in former years. Even this falling
off is to be accounted for among many other things by the war. During
the month of August especially many of the boys who would otherwise be
found amusing themselves with their comrades on the playgrounds found
profitable employment in selling extras to an eager population athirst for
news from the seat of war. This playground supervision is a luxury which
perhaps could very well be dispensed with during hard times and the funds
thus used expended for the more urgent needs of school life.
Sports.
Never before has organized inter-school sports been more satisfactorily
carried on in our schools than during the past year. Ninety-five different
teams were organized for baseball, girls' baseball, lacrosse, football and
basket-ball; and the students and teachers enjoyed many a hard-fought, if
friendly, match between neighbouring schools. While the credit for this
keen interest in healthful, outdoor sport is due primarily to the principals
and their assistants, the gift by the Beard of $5 per team up to three teams
from each school entering a league doubtless served as a stimulus to the
young athletes. In a few instances, too, encouragement was' given by providing better facilities for games in improved play grounds. It is to be
hoped that even more may be done in this direction in future.
Cadet Corps.
The number enrolled in our school Cadet Corps has increased from
474 a year ago to 845 at the close of the present year. There has also
been organized an efficient band equipped with 40 instruments. The Cadet
movement, instead of being a sort of spectacular feature as formerly connected with one school, is now a general feature and flourishes in seventeen
of our large schools. The amount appropriated for the current year to carry
on this wok was $2000.
Extension of High School Work.
Steps have been taken to have music taken up in the three high schools;
and the third year commercial work has been taken up in two of them for
the first time. It is highly probable that work along both of these lines
will increase; and, while there has been almost no additional expense this
year, increased expenditure is inevitable in future if this work is to keep pace
with the growth and expansion of our educational system.
The reports submitted monthly to the Board by our Municipal Inspector and Supervisors show that our teachers are enthusiastic in their work,
devoted to their duty and sympathetic in their interest in the welfare of
the pupils. From a careful investigation of all the facts and data submitted
during the year, your committee has no hesitaton in stating that the work
of our schools has never attained a higher or as high a standard of efficiency
as that at which it stands at the present time. The best of harmony prevails
in every department and the officials and general staff are working with a
singleness of purpose for the attainment of the best results. 16
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
During the course of the year there have been a few changes in our
supervisory staff. Last April Mr. W. P. Weston, Supervisor of Drawing
for the Vancouver schools, resigned to accept the position of Art Master in
the Provincial Normal School. The fact that he was called to a higher
position by the educational authorities who were conversant with the character of his work is sufficient to show that Mr. Weston was both capable
And efficient and performed his duties in a satisfactory manner.
To replace Mr. Weston, Mr. C. H. Scott, the present incumbent,
was appointed last August to supervise this department of school work.
The recent growth of night class work in all its phases, industrial,
commercial, technical and literary, and the additonal labour involved by
the inauguration of prevocational day classes in our schools necessitated the
appointment of a director for this work. On the recommendation of your
committee the Board last August appointed Mr. G. A. Laing to this position. Mr. Laing has organized the work and we are pleased to be able to
report that it is today in a very satisfactory conditon.
The resignation of Mr. W. H. P. Clubb early in December, as a
member of the Board of which he was also chairman, necessitated some
changes in the committees. Mr. Duke who was Chairman of the Management and Finance Committees, became Chairman of the Board and Trustee
Stewart took the places on these committees vacated by Trustee Duke.
We regret as members of the Board the resignation of Mr. Clubb
and the retirement of Mr. Duke who, we are led to believe, is not offering
himself as a candidate for re-election. These two gentlemen have served
the city many years with great zeal and their names will long be remembered
by the citizens in connection with education in our city.
In closing this report permit me to refer to the faithfulness, diligence
and zeal displayed by my two colleagues on the Management Committee,
Trustee McNaughton and Trustee Duke. It is safe to say that not a
thought nor an act in the course of the year's work but the sole motive
behind it was in the interests of the schools and of the children.
Your committee was also ably assisted in every phase of its work
by our Municipal Inspector. His work was always ready and in order,
and we have all learned to respect and admire his courage and convictions.
It is always, at least to me, a pleasure to work with an official of this stamp.
The most conscientious and most capable official may make mistakes, but
the Board that acts contrary to his advice is sure to land in error.
In conclusion it is my firm conviction that all the forces over which
we have jurisdiction are working harmoniously and that we close the strenuous and memorable year 1914 with our schools in a very efficient state.
Respectfully submitted,
^^^K vH^^H      I    A C STEWART,1':,:|■ t^BSs&
Chairman, Management Committee. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 17
REPORT OF THE BUILDING AND GROUNDS COMMITTEE
Vancouver, B. C, January 13th, 1915.
Mr. Chairman, Mrs. McNaughton and Gentlemen:—
Herewtth I beg to submit report of your Building and Grounds Committee for the year 1914.
At the beginning of the year, your Committee were engaged for a
considerable time in adjusting differences between this Board and the contractors for the Dawson and Bay view Schools, in looking over the proposed
expenditures for the year, and since two of your Committee were new members of the Board, it took some time for them to grasp all the details
essential to a proper handling of this work. This entailed some delay
at the commencement, but when work was once begun it was carried on
expeditiously.
Every effort has been made to systematize the work, with a view to
greater efficiency. All heating, ventilating and plumbing has been placed
under the direction of Mr. Walter Leek, of Leek and Company, an engineer of standing; he has also been given the supervison of all boilers and
machinery in connection therewith.
All the School Grounds and improvements in connection therewith
have been placed under F. A. A. Barrs, and the results achieved have fully
justified his appointment. During the past year there has been built 5,510
lineal feet of retaining walls, 5,91 3 feet of iron fencing and 12,008 square
feet of concrete walks. The improvements to grounds have been of a permanent character, and Britannia, Alexandra, Beaconsfield and Dawson
grounds may be considered to be in a properly finished state, and your
Committee suggest to the Board that a continuance of this policy is desirable.
The Constructional Department under F. J. Giles has been efficiently
conducted during the year, and the Beaconsfield School just completed and
taken over is ample evidence of the care exercised in this department, both
in the drawing of the specifications and in the supervision during construction.
Strathcona School now under construction will be available in the early
summer.
Tbej Building Superintendent's department under the supervision of
J. H. Self has accomplished a great deal of work durng the year, in a
satisfactory manner. The supervision of janitors has been added to this
department.
All school painting was placed in charge of J. Blackwood, a practical
painter, and I believe in this way we obtained better results than were
possible in the past, when one official had to supervise so many and so varied
a number of repairs. 18
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
In the matter of janitors, I believe there has been a decided improvement, both as to the up-keep of the schools and in their relations with the
principals. Janitors' supplies are now purchased by tender and carried in
stock whch tends both to economy in purchasing and care in distribution.
Your Committee in considering the question of school insurance recommended the adoption of schedule insurance, and in the acceptance of this
recommendation I believe the Board has adopted the correct plan for their
insurance, and that it will result in a considerable saving of money in the
near future.
Concerning the future policy to be pursued by the Board in the work
governed by the Building Committee, I believe that a considerable economy
can be effected by a reorganization of the departments, and I would
commend this to the incoming Board for early consideration.
I have to acknowledge loyal help from the various officials which has
contributed in no small degree to a successful year's work. Further, I wish
to place on record my appreciation of the hearty support from my associates
on this Committee, paticularly Trustee Seymour, and from the Board
generally. The Chairmanship of this Committee entails responsibilities, and
only with the loyal assistance of both officials and trustees can any one
hope for a successful year's work, and this it is my wish to acknowledge.
Whatever has been accomplished by this Committee during 1914 will I
believe bear the closest scrutiny. We have throughout the year avoided
any legal entanglements, and a clean slate awaits the Committee for 1915.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
HBHB9H^H| fred w. welsh, ^^^^gfl
Chairman, Building and Grounds Committee.
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REPORT OF THE MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
Vancouver, B. C, January 13th, 1915.
Mr. Chairman, Mrs. McNaughton and Gentlemen:—
I have much pleasure in submitting the following report for the
year 1914:
It is most gratifying to note the strong unanimous testimony borne by
you, Mr. Chairman, and by your standing committees to the excellent work
done in your schools during the past year. In the reports of the heads of
departments and supervisors, all of which I have carefully read and which
you have taken as read and ordered to be embodied in your annual report,
there is also struck that same note of satisfaction that comes from a realization of duty faithfully discharged.
As one instructed by you to exercise a general supervison over all
school activites and to advise you in regard to them, I assure you that, so-
far as I can judge, excellent work has been done in all your schools. It
may be well also for me to make clear to you why exceptionally good work
has been done. This explanation should serve a two-fold purpose. It
should increase the only reward that you as public servants can hope to
receive—"the consciousness of well-doing"; and it should serve as a stimulus
for you and coming trustees in the discharge of public duties.
You trustees are managing the biggest concern in this city today.
Strictly speaking you control the energies of over 15,000 people, ranging
from your head official down to the last child to enter a receiving class in
your schools. Rightly to control so vast a host of workers, preventing loss
of time, which always means waste, and preventing misunderstandings and
consequent fricton among employees, which always means inefficiency,
organization of a high order is a thing absolutely essential. That organization was completed and set in concrete form when in January last you had
published your Manual of Rules and Regulations. This manual sets
forth the general duties of all your workers. It is to them what chart and
compass are to mariners.
The value of this manual or rather the value of the organization which
it sets forth has been inestimable during the year. Enquiries from various
individuals as to what is expected of them or possibly of those closely associated with them in their work are now rarely made. When they are, the
answer is invariably given from the Manual and that is an end of the matter.
From it there is no appeal. Your workers, with the Britisher's respect for
constituted authority, carry out your wishes.
After one year's careful scrutiny of the regulations in your Manual
by all whom they affect.    I am convinced they are most satisfactory and 24
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
have proved a boon especially to recent employees. Doubtless, as your
school work expands, these rules will require revision; but for the present
they can only be ignored at the risk of loss.
A second factor contributing to a successful year's work in your
schools is the favorable conditions under which you have enabled your
employees to work. The energy and watchful care of both the Building
and Management Committee have been directed throughout the year to
making facilities for school work as near ideal as possible.
The Building Committee have been untiring in their efforts to provide
new up-to-date school buildngs, to have old buildings put in good repair,
and to have the heating, lighting and cleaning in all buildings as near perfect
as possible. They have also, as far as funds have permitted, done much
to beautify school grounds. All these things have tended to increase a justifiable pride in your schools on the part of all connected with them and
to result consequently in better work.
The Management Committee have provided teachers and pupils with
all needed school supplies. They have also provided the best teachers possible for the schools and have loyally supported them in their work. They
have held the balance true between them and those who have unwisely
endeavoured to interfere with them in the faithful discharge of duty. They
have, with like unflinching justice, held the balance true for parents by
removing from the teaching ranks those who are unable or unwilling to
give an adequate return for the privileges they enjoyed. Treatment such
as this has contributed much to a healthy tone in school life.
Your teachers and other employees fully appreciate what you have
done to make their tasks congenial; and they have endeavoured to repay
you with whole-souled, honest, effective service. I have been in close touch
with teachers and School Boards all my life but never have I found a band
of teachers more loyal to duty and more appreciative of just treatment at
the hands of a School Board than those who now teach in your schools.
Your determinaton to adhere to the present salary schedule has been
another factor in calling forth the best efforts of your teachers. It is to be
hoped that the Board for the coming year will pursue the same policy.
During the past years of unprecedented financial prosperity, many of your
brightest teachers felt dissatisfied teaching for a small monthly salary while
on every hand others of less ability and with little apparent effort were
becoming rich. This dissatisfaction was emphatically set forth by representative bodies of teachers who interviewed me shortly after my appointment in November, 1912. I then assured those deputations that I sympathized with them in their views; but pointed out that a change would
come in the near future not in increased remuneration for teachers but in
decreased remuneration for others not working for salary. It has come
more speedily than the most pessimistic of us ever dreamed of.    There has BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 25
been no increase of teachers' salaries practically since 1912. Still these
salaries today are big compared with the earnings of many others; but they
are none too big. If you are prepared to give teachers only a living wage
in good times and reduce that the moment hard times approach, you will
make them feel that they are not being justly treated; and the splendid
esprit de corps of the present teaching staff will suffer to the irreparable loss
of your children.
There are many reasons I might urge in favour of good salaries for
your teachers.     I shall present but the following:
The time and money spent by teachers in preparing for their life
work is, in many cases, and should be, in all cases, equal to that spent by
those entering other professions. There is no good reason, therefore, why
we should expect a teacher to be content with a $ 100 or even $200
salary in good times and much less in hard times while other professional
men counting theirs in the neighbourhood of thousands.
The ability to teach thirty or forty boys and girls and to do the best
for each, coupled with ability to guide assistants and deal wisely with thirty
or forty fathers and mothers is ability of no low order. It is ability that
cannot be secured for a remuneration not exceeding that whch is offered to
the "hewer of wood or the drawer of water." Let the unthinking say
what they may of boom salaries for teachers, you will be wise if you
continue to say as you have said in the past, 'We want ability of a high
order in our teachers and we are prepared to pay for it."
Again, consider the work to be done by teachers! It is theirs to
take the raw material—often very raw, young boys or girls with their
potentialities for good and evil, and train them up to strong, manly men
and womanly women with a decided bias toward right and an abhorrence
of wrong. This is the biggest and most important task to be done in our
nation today. It cannot be done by novices. It calls for our brightest
intellects and our truest hearts. You can help secure the workers by continuing your hitherto firm adherence to the principle, "the labourer is worthy
of his hire."
Lastly, permit me to say your teachers have shown themselves entitled
to your continued generous support in that they have demonstrated their
ability to use wisely the salaries they receive. Over fifteen months ago your
lady teachers with quick, womanly, sympathetic instinct detected the
approaching financial stringency and began in a small way to help those first
to be caught by the rising tidal wave of depression. They carried their
work on quietly and unostentatiously during the autumn of 1913 and
the winter of 1914. They contributed to relief by the hundreds of dollars.
By the time schools reopened in August last, even the less observant of your
men teachers began to realize that they too should be lending a helping
hand; and thus the work has grown till today your teachers and school
officials are contributing thousands of dollars monthly and have perfected 26
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
an organization which is finding profitable employment for hundreds who
would otherwise be idle and in want. I feel I am justified in declaring
that if all who are receiving an income in this city were to contribute as
liberally of their means and to plan as wisely for the providing of useful
work for the unemployed as your employees have done, unemployment
would become practically unknown in the city.
As you have by generous and wise treatment stimulated your teachers
during the past year to do their best, so your attitude toward me in my
work has made a busy year a pleasant one for me. Your kind offer last
March of a two months holiday for me to travel and study the best school
systems on the continent I appreciated most fully. You will remember
you left me free to select the time best suited for the purpose. That I
have not yet taken this holiday in no way indicates a lack of appreciation on
my part of your kindness or that I underestimate the great benefit such a
trip would be both to myself personally and to your schools. Nothing but
press of important work has kept me in Vancouver. I am glad to be able
to assure you now, however, that I hope to be able to go sometime during
the present term. My work for the past year has, I feel certain, the better
prepared me for this long-delayed tour of investigation.
In conclusion, I wish to express my continued confidence in my coworkers, my thanks to you and all others who have made my work pleasant
for the past year and my unbounded faith in the great possibilities that still
beckon us onward.
Respectfully submitted,
IB^^^M      J. S. GORDON, ^SE|^'^|fe|
Municipal Inspector of Schools.  DR.  F. W. BRYDONE-JACK
School Medical Officer
[ BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 29
SBR MEDICAL INSPECTION.  ^^^WI^^H
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Vancouver, B. C, Dec. 22nd, 1914.
Dear Sir:
The following is the report of the work done by the Medical Department for the year ending December 31 st, 1914:
No. of schools _  31
Highest enrollment 1 3382
No. of visits to schools  1 758
inspections    59970
pupils examined physically 12834
pupils examined at school clinic  1248
pupils excluded 1  392
pupils readmitted   365
notices sent  6780
home visits  3225
pupils   receiving  treatment   for  physical   defects   since  last
annual examination   2175
certificates given teachers.    270
treatments given in school  clinics  for minor  diseases,  not
requiring the family physician's attention  543
visits to hospitals and specialists.  54
Conditions found in 12834 physical examinations:
Vaccinated   I  231 8
Defective eyesight   425
Squint    67
Short sight (wearing glasses) 103
Farsight.  268
Deafness  257
Discharging ears 1  57
Wax in ears. K  250
Defective   nasal   breathing  152
Cleft palate _.    ..j  10
Bad permanent teeth -....Ji... 3812
Enlarged tonsils and adenoids  1 166
Goitre I...  183
Enlarged glands   (in neck)  282
Anaemia     309
Defective nutrition  165
Heart conditions, functional and organic  231
Deformities     141 30
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Skin Diseases—
Impetigo  ...j£  103
Pediculosis   I JL.:  266
Ringworm  I  78
Scabies  82
Unclean  270
Communicable Diseases in School Children—
Chicken pox (174 found on home visiting)      429
Diptheria   1
Il     Measles    J^B- (  38     "       "    i"   |" i)        62
19    Mumps    .^M' ( 79    I      "   §" S '* *)       146
Scarlet fever ....^        18
Whooping cough  (43 )           76
Never before in Vancouver have the schools been kept so clean and
sanitary.
There has been a marked improvement in the cleanliness of the school
children. Four years ago it was the exceptional child that had clean teeth.
Now it is frequent to find whole classes of children cleaning their teeth
regularly. This is due to the hard work done by our nurses, aided by the
active co-operation of the teachers.
During the past year the schools have been particularly free from
the serious infectious diseases—only one child having had diphtheria and
only 18 having had scarlet fever. These diseases show the control exercised by Medical Inspection.
During the past year we were able to obtain treatment for many poor
children suffering serious physical defects through the good will of the
Vancouver General Hospital, members of the Dental Association and members of the Vancouver Medical Association. I would recommend that
the Board instruct the Secretary to write the Secretaries of these organizations expressing the Board's appreciation of the services rendered to the
children for whose welfare the Board is, to a certain extent, responsible.
In August my assistant, Dr| A. W. Hunter, found that owing to
the growth of his private practice he could not continue in school work.
Hie sent in his resignation and Dr. Belle Wilson was appointed in his place.
We deeply regret losing Dr. Hunter, who proved himself exceptionally
capable. Dr. Wilson has already shown a keen insight into the work of
medical inspection.    She is an enthusiastic and a systematic worker. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
3.1
Ventilating
System—
Dawson
School
Illustrates the triple sheet of water, through which air is drawn by 10-ft. Sirocco fan shown below
Sirocco fan which draws air through triple sheet of water shown above and forces a perfectly
pure and adequate supply to all class-rooms 32
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
:--^^mXh   REPORT OF NURSING STAFF     |
Number of physical examinations assisted Medical Inspector with 12834
pupils inspected  r. 58050
pupils excluded      392
pupils re-admitted       365
notjces sent to parents   6780
pupils received treatment   3061
visits to schools 1    1333
visits to hospitals and specialists        54
swabs taken          10
treatments in school clinics      415
visits   to  homes    3225
Skin Diseases—
Eczema   I	
Impetigo  	
  14
..     96
Pediculosis, old   966
new   266
Ring worm 	
Scabies	
Unclean
Other Conditions-
Eye Trouble ....
Ear trouble	
Sore throat	
Enlarged glands
Unclassified 	
Infectious Diseases Found in Home Visits-
Mumps  	
71
58
170
32
10
22
2
38
79
Chicken   pox      174
Measles
38
Whooping cough        43
Found in School-
Chicken pox
Mumps 	
44
8
Dental Clinic—
Total number of children attending  122
Total number of treatments.!;.  1027
Prophylaxis   (cleaning   teeth)  122
Amalgam fillings  jjj,  182
Cement fillings  73
Devitalized pulp and filled roof canals  73
Extractions    I^B-  124
Other treatments      455 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
33
At the beginning of the year the School Board appointed Dr. R. C.
Bamford to take charge of this work and fitted up a room with the necessary apparatus—everything white, clean and sanitary. Only thirty hours
a month is given to this work. The time is very inadequate when we
consider that only 122 children have received treatment during the year
and that only applications received before the Summer holidays have been
dealt with. Those applying for treatment since then have had to be put
off indefinitely. It is, therefore, to be most strongly recommended, if the
Board can provide the means, to have a dentist operating at the School
Board offices three hours every school day during the coming year.
In closing this report the Medical Department heartily thank the
Board, 'the officials, the teachers and the janitors for their active co-operation
in helping us to carry out our work in the schools.
Respectfully submitted,
•    :^^^^SII:li   F* W* BRYDONE-JACK,   fHBH
School Medical Officer.
I 34
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
MEDICAL INSPECTION IN OTHER CITIES AS SEEN BY
^^^^^^^H  OUR HEAD NURSE   {Hp
Vancouver, B. C,
^^^^^^^^^^^tt^^^^^^H °ct°ber |9'|9j4-
Mr. Chairman, Mrs. McNaughton and Gentlemen:—
I have much pleasure in submitting a report on Medical Inspection
of Schools and School Nursing as it is being conducted in the cities which
I ^was privileged -to visit -during -the leave of absence granted me last May
and June. In this time I visited schools in Chicago, Evanston, Detroit,
Montreal, Boston, New York and Toronto. In reviewing, I have endeavoured to report on each activity in the school system which in any way is
connected with the Medical Department.
In all cities the main objects of Medical Inspection are the same, namely
the detecting and correcting of physical defects, the control of infectious disease, the preventing of disease by providing sanitarv and healthful surroundings, both in the school and the home, and by the education of parents and
children. In this way to assist the educational authorities in their work
by providing them with healthier pupils, less loss of school time will result.
Before describing the methods, I should like to speak about the control of Medical Inspection of Schools. This is an important point which
has a great bearing on the work and on the character of the work done.
In Chicago, Detroit and New York, Medical Inspection of Schools is
carried on under the control of the Board of Health. In Montreal and
Toronto the control is entirely with the Board of Education. Boston finds
itself in the anomalous position of having the Medical Inspectors under the
Board of Health, and the School Nurses controlled by the Board of Education.
It was noticed that in the cities where the control is with the Board
of Education, the Medical Inspectors and Nurses seem to be really a part
of the school system and to have a recognized place on the school staff, a
more complete organization exists and more systematic work is done. Where
they come as representatives of the Health Department, the fact that they
do not belong to the school, but are merely visitors is apparent. There
seems to be a tendency among Health Department Officials to look upon
Medical Inspection as merely one way to control infectious disease, and to
pay very little attention to the prevention of disease, overlooking the fact
that one of our most important duties is to keep Tvell children H>ell. Dual
control such as is in vogue in Boston, does not seem at all desirable, and
can only result in friction and confusion. The general consensus of opinion
among the majority of those engaged in the work of Medical Inspection of BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
35
school children, and also among the principals and teachers, was that the
Board of Education should be supreme in the schools and all school workers under their control, the result being greater harmony, and therefore
higher efficiency.
Of the twenty states in the Union having laws governing Medical
Inspecton of school children, seventeen have placed the control with the
Board of Education. In Canada, British Golumbia is the only Province
having Provincial law governing this and though the direction of Medical
Inspection is under the Provincial Board of Health, the actual work is under
the control of the local Boards of Education.
In the cities' where Medical Inspection of school children is carried
on by the Health Department, such as in Chicago, Detroit and New York,
the doctor in charge of the "Child Welfare" or, as it is sometimes called,
*The Division of Child Hygiene" is also Chief Medical Inspector of
Schools, Medical Inspector of Schools being one of its departments.
Under his supervision a staff of half-time medical officers inspects the schools.
In the majority of large cities, they are employed for three hours daily,
from 9 to 12, but in Detroit and Boston, two hours only are given.
Both men and women inspectors are engaged in the work, but in no
city did I see any division of work in regard to the boys and girls, each
Medical Inspector being appointed to schools, usually 3-4, and examining
all pupils in that school.
The work of the Medical Inspectors may be reviewed under two
headings.
1. The work in the schools.
2. Field work.
Under the first heading comes the examination for physical defects
and the examination of absentees. Many variations were seen in the
methods of work, for example, in Chicago, the Medical Inspectors are
engaged for the morning only, but during the time must visit each school
in their district, usually three or four. It is their duty to see all pupils
sent to them by the teacher or the nurse for special examinations. In the
physical examination, the Inspector is assisted by the nurse who makes
the records, sends out the notices to parents, etc. These examinations are
made in a classroom, or in the basemest, or any place that may be convenient at the time. No screen is used and no examination of the heart
or lungs is made except where specially indicated, the examination consisting of an inspection of the skin, scalp, mouth, teeth, throat, eyes and
ears. If, for any reason, the Inspector, considers an examination of the
heart or lungs necessary this is given, but it is not routine. All schools in
Chicago are supplied with scales, and the height and weight of each
pupil are taken yearly.    It is the aim of the Chicago authorities to examine all children once a year, but this is not being accomplished. Before a
child can be examined a consent card must be signed by the parent. This
occasions much delay, and we were told that there were thousands of
children in Chicago schools still unexamined for this reason. All other
cities have embodied compulsory inspection in the School Law,and experience very little difficulty in enforcing it.
Much the same method is followed in Detroit and Boston, but in
Boston all boys entering school sports must have an examination of the
heart and lungs by the School Inspector and present to the Physical Director
a certificate of physical fitness.
In Toronto, a similar examination is given by the Medical Inspectors
but, excepting in special cases, the nurse is not present as no clothing is
loosened. Where the Inspector finds that an examination of the heart or
lungs is desirable, a notice is sent to parents informing them of this and
asking them to meet the Medical Inspector at a given time at the school,
when the child will be examined. If the parents cannot arrange to be present, they are requested to sign a card giving the Inspector permission to
examine the pupil. Toronto is the only city visited which employs a specialist in tuberculosis. All children who have been exposed to tuberculosis
and who appear to have a tendency are referred by the Medical Inspector
to the Tuberculosis Specialist who follows up the cases recommending them
to open-air. class rooms, to the Preventoriums or Sanitoriums as the case
requires.
As mentioned before, Medical Inspectors in all these cities excepting
New York must visit each of the schools assigned to them daily, following
a schedule which is approved by the Chief Medical Inspector. In Chicago,
Detroit and Boston, all children who have been absent from school for
more than one day are referred to School Medical Officer. In Toronto and
New York absentees are referred to the School Nurse who decides whether
it is necessary for the Medical Health Inspector to see them. This method
saves time for the Medical Inspector as there are many cases which it is
quite unnecessary for him to see. 'This method of daily visits to the schools
assists materially in controlling infectious disease. The Medical Inspectors
have the power of giving certificates of readmission after infectious diseases.
New York differs from all in the system of work. The inspectors
visit the schools on two successive days each week the principals being
informed of the time of visit) and make special examinations besides doing
a number of physical examinations. These examinations are conducted in
a similar manner to those already described. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
37
Field Work or Home Visiting.
Chicago:      No home visiting required of M.I.S.
Detroit:      No home visiting required of M.I.S.
MONTREAL: No home visiting required of M.I.S.
BOSTON: No home visiting required of M.I.S.
TORONTO: All cases reported as suspected contagious disease must
be visited by the School Medical Officer.
New YORK: All children reported absent from school for more
than three days from unassigned cause, must be visited by the
M.I.S., the object being to discover unreported cases of contagious disease.
CHICAGO employs a staff of nurses in connection with the Department
of Health to visit all cases of reported contagious disease.
In all cities where a staff of school nurses is employed, the work is.
carried on under the direction of a Superintendent of School Nurses. In
cities which employ a large number of school nurses, such as Chicago with
a staff of 240, New York with 191, in addition to the Superintendent and
her assistants, a number of nurses are engaged as Field Supervisors. Their
duties are to oversee the work of the nurses in the district to which they are
assigned.
The work of the school nurses, like that of the Medical Inspectors,,
may be classed under two headings:
1. School work.
2. Field work.
Each nurse is assigned to duty in a certain number of schools, the-
number being governed by the size of the school and the environment. AH
cities require a daily visit to each school by the nurse. In New York the
nurse must visit each of her schools before 1 1 a.m. In Chicago and
Boston the nurse is required to be present at all physical examinations made
by the Inspector, make all records and send out all notices to parents, and
as the Board of Health controls medical inspection, all records must be
made in duplicate—one copy for the Board of Health and one for the
Board of Education. In New York and Toronto all records of physical
examinations are left for the nurse who sends out the notices necessary. Air
clerical work in connection with the inspections, record cards, etc., is also*
done by the School Nurse.
Routine inspections, or as they are sometimes called "class room inspections," which consist of inspection of skin, scalp, mouth and teeth for
cleanliness, verminous conditions and evidences of contagious disease, are- 38
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
made regularly by the nurses. With one exception these are made in the
class room and take from 1 to 20 minutes according to the size of the
class. In Chicago, each child is examined separately in the nurses' room,
but this method results in a great loss of time and in greater disturbance
to the class • room, as the passing in and out of forty children is very
disturbing. About 45 minutes was spent in inspecting a class of 39 pupils.
The majority of cities require that the nurse inspect all classes once monthly,
and special schools and classes more frequently. Toronto requires each
class to be inspected every two weeks. In Toronto and New York the
nurse must examine at the time of her daily visits to school all pupils who
have been absent from school more than one day and if necessary refer
them to the Medical Inspector.
The nurse also conducts a school clinic daily at each school. Until
two or three years ago, all contagious skin diseases were excluded from
school, but this caused a great loss of school time and it has been proved
that these diseases can be controlled and the children kept in school with
no danger to others if proper treatment is given. All cases of this nature
referred by the Medical Inspector are treated, also cases found by the
School Nurse in her routine inspections, and cases referred by teachers.
All minor injuries are also attended to here. All cases are, of cowse,
referred, to the Medical Inspector on his first visit to the school for confirmation of diagnosis.
Toronto and Boston have splendidly equipped medical rooms. New
York has a few, but in the majority of cases the work is handled with
difficulty in the schools. Chicago nurses also have not the conveniences
that would aid materially in their work, though all conduct clinics.
Health talks are given by the nurses and advice on personal hygiene,
etc. These talks are given in different ways. Some speak to the class
for 2 or 3 minutes at the time of routine inspection, others say a word or
two to each child personally—all are expected to use every opportunity
offered. Tooth brush drills are conducted, the children being taken in
several groups and instructed in the proper use of the brush.
The Nurse's Work in the Home.
When physical defects requiring treatment are found, parents must
be notified. A notification card is sent to the parent recommending that
the child be taken to the family physician. If at the end of three days the
child shows no evidence of treatment, a notice is sent asking the parent to
call at the school at a stated time to confer with the doctor or nurse. If
the parent calls as suggested, the nature of the defect and the necessity for
treatment is explained. If the parents do not respond, the nurse visits the
home, explains the character of the defect, the need of treatment, the beneficial results which may be expected, etc. Repeated visits are
made until results are obtained or absolute refusal encountered.     Where BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 39
parents are financially unable to provide treatment, or by reason of home
duties or occupation are unable to take the child to a physician, it is the
nurse's duty to do so, first obtaining the written consent of the parent.
In Chicago a slip is attached to the notification card of, physical defect, reguesting that the card be signed by the physician giving treatment
and then returned to the school. If this is not done within a reasonable
time, it is the duty of the nurse to visit the home, and see that treatment
is received either by the family physician or through a hospital or dispensary.
In Detroit, Toronto, and Boston, there is not as great an effort made
to have the parent come to the school. Upon the discovery of a condition
requiring treatment, a notice is sent to the parent. It then devolves upon
the nurse to visit the home and see that the child receives treatment. The
same plan for obtaining treatment, either by family physician or through
hospital or dispensary, is followed.
AH cities require home visiting of the School Nurses and place great
importance on this branch. All responsibility in obtaining treatment for
physical defects and abnormal conditions rests with the nurse.
The nurse must make a record of all treatments received on the
pupil's physical record card.
In Toronto, Chicago, and Detroit, all children absent from school
through illness or unassigned causes must be visited by the School Nurse.
In New York this visiting is done by the Medical Inspector. This method
of home visiting of absentees by the Medical Inspector and School Nurses
lessens materially the work of the attendance officers and prevents a loss
of time and an overlapping of work which occurs when all visits for absentees are made by the attendance officers. In the latter method all cases
of illness found by the attendance officers have to be revisited by the school
nurses. In most of the Eastern cities the attendance officers look after truant
cases only.
Records.
In all cities we found a most careful record kept of all work done.
This entails a large amount of clerical work, though printed forms are used
for everything possible. Chicago possibly is most elaborate in its forms of
reports, and also most exacting. Every inspector and nurse is required to
have their daily report at the Health Department by 9:00 a.m. the follow- I
ing day or give adequate reason for its non-arrival. This system of daily
reports is adhered to in all cities. Medical Inspectors are required to send
daily reports of their work to the central office, whether Board of Health
or Board of Education. The completeness of these reports vary in different places, but all report on the number of schools visited, the time of arrival
and departure at schools, the number of children examined, etc.; also all
contagious diseases found. This is all filled in on cards supplied for that
purpose.    These are gone over personally by the chief medical inspector or 40
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
superintendent of nurses as the case may be, before being filed by the
office assistant, in order that the superintendent may keep in touch with
the work, and any unsatisfactory reports can then be enquired into by the
head of the department. In places where field supervisors are employed,
they report for their district.
The percentage of treatments obtained for physical defects in the
Eastern cities is much higher than in the West and may be accounted for
by the number of agencies which they have for help.
All cities have out-patients departments in their hospitals, also numerous free dispensaries conducted by various charitable organizations, pre-
ventoria and sanitoria of various kinds. All these can be utilized in
obtaining treatments. In New York the Board of Health conducts a large
number of clinics for school children only. These are open from 2:00 to
5:00 p.m. daily, and from 9::00 to 12:00 a.m. on Saturdays. Each
clinic has the following service:
1. Eye diseases.
(a) Contagious eye diseases;
(b) Refraction.
2. Nose and throat diseases.
3. Skin diseases.
|p8 3.     Dental. ^Kt^^^^^^^^^^^SSa^^^mKgp^^
Some of the eye clinics for contagious diseases are conducted in the
school buildings, an eye specialist and a nurse being provided by the Health
Department for this work.
Dental Clinics.
All cities recognize the importance of caring for the teeth and Free
Dental Clinics are being conducted in most cities. Chicago, New York
and Toronto operate School Dental Clinics. In Boston the work for
school children is done at the Harvard Medical School and the Tufts
Dental College. These are both large institutions and a great deal of
work is done. In one room alone we saw 84 dentists operating at one
time. In July of this year a new institution known as the Forsyth Dental
Clinic was opened in Boston. This is a memorial to the Forsyth Brothers,
and three years have been spent in completing the building and equipment.
It will provide for 200,000 treatments yearly. This will be so controlled
that all able to pay will be referred to their family dentist. The method
followed at the Harvard Medical School is commendable. At this institution people can obtain competent dental service at a greatly reduced rate.
This meets a long-felt want, for many feel that they cannot pay the regular rates, but are not eligible or willing to enter as free patients.
In Toronto and Chicago the Dental Clinics are conducted in the
schools during school hours.    In Toronto, the morning only is given for BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 41
the work, Saturday included. These clinics are continued during the
summer months. Toronto and Chicago each have nine Dental Clinics,
but in addition have Municipal Dental Clinics and Dental Schools where
children may obtain treatment. In Detroit all needy children receive dental
care at the Municipal Clinics.
New York has six School Clinics and nineteen Municipal Dental
Clinics, but in addition to these are many dental clinics in connection with
Dental Colleges, etc., where treatment may be obtained.
School Buildings and Grounds.
I Many of the older cities leave much to be desired in the way of
school buildings and grounds. The buildings in many cases are much older
than any in our own city. These are gradually being replaced by new,.
up-to-date buildings, but even the old buildings are being equipped with
the most approved sanitary fixtures and drinking fountains. Many of the
schools are made very attractive by plants, statuary and pictures.
We were struck by the very small grounds surrounding the schools-
in the large cities, particularly in the down town districts. In no place did
we see any grounds equalling our own in size. One could readily understand why the playground idea has been taken up so enthusiastically when
there is no place for the children except the very narrow streets. In one
of the large New York schools, which had an enrolment of 2,700 children,
we found that recess was given to classes at different periods as the ground
was so small, scarcely room for them to line up. In fact, when school was
called the lines filled the school ground. Most of the grounds are planked
or cemented.
The schools in the suburbs or less congested parts had much larger
grounds.
In many cases we noticed an equipped playground not far from the
school. Some of the schools were fortunately situated near a small park
or square, then these were utilized. One small school in Boston for the
mentally weak, we found having games in an.old church yard conveniently
situated across the street. The Boston School Committee conducts fifty-
three supervised playgrounds.
In connection with the sanitary arrangements in the schools, many in
the crowded sections of New York, Boston and Chicago are supplied with
baths. In the majority of schools these are shower baths with possibly
four or six bath tubs. The bathroom is in charge of an attendant. All
children who are not presentable for the school room are sent to the bathroom for attention. A regular plan is also arranged whereby pupils are
divided into groups, and each group sent to the bathroom at regular intervals for a shower, the number in the groups being governed by the capacity
of the bathroom. Children attending fresh air classes are showered twice
a week.    Their weight is also taken twice weekly.
J 42
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
This system of bathing is most necessary in the congested districts
where families are crowded together in two or three rooms and have no
facilities for bathing. It is also conducive to establishing habits of cleanliness.
Ventilation.
The fan system of ventilation is used extensively, though many of the
most prominent authorities advocate the fresh air system. In Boston the
school regulations require a temperature of 67 degrees, the freest possible
use of open windows and the flushing of the school room with fresh air
frequently.     No stationary windows are allowed in school rooms.
The beneficial results obtained from the open window class rooms
have led to their establishment in many schools. In many of the newer
schools, the rooms are especially planned for this purpose. In others, the
ordinary class rooms are utilized, the windows on one side of the room
being kept wide open all the time and the temperature kept at 67 degrees.
The pupils in these "open window rooms" are not tuberculous, but are
usually children suffering from malnutrition, anemia and various disorders.
In 'these classes provision is made for food, clothing and rest, and children
receive special treatment according to their needs. As mentioned before
their weight is taken twice weekly and a shower bath also given. A careful record is kept by the school nurse of all children in these special classes,,
and in almost every case there has been a marked improvement in both
mental and physical activity.
Open air classes were also visited in Chicago, Boston and New York.
Chicago has an especially good organization. Two classes were visited
which are conducted on the roof of the Elizabeth McCormick nursery in
connection with the famous Hull House. At this school the classes are
held on the roof summer and winter. Two large tents with adjustable side
curtains are used as classrooms. The teachers and all teaching equipment
and lunches are supplied by the Board of Education. The lunch room
and maid are provided by the Associated Charities, and the nurse by the
Board of Health. The children in this type of school are all tuberculous
or have a tendency to be and are selected by the Medical Inspector of
Schools. There are several schools of this type in Chicago, New York
and Boston. A programme is arranged and followed daily which includes
a lunch of a glass of milk at 10:30 and 3:30; dinner at 12:00, and a rest
period from 1 :00 to 2:30. This is taken in the open air in cots provided
for the purpose. Proper clothing is provided as well as arrangements for
the care of it.
Another type of fresh air school is the Forest School. Boston, New
York, Chicago, Toronto and many other cities conduct these schools. They
are carried on, as their name suggests, in a park or forest. In Toronto
there are two schools of this type, open from May until October. Children
attend from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. A regular daily programme is followed, including lunches, bathing, sleep and school work.    The staff at Jjt BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 43   |
each school consists of two teachers, one nurse, one cook, a helper and a
physical instructor. The expense is all borne by the Board of Education.
These classes are designed for the physically undeveloped, poorly nourished, underfed, anemic and pre-tuberculous children. The open air school
is one of the greatest factors in the prevention of disease and in the building
up of mental and bodily vigor. The authorities in Toronto received many
more applications for children to attend the forest school this year than
they could possibly care for. This they considered one of the greatest
proofs of the success of the undertaking.
Other Special Classes
Many of the educational authorities have inaugurated special classes
for various types of children, whose defects bring them particularly under
the care of the Medical Department.
Detroit, Chicago, New York and Boston all conduct classes for the
mentally weak. These are carried en much along the same lines as in
Vancouver, much prominence being given to Manual Training. These
cases are selected by the Medical Inspectors or Nurses. In all places the
Binet system is used to determine the mental state of the pupil. In one
school seen in Boston we found that in place of a Manual Training Teacher
giving instruction to the pupils in these classes, boys of the senior grade were
giving instruction under supervision. They seemed much interested in this
work and the teacher reported very good results.
In addition to these schools, Boston has a school for the deaf in
which 1 6 teachers are employed. A teacher has also been assigned to give
special help to the children entering the High Schools. A special "Trade
Course" is given to the older pupils in silver-smithing and the making of
jewellery for the boys, and dressmaking and millinery for the girls.
Special classes are held for children with defective speech. There
are two centres for this work, the children being divided into groups and
each group receiving two lessons a week of one and a half hours each. A
special class for the semi-blind is also maintained.
Classes of a similar type to these mentioned are also established in
New York, Chicago and most of our large cities. Classes, or in some
cases, special schools for the crippled are held. All these schools have a
nurse in attendance and are under the supervision of an inspector.
In Boston, I heard of classes that were new to me. These were
classes which are formed for children for whom the regular grade work
does not give enough* to do. When held back by the average pupil, the
tendency is for bright children to grow listless and lose interest in the classes.
These classes are in the hands of teachers selected most carefully. Overwork must be most carefully guarded against. 'These are known as "Rapid
Advancement Classes.
I 1"!
44
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
In all the seaport cities I found "Steamship Classes." These correspond to our Oriental classes and are composed of all types and nationalities of emigrants.
Little Mother Classes.
With the exception of Boston all cities visited are conducting "Little
Mother Classes." It has been found that in most of our large cities
in the care of babies would result in better babies and a lower death-rate
Many of the mothers being at work all day, it was thought that instruction
in the care of babies would result in better babies and a lower death rate
during the summer months. These lessons are made as simple and instructive as possible, practical demonstrations being given. The usual course
comprises instruction and demonstration in the following: The bathing
of a baby, dressing, proper clothing, making of bed, etc., the value of
sleep, fresh air, cleanliness, etc., and the care of milk and feeding bottle, etc.
It was also thought that classes of this kind would be of great educational
value to the girls in future years, as many mothers have very little idea
of the proper care of an infant. In Toronto the course in "Little Mothers*
Work'! has been extended to include simple forms of Home Nursing. At
present, in all cities, these classes are carried on as supplementary to the
usual school work and are held after school, but all are hoping that a place
will be given them in the regular school curriculum. All instruction in
home nursing is given by the school nurses in all cities.
In Toronto a most interesting morning was spent at the Central Neighborhood House. Here the Board of Education has obtained the use of
the kitchen, dining room, sewing room, and reading room, and an experiment
is being conducted. A class of girls is sent two mornings a week and
receive one hour's instruction each in sewing, domestic science, and home
nursing. The class is divided into three groups and each teacher and the
nurse gives their lessons. The idea here is that the pupils are being taught
to do things under conditions that are similar to those in their own homes.
The house is an old fashioned one, the plumbing out of date, and all furniture, equipment and supplies of the cheapest; nevertheless, the pupils are
taught how to cook, sew and care for a family in the most economical way
possible, and at the same time to make a home attractive and clean.
There were many other special features brought to my notice. One
of these, called the "Parental Teachers' Association" interested me very
much. This is an association which meets monthly at each school. Parents and teachers attend. A regular programme of interesting talks is
arranged and the meeting is also thrown open each month and the parents
given an opportunity to enquire into any matter of school work or administration which they may wish to have explained. It is thought that in this
way the parents will be brought into a closer understanding of the aims of
the school. I found these associations in existence under various names in
nearly every city. All teachers and school nurses are expected to attend
these meetings. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
45
Health Day was another interesting feature. I was not able to see
this conducted, but found that in several cities one day each year is set
aside for this. On this day special exercises ware held in the various classrooms. In the older classes, talks and demonstrations are given by doctors,
nurses, etc. Parents and others interested are invited. The object is to
emphasize to teachers, parents and children the real value of health.
This, of course, is merely an outline of the work which is being done.
The details, while interesting, would no doubt prove wearisome. Owing
to the fact that the schools in the East closed on June 19th, it was necessary
to hurry over parts of the work on which one felt longer time should be
spent. This fact also made it rather difficult at times to get a clear idea
of method, as the work seemed to become rather disorganized towards the
close of the term. However, I feel much valuable information was obtained
as well as an insight into the many systems, and hope to use much of the
information and ideas gathered to advantage in our schools.
In conclusion, I wish to thank the Board of Trustees for the leave
of absence granted me, which made all this possible.
Respectfully submitted,
Slip        :^^^^R ELIZABETH   G.   BREEZE, ;^^H
School   Nurse.
WARD-DtBtO">. 46
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 1.   J. S. Gordon, Municipal Inspector
2.   S. Northrop, Supervisor, Manual Training
3. Miss    H.   Berry,   Supervisor,    Domestic
Science.
4. G   P. Hicks, Supervisor, Music.
5. C.   H.   Scott,   Dip.    G.S.A.,   Supervisor,
Drawing.
6. l,ieut.    Bundy,    Supervisor,    Physical
Culture.
7. Miss M, Creelman, Supervisor, Sewiiig".
8. Miss E, Trembath, Supervisor, Primary
Work,
9. Miss C,  K.  Butler.  Assist. Supervisor,
Music,  BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
49
DRAWING.
Vancouver, B.C., Dec. 31st,   1914,
/. 5. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
■ H     City.       SB     jjjjpj|      •  § - ^^^^^^^^^^ft
Dear Sir—
I beg to submit the following report on Drawing for the year ending
December, 1914.
On commencing my work as Supervisor in August, 1914, I found
the Drawing in the schools in a healthy condition, which is evidence of
the good work done by my predecessor.
Briefly, the aim of drawing as an educational factor is threefold, viz:
to awaken and develop the powers of accurate observation, to give skill of
hand, and to train the memory.
With that threefold aim the drawing course includes: Freehand
Drawing in light and shade and color from common and natural objects:
Simple Designs based on geometrical form: Geometrical Drawing.
In the Primary classes the work is done in pastel and watercolor
from simple objects and seasonable nature forms.
Much good work has been accomplished in these classes, but there
is still evidence of a lack of co-relation between the Drawing lesson and the
Nature or Language lesson.
This is especially unfortunate in the Primary classes where the appeal
is largely through the senses. Too often is the child "drilled" for mere
hand work, to the detriment of his perceptive' and inventive faculties.
Good work is being done by the Junior classes both in Freehand Drawing and Color Work. Ruler work, however, is distinctly weak and bears
evidence of a lack of that carefulness in measurement that is so essential
in all "mechanical" or "technical" drawing.
Design work in this grade is largely based on the ruler work.
Much careful work is being done by the Intermediate and Senior
classes alike in Freehand Drawing, Design and Geometry.
In respect of Freehand Drawing, I regret the weakness in knowledge
of Light and Shade displayed by those grades, and also the strong tendency on the part of some classes to draw from a theoretical knowledge of
the form rather than from actual observation.    Object drawing from theory 50
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
is a distinctly bad fault for it at once disposes of "exercised observation,"
one of the most valuable of mental processes in drawing.
While work on the whole is good, much still remains to be done, and
it can not be done as it should be if the Supervisor remain without an
assistant.
A two-monthly visit is all too little, unsatisfactory alike for teacher
and supervisor, and I would strongly recommend the appointment of an
assistant supervisor who would relieve me of the Primary Work, thus
leaving me free to strengthen the remaining Public and High School
grades.
I would further recommend that an Art Master be appointed to take
the art work of the King George and Britannia High Schools.
Alt present this work is being done by teachers of other subjects, and,
however conscientious they may be they cannot exact that quality which
should be looked for in High School work.
For that reason and the added probability of increased classes in the
High School next year, I make the above recommendation.
The prevailing courtesy of school officials and teachers has helped
me to enjoy my five months' work here, and I look forward hopefully to
my work under the Vancouver Board of School Trustees.
Respectfully submitted,
l^HHHH^HHl 4 charles h. scott, H|
Supervisor of Drawing. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
51
MUSIC.
Vancouver, B.C., January 12th, 1915.
]. S.  Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector  of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir—
I have great pleasure in presenting this my ninth Annual Report of
the Music Department, because we are able to look back over a year of
progress.
In many respects the past year has been the most successful we have
yet had. There has been patient, systematic plodding all along the line,
and good results have been obtained. Through the hearty co-operation
and painstaking efforts of our principals and teachers, we have been enabled to lay a good foundation for future development.
I am pleased to report that the great majority of our teachers are doing their own work. It has been our constant aim to encourage the timid
ones. A year or two ago there were a number of teachers who really felt
they could never teach music* who to-day are doing creditable work;
there are a few yet remaining who, I am afraid, will require a great deal
of encouraging before they can be persuaded that they can teach the subject. However the interest manifested in the subject by the teaching staff
generally is very encouraging as it insures success for the future.
During the year the King Edward Course has been supplanted by
the Canadian Edition of the New Educational Music Course. Both teachers and pupils have taken very kindly to the change.
We have also compiled a small Manual and Syllabus for the guidance and help of our teachers, which the Board very kindly printed and
distributed among them. We have now a well-defined graded course from
the Receiving Class to the High School. It is interesting to note the
uniform progress in several schools since the Syllabus has been in operation.
We are now laying plans for some systematic work in our High
Schools, but it will be impossible to get the machinery in operation until
the beginning of another school year, when the time-tables are revised.
We have made a beginning, however, and shall look forward to the time
when we shall have a thoroughly graded course of music instructions in
these schools, with credits given, which course should include not only
vocal music but instrumental, also theory and the first studies in harmony.
We might also give credits to pupils taking the High School course with
private teachers, this is done in some places with most gratifying results. 52
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Our Night School classes are progressing very satisfactorily, although the attendance is not quite so large as last year.
In the month of April we held a very interesting and successful Competitive Festival extending over two days. Three valuable trophies were
donated by influential persons for competition. Twelve schools entered
choirs of fifty voices each, who were trained wholly by the teachers. Each
choir sang the test piece selected by the donors of the prizes, and one
piece of their own choosing. The competition was very keen, indeed so
keen that the adjudicators had some difficulty in awarding the prizes,
slating that the standard attained was much higher than they had ex-
expected. The first prize went to the Lord Roberts School, the second
to the Alexandra School and the third to the Simon Fraser School.
After the competition 1000 children, accompanied by the Orchestra
of the Vancouver Musical Society presented a splendid programme which
was much enjoyed by a very large audience.
The Second Day was taken up by the Musical Society, which gave
an artistic rendering of Mendelsohn's "Hymn of Praise," and a miscellaneous programme.
The Musical Society, which now has a membership of two hundred,
has given the "Messiah" and several other important works. It is the product of our Night School work, and is doing much to stimulate musical
appreciation in our midst.
During the year we have been honored with visits by a number of
teachers from other cities enquiring into our methods.
We are tempted to speak of the importance of music teaching in the
Public Schools, its proper place in the curriculum, its beneficient influence
upon child life, its value as a community asset, etc., but cannot in a brief
resume of the year's work. We are glad, however, that music is coming
more and more into prominence as an educational subject.
In conclusion, permit me to express my sincere thanks to you, sir, for
the unfailing interest you have displayed in the work of the Music Department, which has been most helpful and encouraging; to the Board of
Trustees for their generosity in granting supplies, and other acts of kindness shown; to the supervisors, principals and teachers, for all kindness received during the year, which has been one of sweet harmony.
Respectfully submitted,
B H^^^MH|H||^^^s ge°- p- hicks, BB
Supervisor of Music.   BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
55
PHYSICAL CULTURE AND CADET CORPS.
Vancouver, B.C., December 31st, 1914.
]. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
City.       mm It
Dear Sir—
I have much pleasure in submitting to you the Annual Report on
Physical Culture and Cadet Corps for the year ending December  31st,
i9M-  ^^^pB- B! bb«f i     t iP
PHYSICAL Culture—In dealing with this subject, I desire to
state briefly that from careful observation during my visits to teachers and
classes there is little else to report but continued progress. I have carefully
observed the instructional lessons given by the teachers to the pupils and
the working of the schedule of exercises as planned for each grade.
I have found that with a few coirrections here and there (which are
always very important), all teachers who have qualified now have a good
grasp of their series of exercises for the various grades. The only exception to the foregoing' is that in a few of the Senior Grades the progression has not been all that is desired, with consequent loss of benefit to the
pupils. I have found this to be due mainly to the fact that of late teachers
attending qualifying courses have not been instructed or required to take
examination in the full course as laid down in the Syllabus of Exercises.
I very much regret that this change was made, since the full course of 72
tables of exercises was given to the teachers when the present system was
first introduced, and was afterwards changed to 1 2 and then to 48 tables.
As our present system has always embodied the teaching of the entire 72
tables as required by the Syllabus of Instruction, I beg to recommend that
in future all teachers attending a course of instruction be instructed in the
full course.
Teachers' Instructional Class—At the beginning of the year
I had the honor to instruct a class of teachers at the King Edward High
School in connection with the Night Schools, and I am pleased to report
that all, excepting two, were successful in obtaining the certificate required by the conditions of the Strathcona Trust. At present there are a
few teachers on the staff who are as yet not qualified, but these are seemingly doing their best for the benefit of the pupils.
FlRE DRILL—Very close attention has been given to the Fire Drill
as far as the practice of the individual classes is concerned, and I have
found that all teachers are keeping their classes well in practice. "General Alarms" have also been given at which both teachers and pupils have
responded very well. 56
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
28
1
32
27f|
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# 31
24 1
1
§28
58 1
2
R63
31 1
1
P33
29 m
1
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i^B^IBl CADET CORPS ORGANIZATION.   BBPIB
At the commencement of the present year, the thirteen (13) Cadet
Corps of the City Schools were in a flourishing condition, their organization
being as follows:
No. 433—Fairview Schpol D. A.  Boyes....  3
No. 434—Kitsilano School T.W.Woodhead   3
No. 435—Tennyson School H. L.  Paget....  3
m    Ait.    r\ c l    i J.   R-   Pollock..  3
INo. 43d—Dawson ochool \r   ^   »*
V. Z.. Manning..
No. 437—Grandview School.j|R. Straight  3
No. 438—-Simon Fraser School..O. J. Thomas.... 3
No. 439—Gen. Gordon School..H.   B.  King  3
No. 440—Lord  Nelson School. F. A. Jewett  3
No. 442—Alexandra School I   M. Mullin.... 3
No. 443—Cecil Rhodes School. R. P. Steeves.... 3
No. 445—Model School J. Dunbar   3
No. 446—Macdonald School.... W. C. Keith.... 3
No. 462—Laura Secord School. L.   B.   Code  .... 3
Grand  Total  474
Much, however, remained to be done as regards instructing, organizing and equipping these corps, until in June it was decided to hold the
Annual Inspection. The following schedule was arranged and met with
the approval of the instructors:
Inspection of Cadet Corps.
Monday, June 1st.
Cadet Corps No. 436—Dawson School      9 a.m.
434—Kitsilano  School    I    10 a.m.
443—Cecil Rhodes School m      1 p.m.
435—Lord Tennyson School   3.30 p.m.
439—General Gordon School 2.15 p.m.
Tuesday, June 2nd.
446—Macdonald School   9 a.m.
■ ».   I    ..     ^| 440—Lord Nelson School     10.30 a.m.
437—Grandview School    1 p.m.
462—Laura Secord School   2.15 p.m.  llllliiilll
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59
Thursday, June 4th.
Cadet Corps No. 445—Model School    1   p.m.
442—Alexandra  School     2.30 p.m.
Friday, June 5 th.
433—Fairview School  1 p.m.
438—Simon Fraser School  2.30 p.m.
The Inspection, as arranged, was carried out successfully, Major
W. H. Belson, O. & I. Cadets for the province, being the inspecting officer, whose report has been duly received as being exceedingly satisfactory.
During the Inspection a competition was held between the two (2)
battalions (into which the corps are organized) for the valuable trophy
donated by Lt. Col. G. McSpadden, Officer Commanding the Irish Fusiliers of Canada.
Another splendid trophy was at the same time donated by Trustee
J. R. Seymour, for competition in the second battalion. The General
Gordon Cadet Corps No. 439, commanded by Lieut. H. B. King (principal) were adjudged1 the winners of the McSpaden Trophy (first battalion), with the Cecil Rhodes Cadet Corps No. 443, Lieut. R. P.
Steeves commanding, taking second honors.
In the second battalion, Lord Nelson Cadet Corps No. 440, commanded by Lieut. F. A. Jewett (principal) were the victors for the Seymour Trophy, with the Grandview School Cadet Corps, Lieut. R. Straight
(principal)   a  close second.
On June 1 9th the first Regimental Parade of all corps was held in
the Drill Hall of the 6th Regiment D. C. O. R., and was considered very
successful, and was much appreciated by the parents and citizens gener-
aliy- " ilBill- HI I •^B-;ft •
Cadet Camp.
Macauley Plains.
The following is a brief report on Cadet Corps during the camp held
at Macaulay Plains, Esquimalt, B. C, July 6th to 1 1th, inclusive:
On the morning of July 6th the Corps paraded at Cambie Street
Grounds at 9 a.m., in preparation for embarkation. 60
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
All corps were represented as follows
Supervisor 	
Chaplain	
Medical   Officer
Instructors pi.	
Band	
K.   E.   High....
Alexandra   	
     1
    1
    ...   1
  14
 18
 .....11
I 27
Cecil  Rhodes..  25
Dawson      46
Fairview    42
Total all ranks—473.
Franklin   	
General Gordon.
Grandview   	
... ...15
 .......37
^^^^      32
Kitsilano    24
Laura Secord..   35
Lord   Nelson  37
Lord   Tennyson  ...20
Macdonald   3 1
Model     | 16
Simon   Fraser   40
All expenses, such as transportation to Esquimau and return, messing
while in camp, cartage of baggage, etc., were paid by the Government.
MEDICAL OFFICER—I desire to take this opportunity to express
the sincere thanks of all ranks for the splendid services rendered by Dr. F.
W. Brydone-Jack regarding the medical comforts for the cadets while
in camp.
The embarking, the week's routine of camp, the instruction given,
and the disembarking on returning, I believe was very satisfactory to all.
At the opening of the fall term it was found that almost all corps required a great deal of re-organization.
This was necessary owing to changes and transfers of both instructors and cadets, and a large number having left the schools.
After considerable effort on the part of the instructors all corps were
not only completely reorganized but considerably strengthened numerically.
Two applications were also received for the formation of two more
corps, and permission was at once granted. These were formed at the
Strathcona and Charles Dickens Schools.
KING EDWARD HIGH SCHOOL CADET CORPS No.  101.
At the beginning of May, 1914, after careful consideration by yourself and Principal S. W. Mathews, I undertook the instruction of that
corps, which was very much broken up at the time. An enrolment of 29
students resulted and instructional lessons were continued till the end of
the school term. At the opening in August the enrolment rapidly increased to fifty-eight (58), and this corps, I am pleased to sta'e, is now
well organized and instructed. It is hoped that the uniforms for the corps
will shortly arrive and the equipment be completed.
I am proud to be the instructor of this corps and hope to be able to
keep it in its usual state of efficiency. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
61
Establishment.
The  following  is  the present  establishment  of  each  Cadet  Corps,
together with increase for the year ending 1914:
Corps
Cadet   Band....
No.
Lt.
Instructors
A. C. Bundy...
Strength Increase
of        During          Remarks
Corps       Year
  40       40     Re-organized
K. E. H. Sch.
101
i t
A. C.  Bundy...
..... 55
55     Re-organized
Alexandra    	
442
it
D. McLean 	
  36
g 51  I   ;||||
Cecil   Rhodes..
443
it
I.   M.   Mullin...
..... 33
—)
Chas. Dickens..
522
11
O. J. Thomas...
.....27
27 New Org'tion.
Dawson    	
436
c <
J. R. Pollock         83
D.   P.   McCallum..
20
Fairview 	
433
* t
J.   Dunbar	
  55
23   I         m
Franklin	
509
««
S.   J.   Bryant...
..... 31
31  New Org'tion.
Gen. Gordon ..
439
«t
H. B. King	
  50
13lplt Bp
Grandview   ....
437
Mr
. J. E. Brown ...
  35
Kitsilano    	
434
Lt.
T. W. Woodhead.. 49
^W^^SM
Ld.   Nelson    ..
440
««
F. A. Jewett	
  66
23 ^^^^»
Laura  Secord..
462
i i
L.   B.   Code	
  43
BE ^mW^m
Ld, Tennyson..
435
t <
R.  Straight	
  62
34 ^^^^8
Macdonald  ....
446
i t
W.   C.   Keith...
  50
20 ^^^MS:
Model    	
445
<«
H. B. Fitch	
 32
p 2 '^^^^tf
Simon Fraser ..
438
«*
C. B. Crowe	
  57
24   1   |   m
Strath con a    ....
526;
n
W. J. Nesbitt...
..... 41
41  New Org'tion.
Total Establishment   845
Total increase       378
Staff.
Regimental Organization
Vancouver Public Schools Cadet Regiment.
Military District No.   1 1.
Headquarters     Vancouver,   B. C.
Two Battalions
Regimental Commander (Supervisor) Lt. A. C. Bundy
Hon. Regimental Commander....Lt. Col. Geo. McSpadden
Medical Officer Dr. F. W. Brydone-Jack
Chaplain I Rev. A. H. Sovereign
Musketry Instructor Lt. V. Z.  Manning 62
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
First Battalion.
Eight Companies*,
Battalion  Commander ..Lt.  J.   R.   Pollock
Adjutant... J. ..Lt. T. W. Woodhead
Quartermaster .Mr. G. P. Young
"A" Coy. Cadet Corps No. 101, King Edward Hight School.
"B" Coy. Cadet Corps No. 433, Cecil Rhodes School.
"C" Coy. Cadet Corps No. 436, Dawson School.
"D" Coy. Cadet Corps No. 433, Fairview School.
"E" Coy. Cadet Corps No. 439, General Gordan School.
"F'   Coy. Cadet Corps No. 434, Kitsilano School.
"G" Coy. Cadet Corps No. 445, Model School. BHr •"
"H" Coy. Cadet Corps No. 435, Lord Tennyson School.
Second Battalion.
Nine Companies.
Battalion Commander Lt. L. B. Code
Adjutant | Lt. F. A. Jewett
Quartermaster I .Lt. W.  C.  Keith
"A" Coy. Cadet Corps No. 422, Alexandra School.
"B" Coy. Cadet Corps No. 437, Grandview School.
"C" Coy. Cadet Corps, No. 446, Macdonald School.
"D" Coy. Cadet Corps No. 440, Lord Nelson School.
"E" Coy. Cadet Corps No. 438, Simon Fraser School.
"F" Coy. Cadet Corps No. 462, Laura Secord School.
"G" Coy. Cadet Corps No. 509, Franklin School.
"H" Coy. Cadet Corps No. 522, Chas. Dickens School.
"I'   Coy. Cadet Corps No. 526, Strathcona School.
Recommended Approved
|§(Sgd.) A. C. BUNDY, .Pl|   (Sgd.) J. S. GORDON,    IB
Supervisor of Cadets. Municipal Inspector.
H^|J ISSSUES AND RETURN OF RIFLES.   ^^^BB
All Corps, except Chas. Dickens and Strathcona have received a
supply of Ross Rifles from the Ordnance Department at Esquimalt for
drill purposes.
Five hundred and ninety-five (595) have been received and issued,
each being stamped with the Corps number and a private number, which is
very important for Interior Economy purposes.    All rifles issued to the BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
63
King Edward High School Corps have since been returned to the Ordnance
Department on request.
Cadet Funds.
The Cadet Funds have been very carefully considered throughout the
year, no expenditure being made unless absolutely necessary.
These funds have been audited to date, the accounts being open for
inspection at any time.
Another grant of $2,000.00 will be required to continue the Cadet
work successfully for the year 1915.
iThe Government allowance of $1.00 per cadet for the upkeep of
uniforms during the year was as follows:
Cecil Rhodes  $46.00
Fairview   28.00
Gen. Gordon     56.00
Alexandra $32.00
Dawson  55.00
Franklin  23.00
Grandview  40.00
Lord  Nelson    55.00
Lord Tennyson I  27.00
Model  36.00
Kitsilano    33.00
Laura Secord   38.00
Macdonald  39.00
Simon Fraser   45.00
Total allowance $553.00 J|H
No allowance was made for Cadet Corps No.   101.
A special allowance from the Strathcona Trust Fund to Cadet Corps
of $287.00 was also received, making a total of $840.00 which was duly
placed to the credit of the Cadet Fund.
Grant Strathcona Trust Fund for Rifle Shooting
I also beg to report that cash prizes were given to each of the following corps. ,
(This was another grant from the Strathcona Trust Fund.)
Cadet Corps 433, 434, 435, 436, 437, 438, 439, 440, 442,
443, 445, 446, 462, and 509, awarded by the Local Committee for
rifle shooting as follows: 1st prize, $5.00; 2nd, $4.00; 3rd, $3.00;
4th, $2.00; 5th, $1.25; 6th, $1.00; 7th, $0.75. These prizes were
awarded to the seven best shots in each Corps, for scores made between
September 1 st and October 31 st, 1914.
These cash prizes have been distributed and were very much appreciated by the recipients.
Rifle Shooting.
The report on Cadet Teams rifle shooting as forwarded by Lt. V. Z.
Manning, instructor for the year, is herewith attached. 64
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
In conclusion I desire to thank yourself, the instructors, and all teachers for valuable assistance rendered.
I have the honor to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ A. C.   BUNDY, B| • ".
Supervisor of Cadets and Physical Culture,
Vancouver, B. C, Dec. 28, 1914.
Lieut. A. C. Bundy,
Supervisor of Cadets,
Board of School Trustees,
I     H^H       City.   j|    I    r^S J^jli^^^'-'
Dear Sir:—
I have the honor to submit a report Ij)f the rifle shooting competitions
in the Vancouver schools for the year 1914. As our annual series of
matches close in June of each year, this report will include the finish of
the 1913-14 competition, and the beginning of our work for 1914-15.
In September, 1913, rifle teams were admitted from the Charles
Dickens and Laura Secord schools, making a total of twenty-two teams
in the league. Matches were shot each school night in the Drill HaU,
through the courtesy of Colonel Duff-Stuart. The interest that the boys
take in this branch of sport is shown by the fact that all of the twenty-two
teams entered completed the entire series of matches.
During the year the Board of School Trustees provided a new range
in the basement of the new Dawson School. Here we are free from the
interruptions often experienced at the Drill Hall.
At the close of the competition in June, 1914, the Dawson School
team was found to be in first place with a total of 2880, and as a result
won the splendid Challenge Shield offered by A. P. Brown & Company.
The Townley Cup for the next highest aggregate was won by the Florence
Nightingale boys with a total of 2787. For the third and fourth places
trophies were donated by the "News-Advertiser" and the "Daily Province.*1 'These Cups were won by the Lord Robers and Kitsilano Schools
with 271 7 and 2703, respectively. The winning team will hold these
trophies for one year. Others assisting in the prize list include Mr. Sam
Scott, Dominion Cartridge Co., J. A. Flett, Tisdall's, and O. B. Allan. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
65
For the first and second best shot in the city, Medals are offered
annually by the B. C. Rifle Association. The champion shot this year
was Elsworth Wood, the popular captain of the Lord Nelson team. The
struggle for second place resulted in a tie between Reggie Heay of the
same school and Earl McColl of the Dawson team.
During the year no less than fifteen perfect scores were made. Those
boys who won their V. S. R. L. pennants in this were: W. Buckworth,
R. Girvin, A. Parson, E. Rannie, H. Davison, E. Wood, G. Innes, C.
Cluff, O. McKinney, E. Elvidge, E. McColl (2), J. McKenzie, and
G. Abrams.
In September, 1914, owing to the increase in the number of Cadet
Corps, the rifle shooting was. limited to Cadets only. It was considered
only fair that those boys who sacrifice their time for play to attend drill
should have the advantage of the shooting. |||
As the High School Cadet Corps would have an advantage over the
public school boys, the League was decided one division for the sixteen
public school Cadet Corps, and one for the four sections of the King
Edward High School Cadet Corps.
We have been handicapped this term by old rifles, still the scores
have been of a high standard. Number 3 Section of the High School
Cadets with a score of 253 came within five points of equalling the record
made by the Model School in 1913. High scores in the Public School
League was made by the Lord Tennyson team with 233. Two "possibles"
have been made, one by Thurston Hampton, and one by M. Mclvor.
Increased interest was added to the matches this year by the Strathcona Trust Fund offering seven cash prizes to each Corps, ranging in value
from $5.00 to 75 cents. The winners of these prizes were decided during
September and October, and the boys are now in possession of their prize
money.
Next spring it is our intention to give the boys Some practice on the
longer ranges. The practice that they have been receiving for the past
fourteen years in the public schools will no doubt be of great benefit to
some of the members who are now with the Canadian Expeditionary Force.
Respectfully submitted,
it -   ''^^^^^^^Hv-z-manning' '«Si>fl
Musketry Instructor. 66
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
PRIMARY WORK.
Vancouver, B. C, December 26th,  1914.
/. S. Gordon, Esq,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
1     | |  City.    I      SBIS      BBEBBBBw!^   '
Dear Sir,—
The report upon the work of the Primary Department for the year
1914, is herewith submitted.
There are at present ninety-three Primary classes in operation. Ten
of these have been formed since August.
Teachers are now working under very favouable conditions. With
a few exceptions the attendance of pupils in the various grades has not
been too large, and the schools have been well equipped with special materials for Primary work, such as folding paper, blocks, pegs, etc., for number work, and a large variety of supplementary readers. Teachers usually
take good care of these supplies and seldom ask for more than they actually
require.
A very good percentage of pupils is ready for promotion at the end
of each term. There is a tendency on the part of some teachers, however, to promote children who have not been thoroughly prepared to take up
the work of the next grade. Pupils in the lowest section of some Receiving
classes would be in better condition for Primer work if more consideration
were given them early in the term. This criticism applies to only a small
proportion of the teachers. Very weak pupils should be kept in the Receiving Class for two terms. Pupils who have been well trained in this class
seldom need to remain for more than one term in the Primer classes.
Although the grading takes place at regular periods, exceptions have
been made in favour of children who are much beyond the age of the average Primary pupil. Some of them are foreigners; others have lost time on
account of ill-health or have lived in districts where school accommodation
was inadequate. They usually possess the necessary ability in number,
but are weak in reading and spelling. By giving them access to a large
amount of easy reading matter and assigning extra lessons for home study,
teachers have been able to promote these pupils much earlier than would
otherwise have been possible, and some of them have completed the work
of two grades in one term.
Reading continues to be well taught. Several sections of Receiving
classes read two or three books during the term. The Primer classes gen-
eraHy complete three books per term, not including those used for silent
reading.    Number has been better presented this year, but the results se- BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
67
cured do not always justify the amount of time devoted to the subject.
There is a decided improvement in the quality of the Language work, especially with regard to memorization of poems and dramatization of stories
read by the children. Transcription and Dictation exercises are receiving
due attention. Results of the semi-annual tests on Spelling have been forwarded you. You will have noticed that the percentages were much higher
than those made during any previous year.
I have greatly appreciated the advice and support given me by inspectors and principals. My thanks are also due to teachers for their
hearty co-operation during the past year.
Yours respectfully,
^^^^^^^^^^1  EMILY J. TREMBATH, $^§§:^
Supervisor of Primary Work. 6$
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
MANUAL TRAINING.
Vancouver, B. C, December 29th,  1914.
/. S. Gordon, Esq,%
Municipal Inspector  of Schools,
^^^^^^B     | City.      1     BBB
Dear Sir,—
I beg to submit my report on the Manual Training Department for
the past year.
Once more I am able to report extension, centres having been equipped at the General Gordon and the Hastings Schools.
There are now centres at the following Schools:—
Alexandra
Florence Nightingale
Henry Hudson
Nelson
Simon Fraser
King Edward High
Dawson
General Gordon
Modej|      I
Roberts
Strathcona
Britannia High
Fairview
Hastings
Mt.  Pleasant
Seymour
■
A room equipped for woodwork only will be opened at the commencement of the new year in the King George High School.
The attendance this year has been exceptionally good, the greatest
number in actual attendance being 2728 in October. The average attendance has varied from 93 per cent, to 95 per cent., reaching its highest
point, 95.2 per cent., in December.
The usual exhibit was sent to the Vancouver Exhibition in September, and at the request of the Japanese Government a small exhibit for
educational purposes was forwarded to Japan in December.
Whilst the scheme of work has not been changed to any great extent,
more emphasis has been laid on the desirability of self-reliance, which in
my estimation is a quality demanding the constant and careful attention
of all teachers.
Li • .1 I : . I      '  I    I
The introduction of Vocational Training has brought out the fact
that many parents have not a very clear conception of the different aims
of Manual Training and Vocational Training. Manual Training aims to
educate or develop the child through its motor activities, and this education is the earliest in the child's development, beginning with its efforts to
grasp things, and continues by means of work and play throughout its life.
Various materials are used in employing this method'in schools, namely, BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
69
paper, clay, plasticine, wood and metals. There is no attempt to teach
a trade, but rather to give an opportunity for the concrete application of
some aesthetic, or abstract idea, or principle involved in the other school
work.
Vocational Training avowedly leads to some trade, and only employs
trade principles, methods and materials. It should only commence after
the general training is complete, and is only suited for pupils of a certain
age and stage of development.
Briefly—in Manual Training the model is made for the effect it has
upon the child, whereas in Vocational Training the model itself is the
main object.
During the year the work of all the centres has been satisfactory,
despite the fact that there have been five additions to the staff—Messrs.
Tingley, Jones, Littlewood, Mitchell, and Williams.
Faithfully yours,
^^^^^gS. NORTHROP, '|||^H|§|
Supervisor of Manual Training.
? 70
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
DOMESTIC SCIENCE.
Vancouver, B. C, Dec. 17th, 1914.
/. S. Gordon, Esq ^
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
l^^^^^^l     f  City.
Dear Sir,—
I beg to submit the following report of the Domestic Science Department of the Public Schools for the year 1914.
After due consideration, some changes were made in the course of
study, and the whole has been endorsed by the Department of Education.
I find the teachers of the different grades conscientiously trying to carry
out the course, and they also show in many instances a live interest in
studying and suggesting changes which may improve our work.
There are now fifty-six (56) Intermediate grades with an attendance
of one thousand and eighty (1080) pupils taking the course in plain hand
sewing. The aim, so far in these classes is to get pupils to use their hands
and eyes skilfully in their application to needlework, and to train them in
powers of criticism of the textiles they are using, and of their own work.
The articles made, while of first importance to the pupil and chosen to
please, are adapted to carry out the wider aims, and each year, as the
teachers grasp the idea of hand, eye and brain training, more work and
better work is done through more intelligent application upon the pupils*
part. There is still much to be done in work on the choice of clothing,
both from an artistic and from an economic standpoint. Greater consideration of clothing and shelter, rather than giving all the time to pure
needlework, may make the work of wider value to our coming home-
makers. The children continue to improve in keeping the work clean, and
our thanks are due to the Medical Department for doing so much to raise
the standard of personal cleanliness in our schools. Another reason for
improvement is that the subject appears upon the school monthly report
card, and that all work is being kept for an exhibit by each grade at the
close of the year.
In the Senior grades, the work on clothing is now continued uniformly, taking the form of making and repairing of linen used in the school
kitchens, and the general repair of any garment as well as some new
problems in plain needlework.
The study of Foods, Dietetics, Cookery and Housewifery is also
taken up. As these latter subjects really require almost all the time at
our disposal, we are finding a difficulty in arranging a suitable syllabus,
but by concerted work we hope to solve the difficulty. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
71
There are seventy-one (71) Senior grade classes with an attendance
of twelve hundred and seventeen (1217) pupils in the ten centres now equipped, with a staff of seven (7) teachers. One new centre, Hastings, was
opened this year, and rooms were equipped in King Edward and in Britannia High Schools for the use of pre-vocational classes, and in the King
George High School for the regular High School course.
Much work has been done by the teachers in visiting local industries and familiarizing themselves with conditions in our own town. Much
illustrative material has been collected for use in teaching. Uniform
examinations in theory are given periodically to all Senior grade classes,
and monthly reports upon these, and upon equipment and expense, are
made, and teachers' meetings held for their discussion. Upon the whole
the work for the city is being put upon a systematic basis.
In the High Schools, the course was changed so that the machines
and plain garment making, with some hand embroidery, are learned in the
Preliminary year, and the full time in the Junior and Matriculation years
is given to draughting, making and adapting patterns and to dressmaking
and millinery. The study of textiles is continued. We hope here again
for more work on the broader lines of shelter and clothing from all standpoints.    There are three hundred and fifty (350) girls enrolled.
The  attendance in  all  classes  has  been  exceptionally  good.     The
gjreat majority have an average of well over 90 per cent., and no class
has fallen below 82 per cent, since August, while many have had 1 00 per
cent.    The total enrollment is two thousand six hundred and forty-seven
(2647).   I    |    E, J    I
Public exhibits of the year's work were held in King Edward and
in Britannia High Schools, at which some of the grade work was shown,
and an exhibit was sent to the Exhibition in Melbourne, Australia, and
to the Vancouver Exhibition.
In conclusion, I beg to thank you for your help, and to acknowledge
the co-operation of the Board of School Trustees, the Principals, and the
Teachers during the year.
Yours respectfully,
^^^^^^^^^^^H ELIZABETH BERRY, ||B|fj
Supervisor of Domestic Science. 72
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
PREVOCATIONAL AND NIGHT CLASSES.
G. A. Iyaing, Director Night Schools and Prevocational Work
Vancouver, B. C, December 31st,  1914.
/. 5. Gordon, Esq,,
Municipal Inspector  of Schools,
City.
Dear Sir,—
I beg to submit herewith my report on the work of the Prevocational
and Night Classes.
Prevocational Classes.
When the Prevocational Classes were started in August of this year
there seemed to be considerable confusion of thought as to their raison d'etre.
Some parents were under the impression that the classes were for defective
children, whilst others thought they were trade schools. In order to clear
the ground for the work, I paid personal calls on about a hundred parents
ana explained the nature of the classes to them. It may be well if I outline briefly here the scope of the work attempted.
The aim of the school primarily is to secure a course of education
peculiarly suited to those students whose abilities lie in a practical direction
rather than in academic studies. There is no intention to regard such students as mentally inefficient. On the contrary the experience of the teachers
has been that many of the pupils are of a high order of intelligence, much
higher, indeed, than was expected. The curriculum of the classes was
divided into two main parts. Two-thirds of the school week was devoted
to academic studies, consisting of English Composition and Grammar, Eng- BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
73
lish Literature, History and Geography, Arithmetic and Drawing. The
Grammar was subordinated to the Composition. The Literature covered
a somewhat wider ground than the ordinary entrance class work and was
intended to produce an interest in good reading rather than to impart a
knowledge of different writers and their works. The History course was
designed to show the gradual development of the modern industrial and
economic life. Geography has been treated more from the point of view of
economic geography than from physical. As far as possible the Arithmetic taught has been practically correlated with the manual work of the
students.
The remaining one-third of the week was devoted to practical work.
The girls have been taken through a thorough practical course in general
housewifery, including cooking, sewing, laundry work and domestic hygiene.
The boys have up to the present been engaged in woodworking, but on a
much more practical method than the manual training of the ordinary public schools. The boys were turned into an empty room into which they
carried the lumber with which they made their own work-benches. When
they had finished making their equipment, they devoted their attention to
making such articles of furniture as a roll-top desk, a dining-table, etc.
With a view to construction work on a fairly large scale, models of roof-
trusses and the joints necessary therefor have been made, the work being
based on drawings to scale, the dimensions having been previously calculated by mathematics and by steel-square.
The classes have been carried on at the three High Schools in the
city. Academic work has been done in the three centres, but the practical
work has been confined to the King Edward and Britannia High Schools.
The boys' practical centre has been the old manual training room at the
King Edward, whilst the girls have occupied the specially designed kitchens
at the King Edward and the Britannia Schools.
That the work has been extremely successful I have not the slightest
doubt, and the teachers are to be congratulated upon the value of the education given. In spite of very considerable difficulties under which they
have laboured, they have been enthusiastic in their work.
I feel, however, that it is advisable to make some changes in the coming year if the work is to be developed properly. 'The present accommodation is inadequate for the number of students. It would simplify the
organization and materially help the students if it were possible to separate
the boys from the girls in the academic as well as in the practical work.
If this were done, the Drawing and Arithmetic taught could be better
suited to the practical work. Moreover, if the students could be brought
together in a single school, the great difficulty of successful grading could
be met much more easily, with better results in all directions.
I am convinced that the school is making a reputation which will
result in the attraction of a large number of students in the near future, and
some provision for separate and more extensive accommodation will have
to be made. 74
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
ELECTRICAL PLANT
Night School
Night Schools.
The Night Schools have been more than usually successful this session. The total number of students enrolled has exceeded two thousand,
and in actual attendance there have been upwards of eighteen hundred.
The average attendance has been over eighty per cent. This is highly
satisfactory, as the fluctuating conditions under which many of the Night
School students work render regular attendance very difficult.
The staff numbers 5 1 teachers at present, and these have charge of
some 76 classes. A notable falling off in numbers of students attending
was seen in the carpentry and building trade classes generally. This is
undoubtedly due to the prevailing trade conditions. On the other hand,
there was a considerable increase in the number of students attending the
commercial and the engineering and art classes.  V BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
77
In order to make the work of the various classes a little more coherent
the teachers of the Engineering classes were asked to work under a syllabus
drawn up by Captain Williamson, as far as the Mechanical and Steam
Engineering subjects were concerned, and by Mr. Walker for the Electrical Engineering. The syllabus for the commercial classes was arranged
in consultation with Mr. Welch and Mr. Beech, whilst Mr. Scott was
asked to exercise a general supervision over the Art classes.
Much remains to be done in this direction, however, and I think it
will be advisable to alter the organization radically for the next session.
In this respect the fact that the Board of Trustees has decided to appoint
certain Advisory Committees will materially affect the work. The Advisory Committees will be able to offer sound criticism of the existing organization and at the same time suggest the best means for remedying the
defects.
In general equipment, the Board is to be congratulated in the great
step taken in the Engineering Department, particularly in the institution of
a properly equipped Electrical Engineering Laboratory. The sum of over
ten thousand dollars has been carefully expended in securing much needed
apparatus. The two tutors of the Electrical Engineering classes, Mr. W.
I. Walker and Mr. T. H. Dodson, specified the apparatus necessary, and
Mr. Walker has given a great deal of his time and attention to its purchase. As far as possible the apparatus was obtained from local firms.
The laboratory is now complete and is probably the finest example of a
practical plant in Canada, although not the largest. An Assay Laboratory
has also been equipped to the specifications of Mr. R. W. Suter, and
much good work is being done therein.
The Night Classes are arousing very considerable interest on the
part of various manufacturing firms in the city, and thanks are due to
Messrs. Crane Co., The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., The Canadian
General Electric Co., The Graham Electric Co., and the Isdale Scientific
Instrument Co., for presents of apparatus, i
With the increasing interest in technical education displayed both by
students and by manufacturers, the demand for a technical school worthy
of the city is strengthened, and I hope the Board will recognize the need
for such a school and will plan for it as soon as the present financial stringency is past.
Yours  faithfully,
■   -   t ' it       'ill   GRAHAM A- LAING, .SHf!
Director of Prevocational and  Night Classes. 78 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
^^^^^^^S    SCHOOL  SPORTS.   .J&ff^'--
Vancouver, B. C, January 13th, 1915.
/. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
| .Wm  CzrpJ     l|p]j     «t'      :%:.    f   '
Dear Sir:—-
In the Vancouver Public Schools considerable progress has been made
in organizing School Sports during the last year and a half. Before that
time games were played in the various schools, but only in occasional years
was there any attempt to secure uniformity by a definite schedule. The
advantages of a definite series of games were so evident in holding the
interest and obtaining efficiency, that it was decided to form an Athletic
Association for the carrying out of games suitable for each term. This
Association consists of representatives from each school, and the business
is conducted by a president, secretary and an executive committee of three
members. The officers for the present school year are: President, F. H.
Dobson; Secretary, S. D. Meadows; Executive Committee, Messrs. W.
Pickering, D. Boyes and J. E. Brown.
Each term the Association decides what games shall be played and
up to the present the decision has been to play football and basketball in
the fall term, and baseball and lacrosse in the spring. In addition to these,
last spring a Girls' Baseball League was carried on and created great enthusiasm among the girls. Tennis also is popular in those schools where
courts are provided. The Association is in favor of a track meet in the
spring term, but so far it has been crowded out.
In carrying out the various games, the city is divided into six or seven
districts, each containing four or five schools (the number of divisions being determined by the number of teams entering). In the districts each
team plays home and away games with every other team, and then the district winners play off in the finals for the championship. The honors in
lacrosse for the year go to the Lord Nelson School, whose team won the
Lally medals in the final match with the Lord Roberts. In baseball the
Model team won the D. and M. cup and medals after a hard contest with
the Lord Nelson. The football championship is held by the Lord Strathcona School, which defeated the team of the Florence Nightingale in the
finals, and secured the Godfrey cup, held last year by the Dawson School.
The handsome trophy for basket ball, the Tisdall cup, which was held last
year by the Cecil Rhodes School, was won this year by the Lord Tennyson, when they defeated the Florence Nightingale team in the final match.
Most of the schools of Vancouver are fortunate in having a campus
where these games can be played, and the School Board is to be congratulated on their far-sighted policy of securing school sites where there is ample
room for playgrounds.
Respectfully submitted,
^^■:W;|||^p|^    I.      I' F. H. DOBSON,        §|§
President. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
79
ATTENDANCE REPORT.
James Inglis, Chief Attendance Officer
Vancouver, B. C, December 31st, 1914.
/. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
■   '|t City. §§§      fBBG
Dear Sir—
I beg to submit the following report on the Attendance Department
for 1914: j 1 BBBBIBB      I      flfli
During the year there was a total of 4747 cases investigated, as follows:
In January, 527; February, 499; March, 580; April, 455; May,
495; June, 385; September, 631 ; October, 442; November, 419; Decem-
ber'3M-        1    w I:'        fli       B»Ri
Of the above 431 1 were from the following schools:
Central, 305; Strathcona, 494; Seymour, 451 ; Model, 1 76; Cecil
Rhodes, 81 ; Fairview, 208; Tennyson, 170; Henry Hudson, 195; Kitsilano, 71; Dawson, 298; Aberdeen, 177; Roberts, 68; Gordon, 34;
Alexandra, 120; Laura Secord, 59; Nelson, 164; Beaconsfield, 59;
Charles Dickens, 132; Livingstone, 91; Grandview, 176; Macdonald,
164; Simon Fraser, 50; Mt. Pleasant, 163; Franklin, 37; Hastings, 176;
Florence Nightingale, 172; King Edward High School, 6; Britannia
High School, 2; Bayview, 12.
There were 383 cases investigated that were found on the street during school hours, nine from the Chief Probation Officer of the Juvenile
Court, fifteen from the office of the Municipal Inspector, nineteen from the
Attendance Officer, South Vancouver, and twenty-nine from other sources. Truancy was discovered in 1 10 cases, which is a decrease of twenty-
five per cent, from last year. It was necessary to take Police Court proceedings in five cases, when a small fine was imposed or sentence suspended
with a warning from the magistrate. This course Was resorted to only
when every other effort had failed.
There were 259 cases reported to the Medical Department for their
attention.
This department is always represented at the weekly sessions of the
Juvenile Court, thereby keeping in touch with that work.
Every assistance has been given to the Schools Relief Association.
The work of that association has helped out the attendance of our schools
by providing the necessary boots and clothing, the want of which would
otherwise have prevented many a child from attending school.
In conclusion, I wish to thank the various officers and principals with
whom this department comes in touch for their co-operation in securing a
good attendance at our schools.
Respectfully submitted,
R^2^;iH|^Bfl   JAMES INGLIS, ,|^^^&j;U:.^   *
Chief Attendance Officer. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
81
ATTENDANCE OF TRUSTEES DURING THE YEAR 1914.
Board Meetings.
Special.     Regular.
15 12
Wm. H. P. Clubb (Chairman)      1 1
(Resigned Dec. 7th,  1914.)
(Thos. Duke  (App. Act. Chairman 7|12|14) |14
J. R. Seymour        9
F. W. Welsh  §14
Mrs. McNaughton      10
A. C. Stewart      13
J.  J.  Dougan         10
Building Committee.
Special.
37
F. W. Welsh  (Chairman)    |37
J.   R.  Seymour 1      33
J.  J.  Dougan      30
W. H. P. Clubb 125
Thos. Duke JL        8
A. C. Stewart I      6
Mrs. McNaughton         2
Management Committee.
Thos. Duke  (Chairman until Dec.  7th,   1914)  4
A. C. Stewart  (App. Chairman 7|12|14)  4
Mrs. McNaughton       ... 4
W. H. P. Clubb I I 3
J. R. Seymour  ]
J. J. Dougan   1
F. W. Welsh 	
1
Finance Committee.
Thos. Duke  (Chairman)  3
W. H. P. Clubb (Resigned 7 12114).  1
F. W. Welsh   3
A. C. Stewart (App. Dec. 7th,  1914)          1
Mrs. McNaughton	
J.  J.  Dougan	
J.  R.  Seymour  	
Regular.
12
Regular.
12
Regular.
12 82
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
ENROLMENT AND AVERAGE ATTENDANCE
FOR 1914
Enrolment.
January     12,796
February     13,382
March     13,333
April  I  13,171
May      12,608
June  12,186
August     12,440
September     13,140
October      13,313
November      13,218
December       12,916
Av. Attendance.
11,654.97
12,6-66.35
12,033.4
11,891.06
11,467.43
11,257.54
11,839.18
11,976.8
12,331.41
12,251.81
12,223.93
Percentage.
91.08
91.66
90.25
90.28
90.95
92.38
95.17
95.1 1
92.62
92.69
94.64
Ei
Enrolment for the month of October for
Year. Enrolment.
1898 2724
1899 3117
1900 3393
1901 3710
1902 4087
1903 4416
1904 4994
1905 5609
1906 .%..  ..  .6437 -
Number of Teachers on the Vancouver staff in December for each year
Each year since 181
Year.
1907	
1908	
1909	
1910	
1911 1
1912 1
1913 1
1914 1
irolment.
7370
7984
8845
9942
1385
2393
2990
3313
since 1902
Dece
Dece
Dece
Dece
Dece
Dece
Dece
Dece
Dece
Dece
Dece
Dece
mber,
mber,
mber,
mber,
mber,
mber,
mber,
mber,
mber,
mber,
mber,
mber,
1903 	
1904 	
1905	
1906' 	
1907 	
1908 	
1909	
1910  ....
1911  M	
1912 	
1913 	
1914   102
Males.
I 29
. 30
I 29
. 38
47
I 58
. 65
93
91
Females.
. 63
71
83
92
103
115
128
155
181
220
246
260
Total.
92
101
1 12
130
150
173
193
226
263
313
337
362
Special Instructors employed by the Board,  1914
Instructors of Manual Training	
Supervisor of Manual  Training	
Instructors of Domestic Science	
Supervisor of Domestic Science	
Supervisors  of  Music  .Wt, .X-	
Supervisor of Primary Work M.	
Supervisor of Drawing .2. M~	
Supervisor of Drill	
Musketry Instructor  ..-.»	
Director of Prevocational and Night Classes jK	
  16
  1
  12
  1
	
 x.  1
 M  l
 M m  i
K. «... ...M  i
 m.  i
Teachers in Night Classes                       51
Special Officers employed by the Board:
Municipal Inspector of Schools ~	
Medical Health Officers	
Nurses   	
Attendance Officers 	
1
o
4
Number of Teachers holding the different grades of certificates:
University Graduate in Arts or Science .91  119
Academic   Certificate              6
First-class Certificate  S.  132
Second-class  Certificate  97
Third-class Certificate  ML.  6
Commercial Specialist ...m                      l
Drawing Specialist JB •---•-                  1 V
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PQWi 84 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
With Grade of Certificate and Date of Appointment
Name. Certificate Date of Appointment.
Alexander,   Irene  B 2nd X. January, 1909
Amos,   Maude   2nd August, 1912
Anderson, Mary K B.A. August,  1908, and 1912
Annand, Margaret A 1st. September, 1913
Anstie, Elizabeth  2nd. August, 1912
Anstie, J. K 1st August, 1906
Archibald, Margaret E. R 1st  August, 1912
Armstrong, W.  G M.A August, 1913
Ashmore,   R.  H B.A. M August, 1912
Astle,  Mabel  C 2nd j March, 1908
Bain, Nellie  1st August, 1908
Baker,   b\   Edna B.A January, 1906
Balkwill, Alice M 2nd August, 1911
Bambrick, Carlotta  1st January, 1909
Baron, Edith  2nd March, 1913
Bate, Evelyn B 2nd August, 1913
Bates,  Daniel   A B.A August, 1913
Baynes,  Caroline   1st. August, 1908
Beath,   James    2nd February, 1903
Beaty, Jennie M 2nd November, 1914
Beckman, Elta M ~ ^Academic August, 1911
Beech,   W.   K I B.A August, 1912
Bell, Edna B M,A August, 1909
Belyea, Marie L 2nd August, 1912
Benjamin,  Fanny C B.A October, 1912
Bentley,   Nora  M B.A August, 1910
Bermingham,   Mrs.   S.   M 1st. January, 1914
Bigney, A.   L 1st August, 1909
Bigney, Elizabeth M 1st. January, 1913
Birley, Lillian F Academic January, 1914
Blair, Eliz.  J 1st : August, 1911
Bodie, Isabel  B.A. August, 1914
Bolton, Grace A. BLA. Jft February, 1914
Bow en, Winnifred V 2nd August, 1910
Bower, Mabel  2nd August. 1914
Boyes, David A 1st s August, 1911
Boyes, Francis C 1st— August, 1914
Bridgman,  Clara M.. Commercial August, 1913
Brinton, Effie S 1st August, 1913
Broe, Edna B 2nd August, 1913
Brough, Thos. A. JB.A, August, 1904
Brown,  Gertrude   1st January, iyii
Brown, Harriet W 2nd. August, 1912
Brown,  J.  Elmer B.A. August, 1912
Brown, Verna M 1st- August, 1913
Browne,  Laurie   M.A. August, 1914
Bruce, Graham  1st August, 1914
Brunton, Lulu  2nd.. August, 1908
Bryant, S. J M. m 1st November, 1912
Bryant, Ethel D 2nd November, 1907, and August, 19li
Bunting, Winnifred  K-. B.A. JS. August, 1913
Burchill,  Mabel  R 1st January, 1 913
Burpee, Ethel L. ...........1st January, 1903
Btitterworth, Ernest  1st. October, 1913
Cahill, Hattie M 1st September, 1912
Cairns, Kate  2nd : January, 1910
Cairns, Laura  2nd January, 1913
Cairns,  M.  Louise 1st August, 1911
Cairns, Mabel  -2nd August, 1914
Calvert, Frank G 1st August, 1914
Cameron, C. Alice B.A August. 1909
Campbell,  Donald W .B.A August, 1908
Campbell, Duncan  1B.A. August, 1914
Campbell,   Jessie  L 1st.... October, 1902
Cantelon, Jean M 1st November, 1907
Carruthers, Irene F 2nd August, 1912 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
85
Carter,   Hilda M 2nd August,
Caspell,  Edmund    1st August,
Caspell, Violet 1 2nd November,
Cattell, Dorothy  1st ...January,
Cattell, Margaret  2nd January,
Cave-Brown-Cave,   Beatrice   1st M,  ...August,
Chadwick,   Clara    1st .August,
Chandler, Dorothy G 2nd   January,
Chandler,  Florence A 2nd August,
Chipman, Alice R B.A January,
Chodat, Henri  M.A ...August,
Chute,   Clyde C 1st M. August,
.1st August,
Clark, Angus 	
Clark, Edna  2nd - August,
Clark,   Ethel   G 1st September,
Clarke, Margaret  1st 1 g§. August,
Clements,  Mary  .1st  X August,
Close,  Florence  J ...1st August,
Close,   L.   Laurina i ...1st August,
Cocking, Gladys  3rd September,
Code, Lome B B.Sc August,
Coldwell,  Ross  F B.A , November,
Cole, Josephine A 1st ) -  August,
Collis, R B.A August,
Colter,   Jennie   J B.A August,
Cook, Eva  JB 1st... M~ January,
Coombs,  Mrs.   Florence A B.A January,
Corbett,   Grace  G 2nd - August,
Coulthurst,  Clarice E 1st I October,
Cousins,  Olive J B.A $. £ ugust,
Cowan,   E.   Mabel M 2nd v ugust,
Cowan,  Susie 1 2nd—    I ugust,
Cowie,   Margaret 2nd M November,
Cowperthwaite, Dorothy   2nd      .... I August,
Cowperthwaite,   F.   M B.A.... - - 1890-1897   and
Cox,  Bertha C 1st January,
Cox,  Nellie  S 1st.. - August,
Creech,   Mary 3rd 1 1899-iyut),   March,
Creech, Winifred J. E   2nd April,
Creelman,   Amelia   B.A August,
Cresswell,  John  A .B.A January,
Crombie, Hilda 1st   ...August,
Crombie, I. M M.A August,
Cronkhite,  A.   M B.A October,
Crowe, C.  B B.A August,
Currie,  Blanche   1st - - January,
Currie, Katherine B. .... 1st        April,
Currie,  Flora  M 2nd .'. 1897-1902;  1904-1910.;
1903
1899
1912
1904
1911
1914
1908
1914
1913
lyio
1906
1909
1902
1914
1907
1910
1909
1912
191Z
1913
1910
1910
1911
iyia
1911
1910
1909
1913
iyi^
iyi*
1911
1908
1914
1914
1902
1910
1910
1914
1902
1910
1912
1913
1908
1911
1913
1911
1910
1913
Dauphinee, A. Josephine  1st January,
Davidson, Augusta J 2nd > .*$ February,
Davidson.   Jessie   1 st September,
Davidson,   J.   G B.A.,   Ph.D September,
Davidson,  Lucretia F.   1st ||...August,
Davies.  Edith' A.  R B.A I August,
Dempsey, ;Violet  H  2nd March,
DesBrisay, Isabel J Academic January,
Dewis,  Martha E  ..B.A H August,
Dickey,  Alberta F	
Dickinson, Daisy B	
Dixon, Ellis B	
Dofcson, F. H	
Donnan, William	
Dougan, Wilson 	
Dunbar.   John      1st-
Dunning,  J.  T     M.A
Academic - January,.
1st .Aprllv-
1st August,
B.A August,
M.A   January,
Academic August,
August,
August,
Dutcher, H. K M.Sc September,
Dyke, Kathleen A       ..2nd August,
L910
L900
.910
L907
.910
.912
L914
:912
.911
.907
t913.
,912
.907
.913
914
912
.906
.907
.907
Eaton,  Alice  A  M.A October, 1912
Eldridge,  Dorothy C...        . 2nd       I M.....January, 1908
Elliott, Margaret   . *2nd       March, 1908
Elmsley,   Ada   B ]lst... November, 1900
Estabrooke, Emma D   B.A January, 1913
Evans, C.  R "____     ""ist November, 1907
Evans, Eleanor   1st I August^ 1907
Evans, Nellie D        '2nd.....: August, 1914 86 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Fallows, Muriel P 2nd August,
Faulkner, M. Jean 1st J anuary,
Faunt, Edith  1st August,
Faunt, Jessie 1st August,
Fee, Wilfred J M.A August,
Ferguson,   George  A B.A August,
Ferguson, Mary J o.A August,
Fessant, Emma  2nd August,
Fierheller,   Ina  no October,
Finlayson, Alexander  1st August,
Fisher,  Jessie E. R _2nd January,
Fitch, H. R M.A.,   B.Sc August,
Flanagan,   Claire   T B.A...M January,
Fletcher, Elizabeth E 2nd B. June,
Flett,   William     M.A January,
Flower, Ethel   1st October,
Ford, Duvia  M. 2nd January,
Frame,   Emma  M 1st August,
Frame.   Hazel    2nd February,
Frank, Pauline  1st November,
Fraser, David R B.A August,
Frederickson.   Gertrude   M 2nd January,
Frith, L.  Elsie 2nd January,
Fullerton, Florence L 1st August,
Geddis,  Lila M 2nd January,
George,   Elizabeth   L ■...2nd August,
Gillanders, Hilda C 1st March,
Good, Mrs. Mary 1st....* February,
Gourlie,   Wm.   G..  3rd February.
Grant,   Fannie   I B.A August,
Gordon,   Ruth   2nd December,
Grant, Mabel D 1st September,
Gray,   Susie  W B.A M January,
Greggs, Gladys E B.A November,
Greggs,  Luella  B.A .M August,
Grenfell,  Mary E B.A August,
Griffiths, Margaret W 1st August,
Hadden, Edith C 1st August,
Hall, J. H B./Litt August,
Hamilton,   Margaret  P 2nd August,
Harding,  Mrs. J. M. H 2nd m January,
Harper,   Lulu    1st January,
Harvey, D.  C B.A August,
Haughton, Agnes  1st .m- August,
Hemsworth, E. A 1st M,* BL August,
1 Tenderson.  James  M.A..... M.- Jb January,
Henrv,  J.  K. B. A Ml August,
Hewton,  Sara  2nd 1898-1900;   August,
Hodgins, Lena B 2no...B. August,
Holloway, Mary E. N 2nd August,
1 looley, Elizabeth 2nd... JB. August,
Hornby, Dortny M 2nd M JBL~..August,
Howard, Edith   , 1st April,
Howard. F.  Mabel  S ..:.. B.A...B .9. August,
Huggard, Mrs. Ada O. 1st Januany,
Hughes,  Annie   1st ML X- January,
Jacks, M. Gertrude  ft 2nd ML. .X. August,
Jamieson, Annie B B.A ft JB. January,
Jamieson,  G.   W ^. 1st ft. J9L ft August,
Jewett,  F.  Arnold B.A .ft ft August,
Johnston,  D.  B....*.  B.A ft January,
Johnson, Emily May ..2nd October,
Johnson,  Evelyn  M „^.B.A ftSeptember,
Johnston, Bessie .....1st March,
Johnstone, Marion  2nd 1891-1911;   August,
Jones, Grace F. .^Jst. September,
Jordan, E. E _M.A October,
Jukes, Marian E ..2nd ft March,
Keith, Walter C w B.A M March.
Kelly,  Bertha  ..2nd .ft ft. January,
Kellv,  Minnie E _lst ML..January,
Kendall. George  JB.Sc. ft November,
Kerr,   Rubv   2nd January,
King, H.   B.....>. .„ „B.A   January,
Kingston.  Emily  Q. :... 1.2nd .ft August,
1914
1914
1913
1913
1912
1913
1912
1914
1911
1912
1908
1912
1911
1893
1912
1913
1912
1909
1914
1911
1912
1907
1906
1909
1914
1898
1911
1914
1914
1907
1907
1911
1912
1912
LSJ *
1909
1913
1914
1911
1910
1913
1910
1914
1911'
19iv/
1902
1593
1908
1911
1904
1914
1912
1913
1912
;1906
1912
1909
1907
1890
1909
1902
1912
1912
1891
1914
lUltJ
1912
1911
1912
1914
1910
1907
1910
1904
1909 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
87
Laird, Edna J 1st 1906-1908
Langley,   Celia  G Academic	
Laursen, Lili J - 1st	
Lawrence, Frederick J 1st	
Leach, Mrs. Jean  1st	
1909-1911
January,
.August,
..August,
..August,
.April,
LeFeuvre,  Eva L 1st August,
Leith,   Mrs.   T Academic 1896-1902;   January.
M.
E.
 2nd August,
 B.A January,
 2nd October,
 1st January*
 1st October,
 B.A August,
Loree, Edith   1st August,
Loughead,   Mary   E 1st September,
Luscombe, E. Helen  1st September,
Lewis,  Alice
Little,   D.   C	
Lindseth,   Clara
Loggie, Annie M,
Long, L. Pearl....
Lord,  A.   R	
Marshall,
Matheson,
Mathews,
Maxwell,
Machum,  Vetura  1st August,
Magee,  Edith  M 1st August,
Maggs, A. B M.A August,
Manning, Dorothy D B.A September,
Manning,  Viril  Z B.A January,
Elsie  2nd January,
Corinne E 2nd September,
Stanley W M.A April,
Mary   E.   L 1st August,
Mayers, F. J B.A November,
Meadows, Stanley D B.A August,  1911;  January,
Merriman,   Mildred   p.A September,
Messinger,  Clarence  R B.A August,
Middleton,   Alberta   2nd January,
Miller,   S.   L... B.A August,
Mills,  Sadie 1st October,
Milne, Helen  1st October,
Moodie,   S.   F .B.A August,
Moody, Margaret H B.A August,
Morrison,  Mabel  1 2nd September,
Morrow, W. H M.A August,
Mullin,   Isadore  M 1st October,
Munro, Ernest A B.A. August,
Murphy, Eva B 1st January,
Murray,  Christine  1st August,
Mutch, Ethel J 2nd i, August,
McAdam,  Guy J M.A .August,
McAlpine, Sara  2nd August,
McCallum,   Ada   E 2nd August,
McDiarmid, Kate ... B.A January,
Macdonald, Agnes  2nd ||. 1§„ August,
Macdonald, Christina A 2nd February,
McDonald,   C.   May 1st August,
MacDonald, Edna C 2nd August,
MacDonald, Gertrude  1st January,
McDonald, H. Lucretia  1st September,
McDonagh. William 1st February,
McDougall. Elizabeth M 3-rd .\ August,
McElmon, Annie E B.A August,
McEwen,  Agnes E is. 1st August,
McEwen, Florence E 1st September,
McFarland, Cora H B.A January,
Macfarlane, Edith  Temporary   March,
Macgregor, Annabelle  2nd... August,
Mclnnes, Isabel  M.A :ti. January,
Mcintosh, Grace
ind January,
Mclntyre.  Beatrice A 1st.
McKay, George 	
McKay,    Minna   G
McKee, George E..
McKenzie,
Mackenzie,
McKenzie,
McKenzie.
McKenzie,
McKinnon,
McLean,
Maclean,
August,
M.A August,
2nd March,
B.A May,
Grace 1st August,
Jessie    1st October,
Margaret N 1st January,
Mary E B.A August,
Winewood F .'..B.A August,
Mary  2nd January,
Alice  B.A August,
Donald  1st August,
McLeish, Kathleen  1st January,
McLenaghen, Myrtle V B-A.II January,
McLeod, Hazel E B.A January,
1913
1906
i905
1910
1914
1903
1914
1905
1906
1906
1911
1912
1914
1941
1912
1911
1914
1913
1910
1911
1912
1913
1913
1902
1908
1907
iyii
1911
1909
1914
1913
1912
1905
1914
1909
1912
1913
1911
1911
1913
1913
1914
1911
1900
IS9&
1912
1910
1911
1908
1906
1913
1910
1903
1912
1913
1905
1906
1911
1914
1906
1910
1914
1912
1911
1891
1905
1908
1913
1905
1908
1912
1897
1910
1913
1913
1914
1912 88
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
McMurray,   J.   Ethel 1st.... August, 1914
MacNaghten, Russell E M.A January, 1910
McXair,   Muriel    2nd January, 1905
McNiven,   Catherine    .B.A August, 1914
McPherson, Annie R j .1st August, 1910
MacQueen,   Elizabeth D B.A -December, 1907
McQueen,   Kate   H B.A January, 1911
McRae,   Lottie   S 1st February, 1914
Neil,  Mrs.  E.   14   Stewart 1st - August, 1908
Nesbitt,   William  J 1st August, 1913
Newby,  Myrtle  S 2nd - - August, 1912
Olding,   Elizabeth
.2nd January, 1902
Paget,   Harry   L	
Painter,   Emily   	
Patterson,   Jean  	
Pattison, Thomas .
Pearson, Ethel M....
Perkins,   Alice   G....
Perkins,   Ella   D	
Perry,    Florence    G
Pickering,  Walter   1st
Pollock, James R :Jst
1st October,
2nd January,
1st - ....January,
M.A  F'ebruary,
2nd January,
1st -. September,
B.A August,  1905; April,
1st .August,
 August,
 August.
Preston,  Besie     2nd ...January,
Purdie, A. J. Grosvenor B.A August,
Ramage,   Wm.   G... B.A August,
Rand,  William  L B.A August,
Reid,   Alice  T.   G.| .....2nd August,
Reveley, Ethel H. B 2nd October,
Riley,   Jblsie   B H 1st August,
Rines,  Alfred ft, 1st August,
Rines,   Alice   R.|| ft 1st  August,
Roberts, Elen Jj 1st . ...January,
Roberts,   T.   H.   R   B.A August,
Robertson,   Lemuel .j^^ft.M.A August,
Robinson,  Geo.  E B.A August,
Rogers,   Olive   M 2nd ...January,
Ross,   A.   W I      M.A January,
Ross,  Ellen D ft 1st February,
Ross, Jean M 1st August,
Ross,   Lillian   A ft 2nd January,
Ross,   Lillian  M 1st August,
Salter,   Mildred   Hi 2nd January,
Sanderson,   J.   R  ^  M.A.,  Ph.D August,
Saunders, M, B ©It- Academic ft. August,
Sheepy,  Janet   ft ft~3rd- ----ft - August,
 1st ft February,
1 1st January,
 2nd-.. April,
I .ft 2nd — November,
 B.A I January,
 1 st  M January,
 M.A September,
 Art Jf. .-.August,
   2nd :.-:August,
 2nd   January,
 2nd   August,
 ......1st ..Aug.,   1891;  Aug.,   1893;  Aug.,
 1st August,
3rd .ft January,
 2nd - February,
 1st January,
 B.A August,
 1st ft January,
 B.A  August,
 1st August,
      1st August,
 j_ 1st August,
 w 1st February,
..."-.-,..    1st January,
..__- 1st    ...August,
'~m[l .......M.A November,
B.A January,
"B.A.,    B.Sc October,
Sherman, R.  S	
Sherrin,   Alice   M...
Shine,   Mrs.   Alice
Shine,   Isabelle   M.
Simon,   Annie   D	
Simpson, Lilla M.
Sinclair,   Annie   M.
Sinclair,   J.   G	
Sinclair, Madge P.
Smith, Edith T.....
Snider. Emma L....
Sparling.   R.   ....	
Spencer. Agnes ...
Splan,   Mary   E	
G.
Lie
Stables,   Ne
Steeves,   R.   P	
Stephen.   S.   R	
Stephens.   Emma
Sterns,   Clara  M...
Stevens,  Gladys E.
Stewart,   Christina
S'tewart.  Edith L...
Stone,   Mabel  W	
Story, Marv E	
Straight, R	
Struthers,   R	
Stuart,  Jas: "A	
Suter. R.  W'~	
L.
E.
1912
1909
1907
1901
1911
1912
1911
1911
1912
1910
1910
1912
1912
1914
1912
1912
1913
1908
1912
1913
1910
1901
1893
1913
1909
1912
1912
1911
1911
1910
1913
1906
1911
1903
1909
1903
1912
1914
1913
1911
1910
1910
1910
1904
1900
1912
1913
1912
1913
1914
1910
1911
1914
1912
1910
1914
1913
1907
1914
1913
1902
w BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
89
Tanner, Kebecca
Tanton, Edna G.
Taylor, Grace A,
Taylor,   L.   W.
 2nd August, 1900
 1st April, 1911
    Academic August, 1910
 B.A \ugust. 1 913
Taylor, Minnie       1st    August, 1914
Templer, Mrs.  Jean   „ 1st August, 1911
Thomas,   David     B.A August, 1914
Thomas,  Owen  J B'.A August, 1911
Thomson,  Charlotte   .l.     B.A August, 1914
Tompkins,  Ida   B.A August, 1912
Trembat'h, Barbara E 1st August, 1914
Truswell,  Mary   1st \ugust, 1899
Tucker,   Julia E  1st ft .ft January, 1913
Turner,  Janet C 1st ft February, 1914
Van Blaricom,  Ida M.
Van Wart,  Elsie	
Vermilyea, A.  Irene....
Vermilyea,   Beulah   B.
B.A m. January, 1907
B.A January, 1911
1st ft. May, 191b
1st ~Jft M-May, 1911
Ward,  Blanche  E	
Ward, Edith M	
Ward, Gladys I	
Warner,  Gertrude 	
'Warner, Mabel A	
Warwick,  Ellen M .3rd
Watson, J.  LA	
Watson. Kathleen 	
1st .ft. January,
2nd ft..Nov ember,
1st j| August,
1st February,
2nd || August,
 .—..... August,
B.A August,
2nd B ft....January,
E.
M.
Watson,  Marguerite
Wenborn, Myrle 	
Wickett,   Evelyn   	
Willett.   Jane   T	
Williamson,   Jessie   E
Wilson,  F.  C	
Wilson,    Grace   A	
Wilson,   Jean   B	
Wilson, Rosalind  1st-
Wood,   Berton   J   M.A
Woodhead,  Thomas W
Woods,   William   	
Wyatt,   J.   M.	
2nd flr. JK August,
2nd ft. January,-
B.A ft January,
B.A ,ft February,
2nd .ft M August,
B.A ft. ft. January,
B.A August,
1st ..ft January,
  January,
B.  Sc -ft October,
.Academic August,
.B.A .ft ft August,
.M.A Oct.,  1911; Aug., 1912;  Jan.,
Youni
George   P.
.1st ft January,  1913
DOMESTIC   SCIENCE.
Baird,  Kate  I February,
Bell, Adna  ft. August,
Cooke,  Eva January,
Creelman, Minerva  ft. August,
Fonda,  Ethel   I .ft August,
Marlatt,  Mary  Norah A ft August,
Mutch, Susie L August,
Martin,  Mrs.   Arkley i September,
MacKay,   Ida  F ft ft.January,
Oliver,   Frederica   jft August,
Rath, Martha  ft ft. -ft August,
Smellie, Ella  ft February,
Sterritt, Agnes    ft August,
Stevens, Elsie   ± ft. August,
1
912
1
912
1
914
1
909
1
909
1
913
1
913
1
911
1
913
1
914
1
910
1
913
1
914
1
911
MANUAL   TRAINING.
Cantell. Albert  .ft January, 1910
Chippendale, Thos .ft. ^^ft..September, 1912
Fairey, Francis ft January, 1912
Oardner, N. H ft January, 1908
Hill, William A September, 1910
Jones,   I Tarry A ft August, 1914
Lister, J. George Octoberftjl903
r 90
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
L_
Littlewood, Walter  ft August
Mitchell,  Wm.   C August
Morrison,  F.   S August
McAdam, Josiah W January
McCallum, D.  P August
McKeown, William A August
Parker, A. W January
Parker,  E.   W January
Sievers,  George W March
Templer,  F. W August
Tingley,  A.  P August
White, Charles  August
Williams, A August
£*h0
SUPERVISORS.
1914
1914
1913
1912
1913
1903
1909
1911
1912
1913
1914
1912
1914
Berry, Elizabeth Supervisor of Domestic Science
Bundy,  Albert C Supervisor  of  Physical  Culture
Butler, Constance Assistant Supervisor of Music
Hicks, George P Supervisor of Music*
Laing, Graham A.  (Aug.-Dec.) Director of Prevocational and Night Classes
Northrop,  S Supervisor of Manual Training
Scott, Chas.  H.   (Aug.-Dec.) Supervisor  of Drawing
Trembath, Emily J Supervisor of Primary Classes
Weston, William P.   (Jan.-April) Supervisor of Drawing
SCHOOL MEDICAL STAFF.
Brydone-Jack, F. W., M.D.; CM. (McGill), M.R. San. I School Medical Officer
Hunter, A. W., M.D.; CM. (McGill)   (Jan.-Aug.) Asst. School Medical Officer
Wilson,  Belle H., M.D.   (Sept.-Dec.) Assistant School Medical Officer
Bamford, R.  C, D.D.S School  Dentist
Breeze, Elizabeth  Head Nurse
McLellan, Aletha  Nurse
Jeffers, Adelaide —  Nurse
Ewart, I. May JB.  Nurse
Inglis, Jas.
ATTENDANCE OFFICERS.
Jensen, Nels.
Godfrey, Wm. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
SALARY SCHEDULE
January, 1915.
1st yr.
$60
Grade Teachers.
8th and
2nd yr.   3rd yr.   4th yr.   5th yr.   6th yr.   7th yr.   Succeeding yrs.
$65 $70 $75 $80 $85 $90 $95
Senior Grade Teachers.
(Maximum $100.)
Teachers having had two years' successful experience in graded
schools, minimum salary, $65.
Salaries of substitutes to be paidi by the Board in cases of illness of
teachers up to 20 teaching days in the year, subject to Medical Certificate
from doctor in attendance, or School Medical Officer.
1st yr.
$110
1st yr.
$140
1st yr.
$150
2nd yr.
$120
Vice-Principals.
3rd yr.
$130
4th and Succeeding yrs.
$140
Principals—Small School.
3rd yr. 4th yr. 5th and Succeeding yrs.
$160 $170 $180
Principals—Large School.
1st yr.
$100
1st yr.
$70
2nd yr.
$110
2nd yr.
$80
2nd yr.
$150
2nd yr.     3rd yr.     4th yr.     5th yr.     6th yr.
$160 $170 $180 $190 $200
High School—Male Teachers.
1st yr. 2nd yr.  3rd yr.  4th yr.  5th yr.  6th yr.  7th yr
$130       $140       $.150       $160       $170       $180       $190
High School—Female Teachers.
1st yr.  2nd yr.  3rd yr.  4th yr.  5th yr.  6th yr.  7th yr
$110        $120        $130        $140        $150        $160        $170
Manual Training Instructors
3rd yr.
$120
4th yr.
$130
Domestic Science Instructors.
3rd yr.
$85
Schedule based on twelve monthly payments each year.
No schedule increase to go into effect without the same being recommended by the Municipal Inspector of Schools.
The salary of any teacher may be fixed at a sum not indicated in the
schedule by special resolution of the Board. REVENUE ACCOUNT FOR THE YEAR 1914.
By Total Appropriation for the year 1914 $691,067.00
Estimated Sinking Fund and Interest  213,432.52
Salaries—
Superintendent and Assistants $ 5,325.00
Secretary  and  Assistants  6,902.30
Building Supt. and Assistants.... 3,500.00
Medical Department  9,053.32
Attendance Officers   3,360.00
Playground Supervisors    1,275.00
Night Classes   1.  17,928.50
Chauffeurs I... M 1,217.00
Other Salaries  553.90
I f   Jlf     ' '« ~$ 49,115.02  •
School Salaries—x
Teachers $429,484.10  f
Teachers'  Substitutes          3,866.55
Supervisors         12,465.00
Manual Training Teachers      21,984.00
Domestic Science Teachers      10,679.00   . _~  . _rt ,r
     478,478.65
Janitors   50,043.73
Supplies—
Schools $ 24,422.89  R^^
Domestic Science   2,811.72
Manual Training   2,386.65
Medical  Department  .ft.  1,278.87
Night Classes   ft.  2,247.40
Playgrounds    I I | 600.50   Mp
Janitors         5,894.18     on^^ooi
  39,o4z.z1
MlSCELLAN EOUS	
Fuel $ 21,875.89  §|Hfti|
Electric Light and Power  4,237.59
Gas ..f  1,1 1 1.65
Water  1  1,554.00   2Jv\«|
Insurance   6,262.67
Advertising     226.70
Cartage   368.1 3
Telephone  ..|...  2,087.69   fB§§#l
Scavenging ft.... 1,014.25
Auto Expense   1,311.07
Car Fares   1,224.70
Cadets J| I I. 2,000.00  |»g •
Linoleum  ft.  825.00     . . ~qq <ia
Wm:-i    Carried   Forward   $661,378.95    904,499.52 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Brought Forward $661,378.95 $904,499.52
Solicitors  and Auditors  $     1,436.35
Office Expense         2,156.93
Contingent         3,151.05
JJ; p^ 6,744.33    ;>S#-|1
Repairs and Renewals      34,387.36
Sinking Fund and Interest as per City Hall   21 3,555.09
By Royal Institution Rebate	
Excess Government Grant Over Amount
Estimated   	
To Balance          2,001.14
12,300.00
1,267.35
$918,066.87 918,066.87
By  Balance   down,  being  Surplus   carried   forward to  the
Year 1915  $    2,001.14
We have examined the foregoing Statement, together with the Books
and Disbursement Vouchers relating thereto, and certify that the Statement
is correctly drawn up so as to set forth the Board of School Trustees' Expenditures on Revenue Account for the year 1914, as disclosed by the
records presented for our inspection. We have received all the information
and explanations we have required.
i«Pl KENDALL, BARR & CO., i^^E
THOMAS DUKE,
Chairman.
GERALD UPTON, ||fl
Secretary 94 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
jf    CAPITAL EXPENDITURE FOR THE YEAR 1914.
^^^^^P   'ill   BY-LAW NO. 997.JHp|'
Jan. 1st, 1914.    By Balance on hand... $299,484.27
To Completion of 1913 Contracts—
Dawson School   $    5,340.45   -flpi'      :'§;
Henry Hudson School        4,774.19
Bayview School        32,332.06
&i^^;;;:^M^I|t $ 42,446.70 §.
To New Construction During 1914—
Beaconsfield School   $ 72,290.28
Block 70, Preliminary Plans  355.45
General Gordon Manual Training 1,697.77
Installation  of  Fountains  2,729.21
Enlarging Garage   i  535.97
77,608.68
To Desks, Furniture and Sundry Equipment-
Desks and Furniture $ 9,656.73
Prevocational   and   Night   Class
Equipment      8,520.54
Dental Equipment   717.80
Oil Burning Equipment  6,572.41
Manual Training Equipment  2,768.65
Motor Car   933.86
29,169.99
To Miscellaneous-
Disputed Extras and Legal Expense in Mathe-
son Contract         1,682.00
Additions to Heating and Ventilating Systems..     1 7,889.74
Interior Painting (first coat) New Schools        4,396.53
Remodelling old Dawson into new High School       4,91 3.49
Grounds—Retaining walls, grading Blocks 70,
6, 38, cement sidewalks, surface draining
and fencing       53,731.31
Sundries—Small Capital Expenditures over all
schools (30)       7,447.01
To Balance       60,198.82
$299,484.27 299,484.27
By Balance down,  being credit to the Board on  account
of By-Law No. 997 JH $ 60,198.82 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
95
BY-LAW NO. 998.    ^p^^^ft.
Jan. 1st, 1914.     By Balance on hand...... $157,106.61
To New Construction During 1914—
Strathcona  School   $  34,874.04 |||^V
King Edward High Gymnasium  209.10
Balance    122,023.47
$157,106.61   157,106.61
By Balance down, being credit to the Board on account of
By-Law No. 998, as at December 31st,  1914 $122,023.47
CAPITAL FUNDS AVAILABLE AS AT   ^^^^B
— DECEMBER 31st, 1914.    ^^^ifpilig
By-Law No. 997 .....$ 60,198.82 ifflHH
By-Law No. 998   122,023.47
lllf;  ! $182,222.29
N. B.—Specific amounts set out in By-Law No. 998 of which thereof
balances remaining unexpended are as follows and can only be used
for such construction:
King Edward High Gymnasium ....$49,790.90     -I9H
Model School Heating Plant....    1 0,000.00-$NhBh
We have examined the foregoing Statement, together with the Books
and Disbursement Vouchers relating thereto, and certify that the Statement
is correctly drawn up so as to set forth the Board of School Trustees' Expenditures on Capital Account for the year 1914, as disclosed by the records presented for our inspection. We have received all the information
and explanations we have required.
;^^^^H  KENDALL, BARR & CO., I^^ft
Auditors.
THOMAS DUKE, '^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^S
Chairman.
GERALD UPTON, li^^^^^^^^^^K   WBIB
Secretary. 96
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
SECRETARY'S STATEMENT.
G. Upton, Secretary
Vancouver,  B. C, March 6th,   1915.
Mr. Chairman. Mrs. McNaughton and Gentlemen,—■
I beg to hand you herewith annual statement covering the expenditure
of the Board on account of Capital and Revenue, also analyzed statement
of Revenue, together with statistics on the valuation of lands, buildings,
etc.
Capital.—The financial position of the Board as at December 31st,
1914, is satisfactory. The balance available for general school purposes,
as shown on this account under head of By-Law No. 997, amounts to
$60,198.82. Of course, you have to take into consideration certain unpaid liabilities against this, principally the balance owing on your Beaconsfield School and also certain sums to complete work on your grounds that
you have entered into; finally, an amount due for desks on order and not
yet delivered. This being a general blanket by-law when advertised originally, such funds are available for any purpose of a Capital nature that
the Board so desire.
Referring to statement of By-Law No. 998, you have a balance
down of $122,023.47. Against this you have liabilities on an uncompleted contract on your Strathcona School. You also have a liability for
construction of the King Edward High School Gymnasium and a Hearing
Plant at your Model School. Owing to the fact that this by-law when
advertised originally was a specific one, earmarking the amounts set out
in the by-law, they cannot be expended for any other purpose.
There has been a slight amount expended on the King Edward High
School Gymnasium, which is accounted for by architectural charges in
making many preparatory plans at one time during the year when you con- BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
97
templated going on with this building, afterwards deciding to let the matter rest.
Revenue.—The ordinary procedure has been followed in your Revenue statement, and a schedule has been drawn up showing the customary
analysis of Revenue expenditure, which is all that can be required, and
such speaks for itself.
The greatest care has been exercised by all Committees during the
year in the ordering of supplies. The Finance Committee has been extremely careful in scrutinizing all bills and accounts and every advantage
has been taken of discounts.
I am pleased to be able to report that promiscuous issuing of orders
for supplies has practically ceased; that everything is being done in the
proper official manner and no orders are now being issued unless they are
carefully looked into by the heads of departments before being placed with
the retail or wholesale firms, this being the principal safeguard against
over-expenditure.
The records of the Board in so far as financial matters are concerned
have been thoroughly inspected by the Auditors, Messrs. Kendall, Barr
& Co., from month to month. 'The Finance Committee has received a
quarterly report of expenditures.
Finally, the year 1914 in so far as my department is concerned, has
been a very satisfactory one. There has not been a single dispute on
any accounts or matters connected therewith. I have received the best
of advice from all the Trustees from time to time and conscientious services of the Board's employees in my department, resulting in that which
is always desired — satisfaction to our employers and pleasure to ourselves.
Respectfully submitted,
■      W  ^^p|v^^::^Ml^    GERALD UPTON, H^Pf
Secretary. t
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