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Thirty-first annual report of the Vancouver Board of Trade. 1917-1918 Vancouver. Board of Trade 1918

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Array Thirty-First 
Annual Report 
of the 
Vancouver Board 
of Trade 

1917-1918 
Vancouver, British Columbia 
Canada 
TECHNICAL PRESS. LTD., VANCOUVER, B.C.   Board of Trade Building, Vancouver, B. C. Thirty-First 
Annual Report 
of the 
Vancouver Board 
of Trade 

1917-1918 
Vancouver, British Columbia 
Canada VANCOUVER BOAED OF TRADE
Officers
PAST PRESIDENTS
1887-88-
-D.   OPPENHEIMER
1902-03-
-W.  H.  MALKIN
1888,89-
-D.   OPPENHEIMER   (dec.)
1903-04-
-H.  T.   LOCKYER
1889-90-
-E. V. BODWELL  (dec.)
1904-05-
-h. Mcdowell (dec.)
1890-91-
-R.   H-   ALEXANDER
1905-06-
-A.  B.  ERSKINE
1891-92-
-JOHN  HENDRY
1906-07-
-R.  P.  McLENNAN
1892-93-
-G.  E.   BERTEAUX   (dec.)
1907-08-
-w. j. McMillan
1892-93-
-W.   F.   SALSBURY
1908-09-
-E.   H.   HEAPS
1893 94-
-J.   C.   KEITH   (dec.)
1909-10-
-H. A.  STONE
1894-95-
-G. M. MAJOR
1910-11-
-EWING  BUCHAN
1895 96-
-H.   BELL-IRVING
1911-12-
-A.  G.  McCANDLESS
1896-97-
-H.   BELL-IRVING
1912-13-
-A.   B.   ERSKINE
1897-98-
-WM. GODFREY
1913-14-
-HON.  F.  CARTER.COTTON
1898 99-
-WM.  GODFREY
1914-15-
-JONATHAN  ROGERS
1899-00-
-C.   E.   TISDALL
1915-16-
-JONATHAN ROGERS
1900-01-
-F.   BUSCOMBE
1916-17-
-N.   THOMPSON
1901-02-
-F.  F. BURNS   (dec.)
1917-18-
-B.  W.  GREER
OFFICERS  FOR  1918-19
P.   G.   SHALLCROSS     President
C.   SPENCER    '. . Vice-President
W.   A.   BLAIR     Secretary
(12 marked
COUNCIL'
being the Board of Arbitration)
ALLAN,    O.    B S.   6317 *LAW,   0.  F.
BRETTELL,  E S.     815 *MALKIN,   J
CREEDEN,   V.   J S.  1935 *MALKIN,
*EADIE,   J.   . . .' S. 4843 MACRAE,
FLETCHER,   T.   W B.  2032 *NICOLLS,
*GREER,   B.   W S. -2376 *PARSONS
*HALL,  J.  E S.   8210 *ROUNSEFELL,
*HAMBER,   E.   W.     H.     500 TISDALL,    C.
HOCKIN,    D S. 4691 WATSON,   J.
*HOULGATE,   R.   K S.   7370 "WILSON, W.
*KIDD,    GEORGE      S.  5000
P.
W.   rl.
J.  K.
J.   P.
F.     .
F
E.
D.
• M	
J. BLAKE.
.S.
.S.
.s.
.S.
.S.
.s.
.s.
.s.
.s.
.H
3265
3790
3790
5354
8010
7200
7820
152
5616
200
DATES OF REGULAR MEETINGS  OF THE FULL BOARD
AND    COUNCIL,    1918-19.
Regular meetings of the Council are held on the first and third Thursdays
of  each  month.
FULL   BOARD    MEETINGS.
April           9       October          8
May    	
June	
July     	
August     	
14 November  12
11 December ,  10
9 January     14
13 February    |  11
September       10
March-
II ANNUAL REPORT, 1917-1918 3
Bureaux and Sections of Same, Board of Trade
1918-1919
BANKING, FINANCIAL AND INSURANCE
Chairman    J1.  W.   ROUNSEFELL
Sections:
Banking    H.   H.   MORRIS
Financial  ,. G. L. SMELLIE
Insurance   R.  W.  DOUGLAS
LEGAL AND LEGISLATIVE
Chairman  R. KERR HOULGATE
Executive:
J. K. MACRAE W. MeNEILL
H. T.  DEVINE G. L. SM^ELLIE
J. P. NICOLLS I J. H. LAWSON
TR ANSP ORT ATION
Chairman    J.   E.   HALL
GREATER VANCOUVER AND LOWER MAINLAND
Chairman B.   W.   GREER
MINING
Chairman    C.  F.  LAW
Viee-Chairman  N. THOMPSON
Executive:
A. B. CLABON G.  F.   GIBSON
E   A. HAGGEN CHAS.  A.  LEE
A. E. SMITH F. WILKINSON
J.  B.  MATHERS C. E. CARTWRIGHT
•   ALEX. SHARP A. E. HEPBURN
REAL  ESTATE
Chairman   J. P.  NICOLLS
Executive:
J   J. BANFIELD W.   H.   GALLAGHER
H. R   BUDD G.  F.  GIBSON
H. V. SHARPLES  i
DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN TRADE
Chairman    W.   H.   MALKIN"
Sections:
Industrial   Development    J.   H.   HAMILTON
Fofeign Trade and Commerce  H. G. WHITE
Domestic Trade and Commerce  W. H. MALKIN
Grain   - J-  E.  HALL VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
MANUFACTURERS, FOREST PRODUCTS   SHIPBUILDING
AND FISHERIES
Chairman  E. W. HAMBER
Sections:
Manufacturers and Shipbuilding 	
Lumbermen   E. W. HAMBER
Loggers    At   E.   MUNN
Fisheries   F.  E. BURKE
RETAIL MERCHANTS
Chairman    FRANK   PARSONS -
Vice-Chairman  W. H. P. CLUBB
Sections:
Grocers    W.  H.  WALSH
Druggists    J.   M.   WATSON
Stationers,  Printers  &  Booksellers.... W.   J.   WHITE
Clothing    J.   W.   FOSTER
Hardware   W.  C  STEARMAN
Jewelers: and  Opticians  —- O.  B. ALLAN
Boots and Shoes  JAMES GOODWIN
Advertising    ,	
Automobile    W.   G.   PATRICK
CIVIC
Chairman  .'. GEORGE KIDD
Sections:
City Planning and Housing  J. J. BANFIELD
Conservation  J. FYFE SMITH
Reception  and  Entertainment   GEO.  KIDD
Public Health & Sanitation ....JONATHAN ROGERS
Street Traffic and Public Finance   	
WHOLESALE MERCHANTS
Chairman  J. P. D. MALKIN
ViceChairman    J.   B.   THOMSON
Sections:
Grocers   W.  E.   O.  JONES
Dry Goods  G. A. CAMPBELL
Hardware M J.  E.  McILLREEVY
Fruits  and  Produce   f.F.   R.   STEWART
Brokers  DUNCAN GAVIN
SHIPPING
Chairman    JOHN  EADIE
Sections:
Deep  Sea    J.   C.  IRONS
Coastwise   ; E.   H.  BEAZLEY
Tug Owners  E. J. COYLE
Wharfage & Harbor Property E. W. HAMBER ANNUAL REPORT, 1917-1918
List of Members of the Vancouver
Board of Trade
NAME FIRM
Abbott,  J.   L.   G -.Abbott Macrae  & Co.
.  Abraham,   C.   A Daily Sun
Adams, H.  W Tuckett  Tobacco  Co.
*Affleck,  R.   G | Affleck & Mclnnes
Akhurst,  W.  A -.Canadian  Fairbanks  Co.
Alexander, R. H. H B. C. Lumber & Shingle Co.
Allan, O. B Jeweler   &   Optician
Allan, Thomas  Jeweler   &   Optician
Allan, W. A. M -Canadian  Consolidated Rubber
Allen, C. E H. W. Peabody & Co.
Amiss, J. H   The  Bradstreet  Co.
Anderson, J. G.  Barr & Anderson
Andrews, F. T.' 	
Armstrong, J. V B.  C.  Electric Railway Co.
Arms,trong< W. B. W B. C." Loggers Association
Arnett,  R.  F Puget Sound Machinery Co.
Arnold, A. A Arnold & Quigley
Arnold,  A. F Canadian Financiers Trust
Astley,  W W. Astley Co,
Ault, W. A Perrin   Freres   Co.
Avery, M.   •••• Creeden & Avery
Ayres,   Thos Ayres Varnish & Paint Co.
Badenoch,  Alex Leeson, Dickie &  Gross
Baker, E. P.'.'. Carter & Bird
Baird,   D Vic. & Van. Stevedoring
Balkwill,   T.   R Simson, Balkwill & Co.
Banfield, J. J Real Estate
Barclay, W. G A.. Macdonald & Co..
Barber,   J.   A Real  Estate
Barker, W. H B. C   Packers Association
Barnett, P Tomlinson & Mitchell
Barr, G. S J. Henry Peters Co.
Barrack, S. F P. Courian & Sons
Bartley    George    Cowan & Brookhouse
Battle, C. S_  Broker
Baynes   E.  G Baynes & Horie
Beazley, E. H Union S. S. Co. of B. C.
*Beazley,  P. M	
Beck, A  E •• Beck & Creagh
Bedlingt'on, R. G R. G. Bedlington & Co.
Beebe, C. N Canadian  Westinghouse  Co.
Beetham, E C   P.  Ocean Service
Begg, F. R Begg Motor  Co.
Bell, J. N Canadian  Ingersoll-Rand  Co,
Bell-Irving,   H E. Bell-Irving & Co.
Bentall,  Charles   Dominion Construction Co.
Berkinshaw, N. W Bank of Nova Scotia
Beveridge, G. L Wm. Braid  Co.
Beveridge,  W. F TI. Bell-Irving & Co.
Bigger, H. J#  American  Can  Co. VANCOUVER BOARD OF. TRADE
LIST OF MEMBERS—Continued
;>;'
NAME - FIRM
Black, W. S Black Bros.
Blackson, S 654 Granville  St.
Blair,  G Mackay,   Smith,   Blair   Co.
Blair, J. A Blair & Armstrong
Blair   W. A  Secretary
Bland, W. E National  Home Builders
Blane, W. B. — Insurance Agent
Bogard~us, A. P Bogardus, Wickens Co.
Book, D. K    „ Retail Clothing
Borland, R. J	
Boultbee,   W.   W. \ Johnson's Wharf Co.
Bowman, R	
Bowser, F \	
Bowser, W   J Bowser,  Reid' &  Wallbridge
Braid, William   B.   C.   Vinegar' Works
| Brand,   James    James Brand & Co.
Bravo, E.  Soriano   Consul  General  of' Mexico
*Brenton, H. B B. C. Packers Association
Brettell,   E ......Electric   Supply' Co.
Brewer, Harry  Brewer 'a  Bakery
Bridgman   E. H. % Reeve, North Vancouver District
Brodie, F. A B.  C. Brush Works, Ltd.
Brooks, J. G. .: —Hose   &   Brooks
Brooks, P. R Brooks-Bidlake Cedar Co., Ltd
Brooks,  S.  D.   Powell River Co.
Brostedt, A Canadian Northern Rly. Co.
Brown, A. G Brown,   Fraser   &   Co.
Brown, B. S Brown   &  Welsh
Brown, Fred G Fred Brown & Co., Ltd.
Brown, H. W. H. W. Brown & Co.
Brown, W. R	
Bruce, C. D. daman's Ltd.
Brydone-Jaek, W. D Physician  &  Surgeon
Buchan, E Bank of Vancouver
Buckley, F. L. Broker
Buekworth,  A.  B Broker
Budd, H. R London & B. N  A. Co.
Burbridge, P. William   Van.   Machinery   Depot   Ltd.
Burd, F. J ....Daily Province
Burdick, N. T •-Burdick Bros. & Brett   Ltd.
Burke, F. E. Wallace Fisheries Ltd.'
Burke,  S Pemberton   &  Son
Burley, W. S B. C. Fir & Cedar Lumber Co.
Burns,  D ] j P. Burns & Co., Ltd.
Burns, K. J Great Northern Railway Co.
Burns, W. E .Burns & Walkem
Buscombe, F Buscombe Securities Co
Buscombe,   George   Buscombe Securities Co'
Bushby, G. G B. C. Marine Ltd.
Byrnes, Thomas J United Typewriter Ltd.
Callender,  J.  C Imperial Varnish & Color Co.
Cameron, E  J Automobile Dealer ANNUAL REPORT, 1917-1918
LIST OF MEMBERS—Continued
NAME . FIRM
Cameron,  J. P Wholesale Woollens
Cameron,  M.  J Merchant
Cameron,  S    ..Pacific  Dredging Co.
Campbell,  0.  E Campbell Storage Co. Ltd.
Campbell, G. A. G, A. Campbell & ,Co.
Campbell, D.  R   Canadian Northern Railway
Campbell,  J.  A ,-T. A   Campbell & Co.
Campbell,  J.  H Equitable Life Assurance Co.
Campbell,  N.  S    ....Union  Oil  Co.  of California
Campbell   R.  C'.   Swift  Canadian  Co.
Carson, W. M j Henry Birks  & Sons, Ltd.
Carter, F. J Carter  &  Bird
Carter, T. McG G. Drysdale,  Ltd.
Cartwright, C. E .—.Cartwright, Matheson & Co.
Casey, A. H Barrister
Cassidy, Robt Barrister
Cates, J. A Terminal Steam Navigation Co.
Ceperley, H. T Ceperley Rounsefell & Co.
Chalmers,  A.  J.   Donald H. Bain Co.
Chalmers, D.  A Editor, B. C. Monthly
Charleson, P. W Broker
Chatterton, H. V. O I M   DesBrisay & Co.
Chester, W.  G Ti'lden Gurney & Co., Ltd.
Clabon,  A. B Mining Engineer
Claman,   I Claman's Ltd.
Clark,  D.   R ......Bank  of  Montreal
Clark, J. W Grain Dealer
Clark. J. F —: Clark   &  Lyford,  Ltd.
Cleveland, E. A Cleveland  &  Cameron
Cline,   W Wholesale   Furniture
Clubb, W. H. P 1 ....Clubb & Stewart
Cluff, Fred   •• .-. Cluff Shoe Co.
Coles,  C. P C.  P.   Coles. Co.,  Ltd.
Collister, W. H. R	
Conkey, R. A	
Connor,  D.   .510 Winch Building
Conway, W. J B.   C.  Hardwood  Floors
Gonstantine, A Furs
Cook   E Cook Construction Co.
Conkey, J. A Merchandise  Broker
Cope, F. T vjope & Son, Ltd.
Corneille, F. E. -.:.... JBrackman-Ker Milling Co.   j
Cornett, J. -W Cornett Bros.
Cornish, E. O Marine   Assurance
Cotton,   F.   Carter Chairman  Harbor ^Commission
Cotton, M. P - - Cotton   Co.,   Ltd.
Cottrell, G. H Cottrell's  Storage
Cowdry,   A.   N.  ,.. ..Cowdry-Whitney,   Ltd.
Coyle, E. J - Greer,  Coyle  &  Co.
Cramer, D - Cramer  &  Co.
Crann, J. A King Warehousing Co.
Crawford   F. L Canadian Bank of Commerce
Crawford}  g'. - - -U. Bell-Irving Co., Ltd. VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
LIST OF MEMBERS—Continued
NAME $||: FIRM
Crawford   W. M Empire  Stevedoring  Co.
Creeden, V. J Creeden & Avery
Creer, A. D	
Creery, A. McC H. Bell-Irving Co., Ltd.
Crehan, M. J.   Crehan, Martin & Co.
Crickmay, F. G. .., : Crickmay Bros.
Cromie, R. J Bloedel, Stewart & Welch
Cruise, A. W Consolidated ' Motor  Company
Crysdale   C. A Monarch Life Insurance Co.
Cull, N.'G.   •• t Optician
Cummings, C. V. _ Northern Construction Co.
Cunliffe, B. A.' ■ ■ Renwick  & Cunliffe
Cunningham, G. T Cunningham Drug Store
Cunningham, F. W : Cunningham's  Ltd.
Cunningham, H. M,  Physician
Cunningham, J. A B. C. Refining Co.
Dalby, K. B Druggist
Dalton, W I Mainland  Transfer Co.
Daniels, Charles H Great Northern Telegraph Co.
Darling, H    Darling, Hobson & Co.
Davidson, "J.  D University of B.  C.
Davey, J. N British American Paint Co.
Davidson, A Grand Trunk Pacific S.  S.  Co.
Davidson, J. L Pacific Dredging Co
Davis, Ed.  • • Granby Consolidated Mining Co.
Davison, J. R Industrial   Commissioner
Dawson, C. E Commission Broker   .
Dawson,'  Fred*  Monarch Art Store
Day, Paul  Federal Lumber Co.
Deacon, E. J : Deacon  & Deacon
Dean, E. W E. W. Dean & Son
Deeley, Fred   F. Deely Co.
Deeks, J. F Deeks Gravel & Rock Co.
DeMerrall, L. C Martin  Senour  Co.,  Ltd.
Devine, H. T .;H. T. Devine Co., Ltd.
Devlin, E. E  E. E  Devlin Business Service
Devine,   John    P. Burns  & Co., Ltd.
Dick, Jr, William  Wm.   Dick,  Ltd.
Dickens, B. F Callopy-Holland Advertising Co.
Dietrich, F. A B. C. Equipment Co.
Dinning, R. D Canadian, Credit Men's Trust
Disher, C. E. C. E. Disher Co.
Dixon, C. G Leonard's  Cafe
Dixon;,   L.   A.    ■ • :. Dixon Motors, Ltd.
Doering C Hat  Creek Ranch,  Cariboo  Roac
Dollar,  A. M The  Robert Dollar Co.
Dollar,   Robert    Shipowners
Dowler, E. D Martin & Robertson, Ltd.
Donaghy, D. ., Donaghy & Donaghy
Donnelly,   P Financial Broker
Donohue, R International Time Recording
Douglas, A. H "Bowser, Reid, Wallbridge & Co. ANNUAL REPORT, 1917-1918-
LIST OF MEMBERS—Continued
NAME" Jgg FIRM
Douglas, R. W JJouglas,   MaeKay   &   Co.  '
Dow, A „ jDow Fraser Trust Co.
Dowljng, T. E fowling Mfg. Co.
Downie, D Barrister
.Drayton, C. R. | -Vancouver Financial Corporation
*Drost,  P.   G WA '
Drysdale, G Gordon Drysdale, Ltd.
*DuCane, Charles, G JJuCane, Dutcher & Co.
Duehesnay, A. E '.	
Duker, H Harry  Duker,  Ltd.
Duncan, J. R Vulcan  Iron 'Works
Dunlop, J. R. V Vancouver   Trust   Co
Dunlop,   R,   E Remington Typewriter Co., Ltd.
Dutcher, H. K DuCane, Dutcher & Co.
Dyson,  H. W Yorkshire & Canadian Trust Co.
Eadie, John  Dingwall, Cotts  & Co.
Earle, R. R , Bird, Macdonald & Ross
Eaton, E. S Success Business College
Eekman   J. E New England Fish Co.
Edgett, 'W. H W. H. Edgett, Ltd.
Edwards,   G.  L ...Edwards & Ames
Elderton, C. R Union Insurance Society of Canton
*Elkins, J.  E Elkins  Bros., Ltd.
Elliott, J. E McLennan,  McFeely &  Co., Ltd.
Ellis, H. M H. M. Ellis & Co, Ltd.
Ellis,   J.   N Ellis  &  Brown
*Endacott,   G.   M Endacott & Percival
Erskine, A. B	
Evans,   A.   K Vancouver  Financial  Corporation
Evans, F. G - F. G. Evans & Co
Evans,  W.  F Evans   &   Co.
Fahey   J. T Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.
Falconer, J. H .' B. C. Vinegar Works
Farish, J.  C Physician
Farkas,  A Western Cloak  & Suit Co.
Farr,   E.   J White Pass & Yukon Route
Farrant,   Howard    Confederation  Life  Assurance  Co.
Farrand,   Wm.   J J.  & J.  Taylor, Ltd.
Farris,   W.   B Farris  cfc  Emerson
Faulds,   J.   A.   M -\D. E. Brown's Travel Bureau
Fauser   E. R Dominion  Exelusives
*Fell,  'J.  P	
Ferguson, W. G Ferguson, Higman Motor Co.
Fife, J. T Monarch Life
Fisher,  N.   R Barrister
Fletcher, T. W Reeve Point Grey
Flett,  J.  A J. A. Flett, Ltd.
Forbes, A. M Forbes & Van Home
Forbes, H. M Toronto General Trust Corporation
Ford,  J.   L Eenry Birks & Son
Ford,  R.  S R. S. Ford Co., Ltd. 10
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
LIST OF MEMBERS—Continued
NAME FIRM
*Ford, R. W Vancouver Gas Co.
Forsyth, G. S G. S. Forsyth & Co.
Forsvth, J. D	
Foster,  J.  W \ J. W. Foster, Ltd.
Foster,  W.  L Mainland  Fire  Underwriters
Fowler,  W G Gutta, Percha Rubber Co.
Frampton, C. G Insurance
Francis, R. B I B. C. Leather & Findings Co.
Frazee, C. W Royal Bank  of Canada
Fraser,"   E.   L Oscar Brown & Co., Ltd.
French,  A Tooke Bros., Ltd.
French, ,A    St. French Auto Company
Frith,   R.   J.   H ". Advertising
Fryer, J.  C Bond & Fryer, Ltd.
Gagen,   H.   J .puthbertson & Co., Ltd.
Gale,  R.  H Mayor
Galer, H. N British American Trust Co.
Gall, J. S Richards," Akroyd & Gall
Gallagher, W. H W. H. Gallagher & Co.
Galloway, James  ^McClary Manufacturing Co.
Gait,  John jTJnion  Steamship  Co.
Gavin    D Martin   &   Robertson
Garland,   M.   N 1	
Geddes, H,  G.  R.  Gregg  Co., Ltd.
Geddes J. G ., Union .Bank of Canada
Gehrke, J. W Hanscombe & Gehrke
Gelletly,   R. jDavie  Logging  &  Trading  Co.
*Germaine,  W.  L British American Trust
Gibbs, G. M fSTorthern  Bond Co.
Gibbs, R. C Gibbs Tool & Stamping Works
Gibson, G. F AGibson  & Merrick
Gibson, J. G JBowser, Reid, Wallbridge & Co.
Gibson,   R .- Gibson's Ltd. .
Giffin, J. B JR..  G. Dun  & Co.
Gilchrist,  W The Hose & Brooks Co., Ltd.
Giles, George  Vancouver Engineering Works
Gillman, A. J	
Gilman,  E. P Mining Engineer
Gilroy,'L. E Dentist
Gintzburger,   S Swiss Consul
Giske, E. H	
Givin, A. W Taylor Forbes Co., Ltd.
*Glover,   F.   R. _...B  C. Electric Co.. Ltd.
Godfrey,   William    Bank of British North America
Godson, C. A Robertson-Godson Co.
Goodwin,  James   .'Goodwin Shoe Co.
Gordon. Charles R Mainland Engineering Co.
Gordon, L. L \ Campbell Gordon Co., Ltd.
Gorrie   D. Y Harvey & Gorrie
Gould' J F   Griffin & Co.
Gow, W. M    '
Graham, L. D Barber-Ellis,  Ltd. ANNUAL REPORT, 1917-1918
11
LIST OF MEMBERS—Continued
NAME FIRM
Grant,  D Canadian Export & Import Co.
Graveley, W. J. A .W. E. Graveley & Co.
Graves,  H.  J .<>. A. Roedde, Ltd.
Gray,   C j Real  Estate  Broker
Greenhow, Thomas 	
Greenlees, William  Contractor
Greenwood, R. E .Simonds Canada Saw Mfg. Co.
Greenwood} W. H. i Sunderland   &  Greenwood
Greer, B.  W Maple Leaf Steamship Co.
Greer, T. W.. Pacific Coast Fife Insurance
Grieve    J.   A     Pemberton & Son
Griffin,   F.   ..'. F.  Griffin  &  Co.
Griffin,   W. M .....Martin Griffin & Co.
Griffith, J. H Griffith  &  Lee
Gross, F. D Mainland   Transfer   Co.
Grote, P.H Undertaker m^lu
Gwyn, W. T Dominion Bank
*Gwynn.   G.   I Waghorn, Gwynn & Co.
Hachmuth, E. W E. W. Hachmuth & Co.
Hackett, J. W Robertson  & Hackett
Hager, A. L i Canadian  Fishing  Co.
Haggen, E. A Technical Press, Ltd
Hall, J. E Van. Milling & Grain' Co.
Hamber, E. W B. C. Mills Timber & Trading Co.
Hamilton, D. A Canadian Printing & Publishing Co.
Hamilton, J. H Industrial Progress
Hamilton,  R R. Hamilton & Co.
Hamilton, R. J Hamilton   &   McNeill
Hammond, G. J Mineral Resources Exploration Co.
Hanbury,  John   J. Hanbury & Co., Ltd.
Hanley,   J.   J Insurance  Broker
Hanna, W. M Dentist
Hanna,   J.   J Center  &  Hanna
Hansuld, B. G Northern Securities, Ltd.
Hardie,  N Dodwell & Co.
Hardie, W Coast Steamship Co.
Harper", J. F Bank of Hamilton
Harold, Thomas  Progressive Engineering Works
Harris,  Frank   Crawford   Advertising   Service
Harris, S. A	
Harrison, G. S	
Hart, F. J F. J. Hart & Co.
Harvey,   A.   G Bayfield & Harvey
Harvey J J. A _ Taylor,  Harvey,  Grant  &  Co.
Harvey, J. N J. N. Harvey, Ltd.
Harvey, R. B Earvey & Gorrie
-Harvey,   R.   G Loewen, Harvey & Preston, Ltd.
Har.vey, W. H Dominion Creosoting Co.
Harvie,  Thomas    B.  C. Box Co., Ltd.
Haskins,  L.  B Haskins & Elliott
Hastings, Thomas W Evans & Hastings Printing Co.
Hayward', F. J	 12
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
LIST OF MEMBERS—Continued
NAME FIRM
Hayward, R. F Western Power Co.  of Canada
Heaps, E. H  E. H. Heaps & Co.
. Heaps, J W Heaps & Sons
Heather, G. G G. G. Heather Co.
Hoffmenster,   H Hoffmeister  Bros.
Helliwell, E. F B. C. Telephone Co.
*Helliwell, J. F Helliwell, Moore & McLachlan
*Henderson, E. H Imperial Canadian Trust Co.
Henderson, F F. & F. Henderson
Henderson, F. J	
Henderson, J. W The Temple Pattison Co.
Henderson, L. G '. Georgia  Pharmacy ®ll$
Henderson,  James    Henderson   Publishing   Co.
Henderson,  Stanley ..Imperial Life Assurance Co.
Hennessy, William E Clark, Hennessy & Co.
Henri,   G •. Maison Henri
Henry,  J Kelly Logging & Lumber Co.
Hepburn, A. E Mining Engineer
Hepburn,  W Provincial Court House
Herman, George E Van. Creosoting Co.
Hewitt, G. H Geo.  Hewitt  Co.
Heyer   B. W B. C. Financial Times
*Hill,'E. E	
Hill, L. C Hill Tire Co.
Hilton, H. S Harbor Shipping Co.
Hobson, G. H. L Eobson & Co.
Hockih, D National Drug <% Chemical Co.
Hodges, W. E. f Riddell, Stead, Hodges & Winter
Hoffar.  H.  S Hoffar Motor Boat Co.
Hogg, W. H : Bank of Montreal
Hogg, J. P jiScrimegour, Hogg & Gilling
Hogle, J. H Physician
Holden, W Real Estate Broker
Holland,   H.   B R. V. Winch & Co.
Holland, R.  W. Callopy-Holland Advertising Co.
Holt, G. V .'Canadian Bank of Commerce
Hood, R.  A Eood Bros.
Hood, R. M Okanagan  Fruit  Growers'  Exchange
Hooper   H. C H. C. Hooper & Co., Ltd.
Hope, C. E Hope & Farmer
*Hope, J. A	
Hopldns, Innes  Van. Forge Co., Ltd.
Horie, W. M Baynes & Horie
Home, A. P. ...: ;. Home, Taylor & Co.
Houlgate, B. Kerr 	
Houstoun, A McLennan, McFeely Co., Ltd.
Howard, A. E War Purchasing Commision
Howard, J | Hoss & Howard Iron Works, Ltd.
Howe, S. L	
How,   T.   J.   ...'.	
Hoyes, W. T Physician
Humphreys,  N Noel Humphreys & Co.
Hunter, C. D Empress Mfg. Co.
Hunter, George  Hunter-Henderson Paint Co., Ltd. ANNUAL REPORT, 1917-1918
LIST OF MEMBERS—Continued
NAME FIRM
Hyatt, G. C Canadian Metals, Ltd.
Ingledew, W. W The Ingledew Shoe Co.
Irons, J. C Can. Australian Royal Mail Line
Irving,   R.   B Vancouver Drug Co., Ltd.
*Istel,   A Franco-Canadian  Trust  Co., Ltd.
Jardine, S. G Royal Bank of Canada
Jardine, W. E Chess Bros., Ltd
Jarman,  George H.. Thos. Foster & Co., Ltd.
Jefferies,   P.   W Stettler Cigar Factory, Ltd.
Jeffreys,  H.  H Pither & Leiser, Ltd.
Jenkins, H. L North America Lumber Cp!
Jeremiason, D Booth Logging Co., Ltd.
Johnson, C. Gardiner  Van.  Pilotage  Board
Johnson, G. G Capilano Timber Co., Ltd.
Johnson, J. A Great West Life Insurance Co.
Johnson, J. B Johnson  &  Reeve
Johnson, J. W. F B. C. Sugar Refining Co.
Johnson, T. E The Walter M. Lowney Co.
Johnson, W. H Martin & Johnson
Johnston, A. M Johnston  Bros.
Johnston, A. W Johnston  Bros.
Johnston,   E Johnston Storage Co., Ltd.
Johnston   R.  N Tobacconist
Johnston," W.   W jD. C. McGregor & Co. ,Ltd.
Jones, F. D :._jlelliwell, MacLachlan & Co.
Jones, F. S C. H. Jones & Son, Ltd.
Jones, W. E. O Leeson, Dickie & Gross
Jordan, A. McKay  Actino Optical -Institute
Jordan.   F.   J Frank Darling & Company
Joy, W. O Merchants Bank of Canada
Kappele, A. J Barrister
Kay,   Chas.   J .■ Columbia Paper Company
Kelly   R Kelly, Douglas & Co.
Kemp", H Kemp & Co., Ltd.
Kenmuir, R. J B. C. Refining Co., Ltd.
' Kennedy, C. R ...A. R. Williams Machinery Co.
Kennedy, Joseph  Druggist Sundries Co., Ltd.
Kent, D. H The Kent Piano Co., Ltd.
Kent   H Angell Engraving Co.
Kent," H. W Northern Electric Co., Ltd.
Kerfoot, G. B. » JKerfoot  &  Hall
Kerr,  A Hides
Kidd, George  .B. C. Electric Rly. Co.
Kilby, E. C	
King, F. T Hodgson & King
*King, P. L	
Kirk, C. L  Kirk & Co., Ltd.
Kirk, T. H .-	
Kirkland,  H.  S Kirkland & Rose
Kirkpatrick,   T Shingle Manufacturer
Kloepfer, J. C Kloepfer Hardware Co.
Knight, E. C Van. Lumber Co., Ltd.
Knowler  W. E Knowler & Macauley, Ltd. VANCOUVER BOARD OFTR^DE
LIST OF MEMBERS—Continued
NAME FIRM
Knowlton, E. S Knowltons Ltd.
Knox, J. A ... .(McDonald Lumber Co.
Kodama, G S. Tamura & Co.
Lang, N. R Powell River Co.
*Lantzius,   L jLantzius & Ladner
Lauder A. F .Financial  Broker
Laursen,  V B. C. Electric Rly. Co., Ltd.
Law, C. F ,..^Mining  Broker
Lawson, J. H Davis, Marshall, Macneill & Co.
Lawson, Wf A Van. Insurance and Vessel Agency
Lay, J. M Imperial Bank of Canada
Leckie, R. J 1. Leckie & Co.
Leckie,  W.  H  J. Leckie & Co.
Lee, C. A B. C. Electric Rly.  Co.   Ltd.
Leek,   W Leek   &   Co.
Leeson, E. W North   American  Life  Assurance
Leggat, M. H Wood, Vallanee & Leggat
Leigh, T. E Jrish Linen Store
Lenniie,   D*   G Lennie!  &   Company
Leonard, W. J. Barrett   Foster & Barrett-Leonard
Lester, A	
Leuty, H. B .Richards, Akroyd & Gall
Lewis,   F.   B F. B. Lewis & Co., Ltd.
Lightfoot,  C. L The Gufney Foundry Co., Ltd.
Lillie, W.  G Gerlock-Barlow Co., Ltd.
Lineham, P jjf .F. Darling & Co.
Lipsett,  E	
Littlehailes, A Rainsford & Co.   Ltd.
Livingston,  S Livingston  & O'Dell
Livingstone   J. M. Vancouver Creamery Co.
Lockyer, H.' T Hudson's Bay Co., Ltd.
Logan, M. S Lumber
London, T. W. B Balfour Guthrie & Co.
Loutit, James I Lake  of Woods Milling Co.
Love, George  Love & Co.
Lowe, A. McD Dentist
Lowman, W. A '. C. L. Packing Co.
Lucas, F G. T Lucas & Lucas
Macaulay, C. H Macaulay & Nieholls
Macaulay, II. C E. C. Macaulay & Co., Ltd.
Macdonald, D. M Kelly, Douglas  & Co., Ltd.
Macdonald, G. E.  Macdonald, Marpole & Co., Ltd.
Macdonald, J. F Home Bank of Canada
Macdonald," M A Barrister
Macdonald, T. D _ B. C. Permanent Loan Co.
Maekinnon J. M Mtackinnon & Co.
Macneill, C. B Davis, Marshall, Macneill  & Co.
Macrae, J. K Abbott,   Macrae   &   Co.
Maddock, W. H .-The Modern Office Supply Co., Ltd.
Mahon, C. E Timber Agent
Maitland, R. L Maitland & Maitland  ' ANNUAL REPORT, 1917-1918
15
LIST OF MEMBERS—Continued
NAME FIRM
Malkin, J. F W. H. Malkin Co., Ltd.
Malkin, J. P. D W. H. Malkin Co., Ltd.
Malkin. W. H,  W. H. Malkin Co., Ltd.
*Marpole, C. M _—
Marpole, R. F .'...Oscar Brown Co.
Marret, A. E Pacific  Drug Store,  Ltd.
Marsh, F. W Canada Life Assurance Co.
Marshall, A Merchandise Broker
Marshall, D. G Davis, Marshall, Macneill & Pugk
Marshall, R Lewis & Sills, Ltd.
Martin, R Martin, Robertson & Co.   Ltd.
Martin, W. F Can. Northwest Steel Co., Ltd.
Mason, A. E Jmperial Rice Milling Co.
Mather, W. A C. P. Rly. Co.
Mathers, J. B Mercantile   Mortgage   Co.
Matheson, A. M Burnett & Matheson
Mathews, Thomas  Real Estate Broker
Matthew,   A.   S A. S. Matthew   &Co.
Matthews,J James  Real Estate Broker
Maynard, H. W Van. Nanaimo Coal Mining Co.
MaeDonald, A. J .MacDonald, Nettleton & Bruce
MaeGougan, F. J B. C. Telephone Co., Ltd.
MacGregor, J. T Broker
MacKenzie, Capt. S. F Broker
MacKenzie, W. G Wood, Vallanee & Leggat. Ltd.
MacLachlan, William M Helliwell, MaeLachlan & Co.
MaeLennan," W.  A Steel Co., of Canada I
MLcBeath,  M Northern Securities, Ltd.
McCandless, A.  G	
McClintoek, W. F Kelly, Douglas &• Co., Ltd.
McConkey, W N Physician
MeCormack, J. D Canadian   Western   Lumber   Co.
MeDougall, H. H Morrison Steel &Wire Co., Ltd.
MeEachern   M. T Physician
McFeely, E. J MeLennan, McFeely & Co. ,Ltd.
McGeer, G. G Barrister
McGiven, R. J j. Imperial Life
McGregor, A. G Canadian Pipe Co., Ltd.
McGugan, J. B	
Mcllreevy, J. E Crane  &   Co.
/Mcintosh, D. A Letson & Burpee, Ltd.
Mcintosh   W. R. W. ..'. ; Kelly, Douglas & Co., Ltd.
MeKeen, "S. S McKeen & Wilson
McKereher, J. A Barclay   Shingle  Mills
McKnigh.t,  W.  T , Shell Co. of California
McLean,  N McLean Bros.
McLennan, J. H Powell   River   Co.
McLennan, R: P McLennan, McFeely & Co.
{McLennan, K. A -,.. Robin  Hood  Mills,  Ltd.
McLellan,  L.  D McLellan, Savage & White
MeMartin, J. D Office Specialty Mfg C°-> Ltd.
McMillan,"   Johra —..B.  C.  Farmers'  Exchange
McNeill. J. D McNeill, Welsh & Wilson 16
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
LIST OF MEMBERS—Continued
ffl:
NAME FIRM
McNeill, William   ..Western Power Co. of Canada
McRae,   C.    : Alberta Lumber Co., Ltd.
McRae, William   Chief of Police
McQueen,   Jaspar    (McQueen Produce  Co., Ltd.
MeRobbie, G. H McRobbie* Shoe Co.
McSpadden, G	
*McTavish, F. C Physician
Me Williams, A. L ..Kelly, Douglas & Co., Ltd.
Meakin,   Howard    ^ Turner, Meakin & Co.
Meehan, J. P J. P. Meehan & Co.
Meek, C. S British Pacific Engineering Co.
Mends, J. F J. S. Tait & Co., Ltd.
Menzies,   J False Creek Lumber  Co.
Mercer, J. M Northern Construction Co.   -
Metz, William  National Cash Register Co.
Miller, C. F Dominion Trust Co.
Millar,  R.  M .Millar & Coe, Ltd.
Millerd, F Gosse-Mjillerd'Packing Co.
Milne,   Charles   	
Milne, W. E Milne & Middleton'
Miskin, H Anderson & Miskin
*Monro, A. S	
Morgan, E. B E.  B. Morgan  & Co., Ltd.  •
Morgan, Thos. C,  Tailor
Moore, S. A Moore & Stewart
Moore, Thomas  .'. The Moore Printing Co., Ltd.
Moore, W. W W. W. Moore, Ltd.
Morrill, A. H Pacific   Mills,   Ltd.
Morris, H. H Canadian Bank of Commerce
Morris, J. F Real Estate Broker
Morrison,  A Armstrong, Morrison & Co., Ltd.
*Morrison, W. G	
Moscrop, J Pacific Welding Co.
Mottishaw, R Granville Lunch
Mulligan, G. H Standard Paint Co of Canada, Ltd.
Mundy, E.  G Mundy   Rowland & Co.
Munn, A. E 1 North Pacific Logging Co.
Muip,   Wm j Doiminion  Brokers,  Ltd.
Murdoch,   J.    Lloyds Register of 'Shipping
Murdoff, F. L Williams & Murdoff, Ltd.
Murray, George  Dixon & Murray, Ltd.
Murrin, W. G B. C. Electric Co., Ltd.
Myers, W. C Y. M. C. A.
Naismith,  D Naismith   &   Co.
Nanson, W. H W.  H. Nanson &  Co
Neilson, 1T. S J. Coughlan & Sons
Nelems   M. H Cavers,   Nelems   &   Co
Nelson,'J "The World"
Nelson, W. R J.  K. Miller  Co.
Nichol,   W.  C "The Vancouver Daily Province"
Nichols, J. D	
Nicholson, C. H Grand Trunk Pacific S. S. Co. ANNUAL REPORT, 1917-1918
17
LIST OF MEMBERS'—Continued
NAME FIRM
Nicholson, L. H National Biscuit & Mfg. Co.
Nicolls, J. P Macauley  &  Nicolls
Odium, E Professor
**Odlum,  V.  W. Clapp   Anderson & Odium
Ogilvy, J	
Oppenheimer,  M Oppenheimer Bros,  Ltd.
Orchardson, T. H. F.   Griffin   &   Co.
Owen, W. R.. Owen  &  MeCallum Hardware,  Ltd.
O'Brian, C. M MaeKay &  O'Brian
O 'Brian, J. M Brooks-Scanlon-0 'Brian   Co.,  Ltd.
O'Connor, R. N. .... Gibson Co.
O'Connor,   F.   J Pacific Steamship Company
O'Loane, H. G 0'Loane, Kiely & Co.. Ltd.
Palmer, A. B.' Palmer  Bros.
Paris,   Peter    Boot Manufacturer
Parsons, F Wood, Vallance & Leggat, Ltd.
Pairker,   Albert    Pemberton & Son
Parkinson,   T | Russell Brokerage Co., Ltd.
Patrick, W. G Ford Motor Co. of Canada   Ltd.
Paul], Joseph  Paull & McDanold
Payson, F.  E	
Paxton, J. T. T JjBritish Canadian Lumber Corpn.   ,
Peacock,   Thos.   P ...Royal Bank of Canada
Peel,   Harold   V. , Produce Broker
Perkins, G. C Standard Bank of Canada
Perry, S. A Perry & Mack
Peters   F. W C. P. Rly. Co.
Peterson, H. P H. P. Peterson & Co.
Pettapiece,   Geo.   S Geo. Craddock & Co.
Phelan,W. J .|F.  W. Woolworth & Co., Ltd.
Phepoe, T. B Molsons Bank
Phillips, B. G. D I .Dale & Co., Ltd.
Pickering, H. S -Pptician
Pike, Joseph William  .^Contractor
Pilling, James t Orpheum Theatrical Co., Ltd.
Pirn, H Canadian General Electric Co.. Ltd.
Pinner,  G. W Universal  Car  Co.,  Ltd.
Plow, H. A C. P. Rly. Co.
Poff, J. H .'Sun Life Assurance Co.   -
Porte, G. A. H The Hudson's Bay Co.
Porter, F Marwick, Mitchell & Co.
Porter   G B. C. Electric Co.
Potts, R. J Great West Permanent Loan  Co.
Power, W. D. B. C. Electric Rly. Co.
Pratt, G. C Whalen Pulp & Paper Mills
Pratt, H V. '. Hudson's  Bay  Co.,  Ltd.
Prenter, S. L B.  C.  Breweries,  Ltd.
Preston,  Charles — Prudential Life  Insurance
Proctor   R. C Real  Estate
Purdy, R. C R. C. Purdy, Ltd.
Pybus, H	 18
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
LIST OF MEMBERS—Continued
NAME FIRM
Rae, W. T J. C. Wilson, Ltd.
Ralph,  William  Ralph,   Morris   &   Ella
Ramsay, James  Ramsay Bros. & Co., Ltd.
Rand, E. E E. E. Rand & Fowler, Ltd.
Rankin, H. V Rankin   &   Cherrill
Rankin, J	
Raphael, G. S North  Pacific Lumber  Co.
Read, J.  R Canadian Westinghouse Co., Ltd.
Reddington, C. F Thiel Detective Service Co.
Reeve, D. W .Johnson & Reeve
Reifel, H B.  C.  Breweries, Ltd.
Reid, S. D Canada ' Witch   Co.
Rennie, R. J Wm. Rennie Co., Ltd.
Reynolds, F. W Reynolds Timber Agency, Ltd.
Richardson, F.  A Ames, Holden   McCready, Ltd.
Richardson, P Richardson's Shoe Store
Rickson,  William   John Riekson
Riggs, H. W Surgeon
Ritchie,- G '. Taylor Engineering Co.
Ritchie, T. B Ritchie Bros. &  Co.
*Robertson,   C.   H.   D	
Robertson, R Robertson, Morris  & Co.
Robertson, T. MeE Evans, Coleman & Evans
Robinson,   G.   A Ames, Holden, McCready, Ltd.
Robinson, S. A United Ladyware Stores, Ltd.
Roe, P D Eburne  Saw Mills
Rogers, B. D B. C. Sugar Refining Co., Ltd.
Rogers," B. T B. C. Sugar Refining Co., Ltd.
Rogers, Jonathan  Contractor
Rogers, L	
Rolston, C. M Imperial  Oil  Co.,  Ltd.
Rolston, H. S Vancouver Exhibition Association
Rooke, William M. DuCane, Dutcher & Co.
Roote, W R Roote Auto Top Co.
Roray^ C. S., Jr Roray & Yeaman
Ross, A. W Commercial Union Assurance Co.
Ross, A. A McLaughlan Carriage Co.
Ross, J : Ross & Howard Iron Works
Ross, R. V Frank Waterhouse & Co.
Rounsefell, F^ W Ceperley-Rounsefell Co., Ltd:
Roy, James  Canadian Credit Men's Trust •>
Rubinowitz,  I.  I Barrister
Runkle,  G The Barrett Co.
Russell, A. L Evans, Coleman & Evans
Russell, M. C Eotel Dunsmuir
Russell",   A.   B Searson  & Russel]
Russell, P. J Van. Prince Rupert Meat Co.
Saville,  William   B.  C.  Electric Rly. Co.
*Sawers, N. C	
Sayer,  II.   R	
Schetky,   G.   L Geo.  L.  Sehetky   Ltd.
Sehooley,  F.   T.    Royal Crown Soaps, Ltd. ANNUAL REPORT, 1917-1918
19
LIST OF MEMBERS—Continued
NAME FIRM
Scott, S. D The Province Office
Scott,   F The Holden Co., Ltd.
Scott, G. F IDavies Paper Box Co., Ltd.
Scott, S   M Clothing
Scott, T. P Eayward & Scott
Scrim,  W.   G W. G. Scrim Lumber Co., Ltd.
Seddon,   Harold    Manufacturers'  Agent
Seymour,  G. W Dunlop Tire and Rubber Goods, Ltd.
Shakespeare,   W.  B.    Nelson & Shakespeare, Ltd.
Shallcross, P. G Shallcross & Macauley Co. ,Ltd.
Shannon,   R.   P Smith,   Shannon   Lumber   Co.
Sharpies, H V „ Sharpies & Sharpies
*Sharples, J. W	
Shatford, L. W., B. C. Life Assurance Co.
Shelly,  W.  C.   Shelly  Bros.,  Limited
Sherwood, E.'G Fraser Valley Milk Producers Assn.
Shore, O.'M  Callander, Shore & Sim
Short, A E A. E. Short, Limited
Sigmore,   J.   R .^tudebaker Corporation of Canada
Sim,  W.   H • Louden Machinery Company
Simson, Calvert  ^Simson, Balkwill & Co., Ltd.
Singer,   F  M :F. M. Singer Company
Slade,  A.  P.   „ A. P. Slade & Co.
Sloan, W! P Drum Lummon Copper Mines
Smellie,  G. L : Canada   Permanent   Mortgage   Corpn.
Smith    A.   E .1—Mining Engineer
Smith,'  H.  M McPhillips & Smith
Smith, J. Fyfe   J. Fyfe Smith & Co., Ltd.
Smith,  T.   J    Diamond Vale Collieries, Ltd.
Smith,  W.  N B. C. News Company, Ltd.
Snider,   G.   R .Snider  Bros.  &  Brethour
Spencer,   C.   •• David Spencer, Limited
Sperry, A   H  Pacific Great Eastern Rly.
Sprott, R.' J Sprott-Shaw Business Inst.   ■
Staeey   G.  N.. Merchants Bank of Canada
Stanford,  C.  B   Edward .Stark Shoe  Co., Ltd.
Stearman, W. C,  - Hardware   Merchant
Steers, Wm ': Barrister, etc.
Stephen,   A.  M Paterson, Chandler & Stephen
Sterling, F. W Wholesale  Woollens
Sterrett,  A   W Canadian Fishing Co., Ltd.
Steven, A. 'C   .•—.;.— Canadian Bank of Commerce
Stevens,  H  II Member Vancouver City
Stevenson,   A.  W.   .-. E. H. Heaps & Co., Ltd.
Stevenson,' F. A Trade Roasting Co.
Stevenson,  F.  C • Stevenson & Hoyland
Stevenson, J. W Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul Rly.
Stewart, Andrew •• Dominion Trust Company '
Stewart,   A     P. Burns & Co., Ltd.   .
Stewart, A ' M Clubb  & Stewart
Stewart, C M Stewart & Company
Stewart, F. R -P. R. Stewart & Co., Ltd.
Stewart, Capt. J. R    Merchants Shipping Exchange 20
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
LIST OF MEMBERS—Continued
NAME FIRM
Stewart,  Robert Wholesale Leather Goods
Stewart, S D Commission Agent
Stiri-ett, A. C. — iCredit Foncier Franco Canadian
Stoltze," H.   A     .Stoltze Manufacturing Co.
Stone, Geo. A .• jManufaeturers' Agent
Stone, H. A. Gault  Bros., Limited
Storey,  Jonathan Storey &  Campbell
Stuart,   J.   D Clarke & Stuart Co., Ltd.
Suga,   Koichi    •• .Mitsui   &   Co.,   Ltd.
Summerfield, J. T ..' ^Insurance  Broker
Swales, F S  .Architect
Swartz, N  Swartz Brothers
Sweeney,   C —Bank of Montreal
Swinford,   H    .'—Northern Pacific Rly.  Co.
Syer, W. H  | R. M. Moore & Co., Ltd.  .
*Tait, J.  S	
Tamura, S.  —...•• Japan & Canada Trust Savings Co.
Taylor, A. J. T Taylor Engineering Co.
Taylor,   H.   W W. H. Malkin Co., Ltd.
Taylor   James  Fetherstpnhaugh & Co.
Taylor,' J. I ^Sullivan-Taylor Motor Co.
Taylor, L. W :: Chartered Accountant
Taylor, S. S Taylor, Harvey, Grant & Co.
Teetzel, A. L MacPh'erson & Teetzel
Tepoorten, Edwin J. J. A.- Tepoorten, Ltd.
Tepoorten, J. A ••—J. A. Tepoorten, Ltd.
Thomas,   E Timber Broker   '
Thomas.  E.  A    ..Thomas & McBain
Thompson, J. J.   Bryce   &  Co.,  Ltd.
Thompson,   N    Cammell, Laird & Co.
Thomson,   A.   McG J.Jas. Thomson & Sons
Thomson,   Fred   B lmp'erial Bank  of Canada
Thomson," J. B Jas. Thomson & Sons, Ltd.
*Thorn,  J.   C	
Timewell,  D.p C .p.   C.   Timewell   &Co.
Timms,  Herbert   Timms, Phillips & Co., Ltd.
Tingley, F. C > Vancouver Transfer Co.
Tisdall   C.  E Tisdalls,  Limited
Tod,   R.  M.   •• Tod  &  Manning, Ltd.
Tolmie,   W  A Shaw, Tolmie & Co.
Toombs,   S.   R.    .JEdgcumbe-Toombs Co.
Tornroos,  G W.- B." C. Equipment Co.
Town,  F.   V T.   G.  McBride  &  Co.
Townley,   F.   L Architect
Trueman, Henry N Gulf of Georgia Towing Co.
Tucker,  H.  J Auto Merchant
Tucker,   J    ^.Dominion Construction Co.
Tufts   S. St. Clair  Solicitor
Tulk,'A.  E A. E. Tulk & Co.
Tupper, Sir Chas. H Tupper  &  Bull
Turnbull,  J   D Turnbull  Brothers
Turney, H. 'J , Wallace   Shipyards    Ltd. ANNUAL REPORT, 1917-1918
21
LIST OF MEMBERS—Continued
NAME FIRM
Turquand, W. A Hotel Vancouver
Twiss,  W. J :.Mutual Life of Canada
Tytler,  W The Canada  Shingle Co., Ltd.
VanRoggen.   M.  A Vice-Consul  of  the Netherlands
Vance,  G.  W Mayor
Vinson,  V. V : The  King  Studio
Waddell, B  L ..Belding  Paul  Corticelli,   Ltd.
Wadds, G. T \ Photographer
Wade, F. C Barrister
*Walkem,  G. A	
Walkem,   Knox ;. Burns &   Walkem
Walker, E. E iB. C.  Electric Rly Co.
Walker,   R. Tarvis  Electric  Co.,  Ltd.
Walton," W. H j Gardiner-Johnson   &   Co.
Wallace,  A Wallace  Shipyards,  Ltd.
Wallace,   J Fisheries
Wallbridge, A. H. Retired
Walsh,, W   H   .....
Ward,   L.' Ward, Ellwood & Co.
Ward,  W.  A   W. A. Ward  & Co.
Watson   A. J. 5 Hudson's  Bay Co.
Watson^  H. H	
Watson, J   E  Watson Bros.
Watson, J. H T. H.  Watson Insurance Agency
Watson,  J M..'. ...' .The Owl Drug Co., Ltd.
Weeks, A. C. J. Weeks & Co.
Weir,  J   E. Weir Machinery Co., Ltd.
Welsh, F. W London   Grocery   Co.
Wesbrook   F F Uniyersity of B. C.
West,   J. '	
Whalen,   J.   J Sherwin-Williams Co.
Whalen,   W.   H B. C. Sulphite Fibre Co., Ltd.
White,  B.  D j Sidney Rubber Roofing Co.
White, H.  Gi '. Peruvian Consul
White, W. J White & Bindon   Ltd.
*Whitehead, W. D	
Whitelaw,   R Canadian Pacific Wine Co., Ltd.
Whiteside,   A.   M, - Whiteside & Larson
Whi£aker,"   A B. C. Permanent Loan Co.
Whittaker,  A.   W Whittaker & Whittaker
Whittall, N. R B. C. Iowa Lumber Co., Ltd.
Wickens, C. A .....Bogardus, Wick ens, Ltd.
Wilbur,   H.    1 .Wilbur Towing Co.
Wilkinson,  F ...Wilkinson Co., Ltd.
Wilkinson, J. T New York Life Insurance
Williams, A Alfred Williams & Co., Ltd.
Williams   C. H. E Contractor
Williamson, A T. L Bank of Ottawa I
*Wilson,   G.   W	
Wilson,   H.   C    '- S. R. Wilson Shoe Store
Wilson, J. W	
Wilson.   R.   S.   •• More & Wilson
mm- VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
LIST OF MEMBERS—Continued
NAME FIRM
Wilson, T P	
Wilson, W. J. Blake  P. Bums & Co., Ltd.
Winch, R. V R. V. Winch & Co., Ltd.   J
Winslo'w,  R.  M Mutual Brokers, Ltd.
Wintemute, W. E Simson, Balkwill & Co.
Winter,  G. E.  — Riddell, Stead, Hodges & Winter
Wismer, G. S _ Russell,  Hancox,   WismeT   &   Anderson
*Wolfe-Merton, B. G	
Wonder, G. J JG. J. Wonder & Co., Ltd.
Wood,  A.  W The Rat Portage Lumber Co., Ltd.
Wood,  H.  S ,.  Barrister
Wood,   Jas	
Woods, J.  G ••	
Woodthrope   J. B Woodthorpe ,Bevan & Co.
Woodward,   Chas Woodward Department Store
*Woodward, W. C	
Wootten, H ,Henry Wootten & Sons
*Worsnop, C. B	
Worthington,   G.  H Physician
Wright, F. ...'. Grocer
Wright, F ....£mith,  Davidson  &  Wright,  Ltd.
Wright, F. H iThe Yorkshire & Canadian Trust
Wright  L. H Pacific  Marine Insurance   Co.
Wrigley, R. F Wrigley Directories,  Ltd.
Wyndham  T. W Imperial Tobacco Co.
Yeaman, O. G ..Rofay  &  Yeaman
Young,  J. 'H Webb, Read, Hegan, Callingham & Co.
Young, R.  M    ilas. Thomson & Sons
*On  Actiev Service ANNUAL REPORT, 1917-1918
Thirty-first Annual Meeting
OF THE
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
MARCH 12th, 1918
23
President's Address
To the Members of the Vancouver Board of Trade,
Vancouver, B.C.
Gentlemen :
This is the fourth occasion on which a President of
your Board has presented his Annual Address since the
outbreak of war. There is still no sign of an early peace
and Canada as a loyal scion of the Empire will likely be
called upon to make further sacrifice that the cause of
Freedom and Justice may prevail. Canada has taken an enviable place in the Empire and there have been indications
during the year that she will continue to hold that position.
Despite the disruption in the regular channels of trade
occasioned by the war, the Dominion has each year
enlarged its trade, making that of 1917 the greatest
,in its history. The foreign trade of Canada has now reach,
edthe enormous total of approximately $2,800,000,000. "What
this means will be better understood when it is known that
the' foreign trade of the United States did not reach that
total until its population was over 60,000,000 people.
Previous to the war a balance of trade against Canada
existed annually of over $300,000,000, while today there is
I balance of exports over imports of nearly $600,000,000.
On the declaration of Peace, this large volume of trade will
decline, but I believe will return soon to its present dimensions because the lesson taught by this war is that wealth
is obtained through production and the development of the
natural resources of our country.
There is more money in circulation in the Dominion than
in the palmy days of 1912.. The farmers have prospered and
business firms in all lines with the exception of the building
trades, have never found their records in a healthier condition.    There is now practically no non-employment problem 24
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
and conditions generally were never more favorable or the
commercial and financial outlook brighter in this country
than it is today. ,
; In the year 1917 Canada bought goods to the value of
over $900,000,000 abroad and of these $695,000,000 were
obtained from the United States, and as we sold to that
country less than $400,000,000 we had to find nearly $300,-
000,000 in money and securities. We cannot dispose of our
securities excepting at home and our export and import
business is done chiefly with Great Britain and the United
States. "We export to Great Britain much more than we
import, thus covering our shortage of exports to the United
States, and the difference gives a handsome balance of
trade in our favor.
We are able to talk with pride of the revival of trade
in our own Province during the past year.. For the previous five years this has been impossible and most especially so since the outbreak of war. The basic industries
"of British Columbia are again all established on a sound
financial basis.
The lumbering industry has added to its contribution
of wealth the shipment of vast quantities of spruce to be,
used in the construction of aeroplanes. Last year's cut of
logs scaled over 1,600.000,000 feet, which is nearly 300,000,-
OOOfeet in excess of the production of any previous twelve
months. Allied with the lumber industry is the manufac-
which amounted to 2,400,000,000 shingles
1917, 'representing a value of over $7,000,-
ture of shingles
the year
during
000.
Mining, the oldest industry of the Province, produced
over $40,000,000 during the past year. This was three million
dollars less than in 1916, but is considered a very favorable showing as during the year strikes prevailed in the
Fernie, Trail and Rossland districts, and materially lessened the production of copper, gold and coal. This industry is in its infancy as far as production and value are
concerned and Avhen it is understood that but 27% of the
Province has been prospected, the wealth that is involved
in the development of this industry is enormous.
The canneries of British Columbia produced during
the year a record pack of salmon, viz.. 1,557,445 eases. The
last "big run" was in 1913; when 1,353,901 cases were obtained. There seems to be a great depletion of soekeyes
represented in the product of the past year. This loss was
more    than    overcome by the catch of pinks and chums ANNUAL REPORT, 1917-1918.
which, though of a cheaper grade, are considered an excellent food. The market for this produce is found in
Great Britain, France, South America, Australia and New
Zealand. The halibut and herring fisheries are two phases
of this industry which represent a large volume of trade
and the employment of much labor. The herring Indus-"
try produced 30,000 barrels during the last twelve months,
which represented an increase of 200% over any previous
year's production, while the production of halibut was
7,250,000 pounds,- an increase of 25% over 1916.
In the face of adverse conditions .affecting the agricultural industry with respect to labor shortage and the
cost of supplies, the production for ,the year totalled a
value of oyer $35,000,000, or an excess over the previous
year of over four million dollars. The agricultural products of the Province do not yet nearly meet the demands
of the local market as the value of the imports during,
the period above mentioned was nearly $18,000,000. British Columbia has available large areas of farm lands and
no policy has been evolved by our Governments that has
attracted large settlements  of farming communities.
Shipbuilding is ja new industry in British Columbia
which, during the past year has assumed a prominence
which, if continued, will place it in the front rank as a
producer of wealth, our Province, 'compared with 'other
parts of Canada being pre-eminently suited to the building of ships of either wood or steel.
Two steel vessels have already been launched in Vancouver harbor, while contracts for the building of four-'
teen more have been given, having a total of 147,000 tons
dead weight. Contracts have also been given by the Imperial Munitions Board for the construction of 27 wooden
vessels, four of which have already been launched. The
contract price of all vessels now constructed in British
Columbia or under contract, is over $31,000,000, and 5,250
men are engaged in the industry of shipbuilding.
Vancouver city has had a revival of trade both wholesale and retail during the past year. Large payrolls in
her factories and manufacturing plants have resulted in
providing a large purchasing power. The following tables constitute a barometer which truly indicates that expansion :
The Bank Clearings for 1917  were....*.......$419.610,000
The Bank Clearings for 1916 were  321,585,000
The Customs Returns for 1917 were       7,295,026 26
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
The Customs Returns for 1916 Were       6,095,104
The Postal Returns for  1917  were         661,049
The Postal Returns for  1916  were         605,714
The shipping returns show that the net registered tonnage of Coastwise and Foreign Vessels entering and leaving Vancouver in 1917 was 10,253,100 tons, while in 1916
it was 10,446,257 tons.
The amount of Gold received by the Dominion Assay
Office at Vancouver in 1917 was $3,257,000, while in 1916
the receipts amounted to $2,828,000.
Tour Board in line with the general commercial expansion of the City has, through an energetic campaign,
enlarged its membership over 100%. It has adopted the
Bureau System in which its membership is voluntarily
allocated where the most effective results in promoting
-the business and commercial interests of the community
are obtained. On account /of that expansion the old
quarters in Molsons Bank Building occupied by the Board
for the last 16 years were vacated in November last and
, your Board now occupies more commodious offices, better
adapted to the Board's requirements.
Some of the matters dealt with by your Board during
the year and directly or indirectly affecting the city or
province are as follows :
Civic Taxation.
Provincial Taxation.
Establishment of a Public Utilities Commission.
Formation of a Classification governing shipment of
goods on railways.
Gulf Island Steamship Service.
Improvement of the Pilotage Service in B. C.
Nationalization of the Port of Vancouver.
The establishment of a loaning fund 'by the Conservation Section of the Civic'Bureau for the purchase of
hogs in aid  of pork production.
The settlement of the Longshoremen's strike.
The half-holiday question.
The settlement of the P.G.E. Railway question.
Daylight saving as a Federal measure.
Inducing the Government to send a cargo of wheat
through our Elevator via the Panama Canal to Europe. ANNUAL REPORT, 1917-1918
27
The special development of the iron industry in B. C,
and many other matters of lesser importance but of more
or less vital interest to us all.
In closing my address I wish to thank the Council
and members of the Board as well as the Secretary and
his staff, for their active co-operation during my year of
office, and I bespeak for my successor the same faithful
and earnest support as I have received and wish him
every success in treating with the many problems which >
shall require his attention during his term of office.
B. W. GREER,
President.
The Board of Trade- during the latter part of the year
1917-18 abolished the old system whereby the work of the
Board was carried on by a small portion.of its membership
through Committees, and adopted the more modern method
of Bureau control.
The whole membership of the Board of Trade through
its Bureaux, has thus become responsible in .dealing with
the problems that confront that body in its work. Although but a few months' trial of this new system has been
made, it appears to be working out very satisfactorily and
it is anticipated that during the year the effectiveness and
usefulness of the Board of Trade as a factor in building up
.the civic and commercial life of the city and province will
be demonstrated beyond peradventure.
. The membership of the Board has been increased during the year by over 100 per cent., and the roster shows at
the present time approximately 1,000 members.      Mm VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
CASH   RECEIPTS   AND   PAYMENTS   FOR   THE   YEAR
31st DECEMBER, 1917
RECEIPTS
1917
Jan. 1 To Cash Balance brought forward  :—
In Bank, Current Account  $1,122.22
In Bank   Savings Account       306.71
On hand  8.80
Dec.  31—To  Members  Dues \	
"  Entrance  Fees   	
|' Members Assessment on account of
Delegation  to  Ottawa'        940.00
'' Refund  of Delegation Expienses  to
Ottawa          66.00 .
' | Rents  Receivable  	
" Interest   on   Dominion   of   Canada
5   per   cent.   War   Loan   Bonds
'' Amount  Received   on  Account   of
Council Special Luncheons —.
('  Interest on Savings Bank Account
ENDED
PAYMENTS
1917
Dec. 31—By Salaries:—
Secretary    - $3,850.00
Assistant   Secretary j  1,400.00
Stenographers  1,226.50
Janitor         241.00
Accountant       50.00
|  Rent:—
Molson's Bank Building   1,500.00
Board of Trade Building      150.00
Chamber of Mines         80.00
'' Delegation Expenses:—■
Ottawa     1,100.00
General  538.75
1,437.73
7,666.00
4,040.00
1,006.00
312.00
150.00
38.25
4.55
$14,654.53
6 767.50
1,730.00
1,638.75  30 VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
BALANCE SHEET AS AT 31st DECEMBER, 1917
ASSETS
CASH
In Bank, Current Account   $1,116,44
On   hand  3.60
        1,120.04
Members Dues Unpaid   5 250.00
Investments:—
Dominion of Canada 5 per cent.
War   Loan   Bonds—.three ,at
$1,000.00 each, at cost        2,905.65
Add Accrued Interest    12.50
      2,918.15
Dominion   of   Canada   5%   per f^|j
cent. War Loan Bonds—three
at,- $1,000.00   each,' at   cost      3,000.00
Deduct  Amount Unpaid        2,700.00
300.00  I
Add Accrued Interest  13.75
         313.75       3,231.90
Furniture   and   Fittings    '.  1,780.70
Deduct Depreciation  at  lO.per
cent,  on $829.00  82.90
 1,697.80
Library  1,793.20
$8,092.94
LIABILITIES
•Sundry   Creditors    $1,001.97
Surplus  7,090.97
$8,092.94
Certified correct,
W. A. TOLMIE,
Chartered Accountant.
Vancouver, B. C., 26th February, 1918.     ANNUAL EEPOET, 1917-1918
35
BRITISH COLUMBIA FOREIGN SHIPMENTS FOR YEAR 1917.
Australia    jj 16,309,307 M. Ft.
New Zealand       122,984
West Coast   2,616,652
China |  -1,672,871
Japan   ,.  1,590,246
South   Sea   Islands     1,610,715
U. K. and Continent' .'. 13,447,946
Africa    •. \  5,022,828
India    ,  1,529,014
43,922,563 M. Ft.
APPROXIMATE FIGURES OF PRODUCTION,  SHIPMENTS AND
STOCKS   OF   LUMBER
For Year 1917—Compared with 1916
Million Million
,   feet feet
||j§ij                   1916 1917
Coast   Mfrs 1     630 775
Lumber Shipments—By Eail
Coast   Mfrs        506 537
Local Sales, Coast Mfrs     112 174
618 711
Foreign Shipments—By Water
Coast Mfrs        40 44
658 755
Imported from the United States into the
Four Western Provinces
Lumber     15              -1
Lath   ....—  1               2
Shingles     1                1
Stocks on Hand 31st December, 1917—
Coast Mfrs      117 197      ANNUAL REPORT, 1917-1918
41
Port of Vancouver, B. C.
Fiscal Year Ending March 31st, 1918.
Seagoing Vessels—Inwards with Cargoes
1
|    • No.
1
Tons Eeg. '■
FEEIGHT
Tons Wgt.
| Tons Mst.
British   	
96
513
-|         434
1                         1
|       322,874         128,064
832,951    |      99,623
• 537,119    |    665,347
62,115
99,460
100,613
'12,661
Canadian
Foreign   	
33,166
15,404
Total   	
.1      1,043
1,692,944    |    893,034
262,188
61,231
Seagoing
Vessels—Inwards in Ballast
British   	
|
37
|         193
-|         144
1
65,285
|         63,388
69,256
r
2,830
2,494
1,809
Canadian   ....
	
i	
	
Foreign   	
	
Total   	
-1         374
197,929
7,133
	
Seagoing Vessels—Outwards with C
argoes
British   	
301
j   253
.[         311
441,333
465,021
306,571
68,044
159,810
210,729
58,602
71,496
80,101
24,648
Canadian
Foreign   	
20,140
15,921
Total   	
.|         865
1,212,925
438,583
210,199
60,709
Seagoing
Vessels—Outwards in Bj
illast
56
1         190
.|         258
1         96,746
40,148
i|
2,952
	
2,101
293,563
	
5,447
Total
-|        504
430,457
	
.10,500
	
Coasting   Trade—Inwards
Steamers   ,.
Barques   eh..
9,068
.|         925
2,738,345
811,652
1
159,548
4,225
	
	
Total   	
-|      9,993
3,549,997
 | | 163,773
Coasting  Trade—Outwards
Steamers   ..
Barques   ehl.
i
9,292
.|         914
3,004,910
801,586
1
160,497
	
4,204
Total   	
.|    10^206
3,806,496    |	
164,701
Grand Total
1
1 . 22,985
1
J
10,890,748      1,331,617
1
472,387
468,047 42
VANCOUVEE BOAED OF TEADE
SHIPPING
The following are the regular lines in operation:—
The Canadian Pacific Ocean Services, Ltd.—Canadian
Pacific ships at present on the Atlantic comprise eight vessels
all of which have been requisitioned by the Admiralty.
Trans-Pacific lines to China and Japan and Manila with
the S.S. "Empress of Russia," "Empress of Asia," "Empress of Japan" and "Monteagle." The "Empress of Russia" and the "Empress of Asia" are now operating under
control of the Admiralty.
The Canadian-Australasian Royal Mail Steamship' Line
(operated by the Union S. S. Co., of New Zealand, Ltd.)
comprising the new steamer "Niagara" and "Makura"
gives a four-weekly service to Honolulu (Hawaiian Islands),
Suva (Fiji), Auckland (N. Z.), and Sydney (Australia),
with connections to all other New Zealand,'Australian and
Tasmanian ports. This company also operates cargo steamers at short intervals from Vancouver and other- Pacific
Coast ports to New Zealand and Australian ports.
The Canadian Pacific Railway Company's British Columbia Coast Steamship Service:
The following are the regular lines at present in operation : I
j Vancouver-Victoria double daily mail service in connection with the transcontinental railway comprising S. S.
"Princess Adelaide,"  S.  S.  "Princess  Charlotte,"  S.  S..
"Princess Alice," and S. S. "Princess Mary."
The three-funnel twin-screw steamers, S. S. "Princess
Charlotte,", and S. S. "Princess Victoria," make double
daily service to and from Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle.
The new steamer, "Princess Margaret," built for the
above lines, has been taken over by the Admiralty.
The Turbine steamer, "Princess Patricia,'  'operates a
summer months' double daily service between Vancouver
,and Nanaimo, continuing one round trip per day during
the winter.
The S S. Charmer plies between Vancouver, Nanaimo,
Union Bay, Comox and Powell River, making three trips
weekly. ANNUAL EEPOET, 1917-1918
43
The S. S. "Princess Alice" and S. S. "Princess Sophia,"
sail every week to Skagway, calling at Alert Bay, Prince
Rupert, Ketchikan, "Wrangell and Juneau.
The S. S. "Princess Ena," carrying freight, makes
regular sailings' between Vancouver and all coast points
on the mainland and on Vancouver Island, also making connections for Skidegate and other points on Queen Charlotte Islands.
The S. S. "Princess May" operates weekly to Prince
Rupert and Granby Bay, calling at East Bella Bella, Swan-
son Bay, Claxton, Butedale, Port' Simpson, Port Nelson
(Naas River), Wales Island.
The S. S. "Princess Beatrice' 'operates weekly to Bute-
dale, calling at Powell River, Campbell River, Quathiaski
Cove, Blind 'Channel, Alert Bay, Sointula, Port Hardy, Shu-
shartie Bay, Rivers Inlet Canneries, Namu and Ocean Falls.
The S. S. "Princess Maquinna" gives a service between.
Victoria and "West Coast of Vancouver Island, sailing on the
1st, 10th and 20th of the month.
Tugs "Nanoose," "Qualieum" and "Nitimat" tow car
ferry barges, Transfers Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 7, conveying
railway freight cars between Vancouver, Esquimalt, Lady-
smith and Newport.
The Ocean Steamship Co., Ltd-, and The China Mutual
Steam Navigation Co., Ltd., (Blue Funnel Line). Local
agents, Dodwell & Co., Limited, operates a four weekly
service between Vancouver and Manila, P. I., via Japan and
China Ports. Owing to the war, the direct service between
United Kingdom and Vancouver via Panama, has been
temporarily suspended.
Harrison Direct Line.—Pacific Coast agents, Balfour,
Guthrie & Co.—operates a direct service between United
Kingdom ports and Vancouver via Panama Canal, j This
line has been kept in operation during the entire period of
the war. This service is maintained in spite of the heavy
losses endured, the line having lost 18 vessels sunk by submarines, raiders and mines, and also despite the heavy
demand for its vessels in other services.
Balfour-Guthrie   &   Company  are  also   Pacific   Coast VANCOUVEE BOARD OF TRADE
agents of the Australian Commonwealth line of steamers
owned by the Australian Government and operating between
Australian ports, British Columbia and other points on the
Pacific.
Pacific Steamship Company (successors to Pacific Coast
Steamship Company and Pacific Alaska Navigation Company) .
Steamers "President" and "Governor," calling at Vancouver every week in the B. C. Puget Sound-California
service.
Steamers "Umatilla" and "Queen," "Admiral Dewey"
and "Admiral Schley" affording weekly service between
Vancouver and California ports by way of Seattle.
Steamers "Spokane" and "City of Seattle," Vancouver-South-eastern Alaska service, by way of Seattle.
Steamers "Admiral Farragut,
Imiral  Evans''—Va
vice, by way of Seattle.
'Admiral "Watson" and
Admiral  Evans"- —Vancouver-SoU(thwestern Alaska  ser-
Vancouver to Nome, St. Michaels and Kotzebue Sound
ports, service by way of Seattle, during the open season.
Additional freight service is provided between any of
these routes when conditions require same.
Grand   Trunk   Pacific Coast   Steamship   Co.,   Ltd.—
Operates the threefunnel twin screw 3,500-ton steamers,
S. S. "Prince Rupert" and "Prince George," speed 18%
knots, in a weekly service between Vancouver, Prince Rupert and Skagway, and bi-weekly service to Prince Rupert
and Anyox, and Vancouver to Victoria and Seattle.
S. S. "Prince John" weekly service from Prince Rupert to Queen Charlotte Island points.
Union Steamship Company of B. C, Ltd., head offices,
Vancouver. Agencies in Prince Rupert and Victoria, affords a weekly service to Ocean Falls, Surf Inlet, Prince
Rupert, Anyox, Port Simpson, Port Essington, all canneries
on the Skeena and Naas Rivers, Nanaimo, Union Bay and
Comox. They also provide frequent sailings to Van Anda,
Powell River, Lund and Campbell River.
Their fleet consists of the following steamers: T. S. S. ANNUAL EEPOET, 1917-1918
45
"Chelohsin,
I' Camosun, '
"Comox,"
"Chilco."
" T. S. S. "Cowichan," T. S. S. "Venture," S. S
' S. S. "Cheakamus," S. S. "Cassiar," S. S.
S,  S.   "Coquitlam,"   S.   S.   "Chasina,"   S.   S.
These steamers run under contract to the Trade and
Commerce Department and also the Post Office Department for the carriage of mails to all points.
The Terminal Steam Navigation Company, Ltd., operates daily between Vancouver and Howe (Sound, S. S.
"Ballena" from Vancouver to Newport and connecting
with the Pacific Great Eastern Railway. The S. S. "Bow-
ena' 'to Bowen Island, and the S. S. Britannia" to Bowen-
Island and way points.
East Asiatic Line—Local Agents, C. Gardiner Johnston
& Company, has been temporarily suspended owing to the
war.
Halibut Fleets-r-New England Fish Company operates
out of the port of Vancouver in the halibut fishing, the
S. S. "New England," and the auxiliary power schooners
Knickerbocker and Tyee.
The Canadian Fishing Co., Ltd., operates the S. S.
"Celestial Empire," S. S. "Flamingo," S. S. "Kingsway,"
S. S. "Canada," S. S. "Imbricaria," and the Auxiliary Power Schooners "Pescawha," and "Carlotta G. Cox."
The Canadian Robert Dollar Steamship Co., Ltd., operates a monthly service from Vancouver to Oriental ports,
making calls at Shanghai, Hongkong, and Manila. The
boats operated on this run comprise the "Melville Dollar,"
"Harold Dollar," "Bessie Dollar," and two chartered boats.
The Maple Leaf Steamship Company, of New York.—
This service during the past year has been very irregular,
owing to the war.
Mosquito Fleet.—The local fleet of tugs and barges
required to tow logs and for carrying supplies to and from
the lumber mills and logging camps, and the fleet of fishing
boats and steamers employed in the salmon and deep-sea
fishing, aggregate several thousand tons and are constantly
being increased. 
46
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
DOCKAGE AND WAREHOUSE FACILITIES ON SOUTH
SIDE OF BUREAED INLET
Canadian Pacific Railway Company:
Total length of existing wharf line  -  5,440 ft.
Extension Pier "D"     1,292
6,732 ft
Total area of present wharves  537,720 sq. ft.
Extension Pier "D"  - - 89,860
627,580 sq. ft.
Total   area   of  present   sheds ....262,700 sq. ft.
'   Extension  Pier  "D"    .  76,800
Shed   1    - 8,250
347,750 sq. ft.
Pier -"A"—700 ft. long, 184 ft. wide.
Pier "D"—400 ft. long, 150 ft. wide; extension, 542 ft.
Total length of pier when extension completed, 942 ft..
Grand Trunk Pacific Steamship Company:
Dock    550   ft.   x   100   ft.
Shed 500  ft.  x  70  ft.
Capacity    35,000   square   feet
Great Northern Railway (leased to Balfour, Guthrie & Co.)
Dock    470  ft.  x  127  ft.
Shed    400   ft.   x   100   ft.
Capacity   40,000   square   feet l
Great Northern Railway (leased to The Dollar Steamship Co.):
Dock 470   ft.   x   127   ft.
Shed    400  ft.  x   100   ft.
Capacity    1 40,000   square   feet
C Gardner Johnson & Co.
Dock 700   ft   x   120   ft.
Shed    | j 620   ft.   x   90   ft.
Capacity    i 55,800   square   feet
Union Steamship Co.   of B. C, Ltd :
Dock    \ 435   ft.   x   95   ft.
Capacity    . 66,086   square   feet
New England Fish Co. and Canadian Fishing Co., Ltd.:
Main.Dock    180  ft.  x  140   ft.
Shed    140 ft. x 110 ft.  (double-decker)
Total Capacity  56.000 square feet
Cold Storage Dock  210 ft. x 136 ft.
Shed    180 ft. x.96 ft. (4 stories high)
Cold Storage Capacity  6,000,000 lbs. of fish
Government of Canada:
Dock Si'O ft. I 300 ft.
Shed    @H ft, x 80 ft.
Capacity    42,000 square feet
Evans, Coleman & Evans:
Pier No. 1—Dock 6no ft. x 91 ft.
Shed    fm ft. x 62 ft.
Capacity    36,580 square feet
Pier No. 2—Dock  732 ft. x 100 ft.
Shed    $§ ft. x 75 ft.
Capacity    .;-i,S65  square feet ANNUAL REPORT, 1917-1918 47
STATEMENT SHOWING THE VALUE  OF  GOODS
ENTERED FOR CONSUMPTION AT THE PORT
OF VANCOUVER AND VICTORIA
DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING MARCH 31st,  1917
DUTIABLE  GOODS Vancouver
Ale, Beer and Porter  $ 37,246    $
Animals,  living    58,714
Antiseptic Surgical Dressings   15,220
Bagatelle Tables   1,290
Bags which contained Cement  71
Baking  Powder           	
Balls, Cues and Racks for Bagatelle
Tables ,  437
Baskets    13,015
Baths, Bath Tubs,  etc  6,857
Belting, all kinds, except rubber and
leather    35,712
Belts,  all  kinds/ n.o.p  1,841
Bells !  1,531
Blacking, Shoe and Shoemaker's Ink 13,605
Blinds of wood, metal or other material, except textile or paper ....        	
Blue,  Laundry,  all  kinds    11,318
Boats   -  1,064
Books, Periodicals and other printed
matter    109,159
Boot,  Shoe  and  Stay Laces    14,849
Boots,    Shoes and   Slippers,   except
rubber and leather   33,206
Braces and Suspenders, and parts of 6,774
Brass and manufactures of   139,451
Breadstuffs, viz. :Arrowroot, Biscuits,
&y|k;'Rice, Macaroni, Sage & Tapioca 175,110
Grain, Flour and Meal   477,337
Bricks,  Tiles,  and manufactures  of
Clay, n.o.p.    17,642
Brooms and Brushes    38,804
Buttons     16,213
Candles  2,566
Cane,   Reed   or   Rattan,   Split   and
manufactures  of   -.  1,347
Victoria
8,930
548
2,534
84
945
759
4,325
274
345
830
31
1,038
90
24,316
245
4,709
1,491
18,028
17,500
89,491
5,951
1,857
783
806
894
gti 48 VANCOUVEE BOARD OF TEADE
DUTIABLE GOODS Vancouver Victoria
Carriages of all kinds, Railway Cars,
Trucks and parts of   258,692 38,730
Carpets,  n.o..p    1,002         	
Carpet, Linings and Stair Pads   83       	
Carpet Sweepers   393 134
Celluloid,  manufactures  of    1,889 681
Cement   1,081         	
Chalk,  prepared    1,449 37
Charcoal    812 275
Chicory    478         	
Church  Vestments    131 130
Cider  502 452
Clocks, Clock Cases, Keys and Movements    22,076 5,711
Cloth,  coated or sized for manufac- j
turre of blue or black print cloth        	
Clothes Wringers   689 281
Coal, Bituminous, and Dust   27,328 5,637
Cocoa Carpeting, Mats and Matting.. 397          	
Cocoanuts    877 499
Cocoanut,  dessicated    10,699 2,131
Cocoa Paste, Chocolate Paste, Shells,
Nibs and other preparations  74,709 6,831
Coffee, all kinds, n.o.p .  273,752 29,822
Collars    973 1,013
Combs, dress and toilet  .  2,530 460
Copper and manufactures of £  6,964 1,930
Cordage of all kinds   31,546 32,609
Uorks   and   other   manufactures   of
corkwood    4,861 222
Corsets,  Clasps,  etc  31,105 6,693
Costumes  and  Scenery,   Theatrical.... '     	
Cotton,  manufactures  of   737,033 134,562
Crape, black   193
Curtains, made up   8,765 968
Cyclometers and Pedometers  1,017 30
Drugs, Dyes,  Chemicals,  Medicines.. 231,228 40,143
Earthenware and China  :. 98,236 64,347
Eggs    87,210 1L411
Elastic  4,100 987
Electric Light Carbons and Points  3,629 397
Electric Apparatus, Motors,  etc  104,021 12,761
Embroideries, n.o.p  2 413 52
^J ANNUAL REPOET, 1917-1918
49
DUTIABLE  GOODS Vancouver Victoria
Emery Wheels and manufactures of
Emery  '.  13,643 278
Express  Parcels  64,660 21,414
Fancy  Goods    120,815 50,665
Feather Beds, etc   46
Featherbone   1  	
Fertilizers   i...  2,900 4,161
Fibreware, n-o.p j  2,114 125
Fireworks  |  3,059 1,291
Fish see Free Gods)    142,764 28,318
Flax, Hemp, Jute, and manufactures
of   119,430 22,449
Foundry Facings   389 27
Fruit and Nuts (see Free Goods) ..-. 931,226 126,692
Furniture, wood,  iron,  or other material  -.  38,887 8,759
Furs and manufactures of furs   (see
Free Goods)     6,986 871
Fuses   31,738           	
Glass and manufactures of  124,'954 34,940
Gloves and Mitts   35,164 9,210
Gold, Silver and manufactures of  15,243 3,448
Grease, Axle  .'  7,452 1,442
Gunpowder and other explosives, etc 26,708 3,172
Gutta-percha, Indiarubber and manufactures of  ' 1 224,709 29,878
Hair  and manufactures  of   sfi     1,248 418
Hats, Caps and Bonnets   92,133' 21,253
Hay  9,956 j 17,964
Honey   8,544 4,737
Hops  ......  126 ■ 999
Ink   1  9,295 1,726
Iron and Steel and manufactures of
(see Free Goods)   2,345,808 302,274
Ivory  -  149 22
Jellies, Jams and Preserves   18,635 3,355
Jewelery \  28,176 6,125
Knitted Goods   ..... 8,432 2,296
Launches,   pleasure,   steam,   gasoline
or other motor power  1,400 1,285
Lead and manufactures of   10.749 48,498
Leather and manufactures of   261,387 50,476
Lime    | - ----- -- 11 32
Lime Juice  andx other fruit juices.... 4,232 942
•tK 50
VANCOUVER BOAED OF TEADE
DUTIABLE  GOODS Vancouver Victoria
Lithographic Stones, not engraved —. 16           	
Machine Card Clothing  :.. 22,663       	
Magic Laterns and Slides therefor.... 6,081 ' 173
Malt  	
Malt  Extract    ..... 3,211            j
Marble and manufactures of  9,167 576
Mattresses   - —- 25 75
Mats, door or carriage,    other    than
, metal, n.o.p  11           	
Metals and manufactures of   137,535 12,641
Milk, Condensed and Fresh   16,634 234
Mineral Substances, n.o.p  40,201 2,199
Mineral and Aerated Waters   2,815 981
Mucilage  677 287
Musical  Instruments  78,450 5,692
Mustard   16,347 7,224
Oils, all kinds, n.o.p  3,415,054 240,699
Oiled Cloths of all kinds, Cork, Matting and Linoleum  , 33,737 3,872
Optical,  Philosophical,  Photographic
and Mathematical Instruments .. 18,854 2,794
Packages  118,775 41,176
Paints and Colours  jj  29,133 27,120
Paintings  in  oipls  or water  colours
and pastels, less than $20   84           	
Paper and manufactures of  262,604 39,147
Pencils, Lead    13,952 794
Pens, Penholders and Rulers   4,134 202
Perfumery, non-alcoholic   14,620 1,256
Photographic Dry Plates ....'...,  1,510 113
Picture and Photograph Frames   5,234 3,220
Pickles        11,687 2,179
Plants and Trees   14,166 1,651
Plaster of Paris  2,702 241
Plates, engraved on wood or metal .... 945 75
Pocket Books, Purses, etc  15,310 3,706
Polish or composition, knife or other -17,596 2,261
Pomades 	
Post Office Parcels  70,106 34,946
Precious Stones, n.o-p  819 194
Provisions, viz. t
Butter, Cheese and Lard  176,862 45,352
Meats, all kinds  ,... 411,428 176,586
Pulleys, Belt, for powei- j :._.. 16,957 503 ANNUAL EEPOET, 1917-1918
51
DUTIABLE  GOODS" Vancouver
Regalia and Badges   962
Ribbons    1  48,720
Sails  25
Salt (see Free Goods)   19,475
Sand, Glass, Emery and Flint Paper 3,112
Sauces, Catsups and Soy   65,121
Sausage Casings, cleaned  5,117
Seeds, n.o.p :  30,465
Ships and Vessels, Repairs on   59,825
Signs of any material and letters for
signs   E  1,149
Silk and manufactures of   326,890
Slate  887
Soaps   .-.  45,680
Spices v .|£ 113,096
Spirits   266,217
Spirits, Wine, non-sparkling  105,271
Spirits, Wine, sparkling  3,304
Sponges    1,806
Starch |  5,556
Stockinettes for manufacture of rubber boots 	
Stone and manufactures of  • 3,644
Straw and manufactures of  ..- . 5,868
Sugars and Syrups  4,243,301
Sugars, Molasses  6,423-
Sugar Candy and Confectionery   50,749
Sugar   Glucose,    Saccharine,   Maple
•  Sugar and Syrup   11,444
Surgical Trusses, Pessaries and Suspensory Bandages ..-.  2,043
Tallow   j -  595
Tape  Lines   \  48
Tea (s.ee Free Goods)  j |  2,747
Tin and manufactures of   23,456
Tobacco and manufactures of   57,626
Tobacco Pipes  -  12,009
Trawls and Trawling Spoons .  9,625
Trunks, Valises, Hat Boxes, etc  2,004
Twine, manufactures of  ' 1,967
Umbrellas, Parasols and Sunshades .... 6,690
Unenumerated articles  ~.~ 42,776
Varnish, Lacquers, Japans, etc '..... 1,172
Vegetables j -  243,030
Victoria
1,456
11,959
20
6,001
630
15,212
213
10,570
2,000
513
34,220
358
15,938
2,195
160,912
20,229
2,678
743
2,418
3,399
966
19,195
1,429
10,405
11
94
5,263
3,893
1,228
1,337
498
240
2,582
13,606
68
60,960 52        VANCOUVEE BOAED OF TEADE
DUTIABLE  GOODS     , Vancouver
Vinegar    9,662
Waste or Shoddy from cotton, wool,
or other material   5,778
Watches,  Watch  Cases,  Movements,
Glasses, etc   7,250
Wax and manufactures of  4,159
Webbing  ,  747
Whips, Thongs and Lashes   1,153
Window Cornices and Cornice Poles 565
Window Shades and Rollers   269
Wood and manufactures of   71,092
Wool and manufactures of   736,885
Zinc and manufactures of  |  559
Damaged Goods   3,219
Materials for the Construction of Vessels   90,014
Total Dutiable Goods  19,727,713
FREE GOODS.
Products of the Mine.
Clay  $    257
Coal, Anthracite  160
Minerals  ..'  1,248
Ores  127
Diamonds  176
Salt   57,233
Whiting  " 1,480
Other articles   4,217
Total   $64,898
FISHERIES.
Fish of all kinds   $      38
Fish Oil 	
Other articles  10,325
Total  |  ' $10,363
Victoria
1,758
4,112
5,618
1,631
141
22
17,089
111,250
101
46,306
2,654,999,
$      60
620
5,484
1,651
6,998
18,160
$32,973
$        8
4,253
$ 4,261 ANNUAL EEPOET, 1917-1918
FOREST.
Vancouver
Corkwood \	
Logs and round unmanufactured timber      $ 40,539
Lumber   and   Timber,    Planks,    etc.,
sawn, not shaped       122,050
Other articles  512
Total     $163,101
ANIMALS AND THEIR PRODUCE.
Animals for improvement of stock    $   3,569
Bristles         1,216
Fur Skins, not dressed         8,862
Grease  j       46,486
Hair unmanufactured & Horse Hair 540
Hides and Skins, undressed       64,150
Silk, raw 	
Wool  §1
Other articles 1         9,674
Total    $134,497
AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS.
Broom Corn $    34,394
Cocoa Beans, not roasted, crushed or
ground           2,167
Coeoanuts 	
Cotton, Wool or Raw Cotton, not-
dyed   *       14,659
Fibres, Mexican and Vegetable          3,777
Fruits, green       374,044
Hemp and Manila Grass 	
Indian Corn        89,693
Rice, uncleaned       884,225
Seeds   -         2,376
Tobacco Leaf for Excise purposes        40,622
Other articles        15,243
Total  $1,461,200
53
Victoria
$ 9,458
6,864
. 9,794
$26,116
$    637
16,538
22,781
212
1,705.
$41,873
336
181
124,863
\ 57,764.
348,673
658
3,282
3,726
$539,483 54
VANCOUVEE BOAED OF TEADE
MANUFACTURED AND PARTIALLY MANUFACTURED ARTICLES-
Asphalt	
Bells for Churches 	
Binder Twine  - —-, -	
Fire Brick 	
Plaits, Straw, Tuscan and Grass 	
Pitch and Tar, Pine	
Coke	
Duck for belting and hose	
Drugs, Dyes and Chemicals —	
Fish Hooks, Nets, Seines, etc	
Jute Cloth, Yarns, etc	
Metals :
Brass 	
Copper	
Iron and Steel  	
Tin ;	
Zinc 	
Other :	
Oakum	
Newspapers and Magazines 1	
Oil Cake Meal and Cotton Seed Cake
and Meal	
Molasses	
Nails .	
Oil, Cocoanut and Palm	
Gasoline  .	
Crude Petroleum '	
Rags and Waste 	
Resin or Rosin	
Rubber, Guttapercha, Crude, etc.* 	
Surgical Instruments, etc	
Yarn, Cotton 	
Other articles 	
7,123
51,240
99,784
8.844
10,634
118
14,285
752
78,365
Vancouver
Victoria
1,494
$ 11,561
' 3
1,073
223
459
553
9,043
944
'371
4,781
244,158
438,592
582,518
4,974
39,176
4,751
1,036
15,655
8,337
,669,631
137,819
35,052
56
27,874
8,709
12,059
227
16,147
7,300
120,961
11,552
4,547
7,501
299
7,050
2,069
110,049
Total $3,052,143      $767,606 ANNUAL EEPOET, 1917-1918 55
MISCELLANEOUS ARTICLES.
Vancouver Victoria
Models of Inventions $      1,643 $         511
Paintings in oil or water colours, etc.           961 150
Settlers' Effects       162,245 45,835
Tea  see  Dutiable)     1,256,079 24,756
Coin and Bullion       349,322 46,474
Other articles      805,210 2,555,598
Total .- .$ 2,575,460 $2,673,324
Total Free     7,461,662 4,085,636
Total  Dutiable    | | 19,727,713 2,654,999
Grand Total ... ..$27,189,375 $6,740,635 56
VANCOUVEE BOAED OF TEADE
STATEMENT  SHOWING  THE  VALUE  OF  GOODS  EXPORTED
FEOM THE PROVINCE AT THE POETS OF VANCOUVER,
NANAIMO  AND  NEW  WESTMINSTER
During the Fiscal Year Ending March 31st, 1917
The Mine Vancouver
Asbestos    $       74,386
Coal  271
Gold-bearing,     quartz,     dust,   nuggets,   e,tc     3,058,991
Felspar    .	
Metals, viz.—
Copper,  fine,   contained   in   ore,
matte,   regulus,   etc    4,025^,926
Lead   	
Silver, metallic, contained in ore,
concentrates, etc        669,527
Ores	
Salt  685
Sand and Gravel  .  1,743
• Stone, unwrought   6,900
Other articles    4,747
Total    $ 7,843,176
The Fisheries.
Codfish,   including    haddock,    ling
and pollock, fresh   471
Codfish, dry salted   206
"■'        Smoked  2,232
Halibut, fresh ....*. s 2,078
Herring, fresh or frozen   515
"   "    pickled     97,424
•"        canned    163,774
1        smoked     4,358
Seafish, other, fresh  .-  32
''    ' preserved   469
Smelts    72
Fish, preserved	
Oysters, fresh    22
Lobsters, canned	
Salmon,   fresh     8,043
"      smoked   72
"      canned     1,317,319
"     ,   dog     31!,479
"      pickled   9,375
Fish, all other, fresh    146
Fish  Oil  	
Other   articles     8,152
Total    $ 1,646,239
Nanaimo
New-
West 'r
2,156,589
1,000
1,632
265,107
30
3,000
3,055,513
200
76,222
10
1,525
397
$2,160,789
$3,400,436
1,607
2,626
1,533
700
4,011
178,558
11,609
2,713
34,920
1,254
4,095
338
3,906
1,087
1,125
5,574
48,205
34
2,000
59,J35
702,168
139,613
44,830
1,200
134,552
1,188
248
$   253,860
$1,134,969 ANNUAL EEPOET, 1917-1918
The Forest. Vancouver
Firewood 	
Logs, cedar, capable of being made
into shingle bolts   81,928
Logs, hemlock 	
"    spruce   15,072
"    all  other  	
Lumber, viz:—
Laths   2,812
Pickets    _  256
Planks  and boards         382,149
Shingles     748
Shooks   30,647
"Staves, other and heading 	
All other lumber, n.o.p	
Masts and spars   500
Piling  ?  2,496
Poles,   hop,   hoopi,   telegraph   and
other     34,273
Shingle Bolts 	
Fosts and railway ties	
Timber,  square 	
Total    $     550,881
. ..Animals and their Produce
Animals,  horses,  over  1  year  old $ 3,550
Animals,   cattle,   over  1  year  old 19,255
Poultry    1  266
All   other     1,093
Bones   6,723
Butter     38
Cheese   8,788
Fresh Cream    '-	
Cream and Milk, condensed   56,422
Eggs  --
Furs, dressed   17,930
I'urs, undressed   9,889
Glue Stock  4,137
Hair    3,224
Hides   and   skins   other    than    fur       109,294
Horns and hoofs   756
Honey     12
Lard   611
Meats, viz.—
Bacon   I =  603
Beef   7,383
Hams  	
Pork     I ~«
Poultry, dressed or undressed   1,974
Canned Meats   22
All other, n.o.p  3
Sausage  casings    390
Sheep Pelts ..:.	
.   Tails     703
Nanaimo
210,700
720
47,753
770
116,330
152.
' New
West |
1,768
.$   400,770
937
226,677
429,096
3,145
4,183
15,311
19,646
56
788,770
3,715
230
1,461
1,533
1,265
40,958
66,61c
74,086
704 VANCOUVEE BOAED OF TEADE
Meat—Con tinued
Tallow 	
Wool   	
Other articles ..
Vancouver     Nanaimo
Total
Agricultural Products
Fruits, viz.— -
Apples, green or ripe 	
Berries of all kinds	
Canned  or Preserved fruits	
All other, n.o.p	
Beans and Peas	
Grain, and Products of, viz.—
Wheat   	
Bran    i.	
Flour of Wheat 	
Cereal Foods, prepared, all kinds
Hay   	
Hops and Malt 	
Maple Sugar and Syrup	
Seeds   	
Trees, Shrubs and Plants  !	
. Straw	
Vegetables, viz.—
Canned  or  preserved  	
Potatoes   ...'-	
All other vegetables 	
Other Articles 	
Total
Manufactures
Agricultural Implements, viz.:
Mowing Machines  	
Harvesters   	
Hay Bakes 	
All   other	
Parts   of   	
Binder  Twine	
Books, pamphlets, maps, etc. ...
Biscuits and bread 	
Brushes of all kinds 	
Cement    :	
Clothing and .wearing apparel-
Confectionery
Cordage,  jope
Cotton  fabric  	
Cottons, other 	
Senega   Eoot   	
Buttons   	
Clay   	
Cream   Separators
and   twine..
5,849
5,973
New
West 'r
36.495
427
264,888         $   227,514
$     111,528
813
147
7,433
123,264
47,044
273,573
1,721
2,016
35,792
130
122
814
4,084
69,520
121,990
2,546
10,509
68,736
4,323
3,061
28,796
69,750
9,572
518
4
113
380,253
6,274
2,536
'     376
v    5,438
1,275
17,128
25
700
6
24
8
10,782
10,466
• 2,503
155
18
62,225
• 8,294
68
803,137        $     94,646
 33
2,211
5,194
143
• 20,089 , Manufactures—Continued
Drugs,     Chemicals      and     Medicines, n.o.p. all other  1	
Dyestuffs  	
Earthenware and manufactures of
Electric   Apparatus    .....
Electrotypes	
Explosives  and Fulminates  of  all
kinds   	
Felt, manufactures  of  	
Fertilizers    '.	
Films for photo  use	
Fur,   manufactures   of   	
Scrap Iron and Steel 	
Pig Irin	
Hardware, viz:—'
Tools, hand or machine 	
Hardware,   n.   o.   p	
Steel and manufactures of 	
Jewellery, all kinds, n. o. p	
Jewellers'   Sweepings   	
Junk	
Lamps and Lanterns 	
Lead  in  Pigs    v	
Leather, viz:—
Sole}  -	
Upper   	
,   Boots and Shoes 	
'Harness and Saddlery	
Other manufactures of	
Lime   	
Liquors,   viz.:
Ale and  Beer  	
Whisky   	
Wines , -	
All  other  Spirits   .,..—.
Aluminum   	
Gasoline Launches 	
Glass and Glassware, n.o.p	
Groceries of all kinds 	
Gypsum   or Plaster  	
Guns, Eifles and Firearms 	
Hats   and   Caps    -	
Household effects, n. o. p	
Indian   Work   	
India-ruhber,  manufactures  of
Iron  and  Steel  and manufactures
of, viz:—
'Stoves    -	
Ferro-silicum    |	
Wire and Wire Nails 	
Linotype Machines  	
Machinery n. o. p	
Sewing   Machines   	
Typewriters   	
IPOET, 1917-1918
Vancouver     Nanaimo
103.019     Mis
59
New
West'r .
2,308
35
181
112
1,039
 80
23
48
8,532
18
1,181,280
34
44,214
5,300
8,373
63
33,607
7,040
54
552
247
9,018
74
193,324
20,939
■ 1,810
167
2,885
8,782
1,629
2,200
1,698
300
45,519
29,431
901
178
254
29
16
187
53,825
12,944
7
35,545
29
8
' 4,810
6,573
5,491
1,060
6,871
195
1,398
400
10
02
128
 5
203,095
1,010
.     110,514
137
101,912
2,758
805
13,869
81,926
453
52,545
475
30
13,131
45
2.910
100 60
VANCOUVEE BOAED OF TEADE
li
Ma uuf a c tur es—Continued
Metals,  n.  o. p	
Aerated  Waters	
Musical Instruments,  viz.:
Organs	
Pianos    I,	
Other   	
Oil, n. o. p	
Paper, Wall 	
''      Printing   	
"      n. o. p., etc	
Paints   and  Varnishes   	
Paintings   	
Photographs   	
Bags	
Scientific Apparatus 	
Silk and Manufactures of 	
Tar   	
Stationery   	
Sporting   Goods    :	
Sugarhouse  Syrup  	
Tin,  Manufactures   of   	
Tobacco   	
Trunks and Valises, all kinds	
Vehicles,   viz:—
Automobiles   	
Automobile, parts of 	
Carriages, parts  of  „
Bicycles   ....'	
Bicycles, parts  of 	
Wagons   	
All   other   	
Wood, viz:—
Boats, etc	
Household-  Furniture   	
Doors,   Sashes  and  Blinds   	
Pails, tubs, churns, etc	
Wood pulp, chemically pre-
pa red    \	
Other  manufactures  of  	
Woollens   	
Other   Articles   	
Vancouver
...      831,863
8
2,093
(7,832
35,642 •
192
4'2
2,382,072
17,941
1,717
110
iiii 341
25,351
773
1,062
6,627
1,624
207
24
200
"102
138,760
9,202
3,204
1,682
10,691
697
 339
605
3,615
382,245
26,401
2,904
-29,785
Nanaimo
Miscellaneous Articles
Contractors'   Outfits    -.
Eice   	
Rice   Meal   	
Other Miscellaneous  articles
6;695
5,753
38,801
6,394
i Total  $
57,643
2,792
29
Total     $5,607,197      1,185,221
New
West'r
108,981
9,080
130
20,380
781
10
160
303
1,01.1
681
4,621
14
345
10,704
,4,750
250
190
" 45
19
625
35
476
306,424-
1,193
79
2,119
677,425
11,547
106,819
64,612
569
183,547
Grand Total   $16,773,161      4,000,640      6,507,307 ANNUAL EEPOET, 1917-1918 '  61
ABSTRACT OF ANNUAL DECLARED EXPORT RETURN
Statement showing values of Declared Exports from
Vancouver, B. C, Canada, to the United States of America
during the year ended December 31, 1917, and a comparison with the preceding year :
ARTICLES
Animals    $
Animal Products 	
Antiques    ..	
Autos   -	
Auto Accessories 	
Buiding Material and Sundry Man-
factured Articles 	
Bonds	
Burlap	
Chemicals including Medicines 	
Coin   (Gold)
Coal	
Copra	
Cotton & Woolen Mfgrs. including
army material	
Empties,  (Drums, sacks, etc.)  	
Explosives 	
Circus & Theatrical Goods	
Curios,  Indian	
Natural and Zoological Specimens
Fertilizer  <	
Feed...	
Total Fish (fresh and preserved) ..
Films 	
Furniture	
Fish Lines and Nets 	
Food Products, sundry 	
Fruits, fresh and preserved 	
Groceries  	
Meats, fresh and preserved 	
Miscellaneous  	
Total Vegetables 	
Total Food Products  I
Hardware   	
Household Goods  *
1916
Values
91,110
649,683
5,394
13,048
147,842
51,839
8,643
19,544,536
12,799
15,042
17,491
14,203
48;107
2,188
191,320
721,204
1917
Values
$  95,051
1,123,321
7,716
5,649
387
162,889
11,367
18,256
(Sil'r) 2,343
66,824
52,874
90,359
12,820
71,208
66,669
6,702
22,081
662,932
1,057,295
5,513
2,324
19,681
145,371
36,876
95,438
9,320
2,654
8,330
412
504,967
87,141
348,918s
43,721
263,109
552,768
13,992
257,422
925,168
1,909,915
27.349
220,427 62
VANCOUVEE BOAED OF TEADE
ARTICLES                           1916 1917
Values Values
^Junk j       251,876 283,780
Jewelry  563
Liquors   -     36,555 200,969
Leather and Shoes   762
Miscellaneous           1,102 129
Machinery           7,388 I  109,660
Miscellaneous   \         11,180 7,566
Musical Instruments   543
Metals  -....- m        18,190 141,160
lVEinGr9ils ■	
Gold     2,869,215 3,202,181
Silver   1       832,514 234,186
Minerals (Ores)   16,954,471' 1,5,333,177
Jewelers' Sweeps            2,160 1,739
Magnesite    1         13,816        \	
Oils         77,366 109,764
Professional and Scientific Instruments and Supplies  728
Rails, steel         22,396 11,036
Rubber  255,871
Seeds _:.... 1,092,864
Soap -. H  279
Tobacco    H  (1,299
Wood and Mfgrs. 'of     7,666,461 9,203,856
TOTAL ; $51,145,336 $35,900,801
Difference in Exports showing a decrease for 1917 is
made up by the $19,000,000 of Gold Coin shipped in 1916
from Australia to Vancouver  and invoiced  at Vancouver
to San Francisco for reeoinage. ] There is an increase of
about $2,000,000 of B. C. products exported to U.S  during
1917 over 1916.  64
VANCOUVEE BOAED OP TEADE
CANADIAN TRADE COMMISSIONERS
Argentine Republic.
B. 'S. "Webb, Acting Canadian Trade Commissioner, Eeconquista
No. 46, Buenos Aires.    Cable Address, Canadian.
Australia.
D. H,. Eoss, address for letters—Box 140 G. P. O., Melbourne.
Office—Stock Exchange Building, Melbourne. Cable Address, Can-*
adian.
British West Indies. timB
E. H. S. Flood, Bridgetown, Barbados, agent also for the Bermudas and British Guiana.    Cable Address, Canadian.
China.
J. W. Eoss, 13 Nanking Eoad, Shanghai.      Cable  Address, Can-
Cuba.
J.   C.  Manzer, • Acting  Canadian  Trade  Commisioner,  Lonja   del
Commercio, Apartado 1290, Havana.    Cable Address, Cantracom.
France
Phillippe Eoy, Commissioner General, 17 and  19 Boulevard  des
Capueines, Paris.    Cable Address, Stadaeona.
Japan.
E. P. Crowe, Acting Canadian  Trade Commissioner, P.  O. Box
109, Yokohama.    Cable Address, Canadian.
|j*fl| Holland
Ph.   Geleerd,   Acting  Canadian   Trade   Commissioner,   Zuidblaak
26,  Eotterdam.     Cable  Address,  Watermill.
Newfoundland
W.   B.   Nicholson,   Bank   of   Montreal   Building,   Water   Street,
St. John's.    Cable Address,  Canadian.
New   Zealand.
i  W.   A.   Beddoe,   Union    Buildings,    Customs    Street,   Auckland.
Cable Address, Canadian.  66
VANCOUVEE BOAED OF TEADE
BANKING RETURNS
VANCOUVER CLEARING HOUSE
Comparative  Statement of Clearings for Years Ending
March 31st,  1915,  1916,  1917,  1918
1914-1915
1915-1916
1916-1917
191,7-1918
April   	
$ 39,900,365
38,089,799
37,467,108
38,574,409
33,598,185
34,324,654
31,165,702
28,519,737
25,189,573
24,842,677
19,489,666
21,833,220
$ 21.295,868
■ 22,669,043
22,500,450
23,712,152
24,246,715
24,360,842
24,596,929
26,324,641
25,703,746
21,974,554
21,002,208
25,216,415
$ 21,859,400
26; 080,473
27,'l24,891
27,481,846
28,550,714
29,690,373
31,475,214
3.1,158,064
3 0? 021,584
28,757,111
24,628,127
29,080,730
$ 30,333,013
33,163,457
33 960 212
May  	
July   	
35 285 172
August   	
September   ...
October   	
November ....
December   ....
February
March   	
38,527,759
39,130,527
44,978,846
42,660,326
39,105,578
38,174,171
34,229,519
37 633 399
Total   .
$369,995,095
$283,603,563
$335,908,527
$447,181,979     ANNUAL EEPOET, 1917-1918
CONSULAR AGENCIES IN THE CITY
American Consul General
GEOBGE N. WEST
IRV ING M. LINNELL, Consul.    EAEL G. JOHNSON, -Vice-Consul.
744 Hastings Street West.
Belgium Consul
J. M. WHITEHEAD,  779  Thurlow Street
Brazil Consul
S. J. EMANUELS, 411 Pender Street West
Chilean Consul General for Canada
HON. M. P. MOEEIS, 850 Hastings Street West
Consul for the Chinese Republic
LINGOH WAY, 402 Pender Street,  West
For B. C, Alberta, Saskatchewan, residing at Vancouver.
Danish Vice Consul
W. A.  WAED, 207 Hastings Street West
Ecuador Consul General
HON. j. MaeQUILLAN, 1028 Barclay Street
France—Acting Consular Agent
E. CHEVALIER, 470 Granville Street
Honduras Consul
E. E. MAITLAND, 470 Granville' Street
Italian Consular Agent
NICOLA MASI, 208 Union Street
Japanese Consul
S. UKITA, 525 Seymour Street
Mexican Consul General
SENOE E. S. BRAVO, 850 Hastings Street West
Nether1ands  Consul
M. A. VAN ROGGEN, 318 Cambie Street ^
Norwegian Consul
C. B. STALSCHMIDT, 525 Seymour Street
Peruvian Consul
HAROLD G. WHITE, 402 Pender Street West
Russian Consul
CONSTANTINE EAGOSINE, 719 Jervis Street
Swedish Vice Consul
R. V. WINCH, 739 Hastings Street West
Switzerland Consul
S.   GINTZBURGEE,  122 Hastings  Street West
for the Province of British Columbia and Alberta VANCOUVEE BOAED OF TEADE
PRELIMINARY REVIEW AND ESTIMATE
OF
MINERAL PRODUCTION FOR THE YEAR 1917
This bulletin has been prepared before the receipt of the
official reports for the year 1917 of the Gold Commissioners
and Resident Engineers of the Province, and the customary
returns of mineral production annually made by managers
of mines and reduction-works; consequently, it must necessarily be regarded as being simply a preliminary review of
the progress of the past year, together witji an estimate of
the quantities and value of the several mineral products of
the Province, which it is believed will prove to be approximately correct. |||Pj
The accompanying table shows an estimated mineral
production during 1917 of a total value of $37,182,570. It
will be seen that the total value of the production of 1917
as estimated is $5,107,892 less than that of 1916, equivalent
to a decrease of about 12 per cent.
The decrease, in total value of the 1917 mineral production as compared with that of the previous year would appear at first sight to show a very serious decline in the
mining industry; this condition, however, was not due to
any decline in mining itself, but to the' cumulative effect
of several adverse influences acting on the mining industry as a whole. It must be remembered that the year 1916
was a record one of high metal prices and of demand for
metals, which therefore made that year a banner one for
mining, not only for British Cblumbia, but for the whole
American continent. In comparing the estimated 1917 production with any previous year excepting 1916, it is seen
that the 1917 output easily exceeds any other; for instance,
it is nearly $5,000,000 greater than the former record year
of 1912.
The adverse influences which retarded mineral production in 1917 may be summarized as industrial troubles, reduced metal prices in the last quarter of the year, a very
much lessened demand for lead and zinc for munition purposes, and the economic conditions which severely handicapped the mining of gold.
Industrial troubles in 1917 were more frequent and
extensive "than usual; in the early months of the year a pro- ANNUAL EEPOET, 1917-1918
73
tracted strike in the Crowsnest district not only cut down
the output of coal and coke, but forced the copper and lead
smelters to close for lack of fuel, and, as a direct cause,.
stopped mining in the most productive parts of the Province. The strike was followed by another one at Rossland,
which stopped production from the big gold-producers of
that camp.
,The great decrease in gold production this year is
mainly due to the heavy falling off in the Rossland output,
which usually makes over one-half the yearly output of the
Province. Early in November another serious strike occurred at the Trail smelter, which closed the whole plant
until practically the end of the year; this in turn stopped
productive mining during that time throughout East and
West Kootenay.
The reduction in metal prices was confined mainly to
lead and zinc, as the average price for copper was practically the same as for the previous year, while silver advanced in price. A larger production of lead, however,
could have been made by the Trail smelter but for the inability to market the product, due to the curtailment of
orders by the Imperial Munitions Board.
Gold-mining suffered also from increased costs of labour and supplies, with no corresponding increase in the
value of the metal produced, thereby causing a smaller margin of profit, and, in many cases, making it unprofitable
to mine gold.
But for these untoward circumstances the hope anticipated at the commencement of the year, that the mineral-
output of the Province for 1917 would reach the $50,000,-
000 mark, would probably have been realized. Taken In
the aggregate, our mineral production and development in
the year 1917 and the future prospects of the industry are
conditions for congratulation at this time.
In 1914 the average market price of copper for the year
was 13.6 cents; in 1915 it was 17.3 cents; in 1916 it was 27.2
cents; and in 1917 it was 27.18 cents. The "high-water
mark" for the year was in February, when the high monthly aervage of 31.75 cents a pound was reached; a steady
although somewhat irregular, decline thereafter set in. In
September the United States government, after conferring
with the representatives of the big copper-producers, fixed
a price of 23.5 cents a pound, since that time this price has
prevailed as the standard on the New York market; the 74
"VANCOUVEE BOAED OF TEADE
I
New York price in turn is standard for the American
continent, as sales and Orerpurchases are governed by
it- This fixed price is apparently satisfactory to all, as
the present supply and demand are about equal.
The lead market is at the present time in a very dull
and featureless condition. The high price prevailing for
lead during the first nine months of the year so stimulated
production that the supply soon exceeded the demand, with
the natural result that stocks accumulated and the price
commenced to decline. In Canada the chief producer of
lead is the Consolidated Company at Trail, which company
delivered a large part of its output to. the Imperial Munitions Board. Towards the end of the year, however, these
orders were largely reduced, which caused the Trail Company to have difficulty in marketing its lead; as a result
the company had to curtail lead production.
The average price for lead in January was 7.626 cents
a pound in New York; in June it was 11.171 cents—the
highest; and in December about. 6.25 cents; the average for
the year was about 8.78 cents (absolute figure not yet obtainable.)
Silver was the one metal which did not rise in price in the
early stages of the war, as it was not directly used in war
munitions or materials. In time, however, a serious shortage of silver occurred owing largely to the heavy demands
for currency, occasioned by the rapid expansion of the
world's monetary systems, and the almost complete withdrawal by the Governments of gold as a circulating medium
of exchange. As might be expected with a steady and even
abnormal demand for silver, the price rose, gradually at
first and afterwards more quickly.
The market price of silver in 1914 was 54.8 cents an
ounce; in 1915, 49.7 cents..; in 1916, 65.7 cents; and in 1917,
81-38 cents (December estimated.) The highest monthly
average reached was 100.740 cents, and sales at 115 to 120
cents were recorded. During the last three months the
price has been.fairly steady at somewhere about 85'cents an
ounce.
The high price paid for zinc in 1915 and 1916 resulted
in such an increased production that the supply far exceeded the demand, with the inevitable result that the market price declined very materially in 1917. The present
markt price of zinc of from 7.5 to 8 cents a pound cannot
be considered as being any better than the before-the-war ANNUAL REPORT, 1917-1918 75
price, when it is remembered that operating costs are cor-
rspondingly higher.
The average price of zinc for the year 1917 was 8.884
cents a pound (December estimated), which compares with
12.804 cents in 1916 and 13.23 cents in 1915. The Provincial output of zinc for the year 1917 is, however, only
slightly less than in the previous year.
The various metals and their production are reviewed
in detail later in this report, but it might be noted here that
the following table shows the gross value of the metallic
minerals recovered in 1917 as being $27,663,786, which represents a decrease from the year 1916 of nearly $5,000,000.
The value of coal produced in 1917 shows an increase
of $267,135 as compared with the previous year, but the coke
production shows the large decrease of $649,026. The coal
production in the Coast District was considerably greater
than in 1916, but labour troubles materially decreased the
output in the Crowsnest of both coal and coke; it is in
this latter district that most of the coke production of the
Province is made.
As far as can be ascertained at present, there is a small
decrease in the item of building materials, due to the cessation of building operations in the larger cities.
Mineral Production for Two Years, 1916-1917.
The following table shows the quantities and value of
the several minerals produced in the year 1916, and the estimated production in 1917- It may here be explained that
the prices used in calculating the estimated value for 1917
of silver, lead, copper, and zinc are the average prices for
the year, as published in "The Engineering and Mining
Journal," New York, less a deduction of 5 per cent, off
silver, 10 per cent, off lead, and 15 per cent, off zinc.
Production of Various Minerals Briefly Reviewed.
In order to indicate in a general way the sources of
the various minerals mined in the Province and to give an
idea of some of the conditions that affected their production, and, incidentally, brief information concerning the
larger known mineral deposits occurring in British Columbia, the next following, comments are submitted. 76
VANCOUVER BOAED OF TEADE
Gold.
Placer Gold—The recovery of placer gold for 1917 is
estimated at $550,000, of which practically all is obtained
in the Cariboo and Cassiar districts, only about one-tenth
of the total coming from the other districts. An approximate apportionment is as follows: From Cariboo District,
$170,000; Atlin Division of Cassiar District, $320,000; Sti-
kine and Liard, $15,000; remaining parts of the Province,
$45,000. It may be that a larger yield will be shown, but
this cannot be definitely stated until after the final returns
of. the season's operations shall have been received. This
estimated production for 1917 shows a decrease from the
preceding year of $30,500.
In hydraulic placer-mining, from which about 90 per
cent, of the placer gold obtained in British Columbia is derived, it has been pretty well demonstrated that the gold
out-put is in direct proportion to the number of days in
which water was available for piping.
In the Atlin Division water conditions were normal,
so far as is known, but the shortage of labour handicapped
operations. So many men have left the district for active
service in the war that not only were the larger companies
short of labour, but also the number of individuals mining
in a small way was materially less than in former years.
In the Cariboo District water conditions were good in
the early part of the season owing to the heavy snowfall of
the previous winter, which melted off gradually. This was
followed by a dry summer; with some compensation by reason of heavy fall rains. The output for the Cariboo and
Quesnel Division is expected to have been approximately
the same as in 1916-
Gold-mining in all forms has suffered by the war, due
to the fact that the cost of labour and supplies has materially increased, while the price of the product remains
standard; hence operating costs are higher and profits
lower.
Due to the greatly enhanced market price of the base
metals, such mines operating on a sliding scale of wages,
regulated by the price of metals, have been paying abnormally high wages, which has drawn miners away from gold-
mining, both placer and lode. ANNUAL EEPOET, 1917-1918
77
In addition to the increased cost of all supplies, etc.,
the war conditions have also rendered it almost impossible
.to obtain new equipment at any price. There has therefore been, no inducement for capital to enter into new placer-mining enterprises, either hydraulic or dredging. The
-development of new placer enterprises in the Cariboo and
Atlin fields and elsewhere in the Province can therefore
hardly be expected until the world war is over.
Lode Gold—The quantity of lode gold produced in 1917
is very considerably less than in the previous year. The
output, which is estimated at $2,444,000, as compared with
$4,587,334 in 1916, is the lowest in the record of production
since 1898. The explanation of this very serious drop in
output is the large decrease in the lode gold produced in
Rossland camp, the mines of which usually produce over
50 per cent, of the total gold production of the Province.
This year the Rossland mines only made one-quarter of their
usual production owing to the numerous industrial troubles
which forced the total suspension of ore shipments for five
months, and reduced below normal the output during the
remainder of the year. Further details of this are given
under the heading "Trail Creek Mining Division."
There is also a considerable decrease this year in the
production from the Boundary-Yale District* due to a smaller tonnage of copper ore, carrying low gold values, being
treated by the Grand Forks smelter of the Granby Company. The Crows Nest coal strike also adversely affected
this company's operations by shutting off the supply of
coke.
Nelson Division also made a much smaller output than
in the previous year owing to no production having been
made from the Sheep Creek Camp.
A considerable increase from the Skeena District is
anticipated, which is accounted for by the initial production from the Surf Inlet mine of Belmont Canadian Mines,
Limited, and the increased tonnage of ore, carrying low gold
values, treated at the Anyox smelter of the Granby Consolidated Company-
The following table shows the gold production of 1916
and the estimated production for 1917:— VANCOUVER BOAED OF. TRADE
m
1916 1917
OZ. OZ.
Rossland  - 129,790 32,416
Boundary-Yale   H  76,230 59,685
Nelson     4,107 1,284
Skeena   ,     3,806 17,511
Coast   :     3,204 2,6i2
Lillooet -     2,625 3,000
All others j .....     2,170 1,731
Totals  ....: ..221,932 118,239
The Nickle Plate mine, in the Osoyoos Division, is expected to have made approximately the same production
as in the previous year—viz., 36,000 oz. of gold.
The Yankee Girl Mine, near Ymir, recommenced shipments to the Greenwood smelter after not shipping for a
period of nearly three years, during which time low-level
development was carried on.
The Lillooet production comes from the Bridge River
section and almost entirely from the Pioneer and Lome
mines.
The first production from the Surf Inlet mine since its
acquisition by the present owning company is interesting
and important, a considerable output being expected, the
result of four months' operation. The property is equipped
with a 250-ton mill which commenced milling in August ;
a considerable gold production in the future from this property seems assured.
Silver.
The quantity of silver produced is estimated to have
been about 3,069,021 oz., worth $2,372,353, a decrease from
the production of 1916 of 232,902 oz., but, owing to the
higher market value of silver, an increase in value of $312,-
614. The increase in the market price of silver which commenced ih the last months of 1915 continued throughout
1916 and on into 1917, steadily rising until in September the
high monthly average of 100.74 cents an ounce was reached.
Since then the price has dropped somewhat, the average for
December being about 85.5 cents.    The average for the year
1917 was approximately 81.38 cents an ounce, which com-
'pares with 65.66 cents in 1916 and'49.68 cents in 1915. ANNUAL REPORT, 1917-1918
. The approximate silver-production of the various districts for the year is estimated to have been as follows:—
oz.
Slocan and Slocan City 1,722,269
Skeena    258,300
Boundary-Yale    251,911
Ainsworth    216,571
Fort Steele § 1    192,387
Coast  ..:    128,648
Omineca    104,838
Trail Creek  : "....    51,508
All others    142,589
Total 3,069,021
The Slocan District is again far in the lead of all other
districts in silver production, 56 per cent, of the total being
credited to the Slocan. The figures for this year indicate
an increased production for the Slocan as compared with
last year, of over 200,000 oz., which shows the beneficial
influence of the high price of silver. The Slocan output
would have been still larger but for the curtailment of ore
shipments at different times throughout the year, caused by
the inability of the Trail smelter to handle the ore.
The largest producer in the Slocan was again the Standard, with an output estimated at about 374,000 oz., folow-
ed by the Van-Roi, Queen Bess, and Surprise, each over
200,000 oz. The tota number of shipping mines in the district was about thirty-five.
Ainsworth and Fort Steele Divisions both show decreases as compared with the previous year.
About 50 per cent, of the silver-output from the Boundary District comes from the Granby Company's mines at
Phoenix. Other mines contributing are the Mother Lode,
Sally, and Union.
The silver production from Trail Creek comes from the'
smelting of the goldcopper ores of Rossland camp* which
carry about M oz. of -silver to the ton.
The Skeena production comes almost entirely from the
Granby Company's Hidden Creek mine, at Anyox- The
Omineca production is expected to be about the same as m
1916. Si
80 VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
The Coast production of silver comes from the smelting of copper ores carrying low values in the precious metals. As a larger tonnage of copper ore was smelted, the
silver-output shows an increase.
About 85 per cent, of the total Provincial output of
silver comes from the treatment of silver-lead-zinc ores and
the balance mainly from the smelting'of gold-copper ores
carrying silver.
Lead.
The total amount of lead produced in 1917 is estimated
to have been 38,661,811 lb., valued at $3,054,283. This represents, as compared with the previous year, a decrease in
quantity of 10,065,705 lb., but owing to the higher market
price of lead an increase in value of $46,821. This 1917 output is in value the highest ,in the history of lead-mining in
the Province.
The market price of lead rose and fell during the year;
the average for January was 7.626 cents a pound; the high
mark was reached in June with 11.171 cent/3 a pound, after
which there was a decline to about 6.25 cents in December.
The average price for the year was about 8.78-
The following table shows the estimated production of
lead according to districts :—■
i§
Slocan   13,667,762
Fort Steele , 13,101,200.
Ainsworth    7  6,877,377
Nelson  2.708,400
Windermere-Golden   .' ...... 1^528,600
Revelstoke-Trout  Lake-L.ardeau     410,700
Omineca      287,672
All others  Wm -       80,100
Total .'....■ I j M 38,661,811
The Fort Steele production this year falls slightly below that of1 the Slocan District, which is due to a considerable decrease from Fort Steele, the. 1916 output of which
was 24,156,143 lb. The Fort Steele production comes almost entirely from the Sullivan mine, and during 1917 lead- ANNUAL EEPOET, 1917-1918
81
ore shipments from this mine were greatly curtailed. This
lessened output'was partly due to industrial troubles at the
Trail smelter, partly to excess of custom lead ore at the
smelter, and partly owing to the fact that the efforts at
the Sullivan mine were concentrated on getting out zinc ore.
The Slocan production shows a slight decrease (final
figures may alter this) from the previous year, which is
accounted for .by the suspension of ore shipments during
part of the year through inability to get the ore smelted.
The heaviest contributor was again the Standard—which,
however, did not make quite half of the previous year's
production—followed by the Surprise, Galena Farm, Slocan Star, and Queen Bess, all with a production approximating 2,000,000 lb.
■ The production from Ainsworth shows a decrease of
about 1,000,000 lb. as compared with 1916, but the estimate
on this division is very approximate. The Bluebell is the
heaviest shipper and is credited with having produced about
4,000,000 lb., followed by the Highland with 1,200,000 lb.
and the Florence with 700,000 lb. About twenty shipping
mines are listed in this Division.
The lead production of Nelson Division is estimated
at 2,708,400 lb., as compared with 1,240,784 lb. in 1916, the
increase being due to a larger production from the Emerald
mine, which makes practically all the output of^his Division.
The Windermere-Golden Division is expected to have
produced nearly three times as much lead as in 1916, due to
a largely increased production from the Paradise mine; the
output of this mine was approximately 1,000,000 lb- Other
shippers were the Couverapee, Lead Queen and Monarch.
The Omineca lead production for 1917 is expected to
have been a little larger than that of 1916. The Silver
Standard is the largest producer, with half a dozen small
shippers. The lead-output from this Division should be
larger in the year 1918.
Copper.
The amount of copper estimated to have been produced during the year 1917 shows somewhat of a decrease as
compared with the previous year, but considering the in- 82
VANCOUVEE BOAED OF TEADE
dustrial troubles of 1917 the showing made is very satisfactory. A production of 61,416,617 lb., worth $16,693,037,
is estimated, as compared with 65,379,364 lb., worth $17,-
784,494, in the preceding year. The 1917 output, however,
is higher than any other year excepting 1916.
The market price of copper was subject to considerable
fluctuations during the year. The New York average price
for January was 28.673 cents a pound, and rose in February to 31.750 cents, thereafter gradually declining fo 25.073
in September. . On September 21st, 1916, the War Industries Board of the United States, with the sanction of the
President, officially fixed the market price of copper at
23.5 cents a pound. This price has ruled ever since and
apparently is satisfactory, as, according to the leading authorities on the copper market, the supply at present just
about equals the demand- The average price of copper for
the year 1917 was 27.18 cents, as compared with 27.202 in
1916:
*
The copper production from the several districts is
expected to have been approximately as follows :—
lb. .
,Skeena Division  .....   27,251,323
Southern Coast District 20.283i210
Boundary-Yale District 11,035,361
Trail Creek Division     1,658,080
Omineca Division  1,058,943
All  other districts          129,700,
Total   61,416,617
The Hidden Creek mines and the smelter at Anyox
of the Granby Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company
were operated continuously throughout the year, even although at times some difficulty was experienced from the
shortage of coke and labour. A larger tonnage was treated than in 1916, amounting to approximately 775,000. tons
of ore, and in addition 37,000 tons of quartz flux and 53,000
tons of limestone flux. With the increased tonnage handled
there Avas a corresponding increase in the output of copper, approximately 27,100,000 lb. being produced, as compared with 23,890,896 lb. in 1916.
In the Boundary District the Granby Company's mines
a$ Phoenix and smelter at Grand Forks were not operated ANNUAL REPORT, 1917-1918
83
continuously nor to full capacity throughout the year, owing to the strike in the Crows Nest coalfield shutting off the
supply of coke. Only a little over half the 1916 tonnage
was handled, and, as the grade of ore remained practically
the same, the copper-output shows a proportionate decrease.
An output of approximately 7,000,000 lb. is expected to have
been made, as compared with 13,795,151 lb. in 1916. Similarly, the British Columbia Copper Company (now absorbed by the Canada Copper Corporation) treated a smaller
tonnage during the past year than in 1916, with a consequent decrease in copper-output.
The Britannia mine had a very successful year, the
tonnage of ore mined and milled being about 500,000 tons,
containing 19,000,000 lb. copper, 112,000 oz. silver, and 900
oz- gold. The ore reserves at this mine are large—claimed
to be about 17,000,000 tons—and it is expected the yearly
tonnage treated will increase still further, as the ultimate
}>lans of the eompany are to have -milling capacity to handle 4,000 tons a day.
The.copper-mines on Texada island are expected to have
made about the same output as in 1916 ] the most important
producer is again the Marble Bay.
Several small shipments of copper ore Avere made from
Vancouver island and along the Coast. The high price
of copper has stimulated the work of developing copper-
showings on the Coast, and while this has not resulted in
any great quantity of ore being shipped in 1917, it is likely that a considerable increase of production will take place
in 1918.
The encouraging feature as regards copper in the Southern Coast District is the very satisfactory results being
obtained from serious development, which as yet has not
found expression in actual production, but argues well for
substantial output in the near future. Development, to
be successful, would seem to be so extensive as to be out
of reach of any but strong companies.
The production of copper from Nelson Division during
1917 Avas very low, amounting to about 110,140 lb., mainly
from the Eureka mine.
The Omineca Division produced slightly less copper in
1917 than in 1916, due mainly to suspension of shipments VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
from the Rocher, Deboule mine during the early months
of the year.
During the last three years, copper-mining has attained
the position of being the most important form of mining in
the Province, and from all indications it should maintain
this prominent place for years to come, as last year the
value of copper mined exceeded the total value of all other
metalliferous minerals mined in the Province, and was also
nearly double the combined value, of coal and coke production. It formed about 60 per cent, of the total value of the
metalliferous mines and 45 per cent, of the total mineral
production. In the working of the large low-grade copper-
deposits and the subsequent smelting of the ores produced,
a great number of men are employed and a large proportion
of the money value is retained in the country in the payment
of wages and.purchase of supplies.
All the copper ores carry small amounts of the precious
metals, and therefore any increase in the copper production also increases the output of gold and silver. The high
price of copper during the past year has stimulated prospecting and the development of copper claims, and there
is no doubt that the Provincial output will steadily grow
in future years.
Zinc-
The quantity of zinc estimated to have been produced
:n 1917 amounted to 33,776,335 lbv which, compared with
37,168,980 lb. produced in 1916, shows a decrease of 3,392,-
645 lb. This production is valued at $2,550,113, which
shows a still further proportionate decrease, as compared
with the 1916 value of $4,043,985, due to the decreased
market price of the metal.
The following table shows the zinc production from
1914 onwards :—
Lb. Value
1913  6,758,768 $   324,421
1914 .: j p 7,866,467 346,125
1915  .....12,982,440 1,460,524
1916  37,168,980 4,043,985
1917 (estimated)   33,776,335 2,550,113
The high market price of zinc which prevailed during
1915 and  1916,  thereby  greatly  stimulating    production ANNUAL REPORT, 1917-1918
everywhere, did not continue in 1917. The average price
for the month of January was 9.619 cents a pound and in
March 10.3 cents; thereafter a steady decline in price set
in until an average for November of 7.847 cents was reached.
The final average for December is not' available, but it
was about 7.5 cents. The average for the year is taken as
8.884 cents.
The following table shows the districts from which the
zinc production of the Province for 1917 is made :—
Lb.
Slocan 1 17,021,110
Fort Steele  j 1 jj ! .....13,860,000
Nelson  1,800,000
Ainsworth      859,041
Omineca     236,184
Total  ; li 33,776,335
These figures show, as compared with the year 1916,
1 very slight decrease in the Slocan, a decrease of about
-1,000,000 lb. in Fort Steele, a decrease of nearly 50 per
'cent, in Nelson, an increase of about 200,000 lb. in Ainsworth, and an increase of 70,000 lb- in Omineca.
In the Slocan District the heaviest shipper is the Standard mine, which is credited with about 9,300,000 lb. of
zinc, followed by the Lucky Jim and the Surprise, each
with about 2,000,000 lb.; then the Galena Farm, Van-Roi,
and Slocan Star.
The Fort Steele production comes entirely from the
Sullivan mine; the ore is, shipped to the Trail electrolytic
refinery.
The Nelson production is a zinc-carbonate ore shipped
to United States smelters for treatment, and comes "from
the H.B. group of mines, near Salmo.
The Ainsworth production comes mainly from the
Whitewater and Bell mines, both credited with a production of about 400,000 lb.
The Omineca production comes from the Silver Standard mine and consists of hand-sorted ore shipped to United States smelters, carrying about 60 oz. silver to the ton
and 40 per cent. zinc. 86
VANCOUVER BOAED OF TEADE
. Other Minerals.
Iron—The past year has seen a very great demand for
iron and steel on the Pacific Coast, the normal demand having been greatly increased by the need for steel in shipbuilding and munitions work, while the usual outside
sources have been monopolized by war needs in other parts
of the world and the, high freight rates have made the lack
of local production more pronounofed. Consequently, it
has been strongly advocated in many quarters that the conditions are favourable for the establishment of an iron-
smelting plant somewhere on the British Columbia coast.
So far nothing definite has materialized, although there is
apparently a prospect of such a plant being established on
this Coast. As is well' known, there is on the Coast, in the
aggregate, an adequate supply of magnetite-iron ore, quite
sufficiently free from impurities as to be within the "Bessemer limit," to supply ore for such a plant.
The magnetite-deposits of the Coast have therefore
had some attention bestowed on them during the.past year;
this, however, was mainly confined to examination, with
but little development. Bulletin No. 3, 1917, of this Department describes the more important magnetite-deposits of
the Coast.
A small quantity of crude platinum is obtained from
placer-mining operations in the Similkameen District, but,
although such platinum occurs with the placer gold in the
Dease Lake country, no effort has-been made this last year
to save any appreciable amount.
Molybdenite—The urgent demand for war purposes
for antimony, molybdenite, and tungsten continued throughout the year, but, so far as is known, the only one of these
three minerals to be produced in the Province in 1917 was
a small tonnage of molybdenite.
The Molly mine, on Lost Creek, Nelson Division, shipped about 150 tons of ore crarying from 3 to 10 per cent,
molybdenite. The New Hazelton Gold-Cobalt Company-
shipped a car-load Of ore which is expected will run about
7 per cent, molybdenite. Some other small shipments may
have been made, but no details are available.
At the Molly and Index mines and at Alice arm there
are considerable tonnages of lower-grade ore, and if these ANNUAL REPORT, 1917-1918
87
mines were equipped with small but suitable concentrating
mills a regular production could be maintained.
Talc, etc.—There has been apparent a considerable demand during the year for talc and other fillers for pulp
in paper-making- also iron pyrites for sulphuric-acid making, arsenic, mangenese, chromite. and magnesite. Some
talc was shipped from Lillooet Division, but details are not
yet known.
A few- hundred tons of magnesium sulphate (Epsom
salt) was shipped from Spotted Lake, Osoyoos Division,
to the United States market.
For the first time in the history of the Province there
was a production of arsenic \ this was made from the Nickle
Plate mine of the Hedley Gold Mining Company and
amounted to $20,000. The arsenic occurs as arsenical-iron
pyrites in the concentrates shipped to the Taeoma smelter
by this company. These concentrates haAre been going to
the smelter for years, but until the recent installation of
an arsenic-burner the arsenic content 'was not recovered.
Structural Materials, etc-
The output during 1917 of all structural materials, such
as cement, lime, building-stone, sand and gravel, brick, and
other clay products, will probably show a slight decrease
from that of previous years.
The output for 1917 is estimated at $1,000,000. as
against $1,299,553 in the preceding year, $2,852,917 in 1914,
and $3,398,100 in 1913.
Since 1912, when a production amounting to $3,435,722
was recorded, the output of building materials has steadily
declined, due to the cessation of the building trade, brought
about by the continued financial depression, and the Avar.
It is probable that the figures have now reached a minimum, and that an output amounting from $1,000,000 to
$1,250,000 represents the steady yearly demand for these
materials for use in repairs, renewals, and various small
demands, withqut any new construction-work. It may be
expected, therefore, that the production Avill remain at
about this figure until a period of active construction-work
again commences in the Province. VANCOUVER BOAED OF TEADE
Portland cement is at present the most important item
in the production of building materials, amounting this
year to a little over $500,000.
The outputs of building-stone, crushed rock, sand and
gravel, and red brick have fallen to very low figures. A
considerable quantity of fire-brick and similar material is
made, principally by the large plant of the Clayburn Company. m&
Coal and Coke.
It is estimated that the gross production of coal was
2,402,410 long tons, of which 241,993 tons was made into
coke, leaving the net production at 2,160,417 tons. These
figures show a decrease, as compared with 1916, of 83,170
tons gross and an increase of 76,324 tons net. The quantity of coke made was about 159,554 tons, which is a decrease of about 108,171 tons as compared with 1916- For
purposes of comparison the following table is shown :—
lEst. 19171     1916
1915
1914
1913      |     1912
Tons, 2240 lb.
Coal, gross . .
Less made into
Coke      |    241,993|   401,487*   361,45l(    355,46l(   433,277[      396,905
2,402,410 2,485,58011,972,58012,166,428 2,570,7601  3,025,700
Coal,    net. . [2,160,417(2,084,09311,611,129|1,810,967|2,137,483J2,628,804
Coke.   made..
159.554
267,725| 245,871,1 234,577
286,0451 264.333
In these figures for 1917 the output for the month of
December has had to be estimated, consequently the final
fiugres may vary from them slightly.
Summarizing the ProAdncial production of coal, the
following table shows the estimated output for 1917:—
. Tons of 2,240
lb.
From  Vancouver Island  collieries   1,698,235
From Nicola and Similkameen collieries     151,817
From  Crowsnest District  collieries       552,358
Total quantity of coal mined  2,402,410
Less made into coke (calculated)    241,993
Net quantity of coal produced 2,160,417
In addition to the above net production of coal, there ANNUAL EEPOET, 1917-1918 89
Avas made the coke production shown in the following table i—
Tons of 2,240
lb.
From Vancouver Island collieries      30,399
From, Nicola and Similkameen collieries       Nil
From Crowsnest District collieries     129,155
Total    159,554
As will be seen by the above figures, the net coal production this year is expected to be some 76,324 tons (2,240
lb.) greater than it was in 1916, and again about reaches
the figures prevailing before the war began.
This output would have been considerably greater had
not the Crowsnest Collieries met with a series of misfortunes
during the year that interfered with production, and in
addition to this there v/as' a serious shortage of labour—
partly caused by the-heavy enlistment of the younger men
—and. in the fall there were labour troubles.
All these contributed to occasion a shortage of both
coal and coke, when the demand was most keen. .
Coke.—The production of coke in 1917 was about 159,-
554 tons (2,240 lb.), which is 108,171 tons less than the
preceding year, a decrease of 40.5 per cent.
Vancouver Island Collieries.
The Vancouver Island collieries made a gross output
of 1,698,235 tons of coal, or about 205,474 tons more than
in 1916.
Western Fuel Co.—This company mined this past year
about 658.000 tons of coal, an increase, over the previous
year of 103,391 tons.
The Nanaimo Colliery,, in the city of Nanaimo, is entered by No. 1 or Esplanade shaft, which is connected by
underground workings with a shaft on Protection island
and also on Newcastle Island. The workings are at a
depth of from 600 to 1,200 feet, and are very extensive,
including a large submarine area. On the North side both
the Douglas and the Newcastle seams are operated; on the
Soutli side only the Douglas or Upper seam is worked. This 90
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
property has been in operation since 1881, and is still the
largest producing coal-mine in the Province.
The Reserve Colliery is situated about fiAre miles from
Nanaimo; the Douglas seam is reached through two shafts
950 feet in depth. This property became a producer in
1914; development has been retarded owing to fSuited and
much disturbed condition of the seam.
The Harewood mine, which has been closed down for
a number of years, was reopened during the year, and at
the present time is producing about 600 tons of coal daily.
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Ltd.—This company
operates tAvo collieries—Comox Colliery, situated at Cumberland, seventy miles north of Nanaimo, and Wellington-
Extension Colliery, at Extension, six miles south-Avest of
Nanaimo.
The mines of the Comox Colliery are situated around
Cumberland and are connected by a standard-gauge rail-
Avay with the seaboard at Union bay, Ayhere are situated
the loading-piers, a coal-washery, and a battery of 200 coke-
ovens.
The mines operated during the year ,were Nos. 4 and 7
slopes and Nos. 5 and 6 shafts. No. 6 shaft, hoAVtver, has
not been producing coal since June.
The gross output of coal for this colliery during the
year was 510,956 tons (2,240 lb.), an increase of 61,942
tons over
510,956
19.16.
The mines of the Wellington-Extension Colliery are
situated around Extension, and are connected by a stan-
dard-guage railway with tide-Avater, and the E- & N. Rail-
Avay at Ladysmith, Avhere a coal-washery, bunkers, and
loading-piers are situated. j|||p
Four mines were operated during the year, Nos. 1, 2,
and 3, entered by a tunnel 5,000 feet in length, and No. 4
entered by shaft. The output for" the year was 289,392
tons, an increase of about 32,440 tons over that of 1916.
5 mine is being driven at
A new slope known as No
South Wellington, which is expected to be a
producer before the close of 1918.
substantia ANNUAL EEPOET, 1917-1918
91
Pacific Coast Coal Mines, Ltd.—This company operated the Morden mine throughout the year; the South Wellington mine was closed down early in the year. The Morden
mine is situated about six miles south of Nanaimo.
The outpu^ for the year was 150,517 tons, a decrease
of 2,595 tons from the previous year.
The Suquash Colliery, situated on the north-eastern
coast of Vancouver island and owned by this company, Avas
not in operation during the year.
British Columbia Coal Mining Co.—This company was
formerly known as. the Vancouver-Nanaimo Coal Mining
Company, and operated the East Wellington Colliery until
October 6th, when it was necessary to seal up the mine
owing to signs of fire. The output for the past year was
61,547 tons, a decrease of 16,896 tons from the previous
year.
Nanoose Collieries, Ltd—This colliery is situated at
Nanoose bay, about ten miles north of Nanaimo, and commenced operations towardsthe close of 1916, in the Old
Wellington seam. The output for this colliery during the
past year Avas 27,822 tons, an increase of 27,192 tons from
the previous year.
Nicola-Similkameen Coalfields.
These coalfields produced in 1917 about 151,817 tons,
an increase over the previous year of 41,268 tons.
In the Nicola District three companies produced coal
during 1917—viz., the Middlesboro Collieries, Limited; the
Merritt Collieries, Limited; and the Inland Coal and Coke
Company.
The Middlesboro Colliery produced 83,459 tons during
the year, an increase of 34,454 tons over the previous year.
The mines in operation were Nos. 4, 4 East, and 7.
The Merritt Collieries, Limited, operated the Diamond
Vale mine throughout the year until the middle of December, when the mine was closed down. The production for
this colliery was about 14,000 tons, an increase over the
previous year of about 13,662 tons.
The Inland Coal and Coke Company operated the Coal 92
VANCOUVEE BOAED OF TEADE
Hill mine during the first three months of the year only.
The production for this colliery was 7,439 tons, a decrease
from the previous year of 23,856 tons.
The Pacific Coal Syndicate did not produce any coal
during the year.
At Princeton, the Princeton Coal and Land Company
produced 46,919 tons, an increase of 17,461 tons over the
previous year.
East Ko.otenay Coalfield-
There were only two companies producing in this field
during 1917—the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, operating collieries at Coal Creek, situated five miles east of
Fernie, and Michel, situated twenty-three miles north-east
of Fernie; and the Corbin Coal and Coke Company, with
its colliery'at Corbin. I
There was mined in the district during the year, 552,-
358 tons of coal, a decrease of 329,912 tons from the previous year.
Of this tonnage, about 187,275 tons was used to make
coke and. yielded about 129,155 tons of the commodity; as
compared with the 1916 output, these figures show the
large decrease of 110,960 tons.
The early portion of the year gave promise of a much
larger production than the previous year, but the output
in this district was seriously affected from April until
July, through a prolonged strike and other labour troubles, together with an explosion in No. 3 mine, Coal Creek
Colliery, early in April, which cut off the production of
that mine for the balance of the year; scarcity of labour
was also responsible for some of the decreased production.
The mines which were in operation throughout the
year at Coal Creek Colliery were Nos. 1 North, 1 South, 1
East, B North, and No. 2; the largest producing mine at
the present time being No. 1 South.
Michel Colliery had two mines in operation throughout the year—viz., Nos. 3 East and New No. 8. Old No. 3
mine was closed early in the year owing to shortage of
labour.
Corbin Coal and Coke Co—The output of this company for the year was 101,083 tons, being an increase of
32,063 tons over the previous year. The major portion of
this production was from the open-cut workings of No. 3
mine, or "-Big ShoAving." No. 4 mine was also in operation
during the year.
4|||  94
VANCOUVEE BOAED OF TEADE
SYNOPSIS OF LAND LAWS
CROWN LANDS.
"Crown Lands" mean, and include such ungranted
Crown or public lands as are within, and belong to His
Majesty in right of the Province of British Columbia, and
whether or not any Avaters flow over or coArer the same.
TIMBER LANDS.
Timber lands (that is, lands which contain milling timber to the aA^erage extent of 8,000 feet per acre west of the
Cascades—Coast Range—and 5,000 feet per acre east of the
Cascade,s—Coast Range—to each 160 acres), are not open to
pre-emption, purchase or lease.
By Order iir Council, dated December 24th, 1907, the
Government placed a reserve on all timber lands undisposed
of at that date \ consequently no more licenses to cut tintber
will be issued until otherwise determined.
PRE-EMPTIONS.
CroAvn lands, where such a system is practicable, are
laid off and surveyed into quadrilateral townships, containing thirty-six sections of one square mile in each.
Any person being head of a family, a widow, or single
man over the age of eighteen years and being a British subject, or any alien, upon making a declaration of his intention
to become a British subject, may, for agricultural purposes,
record any tract of unoccupied and unreserved Crown lands
(not being"an Indian settlement and not being timber land),
not exceeding 160 acres in extent.
No person can hold more than one pre-emption claim
at a time. Prior record of pre-emption of one claim and all
rights under it are forfeited by subsequent record or preemption of another claim.
.Land recorded or pre-empted cannot be transferred.or
coiiA'eyed until a Crown grant has been issued.
Such land, until the Crown grant is issued, is held by ANNUAL EEPOET, 1917-1918
95
occupation.    Such occupation must be a bona fide personal
residence of the- settler or his family.
The setter must enter into ocupation of the land
Avithin sixty days after recording, and must continue, to
occupy it.
Continuous absence for a period longer than two
months consecutively, of the settler or family, is deemed
cessation of occupation; but leave of absence may be granted not exceeding six. months in any one year, inclusi\Te of
tAvo months' absence.
Land is considered abandoned if unoccupied for more
than two months, consecutively.
If so abandoned, the land becomes waste land of the
Crown.
The fee on recording is $2.00 (8s.).
The settler shall have, the land surveyed at his own
expense (subject to the ratification of the boundaries),
Avithin five years from the date of record.
After survey has been made, upon proof in declaration
in writing of himself and two other persons of occupation
for two years from the date of pre-emption, and of having
made permanent improvements on the land to the value of
$2.50 per acre, the settler, on producing the pre-emption
certificate, obtains a certificate of improvement upon the
payment of a fee of $2.00.
After obtaining the certificate of improvement and paying for the land, the settler is entitled to a Crown grant in
fee simple.    He pays $10.00 therefor.
The price of Crown lands pre-empted is $1.00 (4s.) per
acre, which must be'paid in four equal instalments, as follows: First instalment, two years from date of record or
pre-emption, and yearly thereafter, but the last instalment
is not payable till after the survey, if the land is unsurveyed.
Two, three or four settlers may enter into partnership
Avith pre-emptions of 160 acres each, and reside on one home-'
stead.    Improvements amounting to $2.50 per acre made on
some portion thereof Avill secure Crown grant for the whole,
conditions of payment being same as above. 96
VANCOUVEE BOAED OF TEADE
Coal and petroleum lands do not pass under grant of
lands acquired since passage of Land Act Amendment of
1899.
No Crown grant can be issued to any alien who may
have recorded or pre-empted by virtue of his declaring his
intention of becoming a British subject, unless he has become naturalized.
The heirs or devisees of the settler are entitled to the
Crown grant on'his decease.
PURCHASES.
Crown lands may be purchased to the extent of 640
acres, and for this purpose are classified as first and second
class, according to the report of the surveyor.
Lands which are suitable for agricultural purposes, or
which are capable of being brought under cultivation profitably, or which are wild hay-meadow lands, rank as and are
considered to • be first-class lands. All other lands, other
than timber lands, shall rank and be classified as second-
class lands. Timber lands (that is, lands which contain
milling timber to the average extent of 8,000 feet per acre
west of the Cascades—Coast Range—and 5,000 feet per acre
east of the Cascades—Coast Range—to each 160 acres), are
not open for sale.
April, 1911: 'The minimum price of first-class lands
shall be $10.00 per acre, and that of second-class lands $5.00
per acre"      :
Provided, howe\rer, that the Chief Commissioner may
for any reason increase the price of any land above the said
prices.
No improvements are required on such lands unless a
second purchase is contemplated. In such case the first
purchase must be improved to the extent of $3.00 per acre.
"When the application to purchase is filed the applicant
shall deposit with the Commissioner a sum equal to 50 cents
per acre on the acreage applied for. When the land is finally
allotted, the purchaser shall pay the balance, of the purchase
price. ANNUAL EEPOET, 1917-1918
LEASES.
97
Leases of CroAvn lands which have been subdivided by
surveys in lots not exceeding 20 acres, may be obtained; and
if requisite improvements are made and conditions of the
lease fulfilled at the expiration of lease, Crown grants are
issued.
Leases (containing such coA'enants and conditions as
may be thought advisable) of Crown lands may be granted
by the Lieutenant-Governor-in-Couneil for the folloAving
purposes:—
(a) For the purpose of cutting hay thereon, for a term
not exceeding ten years;
(b) For any purpose whatsoever, except cutting hay
as aforesaid, for a term not exceeding twenty-one
years.
Leases shall not include a greater area than 1,000 acres.
Leased lands may be staked by an agent.
EXEMPTIONS.
The farm and buildings, when registered, cannot be
taken for debt incurred after registration; and it is free
from seizure up to a value not greater than $500.00 (£100
English). Cattle "farmed on shares" are also protected by
an Exemption Act. Pre-emptions are exempt from taxation
for two years from date of record, and there is an exemption
of $500.00 for four years after record.
HOMESTEADS.
The Government of British Columbia does not grant
free homesteads.
The fact of a person having a homestead in .another
Province, or on Dominion Government lands in this Province, is no bar to pre-empting Crown lands in British Columbia.
DOMINION GOVERNMENT LANDS.,
All the lands in British Columbia within twenty miles on
each side of the Canadian Pacific Railway main line are the
property  of  Canada,  with  all the  timber and minerals 98
VANCOUVEB BOAED OF TEADE
they contain (except precious metals). This tract of land,
known as the Railway Belt, with its timber, hay, water
powers, coal and stone, is now administered by the Department of the Interior of Canada, practically according to the
same laws and regulations as are the public lands in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, and the Territories. Dominion
Government Agencies are established at Kamloops and New
Westminster. The Dominion Government also owns 3,500,-
000 acres of land in the Peace River country, lying between
the 120th and 122nd meridians.
Any British subject who is the sole head of a family,
or any male of the age of eighteen years, may secure a
homestead of 160 acres on any unoccupied land within the
Railway Belt, on application to the local Land Agent, and
on payment of a fee of $10.00. The homesteader must
reside on the land for six months in every year, and cultivate
at least 15 acres for three years, when he will be entitled to
a free grant or'patent.
HOW TO SECURE A PRE-EMPTION.
Any person desiring to pre-empt unsurveyed Crown
lands must observe the following rules:—
1. Place a post 4 or more inches square and 4 or more
feet high above the ground—a tree stump squared and of
proper height will do—at an angle or corner of the claim,
and mark upon it his name and the corner or angle represented thus :
"A. B.'s land, N. E. corner post" (meaning northeast corner, or as the case may be), and shall post a
written or printed notice on the post in the following
form:
"I, A. B., intend to apply for a pre-emption record
of acres of land, bounded as follows:
Commencing at this post; thence north. chains;
thence east chains; thence south chains
thence west chains (or as the case may be).
"Name (in full),    '   '
"Date,"
2. After staking the land, the applicant must make an
application ih writing to the Land Commissioner of the dis- ANNUAL EEPOET, 1917-1918
99
trict in which the land lies, giving a full description of the
land, and a sketch plan of it, this description and plan to be
. in duplicate.    The fee for recording is $2.00.
3. He shall also make a declaration, in duplicate, before a Justice of the Peace, Notary Public, or Commissioner,
in Form 2 of the "Land Act," and deposit same with his
application. In the declaration he must declare that the
land staked by him is unoccupied and'unreserved Crown
land, and not in an Indian settlement; that the application
is made on his own behalf, and for his own use for settlement and occupation, for agricultural purposes; and that he
is duly qualified to take up and record land.
4. If the land is surveyed, the pre-emptor must make
application to the Commissioner exactly as in the case of
unsurveyed lands, but it will not be necessary to plant posts.
5. Every pre-emption shall be of a rectangular or
square shape, and 160 acres shall measure either 40 chains
by 40 chains (880 yards by 880 yards), or 20 chains by 80
chains (440 yards by 1,760 yards) ; 80 acres shall measure
20 chains by 40 chains; and 40 acres, 20 chains by 20 chains.
All lines shall run true north and south and true east and
west.
6. When a pre-emption is bounded by a lake or river,
or by another pre-emption or by surveyed land, such boundary may be adopted and used in describing the boundaries
of the land.
7. Sixty days after recording the pre-emptor must
enter into occupation of the land and proceed with improving same. Occupation means continuous bona fide personal
residence of the pre-emptor or his family, but he and his
family may be absent for any one period not exceeding two
months in any year. It the pre-emptor can show good reason for being absent from his claim for more than two
months, the Land Commissioner may grant him six months'
leave. 'Absence without leave for more than two months
will be looked upon as an abandonment of all rights, and
the record may be cancelled.
8 No person can take up or hold more than one preemption.
9. The pre-emptor must have his claim surveyed, at
his own expense, within five years from the date of record. 100
VANCOUVEB BOAED OF TEADE
10. The price of pre-empted land is $1.00 per acre, to
be paid for in four equal annual instalments of 25 cents per
acre, the first instalment to be paid two years after record.
11. After full payment has been made, the pre-emptor
shall be entitled to a CroAvn grant of the land, on payment,
of a fee of $10.00.
12. A pre-emption cannot be sold or transferred until
after it is Crown-granted.
13. A pre-emption cannot be staked or recorded by an
agent.
TAXATION
Outside of incorporated cities, towns and municipiali-
ties, the taxation is imposed and collected directly by the
Provincial Government, and expended in public improve-
rhents, roads, trails, wharves, bridges, etc., in assisting and
maintaining the schools, and in the administration of justice.
The rates of taxation imposed by the latest Assesment
Act are as--follows:—
On real.property V* of one per cent, of assessed value
On personal property V2 of one per cent, of assessed value
On wild land  A per cent.
On coal land, C^ass A 1 per cent.
On coal land, Class B  2 per cent.
On timber land  2 per cent.
On income of $2,OOo or under 1 per cent
On income of $2,000 and not exceeding $3,000 11/* percent
On incomes over $3,000, not exceeding $4,000 iy2 per cent.
On income over $4;000, not exceeding $7,000 2 per cent.
On income over $7,000 2V2 per cent
Discount of 10 per cent, allowed if paid before June
30th, and the following exemptions from taxation are
granted:—
On personal property up to $1,000 (to farmers only).
Farm and orchard products, and incomes from farm.
On all incomes up to $1,000.
On pre-empted land for two years from date of record,
and an exemption of $500 for four years after record. ANNUAL EEPOET, 1917-1918
101
In addition to above taxes, royalty is reserved on coal,
timber ,and minerals. There is also a tax on timber, coal,
coke and minerals.
SETTLERS' EFFECTS FREE.
Settlers' effects, viz.: Wearing apparel^books, usual
and reasonable household furniture" and other household
effects; instruments and tools) of tradfe, occupation, or
employment; guns, musical instruments, domestic sewing
machines, typewriters, bicycles, carts, wagons, and other
highway vehicles; agricultural implements, and. live stock
for the farm, not to include live stock or articles for sale, or
for use as a contractor's outfit, nor vehicles, nor implements
moved by a mechanical power, nor machinery for use in any-
manufacturing establishment; all the foregoing, if actually
owned abroad by the settler for at least six months before
his removal to Canada, and subject to regulations by the
Minister of Customs: Provided that any dutiable articles
entered as settlers' effects may not be so entered unless
brought by the settler on his first arrival, and shall not be
sold or otherwise disposed of without payment of duty until
after twelve months' actual use in Canada.
A settler may bring into Canada, free of duty, live stock
for the farm on the following basis, if he has actually owned
such live stock abroad for at least six months before his removal yto Canada, and has brought them into Canada within
-one year after his first arrival, viz.: If horses only are
brought in, 16 allowed; if cattle only are brought in, 16
alloAved; if sheep only are brought in, 60 allowed; if swine
only are brought in, 60 allowed. * If horses, cattle, sheep and
swine are brought in together, or part of each, the same proportions as above are to be observed. Duty is to be paid
on the live stock in excess of the number above provided for.
For Customs entry purposes, a mare with a colt under six
months old, is reckoned as one animal; a cow with a calf
under six months old, is also to be reckoned as one animal.
HALIBUT LANDED AT THE POET OF VANCOUVEE FOE TWO
YEARS ENDING 31st MARCH, 1917.
From U. S. Vessels, March 31st, 1916  ,...6,742,224 lbs.
From U. S. Vessels, March 31st, 1917  4,430,000 lbs.
From Canadian Vessels, March 31st, 1916  j 5,178,851 lbs.
From Canadian Vessels, March 31st, 1917  .,3,120,000 lbs. Contents
Frontispiece  Vancouver Board of Trade Building
Page
Vancouver  Board   of  Trade   ...». 2-30
Agricultural Eeturns 31-34
Lumber Industry 35
Fishing Industry 36-39, 101
Shipping .    41-46
Customs Eeturns '.  10, 47-62
Canadian Trade Commissioners 64-65
Consular   Agencies    - 71
Vancouver Statictics:
Post   Office    .'.- 63
Banking    ... \    66
Inland Eevenue   67
Land Eegistry   68
Failures in Canada:
From E. G. Dun & Co 69
From  Bradstreets      70
Mining       72-93
Land Laws     94-101 Index
Page
Agricultural   Production     31
Arbitration, Board of   2
Auditor's Eeport   28
Banking, Financial and Insurance Bureau   3
Bradstree.ts  70
Bureaux, List of   3
Civic   Bureau  - 4
Clearing House Eeturns   66
Consuls in Vancouver   71
Council of Board   2
Customs  Eeturns    40
Dates of Eegular Meetings    2
Dates  of  Council Meetings  2
Docks and Wharves   46
Dun, E. G. & Co  69
Exports     56
Excise Collections  67
Fishing, Salmon  -  36
Fishing,   Halibut     101
Fisheries Bureau • -'•  4
«
Forest Products Bureau   4-
Greater Vancouver Lower Mainland Bureau   3
Halibut   Fishing     101
24
Imports    -	
Land Eegistry    68
Land Laws   -	
Legal and Legislative Bureau 	
Lumber  Shipments   f	
Manufacturers Bureau 	 INDEX—continued
Members,   List   of    .'.	
Mining Bureau  '. -	
Mining, Annual Eeport   -	
Mining, Production for 1917-1918 \	
Nanaimo Exports 	
New Westminster Customs Eeturns -
New Westminster Exports  - -	
Officers   of   Board    -	
Past   Presidents -	
Port of Vancouver, B. C   	
Post Office "Eeturns 	
President's (Address   	
Eeal Estate Bureau	
Eetail Merchants' Bureau	
Salmon Pack  =	
Shipbuilding Bureau 	
Shipping 	
Steamship   Lines   	
Trade, Foreign and  Domestic, Bureau I
Trade Commissioners,  Canadian	
Transportation   Bureau	
United States, Exports from Vancouver 	
Vancouver   Clearing  House '.	
"V ancouver Customs Eeturns ....' .....'	
Vancouver   Exports    .-..56
Vancouver Imports  - ---	
o
3
72
93
56
40
56
2
2
41
63
23
3
4
36
4
41
42
3
64
3
61
66
40
61
47
Victoria   Exports     56
Victoria Imports   I  .^*T7?!7*T    4' "
Wharves and Docks  I J^^M^lT^dDF
VVimi,.:-],.   MeiviiaMh:'   !iin „ .       | ?^7M!?...*?P.?-U4
AUG 2 9 1952
THE LIBRARY U

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