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City of Vancouver, terminus of the Canadian Pacific Railway : British Columbia handbook Picken, M. 1887

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Array CITY OF 
VANCOUVER 
Terminus of the Canadian Pacific Railway. 
British Columbia 
HAND BOOK 
COMPILED BY M. PICKEN. 
VANCOUVER, B. C. 
PUBLISHED AND PRINTED AT THE  DAILY NEWS OFFICE, 
1887. t
PREFACE.
In compliance with the request of a large .number of the
influential citizens, I submit to them a Pamphlet containing such information as will be interesting to the thous-
ands of enquirers, for information regarding this important
city of the west. I
I trust this brief description of the City and Province
will be sufficient to convey to these enquirers, the information they desire regarding the City and Province, and that
it will meet with the approval and materially^aid the business men of the City in their correspondence.
<       ■ >;: .    . .    -*■■<• .,;". -:°- . '  M. PICKEN   /;-.
Vancouver, B. C, February, 1887. 
HARRISON  LAKE,
AGASSIZ STATION. C. P. R„ BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The Hot Sulpher Springs are situated near Harrison Lake, fifty miles east
from Vancouver and four and a-half miles from Agassiz Station on the C. P. R.
A conveyance from the Springs Hotel meets all trains at Agassiz, and the Hotel
is connected with the Station by a telephone #ne.
The Hotel possesses all modern improvements for the convenience and
comfort of invalids and guests, A number of Cottages have also been built for
the convenience of visitors who do not wish to stay at the hotel. In addition to
the above Bath Houses having every convenience have been erected.
The Hotel is in the centre of the most beautiful scenery in British Columbia,
and many interesting sights within easy access. \
can be indulged in on Harrison Lake and the many little streams which flow into
it Harrison Lake is a large sheet of water varying from seven to ten miles in
width and forty-five miles in length, dotted with many beautiful islands. The
hunting around this delightful spot has no equal in the Province.
The water issues from the springs at a temperature of 164 degrees and an
analysis made by Prof. Wenzell, of San Francisco, shows that they contain Sul-
phureted Hydrogen, Sulphate of Sodium, Chloride Pottassium, Alumina, Silica.
One wine gallon of these waters contain 89X grains of solid matter.
IT IS A SURE CURE FOR
«
Paralysis,  Rheumatism, Diabetes, Nervous Diseases, Blood and
Skin Diseases, &c.
Brown & Co., Props. OPPENHEIMER BROS,
Coirmissiort 1 Jtodiants,
-&•
—*M«lll||f^|||llll*««—
«&
-Si.
L ESTATE
S.
Money LoanedPand Adyances Made on
Consignments.
i
Business and Residential Lots  in  all
parts of the City for^sale on
.'.".V!"     ■'.'-'-:!flHHlB Terms.
y
-lr*%
CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED
g For plans and other information
jBKlIp* '1       ' apply at onr office, ""-.'• ■ "•    ■• <•-'*■■•'*
@p|ienilie£na@r Urtelk Slock,
POWELL ST., NEAR CITY HALL, .J|
.•  VANCOUVER, B. C|,.:
I mmmm
1
"^
The (Sffl of tfancoiiVei1.
J*£gHE City of Vancouver, the Pacific terminus
*%K    dian Pacific Railway, and now the recogni2
of the Cana-
nized commercial
center of the Province of British Columbia, is situated on a
small peninsula formed by two arms of the sea, Burrard Inlet
on the North, and False Creek on the South. The town site
is one of the most beautiful and c$&mandino; on the West
o
Coast of America, the surface gently sloping from the center
to the water on either side, giving easy grades for streets, and
the most perfect facilities for drainage and sewerage. The
harbor on the north side, is second to none on the continent.*
It is three miles wide at its greatest width and about twelve
smiles in length, having accommodation enough on its placid
waters for the united fleets of -the world. The entrance'to
this harbor, or as it is called the First Narrows, is about a
quarter of a mile in width, easy to navigate, even by the
largest craft, at all states of the tide, and in any weather.
The harbor itself is completely landlocked, and is sheltered on
all sides from high winds, and vessels in their berths will lie
undisturbed though a hurricane be raging outside, an advan-
iage which few harbors of equal proportions can boast of.
English Bay of which False Creek is the continuation is a
-large open roadstead with excellent anchorage, and being
^contiguous to the entrance to the harbor is a very desirable
addition, to the harbor accommodation. This beautiful location
not only possesses these advantages so important to shipping,
but the natural and ever changing pictures which the eye
lights upon on every side are beautiful in the extreme. The
bay crisp and sparkling, the bold background of green wooded
hills, and far behind these the rugged peaks of the snowcapped mountains, are pictures which when
The labors of the day are over, refresh the eye,
And sooth tne'mind inviting dreams,
Of future peace and joy on high.
It is impossible for pen or pencil to do justice to the
^magnificence of the scenery around this fair city of the west,
■■■■ CITY  OF  VANCOUVER.
a partial glimpse however may give a faint idea of a view to*
be obtained from one of the elevated points of Vancouver.
The townsite it must be remembered is not as it appears on.
the map, flat, but undulating and having several commanding
elevations. From one of these I shall endeavour to describe
to you what can be seen.
Fancy yourself standing on this elevation while yet the
sun is in the east. To the south ward rise the rugged peaks of
the Olympians, capped with snow, glistening in the morning
sun, making them appear as if crowned with sparkling gems.
Gazing over the western sea, whose waves break murmuring
on the shore almost at your feet, it lies clear and cold, broken
with numerous islands, lowering dimmer towards the horizon,,
which is jagged here and there with yet another, that other
the island of Vancouver.. The sea looks a wild yet peaceful
mingling of lake and land ; some of the Islands are green with
abundant vegetation from shore to shore, clothed in the soft,
light of the rising sun ; others are mere rocks, showing a bold,
stern front to the sea, some of them strange, both in form and
character. Over the pale blue sea hangs the pale blue sky,,
flecked with a few white fleecy clouds, white clouds that
looked as if they disowned the earth they had got so high,
yet nevertheless her children, doomed to descend again to her
bosom. A keen bracing wind is out, crisping the surface of
the sea in irregular patches. A few fishing boats like white
winged birds give life to the scene and complete the picture.
Right about turn and you look towards the east, but what
a change is there. The sun has just tipped the mountains.
You see hills of waving pines rolling away eastward and
northward, at middle distance beginning to rise into mountains,
and farther yet on the horizon, showing snow on their crests,
a pure white crown, a crown befitting their majesty. It is a
solemn and very still region, not a pretty country at all, but
great—beautiful with the beauties of color and variety of
surface, while far in the distance, where the mountains and
clouds have business together, its aspect rises to grandeur..
Again looking south-eastward, the mighty Mount Baker, like
a giant sentinel, rears his snowy peak in solitary majesty.
It is a hard thing to choose between the morning and evening
view to the westward. At sunrise it is beautiful; at sunset
it is magnificent. At sunrise the sea appears clear and cold ;
at sunset the sea appears waving ringlets of sparkling gold..
Two varieties of the beautiful : "f*9S5
CITY  OF  VANCOUVER.
5
The bay in ev'ning sunshine bathed,
The hills in gorgeous green arrayed,
The mountains crowned with sparkling snow,
Exalt our thoughts from here below.
The scenery contiguous to Vancouver is mountainous,
grand and majestic in its beauty, inspiring one with thoughts
above earthly thoughts, and dreams of the world beyond, and
the .majesty of Him-who is King of all. Whether rambling
through some lonely valley with a murmuring rivulet for a
companion, or sailing quietly on the peaceful waters of some
narrow inlet bounded on either side by a wall of wooded hills,
or perched on the peak of a towering mountain, the same
thought flows through the wondering brain; how puny is
man compared to those mighty works of nature ? Such is an
every day natural panarama, which always possesses some new
ckarm to please the eye every time one gazes upon it.
With these grand pictures of natures' own framing surrounding you, and a comfortable home, in a temperate climate,
where is the man who could be unhappy ?
The climate is temperate, the thermometer seldom registering above 90° in the summer, and lower than 10° in winter.
The winters/ are for the most part open, with rain and snow
falls at short intervals. The rainy season may be considered
from November till March. The driest months in the year
are June, July, August and September; During the summer
the evenings are cool and pleasant, even after the hottest days.
But the rainy season is not all rain nor the dry season all dry.
We have some beautiful shining days in winter, which expose
the snow-capped mountains, rearing their grotesque heads till
they seem to pierce the blue vault of heaven, so that winter
lias its own peculiar charms. We have a few drizzly, dull
days in summer, but they only serve to break the monotonous
routine of sunshine, and after a shower nature looks joyous
and bright, refreshed by the cooling bath, amply making
ainends for any discomforts that may have been experienced.
It also cools the air and tempers the atmosphere. Altogether,
the climate is healthy and invigorating, and the laborer feels
none of that fatigue from manuel labor which is felt by him
in Central Canada. People from the' east are surprised to see
our people going around in their ordinary summer costume
during the winter months, our fields and forests clothed in a
mantle of green, and flowers blooming in the open air, thinking because of the high  latitude of our Province,  that the 6 CITY  OF  VANCOUVER.
winters would be even more severe than in the lower latitudes
of Ontario and other eastern Provinces.
The history of Vancouver is remarkable for the many
severe and trying experiences which it has successfully passed
through. When Coal Harbor, a bay of Burrard Inlet, on
which stood a small village, having a variety of names, sometimes called Gas Town from a man of the name of Gassy Jaek,
an hotel keeper, and a character in the village; sometimes
Coal Harbor, from the fact of thin seams of coal cropping out
on its shores, and from a story of a man-of-war once having
coaled there; and sometimes Granville the proper name of tfcje-
village ; was chosen as the ultimate terminus of the great
transcontinental railway, jealous rivals with untiring energy
made every endeavour to hinder its progress, and placed every
obstruction in their power to prevent the extension of the
railway from Port Moody; nature however had endowed Coal
Harbor or more properly Vancouver, with such a wealth of
natural advantages that their efforts proved futile, and all
their objections were dissolved. The influence of the enemies
of Vancouver has not been unfelt. Their great aim has been
to create a want of confidence in the place, to make people
doubt its genuineness, and a feeling does exist in a greater or
lesser degree in the minds of people in distant cities and towns
as to its reality. I would like to disabuse those peoples minds
of these doubts, and convince them to the contrary, which can
only be done by stating facts, and with the assistance of the
press throughout the country.
I shall now give a brief sketch of the progress of Vancouver since it became conspicuous to the world as an
important commercial center. Vancouver began-to attract
the attention of the public in the early months of last year.
The agreement between the Government of British Columbia
and the railway company, and the transfer of the lands as a
subsidy having been completed and Vancouver fixed as the
terminus, people began to flock in, and soon after, a town
sprang into existence and building was proceeded with,, with
the greatest energy. Application was made to the Provincial
Government in January for incorporation, a bill for which
was .eventually passed after considerable opposition and
assented to by the Lieut. Governor on April 6th of last year,
and Vancouver became the fourth city in British Columbia,
soon to rise to the first, and the metropolis of the Pacific coast,
of America.    A mayor and ten aldermen were elected; in May,
^~»*i •-%     •. ••
1
CtTY   OF  VANCOUVER.
and extensive improvements were under consideration, when
unfortunately, on the 13th of June, the fire fiend ravaged the
city, leaving one or two buildings where hundreds had stood,
and rendering many penniless who were in comfortable circumstances and doing a thriving business.
On the morning of the 14th June the scene presented to
the eyes of the citizens was a desolate one, one which would
have made any other people but Vancouverites desert it.    But
the citizens were equal to the task, failure never once entered
fi|| their heads, they set to work with a determination to succeed
and they did. The city council never for an instant remained idle. Scarcely had the fierce flames ended their work
of desolation, when they were at work sympathizing,
encouraging and trying to help everybody. They despatched messages to all parts of the Dominion for help to the
suffering ones, which were nobly responded to, and but for
that help Vancouver would not have been the place it is to-day.
Reassured by the encouraging reports which came pouring in
, day by day, strength was added to the arms of  the citizens
and they worked as never men worked before. On the morning of the 15th June numerous tents and small huts were to
be seen dotting the townsite, which gave to it the appearance of ]
a military encampment. Everybody was in good humor, losses
were forgotten, the hopeful future dispelled all other thoughts
from their minds. It was a grotesque scene never to "be forgotten by those who participated in it. The noise of the
'hammer was heard above all other sounds, as busy hands piled
on the boards in the work of re-building. The C. P. R. hotel
was the first to appear above the ruins, and smaller buildings
arose as if by magic in scattered profusion around it. In a
week hotels were occupied, stores opened and doing business
as usual, although confined to considerably smaller premises.
Cordova street soon began to assume a business like aspect,
store after store was put up and opened, and in two weeks the
the whole space from Carrall to Abbott streets was occupied
by buildings, though of a primitive style they answered the
purpose until better could be built. In the meantime the city
council had discussed ways and means for the planking of
the principal streets, and soon afterwards the planking of
Water street was commenced. Once commenced they kept
it going, there being plenty of willing hands to do the work.
Cordova, Carrall, Hastings, Cambie, Powell, and Oppenheimer
streets and Westminster Avenue followed in quick succession. b , .       .  . .      ... : w   ■. &¥*
I
8 CITY  OF  VANCOUVER.
Within six months, over five hundred buildings were
erected, many of them substantial two and three story frame
blocks, and a large number of them built of brick. Such is
the confidence in the future importance of the city, that over
$1,000,000 has been expended on building alone since the 13th
of June last, and the large number of structures, both brick
and frame, large and small at present in course of erection, is
only a forecast of what we may expect during the present
year. Vancouver to-day can boast of having several first-class
hotels with every accommodation for the comfort of the traveller, stores which would do credit to any of the larger cities
in the east, and buildings which will compare favorably with
those of a city three times its size.
Though delayed in the work of completing the railway
to its natural terminus, the Canadian Pacific Railway Company have not been idle. They have been actively engaged
with a staff of over two hundred men, clearing tfyeir lan<i,
grading streets, building wharves, and making every preparation for the immense volume of trade which will pass over
their line during the present year. They have in course of
erection a large hotel, which when completed will rival anything of the kind on the continent. The ground is being
prepared for a large passenger depot, and also for roundhouses, work-shops, workmen's houses, freight sheds and
warehouses. Steamers are being built to ply between this
port and Australia, China, Japan, San Francisco,\ South America-and the channel ports, which will make it the commercial
centre of the 'Pacific....
These influences in themselves are sufficient to cause a
large city to spring up, but when we look around and take
into consideration the incalculable forest, mineral, agricultural
and marine wealth, with which it is surrounded, the possibilities of its future cannot be over-estimated. When saw-mills
are established and the lumber trade fully developed, our
mineral resources utilized, and our great coal fields Jbeing
wrought, iron ore mined, smelted and manufactured into all
kinds of machinery, tools, etc., our copper mines opened and
the wealth drawn from them, our gold and silver mines pouring out their millions, a system of fishing stations established
along our coasts, and piscatorial wealth drawn from the bosom
of the ocean, Vancouver will have become the metropolis of
the west, the London of the Pacific.
XT:
■J*h •*>
CITY OF VANCOUVER. 9
Let us now dwell for a little on Vancouver's connection with
the world. From Liverpool to Halifax, the distance is 2,480
* miles, fraversed in 6| days, Halifax to Vancouver a little over
3,000 miles, traversed in 5 J days, Vancouver to Melbourne
7500 miles, traversed in about 2l days, making a total traveling time between Liverpool and Melbourne, via. Halifax, C. P.
R. and Vancouver of 34 days, while the contract mail time
from London to Melbourne is 44 days,being a saving of ten days
by the Canadian route. Again, the distance from Vancouver
to Hong Kong is about 6,000 miles, traversed in about 16
days, making the total traveling time between Liverpool and
Hong Kong 29 days, while the contract mail time from Lon-
don is 33 days, a saving by the Canadian route of 4 daysl
The distance from Vancouver to Yokohama, Japan, 4,380
miles can be traversed in ten days, making the traveling time from Liverpool 23 days; while by the Suez Canal
the contract mail time is 3.5 days, a saving by the Canadian
route of 12 days. With such overwhelming odds in its favor
the C. P. R. cannot fail to become the mail rpute between the
United Kingdom and these countries, in fact a subsidy has
already been granted by the Imperial Government for this
purpose, which will naturally attract commerce from the old
and less expeditious channels.
The geographical position of Vancouver is also an important point in its favour, and is remarkable for its similar situation in relation to America, as London the great emporium of
Europe is to that Continent. The Province of British Columbia juts out from North-West America as Great Britain from
Europe, and our City is situated in much the same position in
British Columbia as London is in Great Britain. The comparatively favorable distances across the Pacific to Japan, China
and Australia, compare with the same favourable distances
} from Europe across the Alan tic to America.    The direction of
the trade winds tend to this point, the open harbors also which
indent the coast are havens of refuge for the storm beaten
ship. It is also worthy of note that the coasts of the mainland of British Columbia and the islands are indented with
numerous long inlets, bays and coveSj similar to the coasts of
Norway, the west of Scotland and Ireland ; Ireland and the
Hebrides of Scotland, comparing with Vancouver Island and
the Queen Charlotte Islands of British Columbia. The follow-
Ill ing extract" from a speech made by the Earl of Dufferin while
in the province, describes the coast line very clearly.
S1
■ i 10 CITY  OF  VANCOUVER.
i ^Jlgl ~—|	
" Such a spectacle as its coast line presents is not to be
" paralleled by any country in the world. Day after day for
| a whole week, in a vessel of nearly 2,000 tons, we threaded
I an interminable labyrinth of watery lanes and reaches that
"wound endlessly in and out of a net work of islands, prom-
" ontories, and peninsulas for thousands of miles, unruffled by
" the slightest swell from the adjoining ocean, and presenting
"at every turn an ever shifting combination:■,of rock, verdure,
'forest, glacier and snow-capped mountain of unrivalled
"grandeur and beauty. When it is remembered* that this
" wonderful system of navigation, equally well adapted to the
| largest line of battle-ship and the frailest canoe, fringes the
I entire seaboard of your province and communicates at points,
" sometimes more than a hundred miles from the coast, with a
U multitude of valleys stretching eastward into the interior,
| while at the same time it is furnished with innumerable
I harbors on either hand, one is lost in admiration at the facilities for inter-cqmmunication which are thus provided for
"the future inhabitants of this wonderful region."
Equal effects are produced from similar causes under like
conditions, and the analogy between London the metropolis of
Europe and Vancouver, is so nearly perfect that a similar
effect is likely to result. As London owes its growth to the
development of the natural resources of the country to which
it is as a gateway, so Vancouver will grow with the devel-
ment of the natural resources of the country of which it is the
gateway.
The following review of the improvements made in the
city since the 13th June will give an idea of its remarkable
progress since that date :
Clearing land, etc., including C. P. R $  250,000
Grading and Planking streets |        75,000
Mills and Wharves |. fjj        85,000
'■'   '    .        BUILDING.
Cordova street .$   125,000
Hastings    |          100,000
Granville   "      100,000
Pender, Seymour and Richard streets pg       50,000
Water street. $ .|-        90,000
Alexander street :1k      $25,000^
Powell I  W  M 25,000
V--w-
m
m
f/: w*., CITY  OF VANCOUVER. 11
Carrall street |  1*60,000
Westminster avenue.. m  25,000
Dupont street... m$ M  10,000
Miscellaneous streets, (20)  75,000
Total improvements, $1,085,000
Assessed value of Real Estate.....'. ■   2,664,274
Personal Property      108,305
« u
:., .   ';    ' - ■'•'■ ; '       '     - ..■''/■ , ;    .*. . ..-:.-.    :...'.;   $3,857,579
Corporation Acccounts from date of incorporation (6th April),,
1886, to 31st December last. |j|
RECEIPTS :
By Dray Licenses |gt£ •• $     115 50
Feed and Sale Stables and Livery Stables  36 OC
Billiards and Pool, Auctioneers  90 00
Shooting Galleries and Theatre      «    21 00
Victualling houses     .?.\  31 50
Liquor Licenses .7^     4,880 00
^J$| Permits granted previous to 1st July, 1886         965 00
Police Court fines  * 1,036 50
Government grant for Powell street      1,000 00
Bills discounted \    1&907 00
Water street debentures and interest     4>552 28
- -$26,634 78
-      EXPENDITURE: ''. >■'
To Fire, Water and Light tWH mj$ $ 2,918 18-
Fire Hall .%. $ 1,209 87
Tanks .... W^m      r>127 73
Engine and Freight         368 95
General expenses         211 63
To Printing and Stationery \ J&-....         609 00
General expenses acct         904 36'
Election expenses * $       83 75
Furniture, Safe, etc. r... *- ,         507 45
Revision of Voter's List  135 40
Telegrams and Sundries  M||  177 7^
To Bills Payable : j      6,495 <*»
Interest...-  £? |$ ,         no 83;,
Police Commissioners r    2,881 95,
Salaries M     ... ^ . $ 1,853 20
Specials   ;         479 35
Prisoners' board         387 50
" expenses  83 40
General expenses f  78 5°
V mmsmsmm.
¥$& wgi
12
CITY  OF  VANCOUVER
EXPENDITURE.—Continued.
To SalaVies account •. i	
City Clerk . $
Assessment Commissioner	
Treasurer .♦	
City Engineer
i
ist Assistant Engineer
2nd        K "
Fire Engineer	
Hospital Steward
Street Inspector..
498 50
332 25
75 00
333 87
96 00
73 00
244 00
63 00
64 50
1,780 12
■.j*
To Board of Health |r	
Hospital $
Medicine and general expenses	
149 48
94 50
To Board of Works	
Street expenditure §v .... .$ 1,922 J3
Water street .-      4>584 5c
City Hall      ....... 1      1,853 22
243 98
8,435 00
H
General expenses
74 55
To Cash in Bank of British Columbia      2,135 85
Treasurer's hands.. r...  91 23
City Clerk's 'hands ". e J?... 29 18
<c
xi
Total.. .......... $26,634 78
ASSETS :
~^m
%
Bank of British Columbia ; _.. $
Balance in hands* of the Treasurer.......... .-.'i^p,
Cash in hands of the City Clerk M-,;I.
Safe fe,] |p ,...
Water street property owners, re debentures	
Carrall street property owners, re debentures	
Cordova street property owners, re debentures	
Hastings street, east and weit J*.	
Fire engine ...	
City debentures deposited in Bank of B. C	
City Hall and furniture *... .
Four lots on Powell street at $650	
Fire Hall fL . ,E.	
Fire Tanks. 	
Fire Bell '...... | .
City Seal 4 .v ,.	
Tait & Co., rent to December
Hotel Licenses unpaid :—
P. Carey .^	
N. Allen. •>•••%• -|«S
Improvement Account, streets, sidewalks, etc
3ist
LIABILITIES
To Bank of British Columbia....... |^.	
J. & J. Taylor $|.. 4|pffc..   \
Water Street debentures . 3 ,^^^^| \ \ j
$ 2,135 85
91
23
29
18
519
00
4,5°°
00
7,300
00-.
6,300
00
14,000
00
7,268
95
14,100
00
1,853
22
2,600
00
}] 1,209
87
1,127
73
122
50
35
00
25
00
no
00
50
00
2,115
21
^fit  AdO   *7A
4>uD)4y^  /4
$ 7,ooo.
00
412
00
4,5oo
00
"
■r/~;     ,.. CITY  OF  VANCOUVER
13
t^rt-
I LIABILITIES.—Continued.
Carroll     I |   $7.30000
Corcloya street debentures  6,300 00
Hastings "          \ ¥          west of Carrall  10,000 00
Hastings "            I          east of Carrall  4,00c 00
General City debentures  14,100 00
Fire engine  6,000 00
Outstanding accounts on December 31st  4,980 00
*  $65>492 74
PROJECTED   IMPROVEMENTS.
The following amounts will be expended on land and
street improvements, buildings, etc., during the coming spring
and summer:
City Corporation Street improvements $   58,435
"            |          Sewerage  25,000
"            "          City Hospital  2,00a
"            "          Miscellaneous  2,500^
Water Works Company  350,000
Gas Works Company  150,000.
C. P. Railway Company, hotel .$25a,ooo
$$3 already expended %.     50,000
  200,600
Rouncf Houses, etc  250,000
Passenger Depot and Offices ........... 50,000
Wharves  25,000
Sidings, etc  15,000
Freight Sheds  5,000
Land improvements   25,000
Bank building \ .*.... 12,000
Sir George Stephen & Co., block of buildings  25,00**
Lady Stephen, block of buildings  15,000
Vancouver Improvement Company, building and land improvements,
Mill property  159,000
Brighouse & Co., land improvements, Lot 185  85,000
Mr. Angus, store and residence  11,200
Episcopalian Church .«. *!  3,300
Miscellaneous (moderately speaking) €.  1,000,000
; / V    Total.j .J. : ,. .$2,459,435,
The above is a very liberal amount of work to begin the
year with, and mtist bring together a large population.
THE   TEA  TRADE.
Although the Canadian Pacific Railway was only opened
to through^traffic on July. 1st, the following large quantity of
tea direct from China and Japan was discharged at this port
and shipped eastward over the railway:
& mm
u
CITY  OF VANCOUVER.
\fr
m
§
VESSEL. LBS. TEA.
W. B. Flint %.. Jf.. .1,240,763
Flora P. Stafford , fL T^ 1,658,033
Zoroya     529,206
Carrie Delap ^ 1,800,000
Bylgia  ,-M:     550,060
Eudora .»fe ** 1,100,000
Freda Gramp 'J*? 1,000,000
 7,878,002
Representing- in cash $2,000,000. The first of this year's shipments has already been despatched by the barque "George,"
!and is now due at this port, it is therefore very probable the
above figures will be quadrupled in 1887.
CITY INDUSTRIES and EXPORT TRADE,
PRINCIPAL  BUILDINGS. |r
Among the principal buildings are the following : City
Hall and Fire Hall, Public School, Presbyterian Church, St.
James' Episcopal Church, Catholic Church, Oppenheimer
Brothers brick block, Tye & Co's brick block, A. G. Ferguson's
brick block and residence, Gilmore & Clark's brick block,
Templeton's brick block, Crichton's brick block, Tatlow's
brick block, McMillan brick block, the Home brick block, the
„Holman brick block, Sunnyside Hotel, Gold House, Dougall
House, Syndicate, Regina Hotel, European Hotel, Carter
House, Leland House, Hudson Bay Co's Store Poulin's Residence, Mr. Abbott's Residence, C. P. R. Offices, &c, &c.
Among the buildings in course of erection are the follow-
ing: Q. P. R. Co's Hotel, C. P. R. Co's Bank Buildings, to be
occupied by the Bank of Montreal and the Bank of British
Columbia, Sir Geo. Stephen and others brick block, Lady
Stephen's brick block, Angus & Co's brick warehouse, Geo.
Byrnes brick block, 0. P. R. Co's, freight sheds and offices, and
a numerous lot of smaller buildings. The plans for the terminal Passenger Depot and Offices, prepared by Mr. Sorby,
have been forwarded to Montreal for approval, also the plans
for the Round-houses and Work-shops. The city architects
have also received orders for plans for a large number of
Ibuildings.
' f      '       H POPULATION. '   ;        '•1|tf.-< j|f
The population of the city at the present time is about
5,000, and train and steamer are adding their quota to it
daily. In the same month last year the population was not
over 300, giving an increase in twelve months of sixteen
^hundred per cent. CITY  OF  VANCOUVER,
*
15
00
u
VANCOUVER MARKET REPORT.
- CURREET PRICES.
GROCERIES.
Teas, per R>       30c@75
Coffte, per lb. W 'I|. .. 22>£@27j£
Sugar, white, per lb
j|    i yellow,
Rice,
Syrup, per gal
DAIRY PRODUCE.
IOC
9c
4c@ioc
$i oo
Butter, fresh, per tb.
tub,      I      .
Eggs, fresh, per doz.
"    imported "  ?|
Cheese, per*Tb	
2>£c
30c
75c
50c
20c
FISH, GAME AND POULTRY.
a
(.(.
a
c<
Salmon, fresh, per tb
H     cured,
Cod, Rock,
Trout,
Whiting
Oysters,* per qt
Crabs, (Eastern $1 per d
Grouse, Blue, per brace
Ruffed,
Ducks, Mallard,
Widgeon, "
Teal,
Venison... m	
Chickens, Spring, each
Beef, sirloin steak, per lb
roast,
boiling,
corned,
"Mutton, by the side,
best cuts
§        boiling,
Pork,v
m    corned,        ^
Veal,
Lamb.
Bacon,
Hams,
Lard,'
oz
'(&
Hi
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I21/
6c
6c
12
6c
75c
) 5oc@i 00
1 00
62^
75
50
30
7@ioc
5°©75
15c
12)4
8c@ioc
IOC
IIC
15c
IOC
gH
I0@I2^
20C
I5@i6c
l'8@20C
15c
FRUITS.
Apples, per box	
dried, per lb
Pears,
Plums,
Grapes,
Peaches,
Prunes,
Bananas, per doz .....\ Jj]p
Oranges and Lemons, $? doz
$1   25
8c@I2C
8c
12
8c
50
FLOUR AND FEED;
Flour, per bbl..
Oatmeal, per lb
Bran, per sack.
Shorts,
Oats,
"    chopped, per ton	
Wheat, per ton	
Grounf Barley, per ton
VEGETABLES.
Potatoes, per lb	
Turnips,
Beets,
Carrots,
Sweet Potatoes, per lb
Cabbage, u
Onions, "
Cucumbers, per doz..
Tomatoes, per lb.. ,i^J
String Beans,   " '*.. .
Cauliflower, per doz..
a
a
&M&M!,
$5 25
5c@6c
90c
28 00
30
00
40
35
42
00
00
00
IC
IC
IC
IC
5C
2C
3c
75c
BREAD.
Loaves, per doz .^#|ft...
Rolls,        " /^j
Cookies,   " .
Buns, M      !§••••
Biscuits, Soda, per lb.'.....
per box	
Lemon Snaps, per lb.
Ginger       " "    im	
Wine Cakes, each	
Jelly      "        "	
FUEL.
Coal, per ton.......
Wood, per cord s.;...
Coal Oil, per 5 gals ... \jjg$
a
a
$1 00
15c
m
15c
IOC
$2 25
25c
25C
i5@$i
40@5°
$9 00
3 5o
2 25
$10 00
1 75
6 50
5 50
1 25
1 00
BUILDING MATERIAL.
Bricks, per M       $10 00
Lime, per bbl
Cerrfent,
Piaster
Hair, per sack j
Sand, per cubic yard .,
Lumber, rough, per M  10 00
I        dressed, "     $I5@$20
Shingles |    ..... 2 <kfc
Laths "      3 00
Nails, per cwt............ 4 00
"     Shingle, per cwt.... 5 00
Paints, per cwt . .\ ;...    $8@$io
Oil, Linseed, per gal     .$i@$i  15
i 16 CITY  OF  VANCOUVER.
TRAVELING FACILITIES.
The steamer Princess Louise makes daily trips between
Victoria, Vancouver and C. P. Railway, carrying mails and
passengers. ||||
Steamer Evangel, Capt. Tarte, makes semi-weekly trips
between Vancouver, New Westminster and Seattle, calling at
Roche Harbor, San Juan Island and way ports. jjjj|r
f Weekly connection |^ith San Francisco, Cal., is made
by the Pacific Coast Navigation Company's steamers Geo.,
W^Elder and Mexico. '
The steamer Robert Dunsmuir runs weekly between
Nanaimo and Vancouver.
The steamer Pearl makes regular trips between New
Westminster and Vancouver.
Four stages run regularly every day between New Westminster and Vancouver.
The ferry-boat Senator maHes several trips daily between
Moodyville, Hastings and Vancouver.
■  v' H       export Trade. ,';•■■' /  *
Last year, 1886, has been regarded by the sawmill men*
loggers and others as below the average, the principle cause
being the very low freight rates, and consequently a scarcity
of ships.
The Hastings Sawmill is situated on the shore of Coal
Harbor, immediately at the terminus of the Canadian Pacific
Railway, and will from this time on have a very large local
trade from the growth of the terminal city, and will also have
a large market in the Northwest Territories, as soon as the
Canadian Pacific Railway can give shipping facilities, which
in all probability will be by the end of March or the beginning of April this year. The daily capacity is from 50,000 to
70,000 feet, according to the ystyle of lumber, and there are
employed in and around the mill and logging camps about 200
men, with a monthly pay roll of from $8,000 to $12,000. ,The
timber limits connected with the mill embrace about 20,000
acres, and are estimated to contain 600,000,0.00 feet, board measure of lumber. They are all located on the waters edge, and so
situated that rafts can be towed without any danger from
wind or waves. Some of the limits are immediately adjacent
to the mill. These limits are held under lease from the Crown
at a rental of fifteen cents per acre per annum, and with the
exception of 5,000 acres, the present leases may be converted
into freehold by purchase from the Crown at $2.50 per acre.
m
--s^	 CITY OF VANCOUVER.
17
The mill site comprises some six acres of land, situated about
twelve hundred yards from the Canadian Pacific Railway
wharves and station, and the line of the C. P. R. is laid through
its yard. The wharves can accommodate five or six vessels at
one time. In connection with the mill is a store, with a
separate wharf, mess-house, kitchen and dwellings for em-»
ployees. Mr. R. H. Alexander, a gentleman possessing an
excellent knowledge of the business, is resident manager.
During the months of January, March, April and May the
mill was closed for repairs, for which reason, together with
that already stated, the output is far below previous years;
but the average profit has been largely in excess.
The following are the mill's shipments for-last year:
.*»**- 18.
CITY  OV   VANCOUVER.
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19
THE TOTAL  SHIPPED   IS  AS   FOLLOWS
No. Vessels
Tons.
Rough Lumber
Dressed.
Laths.
Pickets
Spars
13
11,897
7,044,411 ft.
638,985 ft.
3.iSS
3,210
413
The Royal City Mills Company are amongst the largest
employers of labour in British Columbia. They own and
work two mills at New Westminster ; and one larsje Steam
Sawmill at Vancouver. 56 ft. x 300 ft. Having a daily
capacity of 45,000 ft., or 80,000 ft., working day and night.
They have also a large Sash and Door Factory, 40 x 120 ft.
A Shingle Mill, capacity 35,000 dail}r; Warehouses, a Boarding-house, 24 x 60 ft., and 20 houses for employees. It has
a water frontage on False Creek of 1,000 feet. The mills and
machinery are all new and of the finest description, possessing
every modern improvement. They are centrally situated and
a good 36 feQt planked road runs from their yards to the central portion of the city. They have three steamers for towing
logs and lumber, and fifteen barges. They operate 10 logging
camps, and employ about 500 men at their mills, camps, and
factories.    The manager of the company is Mr. John Hendry.
The mills owned "by the Brunette Sawmill Company,
(Limited), are situated at the mouth of the Brunette River, on
the west banks of the Fraser, a short distance from New
Westminster. The branch line of the Canadian Pacific Railroad from Port Moody to New Westminster passes through
their yard. The company has now been in existence about
eight years, and have done considerable business during that
time. The mill has a daily capacity of 40,000 feet. They
have a large and conveniently situated wharf at Vancouver
on False Creek.
Leamy& Kyle's Sawmill is situated on the south side of
False Creek, with an excellent water frontage, and was established last year. It has an annual capacity of 15,000,000 feet,
and employs between 30 and 40 men about the mills. They
only suppty the local market, and their trade is increasing
rapidly.
The Moody ville Sawmill is situated on the north shore of
Burrard Inlet, about 3i miles from Vancouver. It has an
annual capacity of 30,000,000 feet.     The   company has  a
— 20
CITY   OF VANCOUVER.
water frontage of two miles on Burrard Inlet. In and about
the mill employment is given to 70 men, and 60 more are employed at the logging camps; besides these about 30 longshoremen are employed loading and discharging. The average
pay-roll of the company is from $7,000 to 810,000 per month.
As will be seen by the following tables the foreign shipments
for last year, 1886, were 12,567,585 feet, while the local shipments were about 1,500,000 feet. The resident manager is
Mr. B. Springer, to whose efficient management the success of
the mill is to be attributed. The company have also a yard
and wharf at Vancouver, situated at the north end of Cambie
street, which is under the supervision of Alderman Humphries.
/ CITY   OF   VANCOUVER.
21
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Ll 24
CITY OF VANCOUVER.
Three of the above mills are within the city boundaries,
and the Moody ville might be said to be in the suburbs, being
directly opposite on the north shore of the harbor. The employees also purchase the larger portion of their supplies in
the city, and all exports and imports pass through the city
custom house.
Regular communication with Vancouver is kept up by
a steam ferry which makes four trips daily between the two
places.
The north shore of the inlet contiguous to Moodyville, is
a favorite resort for the citizens during the summer months,
and I have no doubt that in the near future, it will be fully
taken up with handsome residences, and adorned with beautiful grounds.
Other manufactures have been started in the city, boatbuilding, furniture manufacturing, tin, sheet iron and copper-
ware, etc.
Tin, Sheet Iron and Copper-Ware Manufacturers
e. s. scoullar & co. /
IMcFeely & McLennan.
James Vair.
BOAT BUILDERS
Shaw & Linton.
FURNITURE MANUFACTURERS.
F. W. Hart, employing regularly 8 men.
Irving & Strachan. .     ■
Jacob Sehl.
Abrams &. Co.
CIGAR FACTORIES.
Kurtz & Co.   : ' • If;    ■
Jack Levy. '|:.   '
Though very creditable *to such a young city, they are by
no means to be considered as the future staple manufactures
of the city, as it is very probable that every branch of the
sciences and arts will be represented in Vancouver.
v CITY OF VANCOUVER. 25
CITY COUNCIL AND OFFICERS,
M. A. MacLean, Mayor.
Aldermen:— S ■'■■■' -11
Ward 1.—L. A. Hamilton, Dr. Lefevre.
Ward 2.—Jos. Humphries, Jos. Mannion.
Ward 3.—Robert Clark, R. H. Alexander.
Ward 4.—Edward Sanders, Geo. H. Lockerby.
Ward 5.—David Oppenheimer, Isaac Oppenheimer,
Thos. F. McGuigan—City Clerk.#|p '#    ]-|
G. F. Baldwin—Treasurer and Assessor.
John Devine, Auditor.
J. P. Lawson—City Engineer. jj&e
T. T. Black, Police Magistrate and Solicitor.
J. M. Stewart—Chief of Police.
John McLaren—Police Sergeant.
W. H. Haywood—Constable.
J. T. Abray—Constable.
J. H. Carlisle—Chief Fire Dep't. and Inspector.
A. W. Cameron—Engineer.
Owen Hughes—Hospital Stewart.
A brief biographical sketch of the members of the council will not be out of place.
Mayor MacLean is a native of Tyree, Scotland, and
-came to Canada along with his parents in 1845. He was
brought up in the County of Victoria, Ont., and received his
elementary education there. He afterwards attended Eastman's Business College, Poughkeppsie, New York, and having
graduated there he returned to Victoria County and taught
school for three years. He then went to Oshawa and was
manager of the first co-operative store in that town. Leaving
there he proceeded to Toronto where he was engaged as manager of an Assignees Agency Company in which capacity he
acquired a large amount of business experience. He left there
and travelled west to Winnipeg in 1877, where he commenced
a wholesale business. He suffered in the relapse after the
boom of 1880-81, and had to give up business. He set his face
westward and arrived in San Francisco in 1885, where he
stayed a few months, and from thence came to Vancouver in
the month of January last year. He opened a real estate
office and commanded a fair share of the business. He
took an active part in getting Vancouver incorporated as a
■city, and in the first election was elected mayor by a majority 26 CITY  OF  VANCOUVER,
of 17. He has given all his time to these duties during his
late term of office, and the citizens having this proof of his
worth before them re-elected him at the late election.
Dr. John Lefevre, one of the aldermen elected for Ward
number one, is a native of Belleville, Ont. He received his elementary education at the public and high schools of Stirling,
Ont., and afterwards attended the Normal School, Toronto.
He taught school in Trenton and Brockville for a few years
and then entered McGill University to study medicine. After
a three years' course he graduated taking the first Sutherland
gold medal. He practiced in Brockville for some time. He
then accepted a position as surgeon to the Algoma branch of
the C. P. R. He returned to Brockville after spending eighteen months on the line, and resumed his practice. He was
elected in the beginning of the present year a member of the
Brockville town council, but left shortly afterwards to take
the position as surgeon on the Pacific Division of the C. P. R.
He arrived here in the spring of last year.
Ald. L. A. Hamilton, F. R. C. S., elected as an alderman
at the election in May last, and re-elected as an alderman for
Ward one at the late elections is of Scotch extraction and a
native of Collingwood, Ontario. He was educated at the Col-
lingwood Collegiate Institute and graduated as a land surveyor
of the Province of Ontario and also of the Province of Manitoba. He was engaged as a surveyor on the British North
American Boundary Commission in defining the 49th parallel,
and afterwards under the Provincial Government of Ontario.
Jle subsequently was given the charge of the timber, mineral
and grazing lands, Department of Interior,. Ottawa. He
resigned this position and accepted a situation as Chief
Land Surveyor to the Canadian Pacific Railway Company,
from which position he was promoted last spring to the position he now occupies, Assistant Land Commissioner.
Ald. Joseph Humphries, elected as an alderman in May
last and re-elected at the late elections for Ward two, is a
native of the county of Peterborough, Ontario. He came to
British Columbia via Panama in 1862. He is a carpenter
by trade, and assisted in the building of the Hastings and
Moodyville sawmills. He went to Cariboo in 1862, where he
stayed for several years with varying success. He returned to
New Westminster and proceeded to Cassiar, on the Arctic slope,
where he remained two years and returned to Burrard Inlet in
v CITY  OF VANCOUVER. 2T
1883.    He was employed by the Moody ville sawmill company
and now represents that company in this city.
Ald. Joseph Mannion, elected as an alderman for Ward
two, is also an old pioneer of the Province. He is a native of
the county of Mayo, Ireland, and left home when he was nineteen for British Columbia, via Panama. He arrived in the
Fraser River district in 1862. He proceeded to Cariboo where
he stayed a few years with fair success. He returned to Bur-
rard Inlet and followed stevedoring, etc., until he commenced
business in the Granville hotel in 1872. He was very successful in the hotel business and acquired considerable property.
He sold out his business in March of the present year and retired into private life.
Ald. Robert Clark, elected at the recent elections as an«
alderman for Ward three, is a native of Partick, Lanarkshire,.
Scotland.    He is a mechanic, having; served with one of the
eminent shipbuilding firms on the Clyde.    He left home in
1870  for Canada, and arrived in  Toronto the  same  year.
Staying a few months in that city he continued his journey
westward to Winnipeg, where he was engaged in business for~
four years.    He came to British Columbia in 1875, and commenced business in Yale in partnership with Mr. Gilmore in
1881.    They transferred their business from Yale to this city
in the spring of last  year  and were heavy losers by  the
fire.    Mr. Clark is one of the most popular business men in the
city, and is highly respected by the citizens generally.
Ald. Richard H. Alexander, who was a candidate for
the mayoralty at the first election in May and elected an
alderman for Ward three at the late elections, is a native of*
Edinburgh, Scotland. After leaving home the first place he
halted at was Toronto, Ont. After staying in that city for
some time he crossed the mountains to British Columbia in
1862. He was engaged as bookkeeper to the Hastings sawmill company in 1870, and on the death of the manager, Capt.
Raymur, he was appointed to that position. Mr. Alexander
has shown a keen interest in the progress of the city and was
among the first to propose its incorporation. He was one of
the most active workers and spent considerable time in seeing
the act passed through the House at Victoria.
Ald. Edwin Sanders, elected by acclamation as an alderman for Ward four, is a native of London, England. He came-
to this province in 1885 and commenced business as a builder 28 CITY  OF VANCOUVER.
Ald. Geo. H. L$ckerby, elected by acclamation as an
alderman for ward four, is a native of Charlottetown, P. E. I.
He is a machinist by trade, and came to this city in the month
of July last year. He invested in real estate and built a
house in which he aft present resides.
Ald. David and Isaac Oppenheimer, the aldermen elect
for ward five, are brothers, natives of Bavaria, and spent their
boyhood on the classic banks of the river Rhine. Attracted
by the glowing accounts from America, they left their fatherland and landed in New Orleans in 1848. After spending a
few years in that city they went to Lafayette where they
commenced business in 1853. From Lafayette to San Francisco, and from San Francisco to Sacramento where they
resumed business. In 1860 thev came to this Province,
shortly after the Fraser river gold excitement began. They
opened a store in Victoria and established branches throughout the province, and they prospered. ^t the time the Canadian Pacific Railway proposed Vancouver as their Pacific terminus, Messrs. Oppenheimer in conjunction with a few others,
bought what is known as the Hastings mill property, which
has proved a very profitable venture. Messrs. Oppenheimer have done much for the province, and whatever money
they have made in it has been spent again in some new venture
and never allowed to remain idle.
PUBLIC COMPANIES.
COQUITLAM WATER WORKS COMPANY, Limited.
^ DIRECTORS.
E. A. Wilmot, A. J. Hill,
A. G.Ferguson, J. L. Hunter,
|J     A. E. Hill, C. G. Major, W:\
|}' G. E. CORBOULD.
Capital $600,000, with power to increase to $1,000,000
VANCOUVER WATER WORKS COMPANY, Limited.
.:.:■:   •   vj|v, DIRECTORS.
R P. Rithet, Thomas Earle,
G. A. Keefer, John Irving,
D. M. Eberts, F. W. Foster,
Capital $250,000, with power to increase to $500,000
i$saau. CITY  OF VANCOUVER. 29
VANCOUVER GAS COMPANY, Limited.
v^ DIRECTORS.
G. L. Milne, Chairman.
A. A. Green,       /      D. R. Harris,
J. L. Stamford, C. D. Rand, Sec.
Capital $100,000.1        §
VANCOUVER IMPROVEMENT COMPANY, Limited.
DIRECTORS.        §•     S
D. Oppenheimer, G, A. Keefer,
Major Dupont,      .%Dr. Powell,
E. C. Prior, .   JF. Barnard, Sec.   $
VANCOUVER WHARFAGE AND STORAGE COMPANY, Limited.
DIRECTORS.
James Leamy, Chairman,     Joseph Griffiths,
H. F. Keefer, T. O. Allen, %   |    .*"..■
E. McKendry, f J. W. McFarlane, Sec.
J: Capital $25,000.1,
VANCOUVER ELECTRIC ILLUMINATING COMPANY, Limited.
DIRECTORS.
H F. Keefer, Chairman,       R. Balfour,
-John Boultbee, Jonathan Miller,
B. Springer.
Capital $35,000.
Nearly all the above companies are in active operation.
PRINCIPAL PROPERTY OWNERS. |       1
ASSESSED VALUE,
ABOUT
C. P. R. Company $ 1,000,000
Hastings Saw Mill Co       250,000
Oppenheimer Bros        125,000
Brighouse & Hailstone    I 100,000
Maj. Dupont       $ 75,000
Dr. Powell  {  75,000
Jno. Morton  60,000
H. V. Edmonds  50,000
J. W. Home  40,000
G. E. Corbould         30,000
C. G. Major      25,000
E. Crow-Baker  25,000 SO CITY  OF VANCOUVER,
W. B. Wilson | 25,000
Royal City Planing Mills     ',   25,000
R. H. Alexander ."  25,000
Gilmore & Clark  20,000
A. G. Ferguson  1  20,000
Dr. Milne ...,  15,000
Abrams & Co ..  15,000
-Jos. Griffith  15,000
E. McKendrv  10,000
John Dougall ....."  10,000
"Gideon Robertson  10,000
B. Springer ■. J| 10,000
Wm. Power  v. |l0,000
CHURCHES.
The First Presbyterian Church, Oppenheimer street,
Hev. T. G. Thomson, pastor. Average attendance from 300
-to 400.  S I
The Methodist Church, Water street, Rev. J. Hall,
pastor.    Average attendance 200 to 250.
St. James' Episcopalian church, Rev. F. Clinton, pastor.
Average attendance 100 to 150.
Catholic Church, Richard street, Rev. Father Fay,
pastor.    Average attendance about 100.
schools. -^l:   *
public school,
Corner of Jackson and Oppenheimer streets. Mr. Robinson
;and Miss A. Christie, teachers.
PRIVATE SCHOOL.
Miss Upton, Oppenheimer street.
SOCIETIES.
GRANVILLE LODGE. NO. 29, A. O. U. W.
M. Thain, P. M. W.; P. Cordiner, M. W.; Jos. Little,
P.; A. Neilson, O.; C. A. Coldwell, R.; I. John, F.; A. E.
McCartney, Receiver; Alex. Johnston, I. W.; Wm.Soule,
O. W.; O. Harbell, Guide. Membership, 45. Meets the
2nd and 4th Thursdays in each- month in Gray's Hall,
Oordova street,
MOUNT HERMON LODGE NO. 7, A. F. & A. M<
B. Springer, W. M.; Geo. Black, P. W.; P. Allan, J.
W.;  Van Bramer,  Treasurer; Jos.   Little,  Secretary;   D. CITY  OF VANCOUVER. 31
McMannus, L. D.; Williams, J. D.; Alex. Merryfield,
I. T.; John H. Johnston, 0. T.    Membership 25.   "Meets
Saturday nearest full moon.
WESTERN STAR, NO. 195, C. O. O. F.
C. W. Murray, N. G.; And. Linton, V. G.; A. Johnston,
111 Treasurer ;  M. Mathison,  Secretary ;  E. D. Macpherson,
Conductor; H. Fyfe, Warden ; Kenneth Smith, I. Guard ;
J. Gray, O. Guard ; Robt. Leatherdale and John Beatty, N.
G. Supporters ; H. Eligh and N. McPhee, V. G. Supporters.
m Membership 30.    Meet every alternate Saturday in Keefer's
9 hall.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS, GRANVILLE LODGE, NO. 3.
C. L. Behnson, P. C; F. W. Hart, C. C; Robert
IClark, V. C; W. H. Watson, P.; C. W. Murray, K. of R.
and S.; I. J. Hayden, M. of E.; A. Secord, M. of F.; F. M.
JBlomquist, M. of A.; H. G. Miller, 1. G.; Thos. Britton, O.
O. Membership 59. Meets every Wednesday evening in
Keefer's hall.
This lodge is in a flourishing condition, applicants seeking admission every meeting.
Y. m. c A.
J. M. Clute, President;  W. C. Bell, Secretary ; J. H.
^Carlisle, Treasurer.    Membership 60.    Meets every second
Tuesday in each month in the Methodist Hall.
Ill This association are erecting a new building on Hastings street for a hall, library, reading room, etc.
SHAFTESBURY ASSEMBLY, KNIGHTS OF LABOR.
Meets every Tuesday evening in Gray's Hall, Cordova street.
VANCOUVER ASSEMBLY, KNIGHTS OF LABOR.
Meets every Thursday evening in Keefer's Hall.
ST. ANDREWS' AND CALEDONIAN SOCIETY.
Mayor MacLean, President; Wm. Brown, Vice-President.
VANCOUVER CITY BAND.
%*: Mayor   MacLean,  Hon.   President;   John  Boultbee,
President; E. A. Beck, 1st Vice-President; H. J. Cartier,
2nd Vice-President; Chas. Sullivan, Secretary ; Fred. Mil-
m ler, Treasurer ; C. L. Cartier. Manager ;  D. Evans, Con
ductor, 32 CITY OF VANCOUNER.
VANCOUVER FIRE BRIGADE.
Geo. L. Schelky, President ; J. H. Carlisle, Chief ; J.
G. Garvin, Asst. Chief ; J. Livingstone and J. Matier, Foremen ; Thos. Beckett, Secretary; A. B. McKenzie, Treasurer.
BUSINESS  DIRECTORY.
1
MEDICAL PROFESSION.
Dr. Beckingsale, M. D.. Cordova streefr *
Dr. Langes, M. D., Carroll street
Dr. Lefevre, M. D., Hastings street
Dr. McGuigan, M. D., Cordova street
'    a3fi^   '    "4    ;'     BARRISTERS.       .''   W<f     : •■'"f.
Black, T. T., Seymour street f^
Blake & Muir, Cordova street
Boultbee, John, Carrall street
Corbould & McColl, Cordova street
Goulding, E.G., Abbott street
ARCHITECTS AND CIVIL ENGINEERS. $81
4
Carden & Herman, C. E., Cordova street
Irving, Bell, Cambie street. •
McCartney & Marmette, C. E., Powell street
Mackay, Donald, Architect, Cordova street .
Sorby, T. C, Architect, Cordova street
Strathern, C. E., Granville street
Whiteway, Architect, Water street
M PUBLIC OFFICERS. |
Isaac John, Collector of Customs
Jonathan, Miller, Postmaster    .-,..£,. .-/&■•■ *
C. G. Johnson, Registrar W
Joseph Huntly, Bailiff
BANK.
Bank of British Columbia,  Keith,  Manager,,
Cordova street.
'.'£'•    SAW   MILLS.
Brunette Saw Mill Co., Westminster avenue
Hastings Saw Mill Co., Coal Harbor.   (Manager, R. H.      *        JB
Alexander)
Leamy & Kyles Saw Mill, False Creek m si
CITY OF  VANCOUVER. SS
Moodyviile Saw Mill Co., Burrard Inlet, '      ' |
Manager B. Springer. H
Royal City Mills, False Creek
LIME   KILN. II
Vancouver San Juan Lime Co. 4fe
REAL ESTATE
Bailey, J. A., Cordova street
Ceperley, H., Cordova street||    *
Douglas & Co., J. CM.Abbott street
Graveley & Spinks, Oppenheimer street
Hall & Quackenbush, Granville street.
Home, J. W., Cordova street
Innes, F. C, Cordova street
Johnson, C. G., Cordova street
Jones, H. A., Carroll street
MacLean, M. A., Abbott street   K
Mellon, H. A., Seymour street
Morrison, James, Water street
Pitt, R. D.   '#'      §       g .Jt ■'    .  ■
Rand Bros., Cordova street
Ross & Co., A. W., Hastings street
Tatlow, R. G., Cambie street
COMMISSION   MERCHANTS.
jfef
Barker & McConnell, Abbott street
JDevine, John, Cordova street j
Fraser & Leonard, Cordova street
McDougall, A., Carrall street
Neelands & Co., Hastings street
Oppenheimer Bros., Powell street
Palmer Bros., Dupont street
Woodsy Turner & Gamble, Cordova street j
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS.,
Carey,
Clendenning, J.
GilHs, W. ' | ^ •:"■   ^.   ,;•'•;     -
Hamilton, E. P., Water street
Harkins, W.
Keefer, H. F., Alexander street     V       •   \
McDonald & Cameron
McDonald & Co., J. G: '     ^ |l
McDougall & Co. 34
CITY  OF  VANCOUVER.
McKinnon & Munro
Porter, William, Beatty street
Secord & Garvin
Shearer & Kemp, Oppenheimer street
Spring, T. B. .     .;-    . ■'■'.".     '•'/;-.    . ~ .M
Stephenson & McCraney
STEVEDORES.
Blake,
Soule, W. H. <' v
Thain & MePhaidenf >'     ' *  '. \ <;
LIVERY STABLES.
Cargill Bros., Carrall street
Jones, Westminster avenue
Queen, Cambie street
DRUGGISTS.
McCartney & Bro., W. E.j Cordova street
McDowell & Co., H., Cordova street
Nelson, Chas., Carrall street ^
Vancouver Drug Co. (Dr. Rolls), Cordova street
.' v   _      GENERAL PRODUCE DEALERS.
Clark, J. W., Cordova street ' '    S    ' //
Couth, Robert, False Creek \.    v .,'■*■• ' .
Henderson Bros.,'Cordova street ■§v-.
McLellan & Barnes, Carrall street
HARDWARE.
Dunn &'Co., T., Cordova street
Kenny & Co., J. D., Abbott street
McLennan & McFeeley, Powell street
Scoullar & Co., E. S., Water street i^
Tye & Co., Powell street
R. E. Dodds, Carrall Street    v Jf
FURNITURE.
Abrams & Co., Carrall street / -
Hart, F. .W., Cordova street
Irving & Strachan, Seymour street
McPhalin & Ash, Hastings street
Sehl, Jacob, Cordova street Jl
Wiegand, C. W*, Water street
DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, &c.
Bergland & Co., Cordova street ,'.
1
>
9% CITY OF VANCOUVER. 35
Clute & Co., J. Sm Water street
Edwards & Thicke, | 1 ■„   \  ■-&'*•
■'•.■■.-      Grant, R., Cordova street J
Hayden & Co., Water street
Hudson's Bay Co.'s Store, Cordova street
»   GROCERIES. H)
Fuller, Freeman & Co., Cambie street |*ri
.   ' Hastings Saw Mill Co.'s Store, Cordova stree||§&';-:
-.   '    McGregor, J., Cordova street  ;|.        ify-M^m'Sr'tf-
Martin, F. Cordova' street m
Northcote & Palmer, Carrall street
Otton, H., Cordova street^;
Rowling W. H., Westminster avenue •,
Stanton, Abbott street
Sylvain & Britton, Cordova street
Templeton, W., Carroll street
Thomson, John, Westminster avenue
Thornton, J. B., Cordova street
DRY GOODS.
„Jm' Abrams & Co., Jas., Carrall street jj3|':
|S| Dufour & Co., corner Carrall and Cordova streets
Fprlong & Clunie. Abbott street
'Gilmore & Clark, Carrall street
:•''':' "/     f Oordon, G. R., |   M*.   j |j    • v   •   .,  ;\£ /^M
Ogle, Campbell & Co., Carrall street
III       Taylor & Brady, Water street
MILLINERS.
Crandal, N. O., Westminster avenue
Hanafin, Mrs., Cordova street
Howat, Miss 0. D., Carrall street
Price, Mrs., Oppenheimer street
Parker, Misses, Cordova street.
STATIONERS AND BOOKSELLERS.
, B. 0. Stationery and Printing Co., Cordova street
§;| Perry, A. C., Water street ; §';    %■'
Thompson Bros., Cordova street
Tilley, S. T., Cordova street!*   ;^  ',,';''      v
''.' .   '   'y W;     7 music store.-       ",,.■;.'
■'■/■■■' "'  Adams, Water street    ( '%* 'JT ■■..'■
jjtJT       ,-''.< .' % |   WATCHMAKERS AND JEWELERS.
|p   '   ■';.'      Belling, T., Carrall street v \        '     ,
Brodie,
it ((
/ \
ssss .-•-/'■,■' ?'
CITY OF VANCOUVER.
Cartier & Bro.,,H. J., Carrall street
Grassie, H., Cordova street
Jackson, J. W., Cordova street
Melvin, G. J., Water street .'%)/ %
Reesor, D. A., Corcjova street
TAILORS.
Evans, David, Cordova street
Graham, J. W.,
Symons, C.    |
BOOT AND SHOE MAKERS.
Allan, G. L., Cordova street
Jones, G. J., Carrall street
Leonard, G., Powell street
Marks, S., Cordova street
TOBACCONISTS.
Levy, Jack, Cordova street
McNaughton, D.*   |   .,;     $        fv     |i
5§~    CIGAR MANUFACTURERS,
Kurtz & Co., Cordova street    >
BLACKSMITHS.
Hanafin & Bevis, Hastings street
Mitchell, J., Water street
Shaw, Linton & Co.
BOAT BUILDERS.
BARBERS.
Duferne & Lebel, Carrall street
Mozley, H. L.       .| ".' /||| '?•-./;.,     ■■'■,:■.,  ■'■'.-<  '■■■
Scurry, Abbott street^-    \ '   v         ', s/   ' V
Watson, Cordova street
Winters    gp|f|ltj          "; ■'- 4 ■'    •                    :   •■'•<■     ' .
'.',';' LAUNDRIES.   .V|';''   %-{   .   /•*.._.'•   .'
American Laundry , v ,    ,    ..'•■/
Pacific Steam Laundry
Troy Laundry
Vancouver Laundry, C. D. Mussenden, Pow-
ell«street
< i CITY OF  VANCOUVER.
BUTCHERS.
Coughtrey, A. R, Water street
Oannan, P., Alexander street
Mangan, T. B., Cordova street
May, W. H., Water street   /$/ ;:^p:; • %■
BAKERS.
Blake Bros., Carrall street
Harms, Hastings street   /k
Bcuitto, J., Carrall street
Wright, A. W., Granville street
FRUITERERS.
jibrams, S., Carrall street
Hall, L. J., Water street
Bobinson, W. J., Water street
MARKETS.
Vancouver Market, Shupe& Wench, Cordova street
Water Stre'et Market, A. W. Wright, Water
' .; street ^     :%-:''%^ Sill
WINE AND SPIRIT MERCHANTS.
Brown, F., Water street
TJrquhart, Wm, Water street    "
Vancouver Wine Co., Cordova street.
RESTAURANTS.
Cosmopolitan, Cordova street
Dougall House Restaurant, J. Schlenk, Cordova street
International, Boehlofsky, Cordova street
Mizony's Restaurant, I "
Palace Ovster and Chop House, Water street
*i
HOTELS.
Bridge Hotel, J. Austin, Westminster avenue
Brunswick Hotel, P. Carey, Hastings street
Burrard House, Martin, Cordova street
O. P. R. Hotel, Dunbar, Hastings street
Carter House, W. Carter, Water street
'Centrar Hotel, Quann, Cordova street
'Cosmopolitan, Cordova street
City Hotel, Powell street
Pougall House, John Dougall, Cordova street
Edinburgh Hotel, N. Allan, Water street |jg
?sr 38
CITY  OF  VANCOUVER. *
Grayhound Hotel, Harry Cole, Prop., Water st
Globe Hotel, Wood, Water street.
Gold House, Mrs. Gold, Water street
Granville Hotel, T. Cyrs, Water street      '' .
Leland, The, Mrs. Hirshberg, Hastings street
Maison Dore, P. Clair, Cordova street
Occidental Hotel, Harkiiis, Water street
Regina Hotel, E. Cosgrove, Water street
St. Elmo, Cartwright, Carrall street
Stag and Pheasant, Chas. Doering, Water st.
Star Hotel, — Powis, Cardova street
Sunnyside Hotel, Cargill, Water street
Terminus Hotel, Blair, Water street
Union Hotel, Larson & McDonald, Abbott street
Winnipeg House, Mcllroy & Blyth, Water street
*/ -.■'•   ;-'   ;'■■■•■ ■•■■      : "•     ' ■ SALOONS- ;•   r   • '■;' -■.■.'■-•: '';'
Arlington Saloon, Pender street
Bay View, Kent & Talcot, Cordova street
Bodega, The, Allen & McPherson, Carrall St
Cabinet, The, McLennan, Water street
Club, The, Fred. Little, Carrall street
Eagle, The, JM. Costello, Westminster avenue
Fountain Saloon, Barr, Cordova street
Gem, The, Grant, Cordova street
Germania Saloon, Powell street
Globe Saloon, Cordova street
Hole in the Wall, Edson, Abbott street
Mascotte, The, G. D. Somes, Cordova street
Montreal Hduse, Cordova street
St. Julian, "Cordova street
St. Lawrence Hall, Water street
Syndicate, L. J. Cross, Abbott street^, '/
Tremont, Capt. Clements, Alexander street
West End, Jackson & Brockie, Hastings street
Woodbine, W. Grant, Cordova street H!
PROVINCIAL*
The Province of British Columbia forms the western fac»
of the 'Dominion of Canada, and in view of its great importance to the Dominion, it would be difficult to say whether
HP CITY, OF VANCOUVER. 39
*«r
its geographical position or its great resources were of the j
greater value. It is bounded on the North by the parallel,
of 60 deg. N.; on the West by the Pacific Ocean and the
frontier of the United States territory of Alaska, on the
South by the parallel of 49 deg. N. the boundary of the
United States and on the East by the Rocky Mountains, and
the meridian of 120 deg. W. Vancouver Island though
extending southerly beyond the 49th parallel is wholly within
the Province.
The island of Vancouver, divided from the mainland by
the Gulf of Georgia on the South and Queen Charlotte
Sound on the North, is 300 miles in length with an average
width of 60 miles, containing an area of 20,000 square miles,
while the Mainland, including the smaller islands has an
area of, over 321,305 square miles, giving a total area of 341,j§|
305 square miles. British Columbia has a coast line of over
600 miles on the Pacific Ocean, and is indented with numerous long inlets and bays, affording excellent shelter for ships
in rough weather.
Barclay Sound, the principal harbor on the island of
Vancouver, opens into the Pacific Ocean on the west coast,
and is thirty-five miles long, nearly dividing the island, its
head being only fourteen miles from the east coast. The
water is very deep and the shelter good.
On the mainland the following are the principal indentations:—Burrard Inlet, Howe Sound, Bute Inlet, Millbank
Sound, River Skeena and River Naas. Burrard Inlet, the
principal of these, has been already described.
Howe Sound is north of Burrard Inlet, the mouth of
which is almost completely covered by Bowen Island. The
water is very deep and its shores steep and rocky, with a few
valleys running inland on either side. Rich deposits of
copper ore have been discovered on this inlet. Bute Inlet
is much further north and is surrounded,with lofty mountains.
It receives the waters of the River Hamathaco, a river
said to be famous for its trout fishing. Valdez Island lies
between its mouth and the island of Vancouver.
Millbank Sound, still further north, will eventually become valuable as a harbor, when the gold mines of the Peace
River attract population.
The River Skeena is the next important river north of
the Fraser, ^and regular communication is held by steam ves- 40
CITY OF VANCOUVER.
•   i
sels with Nanaimo.    It is the principal route to the Ominica
'gold mines.
The River Nass, still further north, is near the frontier of
Alaska. It has been ascerided by a steamer over twenty-five
iniles. It is an important salmon fishing station, and it is
believed the region which it waters is rich in gold.
Numerous small islands break the waters of the gulf,
some of them good for agricultural purposes, and others rich
in minerals, and north of Vancouver Island are located the
Queen Charlotte Islands, a group of 150, with mountains
rising from them 5000 to 6000 feet in height.
RESOURCES.
i     S
m
MINERALS.
First among the resources of British Columbia may be
classed its mineral wealth. The exploratory surveys in connection with the Canadian Pacific Railwav have established
the existence of gold over the whole extent of the Province.
Large values have already been taken from the gold mines
which have been worked. This precious metal is found all
along the Fraser and Thompson Rivers ; again in the, north
along the Peace and Omineca Rivers and on, the Germansen
Creek ; and on Vancouver Island.
Want of roads to reach them and want of capital seem to
have been the obstacles in the way of more generally working the gold mines in the past. These obstacles are, however,
in the way of being overcome. Even with these insufficient
means of working, the yield of gold in British Columbia from
1858 to 1876 was $39,953,618.00, the average earnings per
man being $663.00 per year It, is confidently expected that
more gold will be taken out of the mines of British Columbia
than has been spent in building the Pacific Railway. It is
found along a northwest line of more than ten degrees of latitude. Copper is found in abundance in British Columbia, and
silver mines have been found in the Fraser Valley. Further
explorations will undoubtedly develop more mineral  wealth.
The coal mines of British Columbia are probably even
more valuable than its gold mines.    Bituminous coal is founU *%
CITY OF'VANCOUVER. 41
in Vancouver Island in several places, and on the Mainland
extensive coal fields have been found contiguous to the Railway and Fraser River, and anthracite coal of very excellent
quality on Queen Charlotte's Island. This is said to be
superior to Pennsylvania anthracite, and although coal is
found in California, that which is mined in British Columbia
commands the highest price in San Francisco. His Excellency
the Marquis of Lome said respecting it, in a speech at Victoria :' " The coal from the Nanaimo mines now leads
the market at San Francisco. Nowhere else in these
countries is such coal to be found, and it is now being
worked with an energy that bids fair to make Nanaimo\ one
of the chief mining stations on the continent. It is of incalculable importance, not only to this Province of the Dominion,
but also to the interests of the Empire, t^hat our fleets and
mercantile marine, as well as the continental markets, should
be supplied from this source."
Speaking 6f the quality of the coal of British Columbia,
Dr. Dawson, a competent authority on the subject, made the
following statement: "It is true "bituminous coal of very ex-
cellent quality. It was tested by the War Department, of the
United States, some years ^go, to find out which fuels ^ave
the best results for steam-raising purposes on the western
•coast, and it was found that, to produce a given quantity of
steam, it took. 1,800 lbs. of Nanaimo coal to 2,400 lbs. of
Seattle coal, 2,600 lbs. of Coos Bay coal, Oregon, and 2,600 lbs.
-of Monte Diablo coal, California, showing that, as far as the
Pacific coast is concerned, the coal of Nanaimo has a marked
-superiority over all the others.
" The" position of the various stores of coal in the Pacific
is of extreme importance as an index to the future distribution of power in that portion of the world ; but it is not
enough to know where coal isjto be found without looking also
to the quantity, quality, cheapness of labor and facility of
transport. In China and in Borneo there are extensive coal
fields, but they lie'the wrong way' for trade; on the other
hand, the California coal at Monte Diablo, San Diego and
Monterey, lies well, rbut is bad in quality. .Tasmania has good
coal, 'but in no great quantity, and the beds nearest to the
coast are formed of inferior anthracite. The three countries
of the Pacific which must for a time at least rise to manufacturing greatness are Japan, British Columbia and New South
Wales; but which of these will become wealthiest and most
<*%.
> fl
iMM  ■,.    «,
42
CITY  OF  VANCOUVER.
r
.1
!
m
powerful depends mainly on the amount of coal which they
respectively possess, so situated as to be cheaply raised. The-
dearness of labor under which British Columbia suffers will be removed by the opening of the Pacific Railway, but for the present New South Wales has the cheapest labor, and upon her
shores at Newcastle are abundant stores of coal of good quality for manufacturing purposes, although for sea use it /burns
' dirtily ' and too fast The future  of  the Pacific
shores is inevitablv brilliant, but it is not New Zealand, the
centre of the water hemisphere, which will occupy the position that England has taken on the. Atlantic, but some country such as Japan or British Columbia, jutting out into the ocean
from Asia or from America, as England juts out from Europe."
The collieries in active operation at the present time are
as follows : R. Dunsmuir & Sons, North and South Wellington, under the management of Mr. Robt. Bryden ; East Wellington Coal Company, under the management of Mr. Chandler;,.
The Vancouver Coal Company, Nanaimo, under the management of Mr. S. Robins.
The following is their respective outputs for 1886 jj
s  .' '   ;'    VANCOUVER COAL COMPANY.   .p' , '    '
Foreign exportation .'.  Iff v$:..    79^37
Provincial consumption     '.*'     33,260
Coal on hand December 31st, 1886  882
"3.779
Coal on hand January 1st, 1886       ^Al9'
Total output for 1886 ..'. sjjt ......\ ..   112,360
WELLINGTON COLLIERY—R. Dunsmuir & Sons. :JjM
Foreign exportation  144,526
Provincial consumption -• -'f|'  '52>3°°
Coal on hand December 31st, 1886 .- fp||^|f||  20,711
217,537
Coal on hand January 1st, 1886.     31,691
Total output for 1886 j |     185,846
>        -      EAST WELLINGTON  COAL  COMPANY.   ,
Foreign exportation     25,042
Provincial consumption £  427
Coal on hand December 31st, 1886 *slil* " •       4,060
29,529
Coai on hand January 1st,  1886        1*500
Total output for 1886     28,029
Grand Total output for 1886 ^. M-   326,235,
_:~-y^_  _.   - : g.v i ," ■•■■
i
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mm
CITY  OF  VANCOUVER.
43;
Iron has been found in many localities both in the inter-
ior and coast of the Mainland, and on ? Vancouver Island and
Queen Charlotte Islands; but little attention has hitherto-
been paid to this class of ore. Iron manufacturing, however,,
must in the near future become one of the most important
industries in the Province, its close proximity to coal,, and the
easy facilities with which the one can be carried to the other
is a sufficient guarantee as to its future developments. The'
principal deposits of iron ore so far as known at present are
on Texada Island, the entrance to Sooke Inlet, and at Douglas
Portage on the Fraser River.
The first named is a mountainous mass of coarse granular
magnetic ore containing about 64 per cent, of iron and only
about .003 per cent, of phosphorous. A portion of this deposit
was bought by an American Company, which own a bog iron
area on Puget Sound. At first they mixed the two ores and
manufactured pig iron from them for the* San Francisco market.    Lately, however, they have used the Texada ore only.
The Douglas Portage ore is a beautiful kidney hematite,
similar in every respect to the North of England hematite-
arid of equal purity. As yet there is no means of shipping it
to a convenient point for utilizing it and nothing further than
prospecting it has been done. There is no doubt, however,,
that it will soon be sought after. A very important and extensive deposit is also to be found at the entrance to Sooke Harbor, which can be traced for several miles from the coast over
a hill over 500 feet in height and down the other side, and
from all indications the* whole hill is one mass of excellent
magnetic ore. A short distance along the ^coast from this,
deposit a fissure vein about 16 feet in width of hydrous hematite has also been found which adds materially to tl\e value of
the other, for the two qualities mixed and smelted together
produce a very super ior class of pig iron.
The following analysis made in Glasgow, Scotland,! of
three samples of iron ore from the Sooke district will give an
idea of its extraordinary purity:
,       .     '.'.'.'         IRON ORE. .   . '.'%, /&-■ ■
Hematite. Hematite..     Magnetic-
Peroxide of Iron     54.89 i&f65.36 65.00
Protoxide    "          23.61 18.36 31.50
Oxide of Manganese .£*...$' 23 .62 trace
Lime. .| 47 -33 -42
Magnesia.> ;••••*,       -52 I-lS -20
Phosphoric Acid '...:%m    .015 .03 trace
Sulphur J^lllf. lj. .        .02 trace \ .o8<
m I T
■44"
CITY  OF VANCOUVER.
1
I
Hematite. Hematite.'^ Magnetic.
Iron, combined with Sulphur... 0. ..*....        .02 trace                   .07
Alumina %.... ......'.. $$&    7.90 5.19                   .94
Titanic Acid ,;...'         .60 none                    .70
Silica f&M .      11.70 8.50                i 1.40
Water %^ ■'..-  10 .10                —1|
100.075 99-64 160.31
Iron, pure, per cent     56.80 60.03 70.07
Pig Iron, "    |pL W^i M- --iM 61.50 65.00 75-90
)§§ cwts. qts. lbs.   cwts. qts. lbs.   cwts. qts. lbs.
Pig Iron, per ton      12      1*5        12      o    o        15      o    20
Ore required to make a ton of Pig Iron   32.5 cwts.    30.8 cwts.     26.3 cwts.
Analysis <of an Ordinary Sample of Copper Ore.
Sulphur  i.. 20.90
Copper 'M 19.59
Iron..  13.97
Arsenic, Lead, Zinc $ None.
Oxide of Iron.  14.87
Lime  ... -:|? |B 2.12
I Magnesia S :. . . . 1.13
Carbonic Acid  /#.. . 1.50
j^-Alumina, .ffj - 7.03
Silica  ... .\  17.80
Water  .10
99.01
FISHERIES
The fisheries are probably the richest in the world.
Whales and seals abound in the northern seas. Sturgeon are
plentiful in the rivers and estuaries of British Columbia.
They are found weighing over 500 lbs., and are caught with
little difficulty.
Salmon are excellent, and most abundant. Those of
Fraser River are justly famous. There are five species, and
they make their way up the river for 1,000 miles. The silver
salmon begin to arrive in March or early in April, and last till
the end of June. The average weight is from four to twenty-
live lbs., but they have been caught weighing over seventy.
The second kind is caught from June to August, and are considered the finest. Their average weight is only five to six
lbs. The third coming in August, average seven lbs., and are
an excellent fish. The noan, or humpback salmon, comes
every second year, lasting from August till winter, weighing
from six to fourteen lbs. The hookbill arrives in September
and remains till winter, weighing from twelve to fifteen and
even forty-five lbs. Salmon is sold at Vancouver'at five cents
/per lb., and there appears to be no limit to the catch. CITY  OF  VANCOUVER.
4&
\0]
\
:
The principal salmon canneries are located on the Fraser
River, Alert Bay, Rivers Inlet, Skeena River, Metlakahtla and
Naas River. In addition to canning large quantities are
smoked and cured, and salted and packed in barrels for shipment^
The next important fish, and one which belongs to thi&
particular part of the Pacific, is the oolahan or candle fish,,
about the size of a sardine, and equal to it in every respect.
They1 are delicious when fresh, cured or salted, and their oil is
considered superior to cod liver oil for medicinal purposes.
They enter the Nass River about the 1st Mareh and the
Fraser about the 1st of May. Herrings swarm in the waters
of 'the straits. They are a little smaller than those found off
the coasts of the British Isles, though fully equal in quality
when taken at the proper season. The halibut and cod are
abundant, also anchovy, haddock, rock cod, flounder, whjting,
crab, ete., etc. The lobster, however, is a stranger to the
Pacific coast of America, though it is believed the waters are
suitable for their propagation.
The inland streams and lakes abound in salmon trout,,
mountain trout, and the famous fresh water white fish. A
valuable industry might be built up by preparing any or all
of these for the market. The dog fish is caught in large numbers, and a lubricating oil manufactured from them superior
to any other. The Skidegate Oil Co. manufactures this oil in
large quantities, and finds a ready market for it in the United
States, after paying 20 per cent. duty. Seals and sea otters
are annually caught in large numbers off the coast of Vancouver Island and tfhe northwest coast of the mainland, from
which a considerable revenue is derived.
Since the opening of the Canadian Pacific Railway" the
fish-curing business is receiving more attention, and there is
no doubt that in the near future it will become an important
item in the industrial enterprises of the Province.
5E»S3 46
CITY OF VANCOUVER.
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P CITY  OF  VANCOUVER.
47
FOREST WEALTH.
aft,
The forest wealth of the Province is one of its most important natural resources, the supply being almost inexhaustible.
The following brief account of forest trees to be found on
its shores will be^ interesting :
Douglas Spruce (Douglas Pine, Douglas Fir, or commercially Oregon Pine), very valuable tree. Western Hemlock,
large—found on coast and on Columbia River. Englemann's
Spruce—eastern part of province and interior plateau. Men-
zies' Spruce, very large, mostly on coast. Great Silver Fir,
coast tree of great size. Balsam Spruce, abounds in Gold and
Selkirk ranges, and east of McLeod's Lake. Williamson's Alpine Hemlock, too scarce and too high up to be of much use.
Red Pine, (Yellow Pine or Pitch Pine), a variety of the heavy
yellow pine of California and Oregon; very handsome; 4 feet
diameter; common in drier parts of interior. White Pine
(Mountain Pine), Columbia region—Shuswap and Adams'
Lakes—also interior of Vancouver Island. White-barked
Pine, small. Western Cedar (Giant Cedar or Red Cedar),
wood pale, yellowish or reddish color; very durable; often
found 100 to 150 feet high, and 15 .feet thick'. Yellow Cv-
pregs (Yellow Cedar), mainland coast, Vancouver and Queen
Charlotte Inlands. Western Larch (Tamarac), Rocky Mountains, Selkirk and Gold ranges, west to Shuswap Lake; large
tre£, yielding a strong, coarse, durable wood. Maple, valuable hardwood; Vancouver and adjacent islands, Queen Charlotte Island and the Mainland coast, up to 55°, attains a
diameter of 4 feet. Vine Maple, very strong, tough white
wood; confined to coast. Yew, Vancouver and opposite mainland shores; very tough and hard, and of a beautiful rose
color Crab-apple, along all the coasts;|wood very hard;
takes good polish and withstands great wear. Alder, two
feet thick, on the Lower Fraser, and along coast; good furniture wood. Western Birch (Paper or Canoe Birch), Columbia
region, Upper Fraser, Peace River; range and value not much
known. Oaky Vancouver Island; 70 feet in height, 3 feet in
diameter. Dogwood, Vancouver and coast opposite. Arbutus,
close grained, heavy, resembling box; reaches 50 feet in height,,
and 20 inches in diameter ; found on Vancouver and neighboring islands and on mainland.    Aspen Poplar, abounds over W
•
48 CITY'OF VANCOUNER.
the whole interior, reaching a thickness of two feet. Three other
varieties of poplars are found, commonly included under thename
of Cottonwood. One does not extend above Yale, and is the
same wood largely used in Puget Sound to make staves for
sugar barrels for San Francisco. The other two kinds occur
in valleys in the interior. Mountain Ash, in' the interior.
Juniper (Red Cedar or Pencil Cedar), east coast of Vancouver,
and along the shores of Kamloops and other lakes in interior
The economic value of all these trees is, as yet, imperfectly
known. The large sawmills on the coast cut the Douglas
spruce largely for the markets of Australia, South America,
China, &c. It grows in quantity near the coast, close to the waters
of the bays and inlets. There it frequently exceeds eight feet in
diariieter, at a considerable height, and reaches 200 to 300 feet
in length, forming prodigious, dark forests. Abounds on
mainland coast, as far north as about the north end of Vancouver Island; also in Vancouver Island, but not on Queen
Charlotte Island. In the arid southern interior of the province grows on the higher uplands, and here and there, in
groves, on low lands, where the temperature, rainfall, etc., are
suitablel Occurs abundantly on the - Columbia River, and is
scattered irregularly in northern portions of the interior. Tne
timber is straight, though coarse grained, exceedingly tough,
rigid, and bears great transverse strain, For lumber of all
sizes, and planks it is in great demand. Few woods equal it
for frames, bridges, ties, and strong work generally, and for
ship-building. Its length, straightness and strength especially
fit it for masts and spars. Masts specially ordered have been
shipped, 130 feet long and 42 inches, octagonally hewn. The
section of a British Columbia Douglas spruce in the grounds
of the Parliament Buildings, Ottawa, is 8 feet 4 iuches in
diameter. The tree was 305 feet high. The tall flag-pole in
the Botanical gardens, Kew, near London, England, is a young
Douglas spruce.
The White Pine of British Columbia is of similar quality
to the White Pine of Eastern Canada. The Red Pine (Yellow
or Pitch Pine),—Pinus Ponderosa,—is a large tree, that makes
good lumber. The same may be said of the Western Larch
or Tamarac, which, together with the above named trees and
Cedar, is very abundant in the southeastern' part ,of the Province. CITY  OF VANCOUVER. 49
FARM    LANDS.
The mouth of the Fraser River, the principal river in
British Columbia, is bounded on either side by low-lying delta
lands, very rich in soil, and producing immense crops. Of the
grain products, this land is best suited for growing oats, the
product of a single acre being, in favorable seasons, 75 bushels.
Barley yields 40 bushels to the acre, and hay 3J tons. Turnips, 40 to 50 tons to the acre, and potatoes 30 tons. Roots
and vegetables grow to an immense size, and the yield is invariably very prolific. There are large tracts of alluvial soil
further up the Fraser and along its tributaries, such as the
Pitt River and the Sumas River. Large settlements of prosperous farmers are to be seen all along the banks of the Fraser, more particularly below Yale. It has been estimated that
1,000 square miles of land east of the Fraser, in the southern
portion of the Province, may be easily utilized for agricultural
and grazing purposes, and thousands and thousands of acres
in the Spallumcheen, Salmon, Okanagan, Kootenay and Columbia districts. Some of these may require irrigation, but
the greater portion yields abundant crops without artificial
watering. For grazing purposes the bench lands in the higher
altitudes are unsurpassed, the famous and nutritious bunch
grass being the natural covering. Some of these are in direct
communication with the Canadian Pacific Railway, and those
that are not at present will soon be, and schemes are now being considered to tap these fertile valleys; many are also in
direct communication with the navigable waters of the Fraser,
giving easy carrying facilities by rail or water for produce
east or west.
All the delta lands of the Lower Fraser have been taken
up, but only a very small area is under cultivation, large
tracts of it being owned by speculators, and till such times as
it changes hands its development will be delayed. If some of
our energetic eastern farmers were to take hold of it they
would make it one of the most beautiful and most prolific districts in the Province, rivaling California. In any other district in the Province the settler can pre-empt good land without any difficulty. Fruits of the temperate zone grow to perfection along the lower Fraser and in the valleys of the interior. Apples, pears, plums, peaches, cherries, strawberries,
gooseberries, and other smaller fruits grow to perfection. All
these fruits are better here than in California, for this reason: m *
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CITY   OF VANCOUVER.
in California the warmer climate forces them to maturity before they attain their qualities of flavor, while here the growth
is slower and more uniform, and when they become ripe they
are fully developed in every respect.
The opening of the railway has opened up a ready market for this kind of produce in the Northwest and Manitoba,
the demand at present being far in excess of. the supply, and
a large quantity of California and Oregon fruits are shipped
to eastern points daily which might be shipped from this Province. With the influx of settlers which the railway is bringing to our shores no doubt soon these markets will be supplied altogether from this Province.
There is still a great area of the Province unexplored, and
no doubt in the interior west of the Fraser, large tracts of
good land will be found.
The Province has as yet only been partially explored, and
during; the next few vears valuable discoveries will be made
in minerals, and fertile valleys hitherto unheard of will be
brought to light. All classes of society can find a home in
British Columbia, and there is no country in the world to-day
which has the same brilliant prospects of prosperity.
Provincial Reports for 1886.
#    GOVERNMENT ESTIMATES.
The estimated revenues and expenditure for 1886-7,
places the revenue at $576,161.05, and the proposed expenditure at $710,524.50, an excess of expenditure over receipts of
$134,363.45. Following are the heads of the various accounts
in receipts and expenditures :
'   c> HEADS OF RECEIPTS. ;
Dominion of Canada, annual payment of interest @ 5 per cent $ 29,1151 05
" " " " subsidy to Government and
Legislature     355°°° °°
Dominion of Canada, annual payment of grant per capita     48,000 00
" h 1 i       for lands conveyed in trust...  100,00000
Land Sales   100,000 00
Land Revenue 1       5»000 00
Rents, exclusive of Land  200 00
Rents, Ferries  200 00
Rents, Timber Leases and Licenses       6,000 00
Free Miners Certificates     24,000 00
Mining Receipts, General     10,000 00 ■■*
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CITY OF  VANCOUVER. 51
Licenses  $30,000 00
Fines, Forfeitures and Fees  6,500 00
Sale of Government Property  400 00
Reimbursements in aid .'  5,000 00
Miscellaneous Receipts  1,200 00 *
Marriage Licenses  1,400 00
Road Tolls    10,000 00
Arrears of Real Estate Tax, 1 per cent., 1885, 1886  50 00
Provincial Revenue Tax \  75)°°° °P
Real Property Tax   24,000 00
Personal Property Tax ,  20,000 00
Income Tax  i,5°° °°
Wild Land Tax    10,000 00
Printing Office Receipts \  1,700 00
Law Stamps *  53°°° °°
Registry Fees * :  15,000 00
Survey Fees  5°° °°
Asylum for the Insane  100 00
Interest on Investments of Sinking Fund .\ 6,500 00
Tax Sale Deeds .tip,  . I  100 00
Supreme Court Fees  2,500 00
Real Estate Tax 'Redemption  100 .00
Revenue Service, Refunds  60 00
Dominion Government, Refund under the Chinese^ Restriction Act..v    2,000 op
Total V.V  ..$576,161 05
} EXPENDITURES.   . ; M      ' 7>
Public Debt :sfL .;. . $ 72,343 00
Civil Government (Salaries) ' .  62,290 00
Administration of Justice (Salaries)  75*43^ 00
•Legislation  19,800 00
Public Institutions (Maintenance)  9,650 00
Hospitals and Charities  21,250 00
Administration of Justice, other than Salaries <> 50,000 00
Education  94,405 00
Transport  3,150 00
Rent. *  48 50
Revenue Services  7,000 00
Public Works 225,350 00
Miscellaneous . *  69,800 00
Total $710,524 50
Trade Returns
Exports of the Province of British Columbia,, for year
ending 30th June, 1886:
The Mine—
Gold in Dust and Bars.,..;%....  .$746,690 96
Coal  O . .,     973,1^5 op
Iron Ore  440 00
 ! $1,720,325 96
Fisheries  633,110 00 '-•'■•- •-   "..- ■    '.	
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CITY   OF  VANCOUVER
Forest :.....:.:.'...... .v%  $ 200,178 oe»
Animals and their produce    ;;..' Lv  329,248 00*
Agricultural produce ,.. f\ .. 1,917 00
Manufacture's  1,035 00
Total, the produce of B. C   $2,885,823 96
"     not the "         U  .'.. 61,8050a
	
Total Exports  $2^947,628 96
In, excess of the above exported to Eastern  Provinces, Canned
Salmon.....:.  40,846 00
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Imports into the Province of British Columbia, for the
year ended 30th June, 1886*:
Victoria— >:r
Dutiable Goods ........	
^5    Free *	
Leaf Tobacco, excise purposes...
Total	
New Westminster, inclu'g Vancouver,
Nanaimo .....*	
Total Imports ........
In excess of the above goods imported from Eastern Provinces of the
Dominion at
Victoria	
Nanaimo	
Total
Value  of
Total Imports
$2,485,923
409,572
38,635
2,934>i3°
721,908
300,270
$3,956,308
968,667
29,366
$998,033
Entered for Consumption,
Value.   , I Duty Received,
$2,549*975
40^,600
30,438
2,990,013
721,908
300,270
$782,095 99
782,095 99
57,006 36
41,290 81
$4,012,191
$880,393 16
968,667
29,366
Free.
$998,033
The Export trade of British Columbia to  the  United
States, during 1886, was as follows :
Coal $ 896,312 84
Treasure:     693,815 36
Furs, Hides-and Skins  299,721 95
Seal Skins (Undressed)  ... 218,452 61
Canned Salmon and Fish Oil  53,676 6a
Tobacco and Liquors  21,055 0I
Opium, Rice and Chinese Goods \ 7 18,973 03
Miscellaneous , .;.;.; I •  46,934 14
Total    .......-, .$2,248,941 54
This is 11 per cent, increase on the average of the three previous years.
w CITY  OF VANCOUVER. 53
Vancouver^ j&gfcei1 (Jifcieg iq British Columbia.
VICTORIA.
i • Victoria, the present capital of the Province, is situated
on the south-east point of Vancouver Island. The city is well
laid out and substantially built, its churches, schools, and
other public buildings having an appeajance of English solidity about them, while the suburbs of the city and approaches
are decidedly beautiful. The most prominent public buildings
are the Post Office, City Hall, Engine House, Custom House,
Odd Fellows' and Masonic Temples, The Government Buildings, Public School, Colonist Buildings, Bank of British/ Columbia Building, Clarence Hotel, Opera House, Union Club,
&c. Victoria has a population of about 12,000, which includes
about 3,000 Chinese. It is the southern terminus of the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Bail way and has communication by
water with the principal ports on the Pacific coast. The
- Hudson Bay Company is actively represented in this city and
many mercantile firms have their headquarters here.' The
press is well represented by four daily newspapers and two
weeklies, the leading papers being the Daily Times and Daily
Colonist. Victoria is the Brighton of British Columbia and
will always be a favorite holiday resort.
'  ••#''    -'i3 ■ -.   ■■   .   -   NEW WESTMINSTER.        '  ■' - ]
New Westminster is situated on a sloping hillside on the
north bank of the Fraser River, about eighteen miles from its
mouth, and about ten miles south of Vancouver. The city
presents a very picturesque appearance from the river, and
from the deck of the passing steamer its public buildings appear to the best advantage. In the fall of last year the branch
line from the C. P. B. was opened and trains commenced running; into New Westminster, from which time it has made
considerable progress. The time is not far distant when the
street car will maintain constant communication with the terminal city of Vancouver, and the two cities become so closely
connected as to appear one. New Westminster has a population of about 6,000, and from its advantageous location on the
main artery of the mainland commands the major portion of
the business Irom the settlements on the banks of the river.
It has communication with Victoria three times weekly by the
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CITY  OF VANCOUVER,
C. P. N. Co.'s steamers, also steamboat connection with Nanaimo and Puget Sound. Steamers also run up the river as far
as Yale, a distance of 410 miles, and one of the most beautiful
trips imaginable. It is the centre of the salmon canning
industry, and a few miles down the river is located tne canning establishment of Messrs. Ewen & Co., where the, famous
Lion brand is put up. Several sawmills also do a thriving
business in its vicinity. Altogether New Westminster's future
is a bright one, and from the excellent agricultural ? district
which it commands must become an important business point.
The press is represented in this city by the Columbian, a daily
and the Mainland Guardian, a semi-weekly publication.
'v    Sl^Sll   . ...  M/y NANAIMO. ....■>•:.•,•',...■     '■■%/.
Nanaimo, the third city of the Province, was incorporated
in 1874. It is the centre of the coal mining industry, embracing the extensive collieries of the Vancouver Coal Company, Dunsmuir & Sons, and the East Wellington Coal Company. The Vancouver Coal Company's mines in the immediate vicinity are the most extensive, taking in a large area.
Since the general management was undertaken by Mr. S.
Bobins, wonderful progress has been made, many difficulties
overcome, the output largely increased, and the profits of the
company largely augmented. Mr. Robins is a most genial
gentlemen, having the welfare of his employees always at heart,
which has gained for him the regard of all. The collieries of
Nanaimo and vicinity give employment to about 1,500 men,
which makes Nanaimo quite a lively place. It has a population of about 4,000, nearly one-fourth of which are Chinese.
Nanaimo is the northern terminus of the Esquimalt and
Nanaimo Railway, which will create a better outlet for its
coal. The city is distant 'from Vancouver about 40 miles
across the Gulf of Georgia, and between the places about midway is Texada Island famous for its iron ore. Regular weekly
communication is kept up between the two cities by the
steamer R. Dunsmuir. The press is represented in the city
by the Free Press, published semi-weekly.
^. ■■'ijjgjjjf,,'..-- KAMLOOPS.    ■■,-.",:■.   •■.:«,....;.■•.•.
Kamloops, though not yet dignified by the name of city,
will soon be an applicant for that honor. It is situated at the
junction of the North and South Thompson Rivers. It was
located by the Hudson Bay Company in 1863, but  did not
rt CITY  OF  VANCOUVER.
05
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attract much attention till the construction of the Pacific
division of the 0. P. R. was commenced in 1880, after which
it made rapid progress. In the vicinity of Kamloops and between it and Cariboo some valuable ledges of gold bearing
quartz and other minerals have been discovered. A railway
is contemplated between Kamloops and Cariboo which will
further develop the mineral resources of that district. There
is an extensive area of first-class grazing land around Kamloops which adds considerably to the attractions of the place.
The press is represented in the town by the Inland Sentinel,
published semi-weekly. Kamloops will grow with the development of the country, and will become an important station
on the C. P. R.
There are many thriving settlements on the Island notably Alberni, on the West coast and Comox on the East coast,
and also Chemainus, Cowichan and Saanich. On the Mainland from the mouth of the Fraser all along its banks nearly
to Yale, healthy settlements have sprung into existence. Delta,
North Arm, Alder Grove, Langley, Maple Ridge, Matsqui,
Sumas, Chilliwhack, Popcum, &c. Chilliwhack is particularly
worthy of mention as being, I might call, the garden of the
Province. The farmers in this district are all in comfortable
circumstances and their farms well under cultivation, producing the finest crops that can be found anywhere in the world.
A railway company has been formed, to run a line from Pop-
cun, a few miles above Chilliwhack, to Ladner's Landing,
near the mouth of the Frasei, south of the river, a distance of
about 70 miles, which will greatly benefit the agricultural
country south of the Fraser.
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT LANDS.
Crown lands in British Columbia are classified as either surveyed or unsurveyed
lands, and may be acquired either by record and pre-emption, or by purchase.
PRE-EMPTIONS.
The following persons may record or pre-empt Crown lands, viz.: Any person
being the head or a family, a widow, or a single man over 18 years of age, being a
British subject, may record surveyed or unsurveyed Crown lands which are unoccupied, or unreserved, and unrecorded.
Aliens may also record such surveyed or unsurveyed lands, on making a declaration of intention to become a British subject.
The quantity of land) which may be recorded or pre-empted is not to exceed 320
acres northward and eastward of the Cascade or Coast Mountains, or 160 acres in
the rest of the Province.
No person can hold more than one pre-emption claim at a time. Prior record or
pre-emption of one claim, and all rights under it, are forfeited by subsequent record
or pre-emption of another claim.
Land recorded or pre-empted cannot be transferred or conveyed till after a
Crown grant has been issued. kjP mmmwm
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CITY  OF  VANCOUVER.
Such land, until the Crown grant is issued, is held by occupation. Such occupation .must be a bona fide personal residence of the settler or homestead settler, or his
family or agent.   Indians or Chinese cannot be agents.
The settler must enter into occupation of the land within thirty days after
recording, and must continue to occupy it.
Continuous absence for a longer period than two months consecutively, of the
settler or homestead settler, and his agent or family, is deemed cessation of occupation V but leave of absence may be granted not! exceeding four months in anyone
year, inclusive of the two months' absence.
Land is considered abandoned if unoccupied for more than four months in the
aggregate in one year, or for more than two months consecutively.
If so abandoned, the land becomes waste land of the Crown, without any cancellation of the record.
The fee on recording is two dollars.
The settler may either have the land surveyed at his own instance, (subject to
rectification of boundaries), or wait till the Chief Commissioner causes it to be surveyed.
After survey has been made, upon proof, by declaration in writing of himself
and two other persons, of occupation from* date of pre-emption, and of having made
permanent improvements on the land to the value of two dollars and fifty cents per
acre, the settler, on producing the pre-emption certificate, obtains a certificate of
improvement.
After obtaining the certificate of improvement and paying for the land, the
settler is entitled to a Crown grant in fee simple.*   He pays five dollars therefor.
JT PAYMENT FOR LAND AND CROWN GRANT.
The price of Crown lands pre-empted, is one dollar per acre, Which may be paid
in four equal instalments, as follows—First instalment, two years from date of
record or pre-emption, and each other instalment yearly thereafter, until the full
amount is paid.   But the last instalment is not payable till after the survey.
The Crown grant excludes gold and silver ore, and reserves to the Crown a royalty of five cents per ton on every ton of merchantable coal raised or gotten from the
land, not including dross or fine slack.
No Crown grant can be issued to an alien who may have recorded or pre-empted
by virtue of his declaring his intention to become a British subject, unless he has
become naturalized.
The heirs or devisees of the homestead settler are, if resident in the province,
entitled to the Crown grant, on his decease. $$5*
If they are absent from the province at the time of his death, the Chief Commissioner may dispose of the pre-emption, and make such provision for the person
entitled thereto, as he may deem just.
PRE-EMPTIONS FOR PARTNERSHIP PURPOSES.
Partners, not exceeding four, may pre-empt, as a firm, 160 acres, west of the
Cascades, to each partner, and 320 acres, east of the Cascades, to each partner.
Each partner must represent his interest in the firm by actual residence on the
land, of himself or agent. But each partner, or his agent, need not reside on his
particular pre-emption. ♦'
.   The partners, or their agents, may reside together on one homestead, if the.
homestead be situated on any part of the partnership pre-emption.
For obtaining a certificate of improvement, it is sufficient to show that improvements have been made on some portion of the claim, amounting, in the aggregate,
to two dollars and fifty cents per acre on the whole land.
MILITARY AND NAVAL SETTLERS. }|.
Military and Naval officers, of 7 years' service, may acquire free grants of land,
under the " Military and Naval Settlers' Act, 1863." This applies only to the mainland of British Columbia.
FREE GRANTS FOR IMMIGRATION.
The Lieutenant-Governor in Council may, subject to such provisions and restrictions as he may deem advisable, make special free, or partially free, grants of
unoccupied or unappropriated lands, for the encouragement of immigration, or
other purposes of public advantage.
FOR DRAINAGE AND DYKING.
The Lieutenant-Governor in Council may sell any vacant lands, or make free
grants thereof, to any person or company, for the purpose of dyking, draining, or
irrigating the same, subject-to such regulations as he may think fit.
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m CITY OF VANCOUVER.
57
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SALE OF SURVEYED LANDS.
Vacant surveyed lands, which are not the sites of towns or the suburbs thereof,
*and not Indian settlements, may be purchased at the rate of two dollars and fifty
cents per acre- Surveyed lands purchased under the provisions of this section must
be paid for in full at the time of the purchase thereof.
SALE OF UNSURVEYED LANDS.
The applicant to purchase unsurveyed Crown lands, after staking, posting, &c,
must .give two months notice of his intended application in the Government Gazette,
and in any newspaper circulating in the district where the land is situate.
He must also have the land surveyed at his ovgi expense, by a surveyor approved
of and acting under the instructions of the Chief Commissioner.
The price* is two dollars and fifty cents per acre, to be paid as follows:—10 per
cent, at the time of application, and 90 per cent, on completion and acceptance of
survey.
The quantity of land must be not less than 160 dfcres, nor more than 640 acres.
The purchase must be completed within six months from date of application.
WATER RIGHTS.
Landholders may divert, for agricultural or other purposes, the required quantity of unrecorded and unappropriated water from the natural channel of any
stream, lake, etc., adjacent to or passing through their land, upon obtaining the
written authority of the Commissioner.
HOMESTEAD ACT.
The farm and buildings, when registered, cannot be taken for debt incurred,
after the registration ; it is free from seizure up to a value not greater than 2,500
dollars (£500 English); goods and chattels are also free up to 500 dollars (£100 English);
oattle " farmed on shares " are also protected by an Exemption Act.
TIMBER LICENSES.
Unlicensed persons, except for farm and mining purposes, etc., are not permitted
to cut trees on Crown' lands. A timber license may be granted for 1,000 acres for four
;years on payment of $10 annually, and 15 cents for each tree (except hemlock) felled,
passable half yearly. No person can hold more than one license at the same time,
and it is not transferable. Millowners cannot saw logs taken from Crown lands (in
which are included lands leased at less than ten cents an acre) until the timber dues
of twenty cents per thousand feet board measure are paid.
MINING LAWS.
fr Free Miners.
"Free Miners" only can have right or interest in mining claims or ditches. A
"free miner" must be over 16 years of age. His certificate may be for one year ($5),
vOr three years ($15), and is not transferable. He may enter and mine Crown lands,
or, on making compensation, lands occupied for other than mining purposes. To
recover wages, must have free miner's certificate.
RECORD, &.C., OF CLAIMS.
Claims must be recorded ($2.50), and re-recorded ($2.50). Time allowed for record
Is three days after location, if within ten miles of office—one additional day for
.every additional ten miles, or fraction thereof. In very remote places, miners, assembled in meeting, may make valid rules temporarily. Transfers of claims or mining interests must be in writing and registered. Free miners may hold any number
of claims by purchase, but only two by pre-emption, except in certain cases. Claims
may be officially laid over, and leave of absence granted in certain cases, but the
rule is that every full claim or full interest must be worked either b}r owner or
>agent. A free miner can, by record, get a fair share of water necessary to work
claim. A claim is deemed open if unworked for 72 hours on working days, unless
for sickness or other reasonable cause.
NATURE AND SIZE OF ORDINARY MINING CLAIMS.
Claims, as far as possible, are rectangular and must be staked by post or tree.
Sizes are, "bar diggins," 100 feet wide at high-water mark, and thence extend into
the river at its lowest water level. "Dry diggings" 100 feet square. "Creek claims"
100 feet long, measured inrthe direction of the general course of the stream, and
rshall extend in width from base to base of the hill or bench on each side, but when
the hills or benches are less than 100 feet apart the claim shall be 100 feet square.
"Bench claims" 100 feet square. " Hill claims" base line fronting a stream 100 feet—
parallel side lines at right angles thereto at summit of hill. Posts 100 feet apart.
Claim not to coine within 100 feet of any gulch or tributary of cre&t^Measurements
liorizontal, irrespective of surface inequalities. —.■
58
CITY  OF  VANCOUVER.
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DISCOVERERS' CLAIMS.
To one discoverer       300 feet in length.
To a party of two discoverers        600    "
To a party of three discoverers       800    <s
To a party of four discoverers      1000    " "
And to each member of a party beyond four in number, a claim of the
ordinary size only.
The above increase of size applies to dry, bar, bench, creek, or hill diggings, not.
to quartz claims or minerals in lodes or veins.
A new stratum of auriferous earth or gravel situated in a locality where the
claims are abandoned, shall, for the above purposes, be deemed a new mine, although the same locality shall have been previously worked at a different level;
and dry diggings discovered in the vicinity of bar diggings shall be deemed a new
mine, and vice versa.   A discoverer's claim shall be reckoned as one ordinary claim.
Creek discovery claims shalf extend 1,000 feet on each side of the centre of the
creek, or as far as the summit.
LEAVE OF ABSENCE.
On discovery of new lode or vein containing minerals, 6 months.
On proving'expenditure, in cash, labor, or machinery, of $1,000 on each full interest (without reasonable return). 1 year.
Under other conditions Gold Commissioner has option.
MINERAL CLAIMS.
" Mineral claims,"—that is, claims containing, or supposed to contain, minerals*
precious or base (other than coal), in lodes or veins, or rock in place—shall be 1,500
feet wide, and, as nearly as possible, in rectangular form. Must have 3 posts (or tree
posts) at equal distances along centre line, with a notice on each. Only one claim
on the same lode or vein can be held, except by purchase. Quartz claims are deemed to be mineral claims.
In order to get a Crown grant for a mineral claim lawfully held, it must be surveyed by a surveyor approved by the Land Office; notice of application for the
grant must be posted conspicuously on the land and on the Government office of
the district, also inserted for sixty days in the Government Gazette and a newspaper,
if any, circulating in the district, and proof must be given to the satisfaction of the
Government officers that $1,000 have been bona fide expended in money or labor
upon the claim. Or a Crown grant"may be got by paying $50 per acre to the Government, in lieu of representation and expenditure on the claim.
General provisions for ordinary mining claims apply to mineral claims as far as
may be. m
The proper representation of a "mineral" claim requires that the sum of two
hundred dollars, in money, labor, or improvements, '/shall be expended annually
upon the claim, to the satisfaction of a Gold Commissioner, and that the owner shall
have obtained a certificate from the Gold Commissioner to that effect, within a year
from the location of the claim, and thereafter annually, and shall have recorded the
certificate immediately after its issue.
An annual tax of $1 per acre, or fractional part of an acre, of every mineral
claim is payable on the 31st December.
Leases of mining ground, ditch privileges, etc., may be issued, but will not in
general be granted for a longer term than ten years, or for a quantity of ground
greater than—
In dry diggings, ten acres;
In bar diggings, unworked, half a mile in length along the high-water mark.
In bar diggings worked and abandoned, one mile and a half in length along the
high-water mark.
The regulations as to flumes, ditches and drainage need not be detailed, but it
may be stated that the water taken into a ditch or sluice has to be measured at the
ditch or sluice head. No water should be taken into a ditch or sluice except in a
trough placed horizontally at the place at which the water enters it. One inch of
water means half the quantity that will pass through an orifice two inches high by
one inch wide, with a constant head of seven inches above the upper side of the
orifice.
COAL PROSPECTING LICENSES.
A twelve months' prospecting license for 480 acres of vacant coal land, in one
block, may be granted by the Government on payment of $25. The license may be
extended ior another year if the licensee has actually explored for coal, on payment
of $50. The license is not transferable without notice being given to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works. If a licensee wishes to purchase coal lands,, he may
do so under the said Land Act at $2.50 per acre. CITY OF VANCOUVER.
50"*
Brief p#oflI of the Canadian pacific R^ailMd
FROM THE TIME IT WAS INCORPORATED.
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The Canadian Pacific Railway Company was chartered
by the Dominion Parliament in February, 1881.    Previously,
to that time a portion  of its lines existed as partially completed  government  enterprises in charge of the  Canadian.
Minister of Public Works.    Seven years ago, the projected-
railway was estimated as requiring 2,000 miles to be constructed westward to  the Pacific  ocean from  the  existing,
railway system of the Province of Ontario,  at Callander, orb
Lake Nepissing, and Sanford Fleming was then the engineer
in charge of the construction.    Sir Charles Tupper, who was
minister of Public Works, reported on June 30th, 1879, that,
there were 274 miles of railway in operation, and -433 miles
under construction,  about $11,500,000 having already  been.
expended, and contracts made involving some $9,000,000 more..
Work was being done upon three  sections  of the line, the
westernmost being.   Winnipeg  and   Lake   Superior.     The
anticipation then was  that the  through railway  might be
completed by the spring 1891.    The Company was afterwards -
chartered with $100,000,000  authorized  capital, and $5,000,
000 was subscribed and paid in.    Sir George Stephen of Montreal was made president, and has continued at the head of
the enterprise ever  since.    At the close of 1881, ^jhen the
company got fairly into operation, there were 367 miles of
railway completed and 290 more from Ottawa westward to
Lake Nepissing had been bought, to  give a route from the
capital of the Dominion, to the point where the charter made-
the   new  line  begin.    Westward  from Lake Nepissing  to-
Thunder Bay, on Lake Superior, a distance of 650 miles, but
little work had been done, and in fact this section was among^
the last Completed.    From Thunder Bay further westward to
Winnipeg, 425 miles, the railway was finished in 1882, and 200
miles more still further westward from Winnipeg, were also
then completed, leaving a gap of 700 miles to the Rockies.
Nothing had been  done on  the  mountain section, and the
Canadian Government was  at that  time constructing as  a:
public  work, the  section  between the mountains and the
Pacific ocean.    The government had. also some time previously
finished the Pembina branch,, extending 65. miles southward ,
80
CITY OF  VANCOUVER,
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from Winnipeg to the United States boundary. In chartering the railway, Canada imitated the policy of the United
States Congress towards the earlier Pacific Railways, by giving both a money and land subsidy. It promised $25,000,000
subsidy in money, and also 25,000,000 acres of lands along the
route westward of Winnipeg to the rockies, to be available as
short sections of the line were built. It also authorized the
company to mortgage its land grant for $25,000,000, at 5 per
cent, for 50 years to raise more money, and in addition to issue
a mortgage on the line as completed, at the rate of $10,000
per mile.
The small beginnings of the great railway are shown, by
the first financial statement for the  year  ending June 30th,
1881, when it had $388,527 traffic receipts, $347,116 operating
expenses, and $41,411 net earnings.
The charted gave the company very large powers, including the right to build branches, open telegraph lines, and
establish steamer lines from its terminals.    Bv  the  close of
1882, there were 1,730 miles of railway acquired or built, and
the company had then issued $20,000,000 land grant bonds,
depositing the proceeds of their sales with the government,
which allowed 4 per cent, interest thereon, and paid the principal back to the company as the railway construction proceeded. The remaining $5,000,000 land grant bonds were
held by the government as security that the company would
fulfil its agreements. It had at that time sold over 6,000,000
acres of lands, and with part of the proceeds redeemed nearly
$4,000,000 of the land grant bonds. Over $15,000,000 had
then been expended on construction, and the traffic receipts
for 1882, had increased to $3,344,852, and the net earnings to
$882,629. The railway at the close of 1883 hadpbuilt or
acquired 2,157 miles of the main line, and on November 1st
of that year, the government guarantee of 3 percent, dividend
annually on the share capital for 10 years became operative.
In addition to the main line, over 1,000 miles of branches had
been acquired ortr built, ,and the capital stock issued was
increased to $65,000,000. In 1884 the Ontario and Quebec
system of railways was leased in perpetuity, making the
eastern limit of the line at Quebec. There was also established a steamer line* on the lakes, to cover the unfinished gap
in the line north of Lake Superior. This gave a complete
route by rail and water from Quebec "to the Rockies. The
government gave an additional benefit by loaning $22,500,000
rt
iV— CITY  OF VANCOUVER.
61
*n
^
during 1884, to aid construction, which had so far progressed,,
that an engagement was then entered into that the main line
should be completed by May 3.1.st, 1886*
" At the close of 1883, over $78,000,000 had been expended
on the lines, and at the close of 1884, this had increased to
$112,000,000. The great work was completed across the continent in November, 1885, and through train service was
commenced in the following June: The first train leaving
Montreal on the evening of the 28th, and arriving- at Port
Moody on the 4th of July. The journey occupying 136 hours ;;.
the final completion of the railway, however, to Vancouver,,
its Western terminus was not accomplished until February of
the present year, when, on the afternoon of the 23rd, the
whistle of the first locomotive, was heard within the terminal
city limit's. The line on the Lake Superior and Rocky Mountain sections embraces some of the most difficult railway work
ever undertaken. $$;
. The gauge is the standard of the United States—4 feet
8| inches, and the aggregate mileage of the Company is 4,338
miles including the leased lines.
The company last spring made a new financial arrangement with the Canadian government, which came into complete effect July 1st, by which, through the negotiation of its
First Mortgage, five per cent. Bonds at 104 in London, it
secured money to pay part of its government indebtedness,
lands at $1.50 per acre being accepted to repay the remainder,
and also the interest due thereon. It thus honorably discharged all its government obligations, repaid the money
loaned to it, five years before the debt was due, and completed
the contract for building the railway in half the time stipulated. Brieflv stated, the gifts made bv the Dominion, to secure
the consummation of this great work were $25,000,000 cash,
subsidy, 712 miles of government railways, previously constructed at ah aggregate outlay of about $35,000,000, and also
25,000,000 acres of lands. The other loans and advances made
were repaid, and there still continues the guarantee of 3 per
cent, annual dividends on the share capital until 1893. When
the line was completed to the salt water and the company had
made final settlement with the government, the total capital
liability of the Canadian Pacific Railway stood approximately
at $126,884,013, made up of $65,000,000 share capital, and
the remainder bonded debt and capitalized .leases; There are
$35,000,000 First Mortgage Bonds, chiefly held in England, »
62
CITY  OF VANCOUVER.
(where most of the capital has been secured ;) the Quebec province is creditor for $3,500,000 on account of railways bought;
there are $1,823,333 Canada Central Railway bonds, and the
leases capitalized at 5 per cent, amount to $21,560,680. The
financial statement for 1885 showed $8,368,493 gross receipts, $5,143,276 expenses, and $3,225,217 net earnings.
For last year, the company's gross receipts for seven months
ending with July, amounted to $5^3.58,691, the expenses to
$3,406,854, and the net earnings to $1,751,837. The increased net earnings compared with the corresponding period of 1885 were $191,850. The net earnings for year ending December 31st, 1886, are in the neighborhood of
$3,750,000. In addition to the gifts of money,Tlands and
completed railways made by the Dominion government,
other valuable advantages have been given to the Canadian
Pacific Railway. All the lands used in construction for
roadbed, stations, yards and water frontage at terminals have
been a free gift, while the Dominion government admitted
free of customs duty, all rails, timbers, and other materials
imported for the building of the railway and telegraph lines.
The charter also gave the company a monopoly for twenty
years of the territory between its lines and the United States
boundary, by prohibiting during that period the building of
lines there, by other parties excepting roads running southwest, and they are not permitted to approach within 15 miles
of the boundary. The company's properties of every
description, and also its capital stock, are for ever exempted
from all national or local taxation ; and this exemption is
further extended to the land grant for 20 years, unless the
lands are sooner sold or occupied. The company can take
from the public lands, such stone, timber or other materials
a,s they wish to use in construction.
They are authorized to establish "fair tolls" by concert
with the government; and the charter prohibits the reduction of these tolls either by the government or by parliament
"below such rates as would afford a profit of 10 per cent,
per annum on the capital invested."
The grant of such great privileges as these, is unusual,
but it was necessary to get the work undertaken at a time
when the project of building a railway over the difficult and
-almost unexplored mountain ranges of British Columbia
seemed almost impracticable.
The route of the Canadian Pacific Railway goes through
a region of widely* diversified characteristics.    The first 350 CITY  OF  VANCOUVER. 63
M
miles, carrying the lines westward from Montreal to Lake
Nepissing, is through an old and well developed country,
and commands the immense timber traffic of the Ottawa
River valley. The next 1,000 miles reaches the edge of the
great prairie east of Winnipeg, This section is developed
only in portions. It passes through extensive forests and
also valuable mineral lands abounding in copper, iron and
silver. It is thinly populated, however, especially in the
portions north of Lakes Superior and Huron. For 900 miles
westward of Winnipeg is a prairie, one of the finest agricultural regions in the world, and being gradually developed by
opening branch railway lines and the expansion of the many
towns and villages that grow up at favorable locations. The
settlement of this region was begun before the railway came
along, but opening the line gave it a great impetus and
started many new towns. In this liistrict nearly the entire
land grant of the railway is located, and the rich soil extends
to the bases of the Rockies, gradually changing in character
from agricultural to grazing lands. The remainder of the
railway is over a rough country, traversing the various mountain ranges, where there are immense forests and magnificent
scenery. There is a fine grazing region at Kamloops and
if good farming country along the Lower Fraser River.    In
fact the railroad is constructed through every variety of country, and it serves all kinds of traffic interests. In making
the roadway the mountains are crossed at a lower elevation
than upon the transcontinental lines in the United States,
and the mountain gradients, with a .single exception, are
easy. The average mountain grade does not exceed 66 feet
per mile, though on portions of the slope 116 feet per mile
is reached, and in one section of 7\ miles, at the summit of
the Rocky mountain range, there is a gradient of 212 feet to
the mile, requiring the use of extra locomotives in aiding the
, ascent or retarding the descent of heavy trains. The manner of construction of the Canadian Pacific line is admirable,
and exceeds in stability and completeness most of the American railways.
Altogether the building of the Canadian Pacific railway,
in the face of the many difficulties and obstacles, that have
confronted the work was a stupendous enterprise most successfully performed. How important this route becomes
when British interests on the Pacific are considered. Mr.
Van Home the manager of the line, has stated that he will
undertake with the present equipment of the railroad, to ggfc"-"-- '.ctu:*..^.;
n
RffiB
64
CITY  OF  VANCOUVER.
transport 8,000 armed men a day, with their baggage and
appurtenances, from the Atlantic to the Pacific ; that he
could continue to do this for a week, and in no case would
the transit occupy more than one week. Thus 50,000 men,
with artillery and all baggage can be started from England,
and within two weeks the advanced guard will have arrived
oft the Pacific coast ; and all could be there in three weeks
after their departure ; an invaluable advantage and showing
the importance of this great enterprise from a national stand-
point.
The completion of this great work cannot therefore fail
to benefit not only the Dominion of Canada and make her
one of Britain's most valuable possessions, but also materially strengthen the British empire herself, bringing as it
does her colonies and dependencies into a closer union.
Much more could be written on this subject but the
limited space at my disposal prevents me from dwelling upon
it in detail.
11
-
m CITY  OF  VANCOUVER.
6
H
Y,
Victoria,  Vancouver, Yale, Hope, Langley", Kamloops, QUesnelle,
Fort Simpson, Stuart's Lake and Queen
Charlotte's Island.
*)
H
•<>■   ; »>IMPORTERS AND DEALERS INt :   ■-»
Wines, Liquors, -Groceries,
GEHEIUU. DE? GOODS, 1
►•■
Clothing, Carpets, Guns, Ammunition,
MINERS' OUTFITS AND NAVAL STORES.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
The Company's temporary Store on Cordova Street,
Vancouver, is now open for business.
I
___M mm
66
CITY   OF  VANCOUVER.
H
m
m
CO
art
REAL ESTATE,
WBaWmti  m  |
gin, "'jjife,' §ttifant mil fSgMw
V      '. 'INSURANCE.    '    '.:'"-'■
ML
m
ivi
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Representing the -ZEtna, of Hartford, and Hartford, of Hart-.
ford,. Fire Insurance'Companies.
MARINE DEPARTMENT OF  THE  FIREMANS FUND   OF SAN
v      FRANCISCO, AND THE TRAVELLER'S LIFE AND
ACCIDENT OF HARTFORD.
EEAL ESTATE 8EPABTMEHT
Choice Business and Residence Lots in all parts of the City. Investments,
that are sure to return 50 per cent, before the close of the present season.
Improved property; Cottages for Sale and for Rent. Having had ten years
experience* in Real Estate, in the Western Towns of the United States, I am
prepared to offer to Investors Valuable Suggestions. Business for Non-Residents
carefully and accurately transacted. Visitors and Strangers Cordially Welcome.
Plans and price list furnished Free on Application.
Money to Loan
Correspondence Solicited.
ADDRESS
H T. CEPERLEY,
\        OFFICE:   COE,DOVA ST., '     "
V"-__2tf COTtV-SER,, IB- o.
, 1
CITY OF VANCOUVER.
67
I	
DYVI LL
LL CO'Y,
LIMITED, ^r^3
3
Manufacturers ann^Shippers of all Kinds of
PLOUGH   AND   DRESSED
, &G.
Home Orders Carefully and Promptly Executed.
Vancouver Yard* Water St.
s
m
ITessels Chartered and Cargoes supplied for all Foreign Lumber
Ports.    Our Mills being of large capacity dispatch
always guaranteed.
-A-G-EHXTTS
s-3
elch & Company, San Francisco;
R. D, Welch & Company, Liverpool;      fl
■      _ Welch, Rithet & Company, Victoria.
i 68
CITY  OF VANCOUVER.
T
I
— —	
Before the advance in price
'all ''■?-
We offer a large nuirber offlo4s all 66 x 132 ft-
118 Lots^in the^Brighouse property from. . . . | $\
98 Lots in Block 184     ~
14        I      ; I       182 | . ...f 75"
61        "1  : , |      200A f   lis "
81 Acres    .   |       264A |    50 "
120       |       v "   ;    302 K  f 50 "
278        "   -■'   I      '391 and 392 %. Jf, 50 "•■
319 Acre Farm on North Arm road, half mile from
race course.    Will be divided.
7 Acres in New Westminster at $100 per acre.
476 Acres one mile west of New Westminster, $25 per acre
600 Acres opposite New Westminster $8 per acre.
820 Acres meadow land, 7 miles above'New Westminster,' 110
per acre. #;-|j
J. S. GLUTE & Comp
WATER STREET:
m
OI WKSISSM
CITY  OF VANCOUVER.
69
First Bank Established in City of Vancouver
B&UO
Incorporated by Royal Charter 1862.
Capital $2,500,000,    -    with power to increase.
.London Office—28 Cornhill, London.
Branches at San Francisco, Portland, Or., Victoria, New Westminster .and
'VaoEteoafer.
Agents and Correspondents :
Ih Canada—the Bank of Montreal and branches.
United States—Agents Bank of Montreal, 59 Wall Street, New  York;
Bank oi Montreal, Chicago.
United Kingdom—Bank of British Columbia, 28 Cornhill, London; Na-
tional Provincial Bank of England; North and South Wales Bank; British Linen
"Company's Bank; Bank of Ireland.
Ixdia, China, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, and
;6ha^Chai Bank Corporation—Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China,
English Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank, Bank of Australasia, Commer-
*c£al Ba&k Company of Sydney.
Mexico and South America—London Bank of Mexico and South America.
Telegraphic Transfers and Remittances to and from all points can be made
9um-g?f* this Bank at current rates.
OaPecUons carefully attended to and every description of banking transacted-
aUM\*  W     ! W\\ww\ w
^vWWwX, \\\\\\\\V  \\\\\\\w\
wwwwvv    www
okseller, Stationer
m  AND NEWS AGENT,    J|
CORDOVA   STREET,   VANCOUVER,   B.   C.
Dealer  in \Fancy Goods": and Notions,
Maps of Vancouver, New Westminster, Victoria,
&c., always on hand.
•Staple and Fancy Stationery.
New Novels received as soon as Published.
Any books not in stock will be promptly ordered.
Newspapers received daily.
CENTRAL TELEPHONE OFFICE FOR VANCOUVER.
Hi
4@TBeing an old Pioneer, strangers can get reliable information  on  British
'Columbia, at my store. mm
70
CITY  OF VANCOUVER/
flfr^i^y:.-.-  "f\-->
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Real Estate and Comiriissioii .Agent
m vi.
KfirlP
AGENT FOR THE
Equitable Life Assurance Company, ,   T     '   ^
London Guarantee and Accident Company,
—AND SOLE AGENT FOR—
J. & J. TAYLOR'S SAFES, BANK VAULTS, 4C.
Cordova Street,
Vancouver, B. C-
VANCOUVER
AT   MARKET.
"W-_-J-?-_l-R.   STREET.
i;©W©M^M_l
»
mm
"I
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I
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
Hotels, Ships and Families Supplied at
the Lowest Rates. CITY  OF VANCOUVER.
71
/~Jy^ct\,
.   «\—g;^
r KS,   —Jj
& J~^\^\
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! ^im^sA
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THE TA1L0
Crichton Block, Cordova St.,
■    Vancouver, B.\C. //;'■
-•<««
►■ '» 4
The    Most   Complete   Assortment   of
W<:'\.      f Goods  in  the  City.
•mWr
+-••-+
m>>
FIRST-CLASS WORKMANSHIP.
•om:
>-«•-«-
m>
A I FIT GUARANTEED WBmmmmwmmwmmm
72
CITY OF  VANCOUVER.
DAVID EV
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CORDOVA,   STREET.
A Large and well selected Stock always
on hand.
Satisfaction Guaranteed.
JACOB SEHL,
Manufacturer of all Kinds of
Furniture, Bedding, Mirrors,
:   Carpets, Oil-Cloths,
Picture ♦ frames, *]VL,afefcresses,
Door Mats, Window-Blinds and
Cornices.
Carpets Sewed and Laid.
Steam Factory :
LAUREL POINT, VICTORIA.
Warehouse :
CORDOVA ST., VANCOUVER
HENDERSON BROS.
i    i
188100
And Dealers in
Hay, Flour, Feed,
p Farm Produce and
General Supplies,
CORDOVA STREET,
VANCOUVER, B. C
«
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J CITY  OF VANCOUVER
L
Henry V.|Edmonds,
nsuFft&es
CONVEYANCER AND NOTARY PUBLIC.
Property  for  sale  in  New  Westminster   City |and
City of Vancouver. •
Valuable Sites on Burrard Inlet for Manufacturing Purposes
ADDRESS
P. O. Box 39, New Westminster, B. C.
Uangouyei^ VBhai^magy.
W. E. MCCARTNEY & BRO.
itymmf and Jtowilg- '®hmtet#
KAMLOOPS
PUREST DRUGS  AND   CHEMICALS
Patent Medicines, Perfumery.and Toilet Articles,
Dispensing Physicians' Prescriptions a Specialty,
■
... ^ ..{ T7fW<
■
74
CITY  OF  VANCOUVER
#1
KM
|
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J
Q
1
Abbott Street,
<_/ —
H
i
"\r-~--5TOOTJTr-3-53, 33- C-
4.AGENTS   FOR*
I Kfl I
«M
■ £r
■ Hf
A. P. Cassell's Boots and Shoes, Montreal,
The 0. S. Rexford M'fg Co., Axes, Hoes, Rakes, Forks, &c.
(Axes a Specialty), Upper Bedford, Ont.
B.  Lavin & Co., Hats, Caps, &c, Montreal.
ii i
B00Tj3 ABIE j3HQE£ f\l$ AND M
J±   SPECIALTY,
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i
Vancouver1 Bazaar1 \ Japanese Eporiug
WATER ST., OPP. METHODIST HALL.
Fancy Goods, Hotioas and Japanese Curios,
TOYS & MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS..
The Agency for McColl's Bazaar Patterns.
k
m
W& \
City of Vancouver
7£
ROBT. GRAPIT,
IMPORTER AND DEALER IN
II11 ii iMittiiii i mi I ieiii II in ii a 111 ii e BtiBiii.iii ti 111 intiiiniiiniiiri'iiiiiiiiiiBiiinn'iripi. G)
,^iiiiiiiiiiiiii*»iiiiiiii!iii!riiiii!iii:i'i:iii:i.i!iiiiiiiiiiiii!i;i!iiiili:iii!i!iiiiiini!iiiwi'(i!i!iiiiiiiiiii.'liiii:iii!iii:tniiiiiintwii
+J '	
£-5
Greatest Variety of Taole I^elieacies in the City.
Choicest Tea and CoSta tPratt's Astral Coal Oil
A' LARGE  AND  SELECT  STOCK  OF
Dry Goods, Hats, Caps,
BOOTS 3c  SHOES
ALWAYS  ON  HAND.
Cordova Street,
Vancouver, B. C-
^m^m^mm^mmu
J - -  - ^^r^r^r^
I
1
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P   'i!
Mr I1
;'-lh
Cat Hp
til
IE
1
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76
CITY  OF VANCOUVER.
■ ; THEf PIONEER ;(
Fiffnitoe Stee and Factoil,
Keeps constantly on hand a large assortment of
Furniture, Crockery, Cutlery, Glassware, Wall Paper, Parlor Suits,
Bedroom Suits,  Lounges,  Office Furniture,
Woven Wire People's Favorite Spring, Hair and Wool Mattresses.
F. W. HART, PROPRIETOR,
Cordova Street,
Vancouver, B. C.
Barker & McDonnell,
Office: Corner of Abbott and Cordova Streets,
Real Estate' Brokers.
Property of all Description and good paying* Investments.
Houses, Cottages and Rooms to Rent in all
parts of the Town.
INSURANCE AGENTS.
British Empire Mutual Life Assurance Company of London, England.
COMMISSION AGENTS
For Leading Wholesale Firms in England and Eastern Canada.
?£- ^_
CITY   OF  VANCOUVER.
 :_	
77
FRASER &ILE0HARD,
Vancouver, B. C
ANUFACTURERS HllIS
BROKERS AND
dominion fljei^an^,
THE VANCOUVER
an Juan L
1
Agencies,   Correspondence  and   Con
signments Solicited.
References Furnished.
3iji2v-:xa:-B3D-
Manufacturers of the Best
jyl JDJJB LHV[E
QUARRIES: ■
¥SAN JUAN ISLAND,
Washington Territory,
WORKS:
VANCOUVER, B. C.
THE GEM CIGAR DIVAN
STREET.
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JACK   LEVY,   PROPRIETOR.
Cigars Manufactured by White Labor Only.
2g££*IS&__3 —
_*__*_„. .
78
CITY  OF VANCOUVER,
SALMON!
THE   FAMOUS
^■^1^
:
FRASER   RIVER.
X*1
Ewen
Lo.y,
New Westminster,i|B, C,
1W Oldest Established pirm in the Province.
%
E wen's   Lion   Brand  is famous throughout
ft       .the world as the Best in the
ill  Market. ~-pp
m%
CITY  OF  VANCOUVER
79
Water Street Market.
rsy^vo.
A. W. WRIGHT,
Dealer in
<JI{0(3Bf(IES
AND
P^OVISIOiiS
FISH,
Fruit   and   Game,
Dr. Becl^ingsale, ]\I D.,
Graduate of Edinburch University,
Scotland,
logician §tWgeon
Cordova Street,
VANCOUVER, B. C.
ros/^.
T.
VANCOUVER
Wholesale and Retail
Dealer in
Bee
PORK SAUSAGES
\\\\\Vy\\\\^ A\\\\\\\\\\v>   x^c^V   ^^^    ^S^^x     \\v\wft^^\
6. D. Hussenden, Prop.
AND
SALTlMEATS.
Hotels,  Restaurants  and  Ships  Sup
plied on Short Notice.
Cordova  St.,  Vancouver.
olds and Mn Washing
ON SPECIAL TERMS.
si mm mis win
I 80
CITY   OF  VANCOUVER.
T
Bakery and Confectionery
Genuine Pumpernickle Graham and Rye Bread,
Family Cakes Made to Order on Short Notice.   A Fresh, Full and
Fine Assortment of Candies Always on Hand.
Opposite C. P. R. Car Shops.
l <e
EDGAR $ GOULDING
Barrister d Selieiter
OF MANITOBA
(Late with Fred. McKenzie, Q. C.)
OFFICE :
Abbott Street,
VANCOUVER,    B.   C,
J. d. Douglas \ Co
I
—AND—
«
Financial    Agents.
Office:   ABBOTT  STREET,
Vancouver, B. C
Correspondence   Solicited,
i CITY OF VANCOUVER.
81
Jm wMmiwmmj
JINB H^TTE^
CORDOVA STREET,
VANCOUVER, B. 0.
Having had long experience in England, Canada and
the United States, can make either
English, Canadian or American
i
di
WW
4
,i
Water Street, Vancouver, B. C.
•o
Best Hotel Accommodation in the City.
•o-
ALL THE  NECESSARY  REQUISITES FOR THE
WITHIN  THE PREMISES.
•o-
HARRY COLE, PROPRIETOR,
(Late of the Stag and Pheasant.) 82
CITY OF VANCOUVER.
PAINTS, OILS
Watuwkw m& §5rote.
Builders' Hardware:
We carry the largest and best selected stock on the Mainland.
White Lead :
We are Sole Agents for the Celebrated Elephant Brand.
Mixed Paints:
We carry a full assortment, which we warrant superior to any in the
Market, being specially made for ourselves, and having our own
Brand. Varnishes, we have Wearing, Rubbing, Extra Furniture
Damar, Elastic Oak Bleached Shellac, Japan, &c.
Boiled and Raw Linseed Oil:
We warrant to be superior to any in the Market.
 ALSO	
Gold Leaf, Small's Ex. of Logwood, Pearl Shells, Madder,
Rose U. U. always in Stock, as well as a
Pull Line of Brushes.
For Builders' Hardware, Painters' Supplies, Carpenters' Tools,
we are Headquarters.
Our Prices are Right, and we carry the Stock,
and will guarantee to show you a better selected Stock than in any
other store in the Province.
THOS. DUNN & CO.
Cordova Street, near Carroll. CITY  OF  VANCOUVER
W&W^^WWWM
FOR SALE ON
LIBERAL TERMS.
For Maps and  Information
Apply to
HASTINGS   STREET
Opposite Post Office,
l^i(Hf *^0$ ^iili *liiPl
s3^
t
^$      ^5S^ w
Correspondence Solicited 84
CITY OF VANCOUVER.
McLennan Ss McFeely
Manufacturers of
Galvanized
Iron C
ron cornices
—AND—
Tin, boa and Felt Roofing
—Dealers in—
Stoves,  Tinware, Pumps,  Iron
and Lead Pipe, &c.
PIONEER
WATCHMAKING* ESTABLISHMENT,
Victoria:
Vancouver:
FORT    ST. i POWELL   ST.
a J, CASTER & BEO,
-?_^_^.C,Z,IC__.XJ
Watchmakers
and Jewellers.
Fine Watches, Clocks, Jewellery,
* Optical Goods, Silverware, &c.
All work warranted,    Fair Prices,
CARRALL ST.,
Vancouver, B. C.
C. W. WlElM)
---Dealer in—
New and Second-hand
W WIE IT 2TWEUE
Hair, Wool and Woven Wire Spring
Mattresses, Carpets, Oilcloths, &c.
Crockery, Glassware and
House Furnishings.
uni
< ~&
<§
Otton, tl\e QroceF
•Dealer in—
i@@ii of ill DuoilyUoiii.
Water St.,       Vancouver,
EVERYTHING
IN  THE-
^OCERY * LIE.
CORDOVA  STREET,
Vancouver, B. C.
^_^-_,.
	 CITY OF VANCOUVER.
85
-UlSIrf
1
I
JAMES ABRAMS & CO.
Have opened out in their new Store, and beg to call the
attention of the Public to their
Hew and Unrivalled Stogi^ of   .'"  .
Ready-made Glothing, Boots and Shoes,
GENTLEMEN'S FURNISHINGS, HATS, CAPS, &C.
Carrall St.,
Vancouver.
Wholesale and Retail
KM|J|ft <^^    §B>'W'
MERCHANT.
Powell Street,
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Granville  Hotel,
jj|    WATER STREET, ,
VANCOUVER. B. C.
5-RATES;-
$1.00 to $1.50 per day ;
Board $6.00 per week;
Board and Lodging $7 per wk.
The bar dispenses all the best
Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
T. D. Cyrs, Proprietor. ~c
86
CITY OF VANCOUVER.
M. A.  MCLEAN,
Tfotary Public,
-*-
"vjr
<?v~
■•^
Lots in the most desirable parts of the City for sale
at reasonable prices.
Good Investments made for Capitalists Abroad.
-  VANCOUVER, B. C.
Holbrook House
FRONT  STREET,
Between  Steamboat Wharf and Railway Station,
jleW Westminster, 33. C.
JOH ( HH fp^Opij.
!ilgl«6to AGComm,oJaiion
at Moderate Rates,
Syndicate Saloon,
Abbott Street.
BEST BRANDS OF
Wines, Liouorss Ginrs
ii j. ©m@
Proprietor.
f
P
fit
ml
i.J-,-1-.-.
^Jll] I
CITY OF VANCOUVER.
87
&fjt
• •
w
EiC-)1 JL' J-U j__i7
AjS
Water St., Vancouver, B. C.
o-
Finest Furnished Rooms in Vancouver.
MAGNIFICENT BILLIARD & POOL TABLES.
Choicest Brands Wines, Liquors and Cigars,
OHAS. DOERINGr,
PROPRIETOR
THE BODEGA
JJHUOHUUKHKTOMI
Carrall Street,
Vancouver
allan & Mcpherson,
it
i
\
0-
T
H
THE BEST BRANDS OF
Wines,  Liquors  and   Cigars
ONLY KEPT.
mm I
88 CITY OF VANCOUVER.
R B. DODDS'
^i wBwmw a!5^    ^!8s^   v^JRr vato^    v^wS^ ~sR-^   v.\w\\\\\ v>w ~^w
W James Vair's Old Stand, Carrall Street, Vancouver.
■♦-♦•
Importer, Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
McLarey's Famous Stoves and Ranges.
Also, All Eastern Makes of Stoves, Cooking Ranges, Hall,
Parlor and Box Stoves
AT EASTERN PRICES,
and  keep the Largest Stock in the Province to choose from.
Also full lines of
Tinware,   Copperware,   Graniteware,   Pumps,   (Force,   Lift   and
Cistern), Gas Fittings, Lead and Iron Pipe, Sinks, &c.
MANUFACTURERS OF
Brass, Tin, Copper § Sheet-Iron Ware.
x   Roofing and Galvanized Iron Work a Specialty,
Plumbing,    Hydraulic  Fitting  and  General   Jobbing
done promptly and cheaply by first-class men.    No others employed.
S ALL WORK GUARANTEED PERFECT AND SATISFACTORY. H§| .
—FULL   LIIJES   OF—
Hardware frqm trie East, Paints, Oils, Varnishes,
Glass, Putty, Etc., Etc.
Come in and inspect my Stock and Prices and be convinced that this is the
cheapest spot in Vancouver.
Don't forget the place, next door to the Ontario Grocery,
Carrall Street. R.1E. DODDS.
—   [ —*— ' = —

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