Open Collections

BC Historical Books

BC Historical Books

BC Historical Books

Report of the Vancouver Board of Trade for the year 1896-97 Vancouver. Board of Trade 1897

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcbooks-1.0222452.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcbooks-1.0222452.json
JSON-LD: bcbooks-1.0222452-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcbooks-1.0222452-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcbooks-1.0222452-rdf.json
Turtle: bcbooks-1.0222452-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcbooks-1.0222452-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcbooks-1.0222452-source.json
Full Text
bcbooks-1.0222452-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcbooks-1.0222452.ris

Full Text

Array Report 
of the 
Vancouver 
Board of Trade 
for the Year 
1896-97. 
Vancouver, British Columbia, 
Canada.  Report 
of the 
Vancouver 
Board of Trade 
for the Year 
1896-97. 
Vancouver, British Columbia, 
Canada. INDEX.
Page
Past Presidents      - 3
Officers 1896-7      -      .      -      -      -       3
Officers 1897-8   ------   3
Membership Roll 4
President's Address       -      -      -      -   7
Secretary's Report      -      -      -      -    14
Extracts from Minutes - - - 15
Banquet to Hon. L. H. Davies - - 22
Interview with Hon. A. O. Blair      -   22
Lumber Industry-
Shipments of ...      23
B.C. Fleet, 1896 - 24
B.C. Timber Tests 27
C.P.Ry. Routes        ----- 26
Fishing Industry—
Review of 1896                           - 28
Salmon Pack by Canneries - 29
Salmon Pack by Districts       - 30
Salmon Pack, Destination of - 30
Salmon Pack, Total Pacific Coast 31
Salmon Fleet 1896                    - 31
Shipping Industry—
Review of 32
Average Port Expenses - - 33
Rate of Towage - - - - 33
Pilotage Dues -    33
Customs Returns - - - - 35
Trade and Navigation Returns 37
Imports into B.C. for 25 years - 38
Exports from B.C. for 25 years     39
Shipping Returns—
Port of Vancouver - - - 40
Port of Westminster - - 41
Port of Nanaimo - - - - 41
Port of Victoria -    42
Cargoes of Sea-Going Vessels for
the year ending 30 June 1896  -   43
Page
Mining Industry—
Extract from Annual Report of
Minister of Mines for B.C. for
year ending 31 Dec, 1896 ?#   - 46
Total Production for all years -   46
Production per Annum from 1890
to 1896 inclusive -    47
Value per Annum from 1895-96 47
Production by District - -48-
Production of Placer Mining - 48
Production of Lode Mining - 49
Production of Coal and Coke -    51
Extracts from Reports of Government
Officials-
Cariboo     -      -       -      -       -       - 52.
Cassiar 53-
East Kootenay . - - - 53
West Kootenay -      -      -      -    55-
Trail Creek 57
Slocan   -      -      -      - -58-
Nakusp 58-
Ainsworth 58
Nelson 58-
Lillooet 59
Victoria 62
New Westmister       -      - 62
Yale 6»
Osoyoos 64
Kettle River 64
Trail Creek 65-
Boundary Creek    -      -      -      - 68-
Notes on Camps—
Slocan 70-
Nelson 72
Ainsworth 72"
Means of Access and Transportation     73-
Vancouver 1897—
Customs of the Port - - - 75-
From the City Records       -      - 76> 1887-8
1888-9
1889-90
1889-90
1890-1
OFFICERS.
Past Presidents.
1891-2..John Hendry.
1892-3.. G.E.Berteaux(dec'sd)-
W. F. Salsbury.
0. Keith.
R. Major.
. D. Oppenheimer.
. D. Oppenheimer.
. E. V. Bodwell (deceased).
. R. H. Alexander.
. R. H. Alexander.
1895-6..H. Bel
1892-3.
1893-4.. J.
1894-5.. G.
Irving.
Honorary Member.
D. Oppenheimer.—Elected 1897.
Vice-President-
OFFICERS, 1896-7.
President—H. Bell-Irving.
-Wm. Godfrey.      Hon. Secretary-
-Wm. Skene,
Alexander, R. H.
Buscombe, F.
Cockburn, F-
Darling, H.
Evans, E. E.
COUNCIL.
Johnson, C. G.
Marani, C. J.
Murray, W.
McFarland, J. W.
McLagafi, J. C.
BOARD OF ARBITRATION.
Oppenheimer, S.
Paterson, R. H-
Salsbury, W. F.
Skene, W.
Spicer, H. H.
Alexander, R. H.
Buscombe, F.
Cockburn, F.
Darling, H.
Johnson, C. G.
Marani, C. J.
McFarland J. W
McLagan, J. C.
Oppenheimer, S.
Paterson, R. H_
Skene, W.
Spicer, H. H.
OFFICERS, 1897-8.
President—Wm. Godfrey.
Vice-President—S. Oppenheimer.   Hon. Secretary-
-Wm. Skene.
Alexander, R. H.
Bell-Irving, H.
Cockburn, F.
Evans, E. E.
Johnson, C. G.
COUNCIL.
Jukes, Andrew
Ker, Wm. Hy.
McLagan, J. C.
Marani, C. J.
Murray, Wm.
BOARD OF ARBITRATION.
Alexander, R. H.
Bell-Irving, H.
Evans, E. E.
Johnson, C. jr.
Jukes, Andrew
Ker, Wm. Hy.
McLagan, J. C.
Marani, C. J.
Salsbury, W. F.
Skene, Wm.
Sully, Wm.
Sweeny, C.
Tisdall, C. E.
Salsbury, W. F.
Skene, Wm.
Sully, Wm.
Sweeny, C. MEMBERSHIP   ROLL, 1897.
(Corrected to date of publishing.)
-Enteked.   Name.
87..Alexander, R. H.
1896.. Allayne-Jones, A.
A.
Firm.
B.C. Mills T. & T. Co.,
B.
1897..Banfield, J. J.
1896. .Barnard, F. S.
1889. .Bell-Irving, Hy.
1895..Boyd, John
1895. .Boak, A. A.
1897..Boult, Walter
1895..Bowser. W. J.
1895..Braid, Wm.
1895..Burns, F. F.
1895..Buscombe, F.
.. Byron-Johnson, R.
1896. .Cameron, Allan
1891. .Campion, J. W.
1891..Cockburn, F.
1896.. Col tart, Ian
1897..Costello, M.
Ld.
H. Bell-Irving & Co.
John Boyd & Co.
Wm. Braid & Co.
John Boyd & Co.
R. Skinner & Co.
C.
Can. Pac. Railway Co.
B.C. Iron Works Co-, Ld.
R. G. Dun & Co.
The Province Pub. Co
. Cotton.F.C, M. P. P., News-Ad vertiser,
B0SINESS.
Lumber Merchant
Min. Broker and Fin. Agent.
Insurance Agent.
Brit. Col. Elec. Ry. Co., Ltd.
Merchant and Shipper.
Wholesale Plumber.
Insurance Agent.
Musical Instruments & Music.
Solicitor.
Wholesale Tea and Grocery.
Wholesale Hardware.
China and Glassware.
Insurance Agent.
Local Freight Agent.
Secretary.
Manager.
Manager.
Salmon Canner.
Editor.
1895.. Darling, H.
1897..De Beck, G. W.
1897..Diplock, A. B.
1897..Dixon, J. C.
1897..Doyle, H. Junr.
1896. .Drake, W. E.
1887..Dunn, Thomas
Union S.S. Co,
Mackinnon, De Beck & Co.
The Diplock Co., Ltd.
Dixon & Wilson.
Hy. Doyle & Co.
McLary Manufacturing Co.
T. Dunn & Co., Ld.
Manager.
Financial Agents.
Wholesale Stationers.
Com. Agents.
Fishing Supplies.
General Agent.
Hardware.
1890..Evans, E. E.
1897..Evans, Percy
Evans, Coleman & Evans.     Coal Merchants & Shippers.
1898. .Fraser, J. A.
Mining Broker.
1897..Garden, W. F.
1892..Godfrey, Wm.
1897..Hamilton, R.
1897..Henderson, J. N.
1895..Hach, Chas.
1890..Heaps, E. H.
1890..Henary, John '
1896..Hope, Chas. E.
Garden, Hermon & Burwell. Surveyors
Bank of B.N.A. Manager.
H.
Wm. Hamilton Mfg. Co.
Langley & Henderson Bros
Heaps & Sully.
B.C. Mills T. & T. Co.
Machinists.
Wholesale Chemists.
Furniture and Upholstery.
Mach'y Agt. & Shingle Mir.
Manager.
Architect.
1887. .Johnson, C. G.
1896. .Jukes, Andrew
1896..Kelly. R.
1895..Ker, W. H.
Johnson & Burnet.
Imperial Bank.
K.
Kelly, Douglas & Co.
Brackman & Ker Milling
Ship Broker.
Manager.
Wholesale Tea and Grocery.
Co. Miller. 1895..Leckie, R. J. John Leckie.
1896.. Lockyer, H. T. Hudson's Bay Co.
1897. .Lewthwaite, W. A. W. A. Lewthwaite & Co.
Cannery Supplies.
Local Manager. \
Wholesale Provisions.
1895..Macauley, Jas.
1896..Maclure, J. C.
1896. .Macfarlane, Jas. A.
1896. .Macfarlane, John E.
1896. .Mackinnon, J* M.
1892..McConnell, G. S.
1889..McDowell, H.
1837..McFarland, J. W.
18S7..McFeely, E. J.
1890..Mcintosh, W. A.
1896. .McKay, Arch. John
1897..Morgan, E. B.
1889..McLagan, J. C.
1897..McLaren, J. B.
1891. .McMillan, W. J.
1895. .McPherson, Wm.
1895..Marani, C. J.
1890..Martin, Robt.
1897..Milne, Chas.
1893..Murray, Wm.
M.
Knowles & Macauley.
Robt. Ward & Co.
J. A. Macfarlane & Co.
B. C. Iron Works Co.
Golden Cache Mines, Ltd.
G. S. McConnell & Co.
McDowell, Atkins a Co.
McFarland & Mahon.
McLennan & McFeely, Ld.
W. A. Mcintosh & Co.
Bradstreets.
B.C. Land & Investment Co.
The World.
McMillan & Hamilton.
Can. Per. Loan & Savings Co,
Martin & Robertson.
Parsons Produce Co.
Bank of British Columbia.
Wholesale Provision M'chn't.
Merchants and Insurance.
Assayers and Min. Supplies.
Manager.
Manager.
Wholesale Boots and Shoes.
Druggist.
Mining and Insurance Agt.
Hardware.
Meat and Cattle Merchant.
Local Manager,
Manager.
Editor.
Capitalist.
Wholesale Fruit & Provisions
Lumberman.
General Agent.
Grocery Agent.
Wholesale Provisions.
Manager.
O.
1891. .Oppenheimer, S.      Oppenheimer Bros. & Co., Ld. Wholesale Grocers.
1891..Paterson, R.H.
1896. .Pellew-Harvey, W
1897..Phipps, G. W.
1895..Plunkett, Osborne
1890..Pyke, J. A.
Cassell Gold Extracting Co.
Thos. Dunn & Co.
Com. and Shipping Agent.
Assayer.
Cashier.
Director of Mines.
Boots and Shoes.
R.
1895..Ralph, Wm.
1895.
.Ramsay, Jas.
Ramsay Bros. & Co.
S.
1889
.Salsbury, W. F.
Can. Pac. Ry.
1895.
.Schooley, C. A.
Canadian Oil Co.
1897,
.Seymour, J. R.
1897
.Shelton, A. E.
Shelton & Co.
1897
.Short,.B. J.
Short & Squair.
1887
.Skene, Wm.
S. Greensnields, Sons & Co
1895
.Skrine, 0. P.
Osmund P. Skrine & Co.
1896
.Stein. W. T.
1995
.Stewart. F. R:
F. R. Stewart & Co.
1897
.Sully, Wm.
Heaps & Sully.
1887.
.Sweeny, Campbell
Bank of Montreal.
Stoves and Hardware.
Confectionery Manufacturer.
Cashier.
Agent.
Chemist and Druggist..
Furniture Merchants.
Salmon Canners.
Wholesale Dry Goods.
Produce Merchant.
Accountant.
Prod. Mcht. and Ham Curer.
Mach. and Min. Requisites.
Manager.
1891.
1891.
1890.
1890.
1897
Taylor, Walter
.Templeton, Wm.
.Tisdall, C. E.
Townley, J. D.
Tufts, A. R.
T.
B.C. Fruit Canning Co.
Can. Pac. Railway.
Wm. Tufts & Son.
1896. .Twigge, John
W.
1896.. Warren, Falk I
1895..WiIliams,A.,M.P.P McPhillips & Williams.
1891. .Wilson, Geo. J.
1889. .Winch, R. V. Winch & Bower.
1897.. Wheeler, F. J. Great Northern Railway.
1887..Wulfisonn, Johann German Consulate.
Manager.
Groceries and Provisions.
Fire Arms and. Fish. Tackle.
Assistant to Gen. Supt.
Wholesale Grocers.
Major-General.
Colonel, late R. A.
Solicitor.
Salmon Canner.
Fruit and Fish Dealer.
Local Agent.
Financial and Insurance Agt.  ANNUAL   REPORT
OP THE
Vancouver   Board  of  Trade.
March 9th, 1897.
PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS.
Gentlemen,—Another year has come to a close, a year of considerable activity for this Board, and with your permission I propose
shortly to review some of the work done, and touch on a few matters
of interest.
Membership.     The present membership of the Board is 77, an
increase of five since last year.
Attendance at the meetings and interest in the proceedings has
been fairly well maintained, but an effort should be made to increase
the membership, which is still below what it should be.
Work Done. The following matters have, among others, been
considered and dealt with during the past twelve
months : Resolution passed commending action of Provincial Government in the matter of British Pacific Railway ; appointment of
committee to obtain information as to construction of Smelter and
Refinery at Vancouver; resolution favoring construction of additional hatcheries ; navigation of Fraser River and marking out of
channels ; duty on cotton lines; appointment of Major-General John
Twigge as delegate to Third Congress of Chambers of Commerce of
the Empire; resolution passed for presentation to che Congress on
the following subjects, viz : Preferential Trade within the Empire ;
adoption of decimal system throughout the Empire j Pacific Cable ;
fast Atlantic service; appointment of resident representative of
Great Britain in British Columbia, and the formation of an Imperial
Council. Also, resolution favoring a two-cent postage rate in
Canada ; supply of ships' stores free of duty S necessity of increasing
customs staff at Vancouver ; proposal for the establishment of a Dominion Board of Trade ; necessity for police patrol boat for Northern
waters ; special steamer for fishery protection ; visit of Li Hung
Chang and presentation of address ; necessity of improvement of
mail service to Kootenay and Northern coast; desirability for altering date of commencement of Cohoe fishing; proposed railway to
Kootenay  and  appointment  of  delegates  to interview Provincial VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE.
Government \ presentation of address to the Hon. J. Israel Tarte,
Minister of Public Works; presentation of address to the Hon. L.
H. Da vies, Minister of Marines and Fisheries, and banquet in honor
of visiting Ministers; interview with the Hon. A. G. Blair, Minister
of Railways ; resolution to support the Toronto branch of the Navy
League as to the enrollment of Naval Reserve men in Canada ; and
resolution opposing the granting of a bonus to a smelter on a certain
proposal made to the City Council.
Lumber. ^ne Lumber Trade of 1896 shows an  increased
export over the previous year, and prices ruled
slightly higher. There has been considerable activity since the
opening of 1897, but this has resulted more from a sudden and
excessive drop in freight rates than from any increase in the demand.
Prices still continue on too low a basis to be considered satisfactory. It is to be hoped that the general improvement in the principal markets of the world, of which there seem to be indications,
will extend to this important branch of our industries, and make it
more remunerative to the producers.
Fisheries. There was a further development of the salmon
fishing industry during the past season. Though
a poor season was looked for on the Fraser River, the catch was a
fairly good one. The highest prices on record were paid to fishermen for raw fish, but only moderate prices were received for the
salrcon when canned, results in some cases being unsatisfactory to
packers. A large pack was secured on Rivers Inlet, an indifferent
one on Skeena River, "while the total for the Province was about the
same as for the previous year. The total pack for the Pacific Coast
is estimated at 2,300,000 cases—the largest on record—while it is
noteworthy that of this large total, in round numbers, one-half went
to the United Kingdom, shipped in about- equal proportions from
British Columbia and the United States. In view of the extensive
preparations being made in British Columbia for season 1897,
dealers in the United Kingdom are inclined to be very conservative
in their ideas. Halibut and deep-sea fisheries have been carried
on successfully, but on a limited scale only. It is to be regretted
that there has been a considerable falling off in the seal fisheries,
both in the amount of catch and price received for skins.
Mining, There has been great activity in Mining and pros
pecting throughout the Province, during the past
year, and a large number of companies have been formed, both,
locally and elsewhere, to open up British Columbia mines. The
official returns to January 1st, 1897, will be published in full in the
Report. I wish meanwhile to draw particular attention to the.
striking and rapid increase in output of minerals in the Province
during the last few years. Including coal, the total output of the
mines has increased from $3,588,413 in 1893 to $7,146,425 in 1896, !   ANNUAL   REPORT. 9
while from 1895 to 1896 the output of minerals other than coal rose
from $2,834,000 to $4,816,000. For the past year the value of the
output from lode mines only, was nearly double that of the previous
year, and about five and one-half times as great as in 1894. Lode
mining has thus suddenly jumped to the position of first importance
in the industries of the Province. The output of Trail District (gold
and copper) has increased from $702,457 in 1895 to $1,243,360 in
1896, but the increase has been most conspicuous in the Slocan
District, where the product of silver lead ores has risen from
$1,057,677 to $2,010,048 in the same time. The yield of placer
gold in Cariboo District has increased from $282,400 in 1895 to
$384,050 in 1896. The production of lead alone has increased from
-$78,996 in 1893 to $721,384 in 1896, while the production of copper
has increased four fold from 1895 to 1896. Of the total production
in Canada, British Columbia furnished, in 1896, 63 per cent, of the
gold, 98 per cent, of the silver, 19 per cent, of the copper, and all
the lead. Though the increase in the output of the mines is very
satisfactory, it would undoubtedly have been much larger had there
been greater facilities in transportation, in which, it is pleasing to
note, substantial improvements may be looked for this year, owing
to the rapid construction of new railways, improvements in steamship lines, and a much appreciated lowering of freight rates. A
change in laws relating to the formation of public companies is desired by many, which will tend to discourage overcapitalization, and
give greater safeguards to investors. The publication of reports by
Mr. W. Carlyle, the Provincial Mineralogist, is much appreciated by
all interested.
Coal. There is again a falling-off to record, 44,772 tons in
the output of Coal for the year ending December
31st, 1896, the figures being 894,882 tons for 1896, against 939,654
-tons for 1895. The total exported was 634,237 tons, local sales
361,983 tons, while the balance on hand, December 31st, 1896,
amounted to 32,112 tons, against an'amount on hand at the same
date in 1895 of 33,450 tons. The falling-off may again be partially
attributed to the increase in consumption of natural oil as fuel in
California, and to competition of coal from England and from Puget
Sound.
Agriculture. ■"■* *s to ^e regretted that no improvement can yet be
recorded in the Coast District, though doubtless
-farmers in the vicinity of the mines can show satisfactory results. No
general attention is as yet directed to fruit culture, but it is to be
hoped that the systematic efforts of those interested will before long
raise this important industry to the position it is undoubtedly ultimately destined to occupy. The depression in prices of Pacific Coast
hops has affected British Columbia growers, but better prices are now
looked for, and the high quality of the British Columbia product
should insure a ready market. 10
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE.
Railways.
Railway development in the Province, during the-
past year, has been confined to the West Kootenay
District, two branch lines having been completed and opened for
traffic, namely, the Columbia and Western, from Trail to Rossland, and
the Red Mountain Railway, from Northport to Rossland. The following railways are in course of construction : Branch lines of the
Columbia and Western, from Trail to Robson, and a branch of the?
Columbia and Kootenay, from Slocan Crossing to Slocan City.
These two will tap the rich mineral district tributary to Slocan Lake,
and will give all-rail connection with the smelter at Nelson and the
smelter and refinery at Trail. The construction of the Crow's Nest
Pass Railway, from Lethbridge to Nelson, and the extension of the
road to the Coast, are subjects receiving much public attention at
the present time. It is earnestly to be hoped that the Dominion
Government, with due regard to the public interests involved, may
before long decide on such a policy as to these important matters as
will ensure the work being undertaken and pushed forward to successful completion. A larger number of railway charters are being
applied for than us.ual, and the attention of the Board is called to
the desirability of having public charters granted only under greater
safeguards than are usual at present.
Shipping Shipping   for   the   port   of   Vancouver   (Burrard
Inlet) shows a further satisfactory increase over
the previous  year.    Of the number of vessels   which loaded  with
lumber in the Province, about 70 per cent, received their cargoes in
this port.
Steamship Lines. ^e Empress Line of the Canadian Pacific Railway to China and Japan,maintains its reputation
as the only first-class "trans-Pacific Passenger Steamship Service.
The increase in quantity of freight to Australia has be,en such
that the two steamers of the Canadian and Australian Line have
been blocked for months, so that the addition of a third boat—the
Aorangi—to the fleet will be welcomed by all, while the new arrangements which provide for the boats to call at New Zealand, should
place our merchants on an equal footing in the markets of that
Colony, with competitors in San Francisco.
The Canadian Pacific Navigation Company has increased their
fleet by the addition of the steamer Tees for West Coast trade, and
has promised a weekly service on the Northern route during the
coming season.
In Kootenay the five steamers of the Columbia and Kootenay
Steam Navigation Co. were recently acquired by the Canadian
Pacific Railway Co., who are adding to the fleet by building two-
fast passenger steamers besides numerous freight barges on Arrow
Lake, greatly improving their service in that District. The Canadian'
Pacific Railway Co. are also building a passenger steamer on Slocan ANNUAL  REPORT. 11
Lake, besides freight barges which will eonvey cars with ore to the
railway, thus enabling shipments to reach their destination without
breaking bulk. From April 15th it is intended that a daily service
on the Columbia River shall be provided to Trail, Nelson and all
Kootenay points.
Harbors and     The attention of the Government has again been
Rivers. called  to the necessity   of  a Lighthouse at  the
Narrows and at certain points along the Northern
Coast, to the opening of False Creek, and to the improvement of
navigation in Fraser River, and it is hoped and expected that some
of these'works will shortly be undertaken. A general survey of the
Lower Fraser has been begun—as a preliminary, it is hoped, to more
important work.
Smelter and -^ committee of the Board has worked in conjunc-
Refinery. ^on wifcn a committee of the City Council, having
in view the establishment of a smelter and refinery
in the vicinity of Vancouver. It is gratifying to note that a proposal worthy of consideration for the establishment and operation of
extensive works has at length been submitted, and it is hoped before
our next annual meeting comes round a commencement of the work
may have been made.
Third Congress of The Third Congress^ of Chambers of Commerce of
Chambers of       the Empire was held in London in June last, at
Commerce of the WQich   Major-General  John Twigge represented
Empire ^he   P°ard.     The   Congress   was   opened   by   a
memorable speech by the Right Hon. Joseph
Chamberlain in favor of closer relationship between the Mother
Country, her colonies and dependencies. Though there was great
diversity of opinion as to the best means of accomplishing that object
there was general unanimity as to its being both desirable and necessary. Canadian delegates took a most prominent part in all debates,,
chile special importance was given to the resolution of our Board.
w
Fast Atlantic   The present Government has not seen fit to carry
Service. out tne Poncy °f i*s predecessors with respect to
a fast line of steamers.    It is to be hoped that the
difficulties standing in the way of the inauguration of this line may
shortly be overcome.
The Pacific Cable. A conference was recently held in London between delegates representing Great .Britain, Canada and Australia. Their report, though not yet published, is said
to be favorable to the immediate construction of an all-British cable
from Vancouver to Australia and New Zealand.
Siberian Railway. The total length of this line when completed will
be 4,547 miles from Cheliabinsk to Vladivostock, 12 VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE.
or the longest yet constructed. It is expected the line will be
completed from sea to sea within the next three or four years ; but
next year trains are to run over the Siberian road to the Amoor,
making connection by steamer and rail to Vladivostock, the passage
from London to that port being made in 11\ days. When the short
line through Manchuria is completed, London will be brought within
«asy 10 days' journey of Pekin. Though the railway will not be
able to compete with steamship lines in the matter of cheap transportation, it is bound to play an important parD politically and commercially in future development on the Pacific, while its position will
be strengthened by the preferential duties about to be accorded goods
passing over it.
Behring Sea    -By the conclusion of the sittings in Victoria of the
Arbitration.     Arbitration Board, met to assess the damages sustained by sealers, a further step forward has been
made toward settlement of a troublesome dispute.
Progress of the   During last year a considerable amount of atten-
City. *ion nas Deen devoted to mining matters, and sev
eral new firms have established themselves here
with the intention of operating in British Columbia mines, while
among industrial undertakings may be mentioned the arrangements
made for the establishment of a factory for preparation of teredo
proof piling.
There has been a fair amount of building done during the year,
while there exists at present a healthy demand for leases of both residence and business property.
Nothing will serve better to show up the beauties of the surroundings and lend attraction to the city than the extension of good
roads and bicycle paths in the vicinity, and any movement in this
direction should receive the support of our Board.
Trade Outlook. The business outlook is decidedly more encouraging than it was twelve months ago. Though improvement is still to be desired in lumber, coal and fishing industries,
the increased activity in the mining -district is having a stimulating
■effect on trade generally.
A change in the Government of the Dominion from Conservative to Liberal is to be recorded, and a reduction of the customs
tariff may shortly be expected.
As the wealth of the Province lies chiefly in the natural products, a reduction of duty on articles of consumption and on necessary machinery and tools cannot fail to directly benefit us, paying as
we do now a double and treble tax in the shape of heavy freight rates
•over the 3,000 miles of railway which separate us from the centres
of cheap production in Eastern Canada.
1 ANNUAL   REPORT. 13
The Queen's The present year is the 60th year of the reign of
Diamond Jubilee. tne Queen. During the year there will assemble
in London to celebrate this unparalleled event,
the greatest imperial gathering the world has ever seen, to which all
Colonial Premiers have been invited. Mr. Chamberlain referred to
it in the following words :
I It is my belief that great good will result from this gathering,
that a meeting between those who represent in so marked a degree
the interests of the great Colonies and the members of Her Majesty's
■Government will lead to an interchange of ideas about matters of
•common and material interest, about closer commercial union, about
the representation of the Colonies, about common defence, about
legislation, about other questions of equal importance, which cannot
but be productive of the most fruitful results. But after all, this is
the great motive which influences the Government: We want to show
to these gentlemen, we want to show to the Colonies that they worthily
represent, that the days of apathy and indifference have long ago
passed away. We want to show to them, that zve are as proud of them
as we believe they are proud of us. We want to show them that we
have confidence in their future, and that we have hope in their
closer union with ourselves, so that in the future the British Empire,
iounded upon freedom, buttressed by the affections of its several
members, fortified by mutual interest, shall stand impregnable and
unassailable ' four square to all the winds that blow.' "
Gentlemen, with such sentiments inspiring those in authority, I
think we may look forward with confidence and hope that some of
these great aspirations looking towards closer union within the Empire
^politically and commercially may one day be realised.
Before taking leave of you as President, and making way for
my successor, I wish to thank all members for the courtesy and forbearance you have shown me under all circumstances, during my term
of office. There never was a time in the history of Vancouver when
it was more necessary for the business men to work together than
the present; and I hope during the year now beginning, one and all
will lend their assistance and cordially work with the officers about
to be elected, to further the interests of the business community.
H. BELL-IRVING,
President. 14
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE.
Hon.  Secretary's Report  for the Year 1896-97.
MEETINGS.
General Meetings of the full Board 12
Special i"i u it     6
Meetings of the Council 11
MEMBERSHIP.
Members on the Roll, March, 1896  ..73
Resigned    4'
Left Vancouver    4
Deaths    2
—10
63
New Members 15'
Membership on Roll, March, 1897 78
I
FINANCES.
Extract from Balance Sheet, 31st March, 1897.
(All liabilities paid to date.) :
Income—
Total Income, 1896-7  .$1,314 92
Expenditure—
Current expenses $ 558 85
Annual Report      521  55
Furniture account        54 00
Balance, Cash in Bank of Montreal      180 52
$1,314 92
Balance drawn      180 52"
Unpaid dues        75 00-
Total Cr      255 52"
WM. SKENE,
Son. Sec-Treasurer. ANNUAL   REPORT.
15
EXTRACTS  FROM  MINUTES.
At meeting held on 16th April, 1896.
On the recommendation of the Council, it was resolved that
Major-General John Twigge, late Royal Engineers, be the representative of the Board at the forthcoming Congress of Chambers of
Commerce of the Empire to be held in London, and after full discussion of the programme of subjects suggested by the London Chamber of
Commerce for| the consideration of the Congress, the following
resolutions were passed :
(1) That this Board records its opinion that in Preferential
Trade between the Mother Country and her colonies and dependencies, lies the future prosperity and maintenance of the unity of
the Empire.
(6) That in the opinion of this Board the British system of
weights, measures and currency now in use is unworthy of the
greatest commercial nation of the world, and that the adoption of a
decimal system throughout the Empire should riot be longer delayed.
(13) That this Board wishes to call special attention" to the
desirability of urging forward the Pacific cable project on commercial
as on strategic grounds.
(14) That the early inauguration of the fast Atlantic service is
a matter of the first importance to Canada, and with it should follow
the acceleration of the transcontinental mail service, together with
a corresponding improvement of the steamship service from
Vancouver to Australia.
(19) That this Board is of opinion that the appointment of a
resident representative of the United Kingdom in the Province of
British Columbia would be attended with the most beneficial results.
(20; That in the opinion of this Board the formation of an
Imperial Council for the consideration of questions of Imperial
interest is a matter of first importance and would not only be the
best means of furthering the general objects of the Congress, but
would prove a powerful agent in the coiM)lidation and strengthening
of the Empire.
On the 14th September, 1896, on board the R.M.S. Empress of
China, a deputation composed of President Bell-Irving, Vice-President
Godfrey, Secretary Skene, and Messrs. Alexander, R. H. Paterson,
_C. G. Johnson, J. W. McFarland, W. Murray, F. Cockburn and S.
Oppenheimer, waited upon His Excellency, Li Hung Chang, when
the following address was presented by the Board : 16
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE.
To His Excellency, Li Hung Chang, Plenipotentiary to His Majesty,
the Emperor of China; Senior Tutor to the Heir Apparent :
Senior Grand Secretary of State and Earl of the First Rank :
May it please your Excellency : The members of the Vancouver
Board of Trade have the honor to present to your Excellency their
congratulations on your safe arrival at this point in your long and
arduous journey, and regret that the shortness of Your Excellency's
stay in our City has prevented your being tendered a reception in
some more fitting manner.
Our Board has followed with lively interest the course of Your
Excellency's travels, and is firmly assured that the result, on the one
hand, of the influence of your personal presence, and, on the other,
of your keen observation and the interest you have shown in all the
developments of modern science and means of communication and
transport, cannot fail to materially strengthen and extend the.
commercial and international relations so happily existing between
the great Chinese and British empires.
Situated, as it is, at the nearest point of direct communication
between the mainlands of China and Canada, and the terminus of
our great transcontinental railway, it is evident that Vancouver is
destined to occupy a prominent place in future international intercourse, and this Board respectfully desires to express to Your
Excellency the opinion that the establishment of a Chinese consulate
in this City would prove of great mutual advantage, and desires
further to call Your Excellency's attention to the fact that consulates
of the United States, France, Germany, Spain, Japan, Norway and
•Sweden, Chili, Ecuador and Hawaii are already stationed in
Vancouver.
Our Board feels highly honored that it has pleased Your
Excellency to choose Vancouver as your point of departure for your
native land, and trusts that your voyage across the Pacific may be
an agreeable one, and that you may yet be spared many years to
occupy that exalted position in the councils of your great Empire
which Your Excellency so eminently adorns. We have the
honor to be
Your Excellency's Most Humble and Obedient Servants,
H. BELL-IRVING, President.
W. GODFREY,   Vice-President.
WM. SKENE, Hon. Secretary.
in reply the Viceroy said : It affords me great pleasure on the
•eve of my departure from the Canadian shores to return to my native
country, to receive the members of the Board of Trade of a city,
which, chough  so  young  yet, is  so  situated  as  to  have all the ANNUAL   REPORT. 17
advantages and qualifications of becoming one of the most important
centres of commerce in the world. I am just as much desirous as
you are to expand the commerce between our two countries, because
I fully appreciate the economical principle that the benefits derived
from the free inteichange of the surplus of the national products of
any two countries are never partial but always mutual. During the
tenure of my office for the last 30 years as High Commissioner of
Trade for the northern and southern ports of China, no effort was
spared to protect, encourage and develop the commerce between the
Chinese continental, and British colonial empires, whose very
characteristic difference only helps to make us the best friends
together. It is gratifying to think my recent sojourn in your
mother country and the present visit to this Dominion will serve as
the best means to strengthen the already existing most cordial
international and commercial relations between our empires, and the
opportunities afforded to me, and of which I have fully availed
myself during my long journey, to be brought into constant contact
with men of high administrative ability and technical knowledge,
and to investigate the application of the most modern scientific
discoveries and inventions for the promotion of the happiness
of mankind. I will certainly raise my voice after the return to my
native country in advocating the introduction of the appliances
of modern western civilization to the Chinese Empire, and it will
undoubtedly result in stimulating the commerce between the hemispheres of the globe. With regard to the proposal of the establishment of a Chinese consulate in this port, I can assure you that it
will receive the most careful and attentive consideration of
the Imperial Government upon my return to Peking. Before
bringing my reply to a conclusion I have to express my entire
satisfaction that our mutual commercial interests are watched and
guided by a body of such able men as you are, and my sincere hope
is that the trade of Vancouver will continue to progress, prosper and
expand.    (Applause.)
[Copy of Address presented to the Hon. J. Israel Tarte, at the Board
Room, on 17th November, 1896.]
To the Honorable J. Israel Tarte, Minister of Public Works,
Dominion Government.
SIR) The Vancouver Board of Trade desires to extend to you
 as the first member of the present Liberal Government visiting
our Province, a cordial welcome to the Pacific coast, and considers it
a happy augury that at so early a period in its term of office, your
Government should have shown so much interest in the affairs of
British Columbia.
The Board takes this opportunity to express its gratification at
the recent appointment of   such a distinguished  member of   the f
18
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE.
British Columbia Bar as Mr. A. J. McColl, Q.C., to the position of
Supreme Court Judge, an appointment which, it feels assured,
has given general satisfaction throughout the Province.
As matters of first importance to the Dominion in general,
to the Province of British Columbia, and to Vancouver in particular
as the chief terminal and shipping port on the Pacific coast,
the Board would call your attention to the paramount importance of
the establishment of a fast Atlantic service, the acceleration of the
trans-continental mail service, and the taking of such steps in regard
to the Canadian-Australian line, that with the least possible delay it
may be raised to the position of a first-class mail and passenger
service, and, further, in the same connection, that everything possible
should be done to facilitate the early consummation of the Pacific
Cable. Upon these matters strong representations were made by
this Board to the late Government, about a year ago, and it would
respectfully urge that you may be pleased to give them your serious
consideration.
The Board has taken great interest in the recent movement
towards preferential trade within the Empire, having had a
representative at the recent Congress of Chambers of Commerce of
the Empire in London, and trusts that your Government will
give due consideration to any project having for its aim the furtherance of this great qnestion.
Certain recently published reports with respect to improvements
on the Fraser River appear to this Board to be somewhat misleading,
inasmuch as they would indicate that the work already done
was begun at the wrong end and should have been carried out in the
upper reaches of the river. While admitting that improvement in
the upper reaches is very desirable in the agricultural interests, and
that the removal of snags and bars so as to keep an open channel for
local steamers available at all seasons is of the greatest importance,
the Board would wish to impress upon you its conviction that the
work carried out by the Government engineers at the river mouth
has been of inestimable benefit, and further that the regulation of the
river channels from its mouth to New Westminster, is now, and always
will be, a matter which should receive first and constant attention.
In the interests of the great mining industry of Kootenay, and
the vast and growing traffic in that section, this Board would
respectfully call your attention to the necessity for improvements
being made to aid the navigation of the Columbia River.
The constantly increasing developments of mining and of
settlement alike in the interior and on the northern coast of
our Province, call for a revision of postal communication, which the
Board trusts you may be pleased to bring to the notice of the Postmaster-General. ANNUAL   REPORT. 19
As the tariff is to engage the early consideration of your
Government, the Board would call your attention to the anomaly
which exists on the duty leviable on iron and steel plates used for
the manufacture of rivetted and welded pipes, whereby these plates
bear a higher duty than the manufactured pipes, thereby rendering
impossible what would, under more equitable arrangement, become
an important local industry ■ this matter was promised the attention
of the late Government, but nothing resulted.
In regard to matter of more strictly local importance,
the Board desires to impress upon your notice : (a) The immediate
erection of a lighthouse on the north shore at the entrance to the
First Narrows in Vancouver harbor; (b) the removal of Parthia
shoal: (c) the re-opening of False Creek to navigation and dredging
of the same ; (d) and specially urges that the question of foreshore
rights within the City limits be definitely and finally settled.
Thanking you for the courtesy of an interview and trusting
that your sojourn in our Province may be agreeable and beneficial,
we have the honor to be your humble and obedient servants,
(Signed) H- BELL-IRVING, President,
W. GODFREY,   Vice-President.
WM. SKENE, Hon. Secretary.
[Copy of address presented to the Hon. L. H. Davies, at the Board Rooms,
on 14th December, 1896.]
To the Hon. L. H. Davies, Minister of Marine and Fisheries:
Sir,—The members of the Vancouver Board of Trade desire to
take this opportunity of cordially welcoming you to our city and
trust that your stay in the Province may be an interesting and
pleasant one, and may the better enable you to guage alike its-
resources and its needs.
The Board feels gratified that at this early period such an
important member of the Government should have visited our
Province, and your having undertaken such a long and arduous journey
at this season of the year is proof that our requirements will not be
overlooked—the interests of the department which you personally
represent being of special concern to British Columbia.
Touching some of the matters alluded to during the recent visit
of your colleague, the Honorable the Minister of Public Works, the-
Board would urge upon you the importance to the Province and the
Dominion of the establishment of a fast Atlantic service, the acceleration of the trans-continental mail service and the taking of such
steps as may with the least possible delay lead to the raising of the 20
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE.
Canadian-Australian line to the position of a first-class mail and
passenger service, and further, in the same connection, that everything possible should be done to effect the early consummation of
the Pacific cable.
The Board feels, sir, that in the past British Columbia has not
received that attention at the hands of the Dominion Government
which its importance and rapid development would seem to deserve,
and trusts that in future our requirements may be better understood
and more promptly dealt with.
Touching matters of general importance, the Board desires to
express its satisfaction in learning from the Hon. the Minister of
Public Works that a survey of the lower Fraser River is about to be
made, and hopes that no delay may occur in the furtherance of that
great undertaking, so important to the vital interests of a large
section of our Province. The maintainence of open channels for
navigation from New Westminster to the mouth of the river
is a matter of considerable importance to this Board, and we would
urge for your consideration, that, owing to the constant changes
occurring in the channels of the river and the frequent accidental
destruction, of existing marks, discretionary powers be given to the
resident engineer to affect such repairs, re-adjustments, etc.,—in
these minor matters—as may from time be necessary, without
previous reference to Ottawa, and further that any changes in the
position of buoys, etc., or alteration in the channels should be
speedily and regularly announced.
In view of the already considerable importance and prospective
great increase in the near future of traffic on our northern waters,
the Board would particularly call your attention to the necessity for
a thorough survey being made of the inside channels from Burrard
Inlet northwards to Cape Caution, and the erection of the necessary
protection to navigation in the way of beacons, buoys, etc.
In regard to fisheries, while matters affecting the salmon
industry will be dealt with in detail by a deputation of canners, our
Board appreciates the fact that one of the principal objects of your
journey is to enquire into and arrange for the establishment of
further fish hatcheries, a matter of great importance to our principal
industry, and in which prompt and practical action should no longer
be delayed, and has the greater confidence in pressing this point, as
the Dominion Government receives over $25,000 per annum
in revenue from the British Columbia fisheries. In view of the
increasing importance of the salmon industry, as well as the
great possibilities in our deep sea fisheries, the Board would respectfully suggest that more frequent visits of your able fish commissioner
to this coast would prove of great benefit generally and would assist
the Department in framing permanent regulations more in accordance with actual requirements. ANNUAL   REPORT. 21
In this connection the Board desires again to call your
attention to its resolution of 11th August last, viz. : " That for the
prevention of the smuggling which is now prevalent in the northern,
waters of British Columbia, and for the protection of the fisheries,
the Dominion Government is respectfully urged to provide a special
steamer for this service, more particularly during the summer
months," and would now further express its opinion that the time
has arrived when measures should be taken to protect the interests-
of fishermen generally from foreign interference on our Pacific coast,,
equivalent to those existing on the Atlantic seaboard.
Turning to more local matters, the Board desires to call your
very especial attention (a) to the necessity for the immediate erection
of a lighthouse and fog-bell at the entrance to the First Narrows in.
Vancouver Harbor j (b) to the desirability of an exact re-survey
being at once made of Parthia shoal and the erection of proper and
distinctive marks in connection therewith for the guidance of
mariners until its removal can be effected ; (c) to the re-opening of
False Creek to navigation and dredging of the same, this matter
being of much importance in the interests of various industries and
prospective increase in local traffic.
Reverting to matters of more general importance, the Board
would impress upon your notice that the. rapid developments in.
Kootenay demand improved means of communication, its views being
embodied in the following resolution of October 13th last, viz. r
" Whereas, it is probable that at the ensuing session of Parliament,
renewed application will be made to the Doruinio.n Government for
assistance towards the construction of a railway through the Kootenay ; and whereas, it is essential to the best interests of
British Columbia that such railway, if constructed, should be either
extended to the Pacific coast or connected with some independent
line from its terminus in Kootenay to the coast; the Vancouver
Board of Trade would strongly urge upon the Dominion Government
that, provided a satisfactory proposition from responsible parties for
the construction of a direct railway from Kootenay to the coast be
presented, that the Government should give it their favorable
consideration and support, making it a condition that it should
proceed simultaneously with the construction of the Crow's Nest
Pass line. Further, that in the opinion of this Board, equitable
regulations respecting freight and passenger rates be made a condition
precedent to any line being subsidized."
In the same connection and in order to facilitate rapid and
improved means of communication, so vital to the interests of this-
Province, the Board would urge that the Government should reserve
the ri^ht of way for telegraph and telephone lines on all subsidized
roads.
The constantly increasing developments of mining and of
settlement alike in  the  interior  and  on  the  northern  coasts of 22
VANCOUVER   BOARD   OF   TRADE
our Province, together with the expansion of the fisheries, call
for a general revision of the postal service. A daily direct service to
Kootenay ; a bi-weekly service to Comox and Union, and, during the
summer months, a weekly service along the northern coast are
urgently required.
It is to be hoped that when the present contract for northern
coast mails expires, the new contract may be made weekly during
the summer, instead of fortnightly as at present. This Board
further desires to urge that the terminal position of Vancouver
-should entitle it to be considered as the chief centre for the collection
and distribution of mail, and trusts that when changes are made this
fact may not be 'overlooked, all of which matters we beg that
you may be pleased to bring to the notice of the Postmaster-
General.
In conclusion, we desire again, sir, to express our gratification
at having an opportunity of receiving you, believing that nothing
will tend to promote the good government of our Dominion than
persona] knowledge by the members of the Cabinet of the requirements of each Province.
We have the honor to remain your humble and obedient
.servants,
(Signed) H. BELL-IRVING, President.
WM. SKENE, Hon. Secretary.
BANQUET.
On the evening of December 14th, a banquet in honor of Mr.
Davis was held in the Hotel Vancouver, 84 being present.
Interview with the Hon. A. G. Blair.
On Monday, 21st December, a special meeting of the Council
interviewed the Hon. A. G. Blair, Minister of Railways and Canals,
at the Hotel Vancouver.
Mr. Blair assuring the meeting " that so soon as it may be
demonstrated to the Dominion Government that a direct railway,
commercially feasible, can be constructed from the Pacific coast to
Kootenay, the Government will be bound to give such a road their
serious consideration and support."      .if
28 VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
BRITISH COLUMBIA SALMON FISHERY, SEASON, 1896.
The total pack of salmon for the Province for the past season
■was the highest on record.
Several new canneries were built on Fraser River, one on the
West Coast and one on Rivers' Inlet.
Owing it is supposed to the beneficial effect of the hatcheries,
the run on Fraser River was a fairly 'good one, though the past was
the " off year."
A large increase in the number of boats fished on Fraser River
has again to be recorded, while the highest price known was paid for
raw fish, the margin of profit left to the canners being reduced to a
minimum, and in some cases entirely extinguished.
Five new canneries were built on the American side in Puget
Sound, all of which put up considerable packs.
The increasing competition of these factories in the English
Market, enabled as they are to undersell the British Columbia Pack,
owing to their obtaining the fish cheaply by means of traps, is being
severely felt by British Columbia packers, while owing to the further
•extension of use of traps in Puget Sound waters, and to the refusal
of the Government to permit extension of trapping on tha British
side, this competition is bound to be more severely felt in the future.
There is a general and unanimous demand for the extension of
the hatcheries in British Columbia. The Government has not yet
taken any active steps in this direction, but it is sincerely to be
hoped that something will be done this season.
Owing to the extensive preparations being made in British
•Columbia, Alaska and Puget Sound for the coming season, there is
little demand up to the present for 1897 pack in England, and prices
-are likely to rule low.
The outlook for packers generally can not be considered as
■encouraging, but the care and attention now being paid to the
packing in British Columbia will insure the product from this
.Province obtaining a market in preference to any other. ANNUAL  REPORT. 29
Pack of  British   Columbia   Salmon,   Season   1896.
Compiled by R. P. Rithet & Co., Ltd., Victoria, B.C.
PACK BY CANNERIES.
Fraser River.
Cases.
A.lliance Canning Co  4,510
.Anglo-American Canning Co  6,692
Anglo-British Columbia Packing Co  61,849
.Atlas Canning Co  6,000
JBon-Accord Fishery Co  15,735
Boutilier & Co., F  7,956
Brunswick Canning Co  9,484
■Canadian Pacific Packing Co  14,797
•Costello & McMorran  12,012
Dinsmore Island Canning Co  6,335
Ewen & Co  19,896
Federation Brand Salmon Canning Co  14,662
Fishermen's Canning Co  9,908
Eraser River Industrial Society  5,205
Hume & Co., John A  6,334
Lulu Island Canning Co  7,508
McPherson & Hickey  7,700
JVLalcolm & Windsor  22,526
Pacific Coast Canning Co  8,955
Provincial Canning Co  4,355
•Short & Squair  15,642
Terra Nova Canning Co  9,442
Todd & Son, J. H  21,972
Victoria Canning Co  47,599
Westham Island Packing Co  3,750
"Westminster Packing Co  6.160
Skeena River.
.Anglo-British Columbia Packing Co  22,919
Balmoral  Canning Co  10,444
British Columbia Canning Co  10,521
Carlisle Packing Co  13,650
Inverness Canning Co  11,118
Royal Canadian Packing Co  10,699
^Skeena Packing Co  10,512
Victoria Canning Co  10,277
Rivers Inlet.
.Anglo-British Columbia Packing Co  30,407
British Columbia Canning Co  39,229
Brunswick Canning Co  17,519
Victoria Canning Co  20,313
Naas River.
^Federation Brand Salmon Canning Co  14,649
Carried forward  579,241 30
VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
Brought forward 579,248
Lowe Inlet.
Lowe Inlet Packing Co   10,395-
Namu Harbor.
R. Draney I     3,987
Al*ert   Bay.
Alert Bay Canning Co     2,840-
. West Coast,, V.I.
Clayoquet Fishing <fc Trading Co     4,995-
West Coast Packing Co       112:
Total pack 1896 601,570'
PACK BY DISTRICTS.
1896
cases
Fraser River 356,984
Rivers   Inlet Mi 107,468
Skeena River- 100,140
Naas River     14,649
Lowe Inlet    10,395
West Coast, V.I     5,107
Namu Harbor     3,987
Alert Bay     2,840
Gardiner's Inlet	
1895
cases
400,368
58,579
67,797
19,550
8,681
3,320
3.000
5,100
894
ises
3,967
9,351
1,151
9,587
8,315
,000
1893
cases
457,797
38,659
59,683
15,190
8,724
1892
cases
80,215
15,126-
89,780
25,434
8,161
3,700
6,476
3,598-
6,156-
601,570   566,395   494,371   590,229   228,470-
Salmon Shipmems in Detail.
1896
England— cases
London direct 182,253
London overland     9,076
Liverpool direct 322,364
Liverpool, overland  11,405
Via other ports	
Overland (previous years)       65,647
Eastern Canada  51,041
Australia   11,609
Other destinations.     2,128
Local Sales     3,844
Stocks on hand     7,850
Total 601.570
1895
1894
1893
1892
cases
cases
cases
cases
96,459
94,203
148,332
61,864
256,301
222,345
253,833
101,447
29,590
59,296
25,703
65,647
20,424
27,445
79,288
76,009
114,792
sg^o-
8,832
15,078
8,830
150
1,498
4,326
2,642
2,931
{4.311
25,952
4,374
8,213
566,395
494,371
590,229
228,470- ANNUAL   REPORT.
31
TOTAL PACIFIC COAST SALMON PACK, 1896. .
cases       cases
Columbia River.—Spring 435,100
Fall   66,'l00
 501,200-
Sacramento River—Spring. >  7 732
Fall ■    6,740
 14,472"
Rogue and Klamath Rivers.—Spring   15,000
Fall     5,400 I
       20,400-
Oregon Rivers.—Fall  95,000-
Puget Sound and points near Fraser River  206,000
Alaska  874,596-
Fraser River 356,584
Skeena River 100,140
Rivers' Inlet 107,468
Other Northern Points   36,978
Cohoes Pack, estimated  25,000
     626,570-
Grand   Total 2,338,238-
SALMON FLEET, SEASON 1896.
Br. bark Natuna...
Br. ship   Orealla..
Br. bark Snowdrop
Br. ship Drumcliff..
.Sailed Oct.
M     Nov.
cases
43,168
73,978
Nov.17  22,147
Dec. 16  42,960
To London direct.
182,25»
Br. bark Embleton Sailed Oct.
Dan. ship Tercera      E     Oct.
Br.' bark Glenogil	
Br. bark Glenogle	
Br. ship Drumlanrig	
Br. bark Cairnsmore	
3  4f,330
9 .'.... 40,328
Oct. 21  97,011
Nov. 6  39,187-
Nov.22  70,044
Dec. 22  30,464
To Liverpool direct	
Total by sea to England.
322,364-
504,6)7 32
VANCOUVER  BOARD  OF  TRADE
SHIPPING.
Vancouver possesses a magnificent and perfectly sheltered harbor,
^accessible for vessels of any draught, and with adequate wharfage
facilities, the charges for wharfage being levied on the cargo and
paid by the receivers. Although not yet possessing a dry dock,
"there is an excellent beach on the north side of the harbor, where
iron vessels can be safely beached for the purpose of being scraped
And painted, the rise and fall of the tide (13 to 15 ft.) being
-sufficient to permit this being done in a satisfactory manner. Shipmasters visiting the port all concur in praising the natural advantage
which enables them to rid their vessels of marine growths in such an
inexpensive manner and with perfect safety.
For inwards business there are general cargoes from Europe,
and cargoes of raw sugar from Java for the Refinery. For outwards
business a charter for lumber can nearly always be obtained, and in
the season (August to September) canned salmon for the United
^Kingdom.
The I Empress" line of mail steamers, belong to the Canadian
Pacific Railway, leave for Japan and China once a month during the
-winter, and once every twenty days in the summer (calling at
Victoria, Vancouver Island, for local mail and passengers).
The Canadian-Australian Mail Line leaves for Sydney once
-a month, touching at Victoria, Honolulu and the Fiji Islands.
The Pacific Coast SS. Company's steamers ply regularly between
Vancouver and San Francisco every five days, calling also at
Victoria. There is a daily service with Victoria and with Nanaimo,
"the steamers connecting with the incoming and outgoing trans-con-
"tinental express trains of the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Provisions and supplies of all kinds are plentiful and at
moderate prices, imported stores being allowed to be supplied from
bonded warehouses.
Annexed will be found a list of the usual disbursement expenses,
together with copies of actual disbursement accounts : ANNUAL  REPORT. 33-
Ordinary Expenses of a Vessel at Vancouver.
Hospital dues per register ton  <$        02
Health Inspector's fee  4 00
Harbor dues  5 00
Bill of health, outwards  1 00
Pilotage, per foot (each way)  2 00
Pilotage, per foot (steamers)  1 50
Port Agency (according to size) $25 00 to 100 00
Discharge of ballast (usually done by ship's crew)
or per ton ,  10 00 to   25 00
Harbor towage  10 00 to   20 00
Stevedoring—
General cargo or salmon, per ton  45
Sugar, per ton  27^-
Lumber and timber, per M. ft., according to
the style of cargo and facilities of the ship. 80 to     1 00
Watering  15 00 to   20 00
Rates of Towage.
PILOTAGE  DISTRICT  OF  YALE  AND  NEW  WESTMINSTER.
The ports of  the Pilotage District of  Yale and New "Westminster shall be as follows :
Port of Vancouver.
Port of New Westminster.
• Port of 5tTale and several landings on the Fraser River.
(1) The limit of the Port of Vancouver shall be inside a line-
drawn from Point Atkinson to the red buoy on Spanish Bank.
(2) The limit of the Port of New Westminster shall be inside a
line drawn between the outer buoys and north and south sand heads
at entrance of Fraser River.
DUES.
For vessels entering or clearing from the Port of Vancouver-
the rates of pilotage shall be as follows :
Vessels under sail $4 00 per foot-
ii      in tow of a steamer    2 00       y
ii      under steam   1 50      n 34 VANCOUVER   BOARD   OF   TRADE
The pilotage from Cape Flattery or Royal Roads to a line drawn
from Point Atkinson to the red buoy on Spanish Bank and vice
versa is not compulsory, but if the services of a pilot is required, he
.shall be paid the following rates, viz. :
From Cape Flattery $6 00 per foot
I     Callum Bay    5 00       ..
I    Beachy   Head.    4 00      ,,
n    Race Rocks or Royal Roads    3 00      n
And for vessels under steam or in tow of a steamer the
following rates shall be paid :
From Cape Flattery  $3 00 per foot
I     Callum Bay    2 50       m
I    Beachy Head    2 00      ,.
ii    Race Rocks or Royal Roads, vessels under steam. 2 00      a
M ii ii ii     in tow of a
steamer    1 50      fi
NEW  "WESTMINSTER.
I
From the lighthouse on Fraser sand heads to New Westminster :
"For vessels under sail    . $4 00 per foot
ii        n      in tow of a steamer    2 00      n
ii ii      under steam    1 50      |
From the lighthouse to Cape Flattery or Royal Roads and vice
-versa the pilotage is not compulsory, but if the services of a pilot
-are required he shall be paid the following rates :
For vessels under sail :
From Cape Flattery |6 00 per foot
I    Callum Bay.".... ,    5 00      ,■
n    Beachy Head   4 00      n
ii    Race Rocks or Royal Roads    3 00      n
For vessels under steam or in tow of a steamer, the following
rates shall be paid :
'. From Cape Flattery  3 00 per foot
ii    Callum Bay , 2 50      ii
ii    Beachy Head  2 00      n
ii    Race  Rocks  or  Royal   Roads,   vessels  under
steam  1 00      |
ii    Race Rocks or Royal Roads, vessels in tow of
a steamer  1 50      I
Any fraction of a foot not exceeding six inches shall be paid for
.-as half a foot, and any fraction of a foot exceeding six inches shall
be paid for as a foot. ANNUAL REPORT.
35
VANCOUVER CUSTOM HOUSE.
Imports.
"Quarters ending March. June. Sept.
4894—Dutiable $160,304 $218,501 $199,223
1895—       „          126,853 204,899 249,471
.1896—       I         254,522 233,957 361,271
1894—Free     221,210 172.951 250,833
1895— „           36,167 144,065 44,024
1896— , 127,157 127,083 61,061
Dec.
$182,733
253,490
354,674
34,789
38,698
59,094
Totals.
$ 760,761
834,713
1,204,424
679,783
262,954
374,395
Total imports.
1894
.$1,440,544
1895
$1,097,667
1896
1,578,819
1894—Duties
1895— „
1896— 1
1894—Other rev
1895—
1896—
REVENUE.
March. June. Sept. Dec. Total.
.$51,615 68 $68,636 16 $65,594 02 $60,066 01 $245,911 37
47,047 94
73,970 56
9,451 68
7,604 52
6,778 28
63,610 30
83,956 82
17,763 43
16,209 82
17,293 20
66,507 13
83,339 30
5,271 90
17,737 49
24,569 09
77,143 27
91,204 14
8,052 70
8,942 16
13,067 45
254,309 66
332,470 82
40,529 71
51,493 94
51,708 02
EXPORTS.
1894
Products of the mines $ 16,758
fisheries  282,425
Forest  336,994
Animals and their produce     25,846
Agricultural produce       5,847
Manufactures     44,309
Bullion     17,651
.Sundries       1,345
Totals $731,175
1895
1896
$ 28,753
$193,627
259,172
137,802
455,956
483,526
53,269
51,247
12,907
76,740
58,934
75,520
13,490
72,546
2,730
$882,481
$1,093,738 36
VANCOUVER   BOARD   OF   TRADE
Returns, Division of Vancouver.
For the Year ending December 31st, 1896. S
Ex-Warehoused    Ex-Wareh'usect
Articles. Warehoused. for for
Consumption Export.
Spirits, galls     56,491-97 47,722-69 393.18-
Malt,  lbs  706,345 704,013 	
Tobacco    144.260J 140,620 2,580
Raw Leaf Tobacco     26,788| 26,6824 	
Cigars    128,425 144,275
Duty Collected $141,989.09.
Quarters ending
Enters
D   FOR   CoNSU
MPTION.
Duty Col.
Free.
Dutiable.
Total.
March 31	
Dec. 31	
$   133,960
135,424
68,837
65,271
$   228,476
259,361
263,063
264,551
$   362,436
394,785
331,900
329,822
$   73,970 56-
83,956 82
83,339 30-
91,204 14
$   403,492
$1,015,451
$1,418,943
$332,470 82;
Revenue.
Custom Duties, as above $332,470 82
Sick Mariners' Duea       1,832 94
Steamboat Inspection  406 92.
Chinese Immigration     57,753 00-
Other Revenues       1,715 16
$394,178 84,
Total Revenue.
1894 1895             1896
Customs $286,441 $305,803 $394,178
Inland J    95,258 111,504         141,989-
Totals $381,699
$417,307
$536,177  38
VANCOUVER  BOARD   OF  TRADE
Imports into the Province of British Columbia for 26 Years
Ending 30th June, 1896.
Value of
Total
Goods Entered Fob Home Consumption.
Dutiable
Free .
Duty
Imports.
Goods.
Goods.
Total.         i
Collected.
To 30th June, 1872
81,790,352
$1,600,361     $
166,707
Sl,767,068      §
342,400 48
From Canada.
22,215
•
22,215
22,215
To 30th June, 1873.,
2,191.011
1,569,112
507,364
2,076,476
302,147 65
From Canada..
75,608
75,604
75,604
To 30th June, 1874
2,085,560
1,676,492
371,544
2,048,336
336,494 47
From Canada
66,104
66,104
66,104
To 30th June, 1875..
, ..      2,543,552
1,924,482
566,111
2,490,593
413,921 50
From Canada .
117,054
117,054
117,054
To 30th June, 1876
2,997,597
2,237,072
707,906
2,944,978
488,384 52
From Canada.
129,735
129,735
129,735
To 30th June, 1877.
...      2,220,968
1,820,391
346,318
2,166,709 •
403,520 21
From Canada.,
163,142
163,142
163,142
To 30th June, 1878
2,244,503
1,905,201
367,926
2,273,127
426,125 14
From Canada.
144,754
144,754
111,754
To 30th June, 1879
2,440,781
1,997,125
320,326
2,317,454
484,704 04
From Canada,
184,951
184,951
184,951
To 30th June, 1880
....    1,689,394
1.614,165
122,451
2,457,116
450,175 43
From Canada.,
208,072
208,072
208,072
To 30th June, 1881..
....    2,489,643
2,214,153
242,963
1,736,616
589,403 62
From Canada..
387,111
387,111
387,111
To 30th June, 1882..
....    2,899,223
2,472,174
404,287
2,875,461
678,104 53
From Canada..
449,768
449,768
449,768
To 30th June, 1883..
...    3,937,536
3,331,023
550,833
3,866,856
907,655 54
From Canada
624,207
624,207
624,207
To 30th June, 1884..
4,142,486
3,337,642
702,693
4,040,335
884,076 21
From Canada..
       789,287
789,287
789,287
To 30th June, 1885..
    4,089,492
3,458,529
564,923
4,023,452
966,143 64
From Canada..
927,054
927,054
927,054
To 30th June, 1886...
    3,953,299
2,951,379       1.060,347
4,011,726
880,226 65
To 30ih fine, 1887...
     3,547,852
3,065,791
560,348
3,626,139
883,421 53
To 30th .June, 1888...
     3,509,951
2,674,941
729,266
3,401,207
861,465 14
To 38th .! uiie, 1889...
     3,763,127
2,002,646
807,140
3,809,786
974,675 69
To 30th June, 1890...
4,379,272
3,357,111        1
,C30,375
4,287,486        1
,075,215 20
To 30th Jipje, 1891..
    5,478,883
4,261,207       1
,074,983
5,336,190       1
,346,059 42
To 30th Jime, 1892...
    6,495,589
4,423,411        1
,803,005
6,220,419         1
,412,878 00
To 30th June, 1893..,
...    3,934,066
3,662,673       1
,255,495
4,918,168        1
,367,250 32
To 30th June, 1894...
5,320,615
3,582,333        1
.738,282
5,336,961        1
,308,631 23
To 30th «ie, 1895...
I.HH.ilTti
3,131,490        1
,236,935
4,368,425        1
,137,727 49
To 30th June, 1896..
    5,566,238
3,933,050       1
,593,894
5,496,944       1
,306,738 56 ANNUAL  REPORT.
39
Exports, the Produce of Canada, from the Province of British
Columbia, for 25 Years Ending June 30th, 1896.
Animals
,nd then-
Agric'l.
Miscel
Tear.
The Mine.
Fisheries.
Forest.
produce.
Products
laneous.
Total.
1872.
.$1,389,585
$    37,707
$214,377
$214,700
$     142
$    1,540
$ 1,858,050
1873.
. 1,224,362
43,361
211,026
259,292
2,885
1,197
1,742,123
1874.
.  1,351,145
114,118
260,116
320,625
5,296
443
2,051,743
1875.
.  1,929,294
133,986
292,468
411,810
9,727
2,777,285
1876.
. 2,032,139
71,338
273,430
329,027
3,080
"68
2,709,082
1877.
.  1,708,848
105,603
287,042
230,893
3,083
1.500
2,346,969
1878.
.  1,759,171
423,840
327,360
257,314
462
2,768,147
1879.
.  1,530,812
633,493
273,366
268,671
2,505
57
2,708,848
.1880.
.  1,664,626
317,410
258,804
339,218
3,843
100
2,584,001
1881.
.  1,317,079
400,984
172,647
350,474
248
22
2,231,554
1882.
1,437,072
976,903
362,875
300,429
946
2,616
1 3,080,841
1883.
.  1,309,646
1,333,385
407,624
287,394
6,791
443
3,345.263
1884.
. 1,441,052
899,371
458,365
271,796
1,745
1,413
3,100,404
1885.
1,759,512
727,672
262,071
414,364
2,324
5,948
3,172,391
1886.
1,720,335
643,052
194,488
329,248
1,907
2,811
2,891,811
1887.
1,832,827
910,559
235,913
380,120
10,265
1,911
3.371,601
1888.
1,889,805
1,164,019
441,957
318,839
27,631
85,826
3,928,077
-1889.
2,377,052
993,623
449,026
397.685
14,831
102,089
4,334,306
1890
2,375,770
2,374,717
325,881
346,159
9,823
113,271
5,545,621
1891
2,930,229
2,274,686
374,996
294,646
5,017
20,434
6,257,158
1892.
2,979,470
2,351,083
425,278
390,854
25,018
31,976
6,574,989
1893.
2,898,947
1,501,831
454,994
310,621
30,173
446,231
5,642,797
1894.
3.521,543
3,541,305
411,623
149,269
23,323
196,895
7,843,958
1895.
4,615,452
3,264,500
500,048
454,618
20,366
85,190
8,949,174
1896.
5,762,960
3,288,776
685,740
434,6,47
60,763
57,022
10,289,908 40
VANCOUVER  BOARD  OP  TRADE
SHIPPING RETURNS.
PORT   OF  VANCOUVER.
Return of Vessels for the Year ended 31st December, 1896:
SEA-GOING VESSELS.
INWARDS.
Number.
Tonnage.
Cargo.
Tons.
Weight
Tons
Measurement
British	
61
11
288
119,403
1,334
219,400
34,292
1,939
16,622
56,187
2.152
Eoreign	
19,135
Total	
360
340,137
52,853
77,474
OUTWARDS.
Number.
Tonnage.
Cargo.
Tons
Weight
Tons
Measurement
British	
57
14
287
112,038
1,695
2-19,352
75,392
1,276
60,027
89,068
1,288
Canadian	
Foreign	
71,076
Total	
358
333,085
136,695
161,432
Inwards ..
Outwards.
COASTWISE.
Number.
Tonnage
2,038
422,081
2,057
421,21ft ANNUAL   REPORT. 4J.
PORT OF WESTMINSTER (Fraser River) B.C
Returns for the year ending 31st December, 1896.
Local Shipping. No. Tonnage.
Steam vessels on register 73 9,246
Sailing     „       „      17 1,354
Total JH) 11,100
Vessels built during 1896 10 1,263
Imports—Dutiable j§; $300,175 00
Free  211,686 00
Total  511,861 00
IExports—Total value $29,664 00
Hevenue—Total collection 1896  $90,450 25
(By the courtesy of the Collector of Customs.)
PORT OF NANAIMO (Vancouver Island).
For the year ending 31st December, 1896.
.Sea-going Vessels—
inwards.                                          no. tonnage.
Steamers 342 194,964
Sailing vessels  82 99,095
Total 424 294,059
OUTWARDS. NO. TONNAGE.
Steamers 346 215,625
Sailing vessels  88 109,502
Total 434 325,127
^EXPORTS—
COAL. TONS. VALUE,
United States 657,498 $2,426,986
Hawaiian Islands  11,038 43,126
Guatemala     1,250 4,125
Buenos Ayres        492 1,476
Mexico....'.     4,003 16,012
Japan     2,345 7,739
Total tons 676,626 $2,499,464
Produce of the forest.      105,572
Miscellaneous  4,371
Total $2,609,407 .42
VANCOUVER   BOARD   OF   TRADE
Imports—Dutiable, value $130,168 OO
Free     63,193 00-
Total  $193,361 00
Revenue—Duties $46,714 90
S. M. Dues '.     2,701 83
Other revenue -..       334 74
Total .$49,751 73
(By the courtesy of the Collector of Customs.)
PORT OF VICTORIA (Vancouver Island).
Returns for the year ending 30th June, 1896.    (Later returns not-
obtainable at this port.)
Vessels employed in the coasting trade of the Dominion of Canada
arrived at and departed from Victoria, B.C., during the year ending 30th
June, 1896:
Vessels Arrived.
No. Vessels. Tonnage.
1,425 391,765
Vessels Departed.
No. Vessels. Tonnage.
1,417 399,060
Vessels entered outwards for sea at Victoria during year ending 30thi
June, 1896:
With Cargo.
*No. Vessels. Tonnage.
661
470,643
In Ballast.
No. Vessels. Tonnage.
716 434,309
Vessels entered inward from sea during year ending 30th June, 1896 :
With Cargo.
*No. Vessels. Tonnage,
1,113 631,366
*Include Puget Sound daily service.
In Ballast.
No. Vessels. Tonnage.
273 298,303
Number and tonnage of vessels built and registered at Victoria during the?
year ending the year.
Built
No. Tonnage.
6 357
Registered.
No. Tonnage.
6 600 ANNUAL  REPORT.
43-
Comparative Statement of Cargoes handled at the Ports of
Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia.
For the year ending 30th June, 1896.
(From the Official Returns.)
OUTWARDS.
Port of Vancouver (Burrard Inlet).
Number.
Tons Reg.
Quantity of Freight.
Tons
Weight
Tons
Measure
40
9
203
83,614
672
224,879
49,588
3,436
82,357
60,661
3,958
96,404
Total	
252
309,165
135,381
161,023
Average Cargo
533.25
639.00
Port of Victoria (Vancouver Island).
Number.
Tons Reg.
Quantity <
Tons
Weight
if Freight.
Tons
Measure
1
619
52,635
1,113
416,895
4,801
980
14,458
1,089
165
2,844
Total	
661
470,643
20,239
4,098
Average Cargo
30.62              62.00
*Include daily ferry services to and from Puget Sound ports. -44                                       VANCOUVER  BOARD  OP  TRADE
INWARDS.
Port of Vancouver, (Burrard Inlet)
Number.
Tons Reg.
Quantity of Freight.
Tons
Weight
Tons
Measure
34
8
185
77,097
507
195,576
26,188
588
20,866
48,303
543
23,052
Canadian	
Foreign	
Total	
227
273,180
47,642
71,898
Average Cargo
209.87
316.73
Port of Victoria (Vancouver Island)
Number.
Tons Reg.
Quantity of Freight.
Tons
Weight
Tons
Measure
50
91
972
87,094
6,195
538,077
16,790
1,733
21,039
6,673
6
5,346
Canadian	
*Foreign	
Total	
1,113
631,367
39,562
12,025
Average Cargo per vessel	
35.54
10.80
*Include daily ferry services to and from Puget Sound ports. ANNUAL  REPORT.
45
Summary of Cargoes of Sea-going Vessels for the Year
Ending 30th June, 1896.
Tort of Vancouver :
Tons
Weight.
Tons
Measure.
135,381
47,642 i -
193,023
20,239
39,562	
59,801
161,023
718,981
4,098
12,025
	
Port of Victoria :
232,921
Inwards	
Totals	
16,023 f
46 VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
MINING.
As the most authentic source of unbiassed information regarding the general characteristics and present position of our mines,
the following extracts have been taken from The Annual Report of
the Minister of Mines for British Columbia, for the year ending 31st-
December, 1896.
RETURNS.
Showing the total amount and value of the output of the mines-
of British Columbia to January 1st, 1897.
JAMES BAKER,
Minister of Mines.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
10th February, 1897.
TABLE I.
TOTAL PRODUCTION FOR ALL YEARS.
Gold, placer $ 57,704,855
Gold, lode  2,177,869
Silver  4,028,224
Lead  1,606,427
Copper  254,802
Coal and Coke  33,934,427
Building stone, bricks, etc  1,200,000
Other metals  25,000
$100,931,604
The next Table shows the rapid increase in production during-
the last seven years, the increase for 1891 over 1890 being due to
the large export of coal, the output of which for that year of
1,000,000 tons, being the largest ever reached by our colleries. In
the year 1892 the influence of the production of the lode mines
began to be felt, and since then the very marked increase in production has been carried by the quickly growing value of the gold,
silver, lead and copper produced. ANNUAL   REPORT.
4r
TABLE II.
PRODUCTION FOR EACH YEAR FROM 1890 TO 1896 (INCLUSIVE).
Year. Amount.
1890 $2,608,608
1891   3,546,702
1892.....   3,017,971
1893   3,588,413
1894   4,225,717
1895   5,655,302
1896   7,146,425
Table III. gives a detailed statement of the amount and value-
of the different mine products for 1895 and 1896, but it has as yet
been impossible to collect statistics concerning the amount of building stone, brick, lime, fire-clay, tiles, etc., hence these tables
do not contain any particulars this year about the mining of the
economical materials, which, of course, should be here included.
However, the increase in the value of the precious metals produced, and the baser metals, especially of lead, is marked, and the
total increase for 1896 over 1895, very gratifying, the total production of the mines, other than coal, having increased from $2,834,000-
to $4,816,000.
TABLE III.
AMOUNT and value of materials PRODUCED  1895 AND  1896.
Cust'mary
Measures
1895
1896
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Gold, Placer	
Oz	
Oz	
O-J	
Lbs	
Lbs
Tons	
24,084
39,264
1,496,522
952,840
16,475,464
' 939,654
452
$   481,683
785,271
977,229
47,642
532,255
2,818,962
2,260
10,000
$5,655,302
27,201
62,259
3,135,343
3,818,556
24,199,977
846,235
615
$   544,026-
1,244,180
2,100,689
190,926-
721,384
Coal	
Coke	
2,327,145
3,075
15,000
$7,146,425 r
48
VANCOUVER  BOARD  OF  TRADE
TABLE IV.
PRODUCTION  OF  METALS   PER  DISTRICT.
Name
Divisions
Districts
1895
1896
1895
1896
$ 282,400
$ 384,050
$   81,000
40,700
18,200
142,500
$   82,900
53,000
51,100
197,050
Lightning Creek        1
Quesnellemouth        1     ...
Keithley Creek         1     ...
22,575
17,575
2,223,206
21,000
Kootenay, East	
154,427
Kootenay, West	
4,002,735
Ainsworth. Division	
.     388,944
63,608
1,057,677
702,457
10,520
545,529
2,010,048
1,243,360
14,209
Trail Creek      i
Lillooet 	
40,663
241,581
33,665
Yale	
206,078
Osoyoos       Division	
147,731
41,650
48,400
131,220
9,000
65,108
Yale                    i,
Other Districts	
10,000
15,000
$2,743,387
$4,592,115
$2,838,000
$4,816,955
PLACER   GOLD.
Table V. gives the yearly production of placer gold as determined by the returns sent in by the banks and express companies of
gold sold to the mints, and from returns sent in by the Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders. To these yearly amounts one-
third was added up to the year 1878, and from then to 1895, one-
■fifth, which proportion was considered to represent approximately,
the amount of gold sold of which there was no record.
The gold output is now beginning to steadily rise as the operations of the large hydraulic mining companies in Cariboo begin to
•assume such a scale, that with larger water supplies and the mines
more opened out for work, a much larger amount of ground can be
■washed.
This placer gold contains from 10 to 25 per cent, silver, but the
silver value has not been separated from the totals. ANNUAL  REPORT.
4&
TABLE V.
YIELD OF PLACER GOLD PER YEAR TO DATE.
1858 $ 705,000
1859  1,615,070
1860  2,228,543
11861  2,666,118
1862  2,656,903
1863  3,913,563
1864  3,735,850
1865  3,491,205
i866...... 2,662,106
1867  2,480,868
1868  3,372,972
1869  1,774,978
1870  1,336,956
1871  1,799,440
1872  1,610,972
1873  1,305,749
1874  1,844,618
1875  2,474,004
1876  1,786,648
1877 1,608.182
1878......$ 1,275,204
1879  1,290,058
1880  1,013,827
1881  1,046,737
1882  954,085
1883 , 794,252
1884  736,165
1885  713,738
1886  903,651
1887  693,709
1888  616,731
1889  588,923
1890  490,435
1891  429,811
1892  399,526
1893  356,131
1894  405,516
1895  481,683
1896  544,026
$57,704,855
PRODUCTION  OF  LODE  MINING.
The next table shows very clearly the fact that lode mining in
this Province has just fairly begun, and that the progress now being
made, is decided and very satisfactory.
The gold production of course consists mostly of the output of
the Rossland mines as per smelter returns, but there are added the
gold saved by amalgamation in the Osoyoos District, as at Camp
McKinney, in the Nelson District as at the Poorman Mine, and the
product of small lots of gold ore sent out to the smelters from other
parts.
Some silver ore is known to have been sold prior to 1887, but
no record has been obtained regarding these small sales.  ANNUAL  REPORT.
51
Production of Coal and Coke.
In Table VII. is given the total number of long tons (2,2403bs.)
of coal and coke for each year as reported to the Government by the
•different colleries in the Province. The production of coke is small,
but will be now rapidly increased when the coke ovens, now being
perfected at the Union Mines at Comox, and the coking coal of the
-Crow's .Nest Pass, will have begun the regular supply of this fuel to
the smelting centres. For the last two years the output of coal has
been declining by reason of the increasing competition of British and
American coal in the Pacific Coast markets of the United States,
■where most of the coal exported from British Columbia is sold.
TABLE VII.
COAL AND COKE PRODUCTION PER YEAR TO DATE.
Year
1836-52	
Tons (2,240H>s.)
10,000	
Value
ill  40.000
1852-59	
1859 (2 months)
1860	
1,989	
.  14,246	
.  13,774	
.  18,118	
101
56
55
72
115
131
100
124
592
956
988
1861	
096
1862	
1863	
472
380
1864	
1865	
.  28,632	
.  32,819	
.  25,115	
31,239	
528
276
1866	
1867
460
956
1868	
1869	
1870	
1871 2 3
.  44,005	
.  35,802	
.  29,843 -	
148 459 .
176
143
119
493
020
208
372
836
1874.	
1875	
,  81,547	
. 110,145	
. 139,192	
154,052	
. 170,846.,	
. 241,301	
. 267,595	
. 282,139	
213,299	
244
330
417
...  462
522
723
.  802
685
846
...  639
641
435
1976	
1877	
576
156
1878	
1879	
1880	
538
903
785
1881	
1882	
1883
171
417
897
1885	
1886
. 265,596	
326,636	
1,182
1,096
...  979
210
788
908
■Carried forward.. 3,355,557    10,758,565 r
52 VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
Brought forward.. 3,355,557 10,758,565
1887    413,360  1,240,080
1888    489,301  1,467,903
1889      579,830  1,739,490
1890    678,140  2,034,420
1891 1,029,097  3,087,291
1892    826,335  2,479,005
1893 978,294  2,934,882
1894 1,012,953  3,038,859
1895    939,654  2,818,962
1896    846,235  2,327,145
Totals 11,248,759 tons. $33,926,602
Coke 1,565 tons $7,825
CARIBOO.
(From the Report of Mr. John Bowron, Gold Commissioner.)
Both placer and quartz mining have received more than the
usual attention during the past season.
The principal sources of the gold supply at the present time are
the hydraulic claims, the profitable working of which depends on the
amount of water supply obtainable under pressure. This season
being the driest ever known, those claims that secured a few weeks'
run only were deemed fortunate, while many of the regular
producers were unable to clean up at all, hence the comparatively
light increase in the product, considering the number of men
engaged, as compared with other years. A large majority of those
employed were engaged in development work on both placer
and quartz claims.
The estimated gold product for the year is as follows :
Barkerville Polling Division  $ 78,900-
Lightning Creek |             50,000
Quesnelle |             48,100*
Keithley, Quesnelle Fork and Horsefly       200,000
Estimated product from 1st to 31st December, including
desultory   mining,   of   which   no   account   could   be
obtained      10,000
Total $387,000
COMMUNICATION   AND   TRANSPORT.
The Cariboo and Lillooet districts are reached by stage from
Ashcroft station, C.P.R.
The number of horses and teams employed on this road during
1896 were 600 draught horses and 400 pack animals.
Amount of freight handled, 6633 tons. ANNUAL  REPORT.
53-
CASSIAR.
(From the report of James Porter, Gold Commissioner.)
Owing to the scattered state of the mining population here and
the great distance they are apart, etc., and the expense that would
necessarily be incurred in visiting all points in order to gather
anything like accurate information, I regret to say that I am not in
a position this season to frame a mining report and to furnish
you with mining statistics.
I think that the output of gold for the season might be
computed as being a trifle less than that of last.
During the summer some prospecting was done in various
directions, but s-o far I have not heard of anything of importance
being discovered. Very little or no attention has been paid during
the season towards quartz development here.
There is plenty of quartz known to exist here, and I do not see
why some of it should not be sufficiently rich to pay. So far
but little attention has been paid to this place, and I honestly
believe that if prospecting was turned in this direction that something of importance would be discovered. Some good openings are
also here for hydraulic mining, and it is my honest opinion that if
some attention was paid to this sort of mining that it would prove
to be a good investment.
COMMUNICATION    AND    TRANSPORT.
By steamer from Vancouver or Victoria.
EAST  KOOTENAY.
By W. A. Carlyle, Provincial Mineralogist.)
A short examination was made of those parts of East
Kootenay where mining was being actively carried on, but with the
exception of mines such as the North Star, Moyie Lake Mines, and
the placer mines on Wild Horse Creek, little work other than
assessment work was being done. However, in the southern part of
Port Steele District the prospectors were very busy during the past
season, both in the Selkirks and Rocky Mountain Ranges, and a-
large number of claims were staked off in close vicinity to the North
Star Mine and on the St. Mary's River, Bull River, Perry Creek
and their tributaries. The construction of the Crow's Nest Pass
Railway, which now seems to be an assured fact, will certainly"
stimulate far' greater activity, for there is no doubt whatever
but that this part of the Province should be thoroughly explored as
means of ingress and egress improve, as already some very valuable
properties have been discovered and developed, and many locations
have been made, which work will greatly enhance its value and
importance. 54 VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
I
Hitherto means of communication have been such that
■considerable time had to be consumed in reaching any part, and
prospectors and mining men have been attracted to other parts more
easy of access, but with a more extended steamboat service on the
rivers, new roads and trails, and with keener interest aroused by the
progress of mining in other parts of Kootenay, the Division of East
Kootenay is on the eve of receiving much greater interest, with
every probability that her latent resources will prove very valuable.
At Golden, in the office of Gold Commissioner, is an excellent
■collection of samples of ore, mostly argentiferous galena and tetra-
hedrite ores, also copper ores, from the various lodes uncovered in
the district.
TOPOGRAPHY.
Running north and south for over two hundred miles, flanked
■on the east and west by the towering ranges of the Rockies and the
•Selkirks, is the wide and beautiful valley through which flows the
■Columbia River to the north, and the Kootenay River to the south,
to join waters at Robson in West Kootenay. This valley is ten to
thirty miles wide, and gently rises to the foot-hills along the main
ranges, which are often bold and craggy and rise in lofty peaks.
Coal and Coke and Oil.
The building of the Crow's Nest Pass R.R., and the demand
for coal, and more especially coke, are attracting much attention
now to the large deposits of coal that will be made available by this
railway, and by the splendid coking qualities of this coal, or of a
large part of it, as reported upon by Dr. Selwyn, late Director of
the Geological Survey of Canada. An excellent coke, very low
in ash, can be produced ; a coke not excelled by any other made in
the west; and as lai-ge smelting works are now being constructed,
this fuel supply will be a valuable factor in the smelting of the ores
of this Province within her own borders. With the advent of .the
railway, the oil fields described will also receive that exploration
their surface indications warrant.
By J. F. Armstrong, Gold Commissioner.
The chief statistics are—
1895.               1896. Increase.
Free Miner's Certificates... $     404 00 $     537 00 33 per cent
Other Mining Receipts      2,203 10        2,873 26 76      n
Value of Mineral Output..   17,575 00 154,427 00 779      n
Means of Communication, Etc.
In this district, the Mining Recorder, for each division, has his
office in the town from which the division is named. annual report.
00
Fort Steele is centrally located for its division, and is a
good point for the purchase of supplies. It can be reached from
Golden, B.C., on the C.P.R, and from Jennings, Montana, on the
■Great Northern Railroad, by steamer during the season of navigation, and by stage during the rest of the year, and by the Moyie
trail from West Kootenay via Goat River, and by the St. Mary's
trail from Kootenay Lake via Pilot Bay. The trunk road from
Golden to Fort Steele is in good order, and fit for the transportation
•of heavy loads; waggon roads radiate from Fort Steele to Cranbrooke,
to a point on the St. Mary's River, near Mark Creek, to the placer
■mines on Wild Horse Creek, a/fid to the International Boundary
Line at Tobacco Plains. With the exception of the last, these roads
are in good order.
Windermere is situated on the trunk road on the line of navigation from Golden. It is in a good farming country where produce
can be purchased at reasonable prices. The northern part of the
division situate at the head of the Kootenay is, from want of trails,
difficult of access, though not distant from stations on the C.P.R. in
Alberta.
Golden is on the line of the C. P. R., and is well supplied with stores.
All supplies for points south are sept from this place by boat or
waggon, to the different landings from which the trails diverge.
In the Donald division, the trails are built from the different
railway stations. The northern part of the division is almost
■unexplored.
WEST KOOTENAY.
The Revelstoke, Illicillewaet, Trout Lake and Lardeau
Mining Divisions.
By J. T>. Graham. Gold Commissioner, Kevelstoke.
Returns from Mining Recorders.
Revelstoke. Illicillewaet. Trout Lake. Lardeau.
.Mineral claims recorded         135              64 208            128
Placer claims         I                   3               .. 1
,,            re-recorded             1                .. ...
Placer leases held  26
I           applied for             9                • . 1
Certificates of work recorded          28              33 93              20
Bills of sale recorded           77           ,39 80             28
Gold Commissioners' permissions
recorded           24                3 ...             ...
Payments in lieu of assessment ..        ... • ■ •                1
Revenue Collected.
Free Miners' Certificates 81,507 00   S275 00 $   535 00   S27100
Mining receipts.  3,701 35     506 50     1,244 45     676 75 56 VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
\
Near Revelstoke.
Early in July this year quite an excitement was raised
by discoveries made on the hill at the back of Revelstoke of rock
carrying gold, where 10 claims were recorded as located on the
mountain, but the excitement soon died out, and little or no work
was done on any of them.
I would beg to point out that lack of transportation facilities so-
far has acted as a detriment to the Big Bend country. This season
opened very late, in fact the 'snow was on the mountains till July,,
then came the floods, that practically cut off all communication with
the Bend for about 5 weeks by trail. This could be avoided by a
steamboat running up as far as Death Rapids, by which it would bean easy matter to transport supplies to the various creeks flowing,
into Goldstream, that flows from the east into the Columbia above
the rapid, above which point the trails follow the higher benches.
There is a possibility of a steamer being put on the Columbia next-
season, to run above Revelstoke.
Considering the excitement in the Rossland District, which has-
been the Mecca of all mining men, this section has done fairly well
when the shortness of the season is taken into consideration, and I
have every confidence in this section. It is but a question of a short
time when it will be found that the north end of West Kootenay is
equal, if not superior, to any part of it, but, as before stated,,
transportation facilities are wanted for the rapid opening up of this
part of Kootenay.
. This section has not even as yet been prospected, alluvial
diggings alone having been the principal thing looked for by
the placer miner, for "whom there is no fascination in quartz leadsr
only in the small particles of gold buried in the rivers and streams.
Lardeau Mining Division.
This division has not made as much progress as I had expected,,
considering the surface indications on the claims in this division,.
' most of which carry gold, silver, copper and lead.
It is to be hoped that parties owning claims will open them up,
or dispose of 'them at reasonable figures to others who are willing to-
do so.
Illicillewaet.
Since my last report this section of West Kootenay has made a-
good deal of progress.
Very active work has been done on the "Lanark" and "Isabella"
Mines, in connection with which there has recently been completed
(March, 1896) an aerial tramway, 6,550 feet in length, with a fall of
2,640 feet.    The capacity of tramway at first will be 100 tons in 10 ANNUAL  REPORT.
57
hours, to be increased to 150 tons in 10 hours by the addition
<rf more carriers or buckets, and the capacity per day will then be
-375 tons in 24 hours with 30 carriers of 50(1 pounds capacity, each
running at a speed of 5 feet per second. The tramway is divided by
an -intermediate station into two sections of the same length
-and fall, and, running by gravity, develops a surplus of 11 h.p. The
ropes in use, which have been specially made, are—
■side.
1 stationary carrying cable 1^ diameter, 3,300 feet long, loaded
1 stationary carrying cable |-in. diameter, 3,300 feet long,
empty side.
1 endless traction rope f-in. diameter, 6,600 feet long.
The longest span between towers is 2,900 feet. Breaking strain
of ropes, 200,000 pounds per square inch.
At the Lanark mine there is estimated to be in sight somewhere
in the neighborhood of 100,000 tons of ore, which will concentrate
About three and one half tons into one.
Trout Lake Mining Division.
Since my last report I am pleased to be able to state that this
section has taken a step forward, and by all indications will be one
■of the best mining sections in the Province. Experts who have
examined the section all express themselves well pleased with
the leads, which they state are equal to anything in the lower
Kootenay country.
TRAIL CREEK DIVISION.
By Mr. Jno. Kirkup, Mining Recorder
Mr. Kirkup submits the following information with reference
to records, etc., for this division during the year ending December
31st, 1896, as follows :—
Records of Mineral Claims  2,588
Bills of sale, Bonds, etc  2,690
Certificates of Work  1,211
Certificates of improvement  93
Free Miner's Certificates  4,200
Number of claims working, about  175
Number of miners employed  1,500
Output of mines not obtainable	 »58 VANCOUVER   BOARD   OF   TRADE
SLOCAN DIVISION.
By Mr. A. Sproat, Mining Recorder.
The following are the statistics of the Slocan Mining Division
for the year ending 31st December, 1896 :—
Number of Records (location) ,  1,189
ii           Certificates of Work issued  749
Money paid in lieu of work on 12 claims	
Number of Bills of Sale recorded  1,170
ii           Bonds and Agreements recorded  106
it          Certificates of Improvement issued  27
ii          abandonments recorded  25
NAKUSP SUBDIVISION.
By Mr. F. S. Farquier, Mining Recorder.
The following are the statistics of the Nakusp Record Office
for the year ending 31st December, 1896 :—
Number of placer locations  1
n quartz      I  3       254
ii transfers recorded       169
M claims or interests transferred       264
i abandonments recorded  1
n Certificates of Work recorded       127
Average number of men engaged in mining       110
Amount of revenue from Mining Receipts $1,428 50
n n        Free Miner's Certificates . j   1,052 00
AINSWORTH DIVISION.
By Mr. Jno. Keen, Mining Recorder.
Kaslo, B.C., 1897.
The following are the statistics from this office for the year
ending December 31st, 1896 :—
Number of Mineral Claims recorded     813
n Certificates of Work     458
n paid $100 in lieu of assessment work         5
ii documents recorded     571
n ' abandonments       21
ii Free Miner's Licenses issued     929
NELSON   DIVISION.
By Mr. J. H. Rashdall, Mining Recorder.
The following are the statistics of the Nelson Record Office for
the year ending December 31st, 1896 :—
Number of Locations recorded    2,544
1 Transfers       807
ti Certificates of Work       323
n Free Miner's Certificates    1,138 ANNUAL  REPORT.
59>
LILLOOET.
By F. Soues, Gold Commissioner.
The total yield of gold from the district (ascertained from-,
reliable sources only) is $33,665, showing a decrease from the annual
returns for the last seventeen years, at least. The total ascertained
district yield for the past 17 years is $1,185,023 ; an annual average
of $69,707. It should be borne in mind that the above amount is
really the returns of desultory work done by Chinese and Indians.
There cercainly have not been over half a dozen white gold-producing
miners in the district during the year.
I attribute the low point reached in production to the discovery
of rich gold-bearing quartz on Cayoosh Creek in April last, which
caused a great influx of the mining element, all apparently having
the one aim in view, the discovery and location of mineral claims,,
and as such "were non-producers.
QUARTZ.
Much excitement in this class of mining has prevailed since the
location of a rich gold-bearing claim on Cayoosh Creek in April
last.
From my observations, there are three kinds of gold in
the creek, the finer kind uniformly distributed through the ore found
in the " Golden Eagle," (Golden Cache Group). The coarser and
richer specimens found in the " Bonanza" group, and the still coarser
specimens found in the river bed workings, by the Chinese, some of
them going as high as $70. It is a well established fact, I think, that,
coarse gold, released by whatever agency from its rocky matrix, moves-
but a short distance, even in swift running rivers. In the " Golden
Eagle " and " Bonanza " group are the sources of at least a portion of
the two first named kinds. In my opinion, the source of the third
kind has not yet been located, and most likely will be found below
the line of Cottonwood Creek.
In December, 1887, Mr. A. W. Smith reported Ms purchases of
gold for that year at $65,696, a large proportion of which was itputf
the Chinese claims on Cayoosh Creek. In 1888 his purchases
amounted to close on $60,000, seven-eighths of which was estimated.
to b"> from Cayoosh Creek. In 1889 the amount bought by
Mr. Smith dropped to $39,000, with the exception of about $100-
worth, all bought from the Chinese miner. Summed up, the Chinese
were the discoverers of gold in Cayoosh Creek. From Mr. Smith's
accurate retufns, we find that he bought from them in three years-
gold amounting to, in round figures, say $103,000. To be well,
within the mark, allow one-half of that amount as carried away by
them, and we have'a total of $154,500 for the three years. The
whole of this was taken from say five miles of the creek, ancL
all below the line of the " Bonanza " group. "60 VANCOUVER   BOARD   OP  TRADE
Bridge River.
From a personal residence of 34 years in the district, at Pember-
ton, Lillooet and Clinton, and, during the whole of that time, with
exceptional opportunities of learning the amount of gold obtained
and the localities, I may be supposed qualified to deal with the
matter intelligently and correctly. With the decade ending 1869
official public reports, with regard to mines and mining in this
district, are conspicuous only by their absence. The early miners
into this Province, 1859-60, worked their way up the Fraser River,
testing all the tributaries for gold. Bridge River in those years was
located and worked and from that time on to the present, by white,
Indian and Chinese miners, year by year, with varying success.
The richest finds and largest nuggets were obtained in the decade
referred to. With the decade ending 1879, we have official mining
statistics, commencing in 1874, in some of which annual reports,
•place has been found for Lillooet district and the estimated returns.
In others the district has been entirely ignored.
From 1860 to the discovery of Cayoosh Creek, Bridge River
has been the principal source of the gold obtained. If the old
■mercantile books of Mr. Smith, Mr. Foster, and other traders doing
business in Lillooet in the sixties, and the records of the now almost
forgotten Dietz & Nelson express line, then carrying express and
treasure between Victoria and Lillooet, could be now examined, the
result would be a very startling array of figures of the amount of
gold obtained from Bridge River and the Fraser River benches and
bars in the immediate neighborhood of Lillooet. In the early
sixties the principal workings were from, the mouth up to the head
•of Deep Canyon, from which point the river flows through a long
marshy section, some 50 miles. The river bed here is smooth,
sandy, with fine gravel, in which only fine colors have been found-
Above this stretch, Tyaughton Creek has produced considerable
-coarse gold. Gun Creek so far has produced fine gold, and in
limited quantity. Coarse gold is -found in Cadwallder Creek
-and the South Fork. Mr. A. W. Smith showed me a sample of 6
•ozs. of very coarse gold, which he bought from an Indian last week,
whose claim is located at a point above Gun Creek, and below
•Cadwallder Creek. The lower 13 miles of the river is now covered
by an Indian reserve, sketch plan of which I append, and the
■wisdom of thus practically locking up so much of a well-known
-auriferous stream may be questioned. The valley of Bridge River
for a considerable distance is paralleled by the valley in which are
situated Seaton and Anderson Lakes, and, at one point on Seaton
Lake the distance to Bridge River, at Jack's Landing, is only about
six miles. The division between these two valleys is a high and
■much broken up ridge of mountains, with numerous streams (not
shown on the Provincial map), falling into the above named Lakes. ANNUAL   REPORT. 61
The whole of the creeks, notably McGillivray Creek, are
Auriferous. The ridge, of mountains referred to widen out to the
south-west, reaching a summit, on the south side of which the
watershed is to the head of Birkenhead River, on which the
•" Blackwater " claims have be.en recorded this year.. In 1864 I was
shown gold by an Indian, which he found at the headwaters of Lillooet River. On the north-western side of the line first referred to,
gold has been found in various places.    (See my report for 1886.)
It will be noted from the foregoing brief and. imperfect
references that Bridge River and its tributaries have been in places
highly auriferous, with a possibly barren zone above the deep
•canyon, and further, that it has a wide-spread surrounding of
mineralized rocks. The gold found in the river is unmistakably
different to that found in the Fraser River bars and benches, and in
form and size of the pieces bear a strong resemblance to the gold
found in the placer workings in Bendigo, Victoria, in the early
"fifties, with this difference, that Bridge River gold shows much
more recent release from its rocky matrix, in fact, at least one-third
of the pieces still hold imbedded pieces of quartz.
In other lands, placer mining has, with few exceptions, whether,
in wide areas of alluvial deposits, in ancient or modern river beds,
led up to the discovery of the rocky matrix, from which the alluvial
jjold was obtained. Placer deposits, in a few years, Jed to the
discovery of the famous comstock lode. Placer deposits located the
Treadwell mine on Douglas Island.
The fabulously rich placer mines of Ballarat and Bendigo,
-discovered in 1851, in two years located the reefs, some of which on
Bendigo, have " lived down " 3,000 feet, and been continuously
worked for over 40 years. The experience on Cayoosh Creek, shews
that in little more than one year, the matrix, of at least a portion of
the gold found in the creek, was located,
The following abstract shows the mining transactions in Mr.
Phair's office at Lillooet, and my office here, for the year :—
Recorded Mineral Claims 220
Conveyances of |     87
Abandonments B       3
Certificates of Work 1     16
Water Grants for |       3
Recorded . Placer Claims      9
Re-recorded |       7
Conveyances |     10
Water Grants recorded        |       8
Dredging Leases in force    13
Hydraulic Mining Leases in force    34
,, ii applied for   7
Free Miner's Certificates (Revenue). $1,067 00
Mining Receipts, general        n            4,408 65 f
I
I
62 VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
VICTORIA  MINING DISTRICT.
VICTORIA DIVISION, (Vancouver Island).
By W. S. Gore, Gold Commissioner.
I have the- honor to hand you -herewith a report upon the-
mining transactions which came within my jurisdiction during the
last year. This is the first report of the kind that I have had the-
pleasure of presenting. Heretofore there have been but very few
mining locations made on. the coast, and the claims which had been
recorded were not prospected with any very satisfactory results ; it-
is therefore gratifying to note the comparative magnitude and
importance of the past year's transactions. I have also appended a.
complete detailed list of all the Crown Grants for mineral claims
which have been issued by the Government up to the date of this-
report, which will be a matter of pu blic interest and convenience, as-
will also be the list of Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders-
which is annexed.
No. of Free Miner's Certificates issued 690
M Mineral Claims recorded 342
ti Placer I j    25
ii Certificates of  Work    60
ii Certificates of Improvement      1
ii Grants of Water Right    13
n Lay-overs    11
n Placer Leases    22
ii Conveyances    83
Revenue   Derived.
From Free Miner's Licenses $3,460 00
ii    Mining Receipts generally    3,117 10
Total    $6,577 10-
The mineral claims above referred to, are situated principally
in the vicinity of Phillips Arm and Loughborough Inlet, and at
various other points on the coast of the Mainland, also on the-
southern portion of Vancouver Island, and consist chiefly of gold,
silver and copper, in combination of varying proportions. Nearly-
all of the mining locations in Victoria District are easy, of access by
water, and the prospects for successful mining at these places during-
the ensuing season are bright.
NEW WESTMINSTER DIVISION.
Heretofore this has not been regarded as a mining district-
of any importance, and the number of claims taken up has been
small. Notwithstanding the transfer of Texada Island from this to
the Nanaimo District, the number of claims recorded at the office of ANNUAL  REPORT. 63-
Mr. Robson, Mining Recorder, during the past year, has been,
beyond all precedent, and the other business in connection with the
office has correspondingly increased, as will appear from the following-
comparative statement:—
1885.        1896.
Free Miner's Certificates issued   468        1,150
Mineral Claims recorded    182 518
Certificates of Work issued      12 37
Conveyances, from 1889 to 1896, 81 \ during 1896, 81.
As a majority of these claims have been located during-
the latter part of the year, very little development work has been
done yet, and one cannot speak with any certainty respecting-
the actual value of these mining properties. Generally the rock is-
low grade, but reports of assays in several cases have been very
encouraging ; some of the claims located on Harrison Lake having-
shown over $200 in gold to the ton. The mineral locations are
spread over a large area, including Harrison Lake and River,
Glacier Lake, Mission, Chilliwack, Sumas, Stave Lake, Pitt Lake,
Burrard Inlet, Howe Sound, Squamish River, Malaspina Straits,
Jarvis Inlet,, Powell Lake, and elsewhere adjacent to the Straits of
Georgia and Fraser River. The amount of prospecting done during
the summer has been very large, and there is every reason for
expecting that a considerable amount of development work will be
done during the coming summer.
For some time negotiations have been going on, looking to the
establishment of a smelter and refinery at Vancouver or New
Westminster, but no definite arrangement has yet been concluded.
Such an establishment would greatly tend to stimulate the
development of local mines, ■ as it would probably reduce
the cost of treating the ores. A large proportion, of the claims
located in this district are adjacent to navigable waters, and the ore-
could be laid down ab- very small cost, either on Burrard Inlet or
Fraser River ; and if a smelter were in operation at either of these
points, the low grade ores could be worked at a profit. The mining
outlook in this division for 1897 is very hopeful.
YALE MINING DIVISION.
The following is the yield of gold the past year for the
Yale Division of Yale District, which is.perfectly reliable, being the
respective amounts purchased by the merchants at the different
points mentioned :—
Agassiz $     500
Hope         112
Yale    13,350
Carried forward $13,962 f
■64 VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
Brought forward $13,962
Spuzzum      3,042
North  Bend      2,912
Keefer's      3,200
Lytton    14,939
Spence's   Bridge      1,240
Ashcroft    14,391
Shipped direct to Victoria by Ottawa Hydraulic
and Wendell and Columbia Co'ys      2,922
Taken away in private hands and unaccounted
for      5,000
 $61,608
Free Miner's Certificates issued $   971 00
General Mining, Receipts    3,032 15
THE OSOYOOS, KETTLE  RIVER AND VERNON DIVISIONS.
By C. A. R. Lamhly, Gold Commissioner, Osoyoos, B.C.
I have the honor to submit the annual mining report and
statistics, for the Osoyoos Division of Yale District, for the year
1896 :—
OSOYOOS MINING DIVISION.
Camp Fairview.
Work has been carried on in this camp during the latter part of
the year with greater energy than at any time for the past two
years, and a number of claims have been sold and bonded at prices
ranging from $200 to $75,000.
Following is an abstract of the mining records and free miner's
•certificates issued in this Division forthe year 1896 :—
Free miner's certificates issued 167
Claims   recorded 303
Certificates of work issued ...Ill
Permits to re-locate      3
Abandonments      2
Bills of sale recorded    87
Bonds and agreements recorded    25
Water grants recorded      4
Certificates of improvements issued      1
KETTLE RIVER MINING DIVISION.
The following is taken from a report furnished by Mr. Wm. G.
McMynn, Mining Recorder for the Kettle River Mining Division":—
The mineral development and progress generally of this division
•during the year 1896 has been very marked and encouraging. ANNUAL   REPORT.
65
During the past year there have been more free miner's-
certificates issued, and more location, conveyance and certificate of
work record made in this district, than during the whole of
the previous three years.
The following table will show at a glance the progress which
has been made since the Kettle River Mining Division was-
established, and a Mining Recorder's office opened in the year 1893:
Abstract.
1893
1894
1895
1893
Free Miner's certificates	
194
102
66
59
202
93
85
55
3
451
771
140
244
■   11
3
12
3
3
957
1279
Certificate of work resords	
566
Conveyance records	
Certificate of improvements	
713
15
Mill site leases	
1
Abandonments	
6
1
3
35
Water Grants	
3
9
Abstract of the mining receipts for the Vernon Division for the-
year 1896 :
Claims recorded 215
Certificates of work issued    50
Transfers recorded   44
Free miner's certificates issued 247
TRAIL CREEK MINING DISTRICT,
Report of Wm. A. Carlisle, Provincial Mineralogist.
Perhaps the greatest factor that will determine the progress of
mining and the realization of the wealth that undoubtedly is now
locked up in these mountains, is the means of communication and
transport. The ores must be carried to the metallurgical centres for
treatment, and if the ore deposits now known to exist, and those
that may yet be discovered, are to be made available and to become
a most valuable part of our resources, trails, roads and railroads
must be constructed to make possible the concentration of ores,
fuels and supplies at the most favorable points ; and if this part of
the industry is to be retained in Canada, Canada must assist-
in boldly advancing these means of communication to make easily
accessible the coal fields and the mines from which the different
classes of ore can be obtained, that separately are difficult to treat
but brought together and intermixed, can be reduced at minimum
smelter charges. Favored by the trend of the mountains and
valleys, American railroads are rapidly entering from the south to
transport Kootenay ores to the American smelters; but, notwithstanding much greater difficulties of construction, Canadian roads- r
-6fi
VANCOUVER  BOARD  OF  TRADE
must be energetically built, and, not only will more mines be opened
up, but the large reduction works with the large employment
■of capital and labor will be mostly retained within this Province.
'The opening up of Kootenay during the last six or seven years has
been rapid, but the most marked advance has followed the building
•of the various lines of connection already completed, as is seen, for
one instance, in the rise of the new camp of Rossland, but more
rapid advacce is awaiting these better facilities, which, it is safe to
predict, will be called on to carry a heavy tonnage. Several
important lines are seeking aid to be built; lines that will open
country that already is proving, most promising as it is further
prospected, and it is hoped that this aid will be granted, so as to
permit the immediate commencement of these important undertakings. Not only is the bulk of this ore being shipped to the south
but the large proportion of the fast increasing demand for mine and
mercantile supplies is being satisfied by the cities on the other side
of the border, with the result that a great revival in their business
affairs has followed the opening up of these good markets in British,
Columbia, greatly due to the fact that orders can be now more
promptly filled and forwarded from this source, this advantage more
than counterbalancing the customs duties that are imposed upon
imports. Not only this, but much of the mining machinery manufactured in Eastern Canada, and now being extensively ordered, is
being brought most of the way over American railroads to the point
■of entry, Northport If our own centres of trade are to benefit by
this growing business, strong efforts must be made to get these
facilities for rapid and prompt delivery which, with customs dues,
will more than give Canadian business concerns the advantage, as
the fact should be realized that new and large markets are opening
up in British Columbia. American business men are making strong
efforts to secure this trade, and the current once set in, it will
be difficult to deflect it into that channel most beneficial to the
commercial interests of this country.
The discovery, during the last two or three years, of large bodies
of high grade gold ores, in which dividend-paying mines are now
being operated, is attracting the earnest attention of many mining
men and capitalists of both America and Europe. The opening up
of the large mines at Rossland that, notwithstanding many heavy
disadvantages—rapidly being overcome, such as means and cost of
transportation—have proved very remunerative, and as more
■ extensive exploratory work and greater depth are attained, promise
permanency of large and profitable ore bodies, is stimulating more
thorough prospecting, not only around Rossland, but in many other
localities in this district, with the results that other camps are
quickly coming to the front as good prospects on being worked
-disclose ore of increasing value. ANNUAL  REPORT.
67
Many claims at many points in Trail Creek District are
stow being carefully examined and bonded or bought, which better
means of access and egress, now projected or being completed, will
render possible their being worked, and the principals or agents
representing capital are investigating these new resources. The fact
that men interested in the treatment of ores, or their transportation
-on studying the conditions and possibilities now shown, have begun
large undertakings, or are now planning them, is indicative that the
future development of this part of the Province will be soon on an
-extensive scale, and of their confidence, based on experience, in the
extent and value of its mineral wealth.
The concensus of opinion of many mining men who have
studied the conditions and surface showings in this new camp
at Rossland, is to the effect that few camps have ever shown so many
■favorable indications that warrant the belief that on further
extensive, systematic exploration, other shutes of gold ore will be
uncovered. Prospecting has disclosed these many parallel veins,
varying in width, when exposed, from an inch to several feet, and it
is believed that many more ore chutes will be found when these most
promising surface indications are thoroughly exploited, for it is quite
improbable that the large shutes of rich ore that have been shown
on the surface by denudation will be found to be the only ones.
This district has now reached that stage when persistent, plucky
■development work, sustained by ample capital, must be done to
prove up these many veins and surface showings, but a sufficient
amount of working capital is demanded, (a.) because much of
the rock is very hard to mine, necessitating good machinery to make
jproper progress, (b.) considerable or even extensive development
work must be done in the search for more pay shutes, (c) while the
more or less faulted nature of the ground, though not serious, will
-complicate this work. While the present mines were opened up
with comparatively small capital by reason of the mines producing
pay ore shortly after work was begun, or ore that was very profitable as soon as roads were built over which it could be sent to the
.smelters, still any enterprise that is now undertaken will require
strong financial support, and already several powerful companies are
at work.
The Ores.
The ores at Rossland, with the exceptional free milling gold
quartz of the O.K. mine may be divided into three classes :—
(a.) Those large deposits of coarsegrained massive pyrrhotite,
locally known as the " iron ore," in which very little or no value in
gold is carried.
(b.) The ore found in many claims on the south belt, as the Lily
May, Homes take, Mayflower, Curlew, Gopher, R. E. Lee, etc.,
in  which the sulphides are not pyrrhotite,  but iron pyrites and 68
VANCOUVER   BOARD   OF   TRADE
marcasite (white iron), with in some of these mines much arseno-
pyrite and also zinc blende and even galena, in which case the silver
value exceeds the gold, and the percentage of copper is very small
or nothing.
(c.) The typical ore of the camp as sold by the Le Roi, War
Eagle, Iron Mask or Josie, is divided into first class and second class-
The first-clas.s consists of nearly massive fine grained pyrrhotite and
copper pyrites, sometimes wr!h a little magnetite, or mispickel, with
more or less quartz and calcite. In this class of ore, as got from the
lowest workings of the Le Roi, the amount of quartz is much higher,
the smelter returns giving 41 to 52.8% silica, and 20.6 to 26.8%
FeO., but this is proving the best ore in the mine, the average
smelter returns were on 1,200 tons, 2.6 oz. of gold, 1.8 oz. silver,
and 2.5% of copper, or $53.05 net, per ton, while some shipments
went as high as 4.06 oz.
ild.
The second-class ore, and the bulk of the ore of the camp
shipped, will be most probably of this character and value, is
a diorite with a comparatively small percentage of these sulphides,
but the character is still very good ; 1,800 tons of the Le Roi,
second class, yielded by smelter returns an average of 1.34 oz. of
gold, 1.4 ozs. of silver, and 1.6% copper, or $27.97 net per ton.
Cost of Mining.
The cost of labor and mine supplies is now about the same as
found in other mining centres of the west. The following is
the cost of labor :—Miners, $3 to $3.50 per 8 and 10 hour shifts ;
trammers and top-men, $2.50 per 10 hours ; engineers, $3.50 to $4
per 10 hours; timbermen and blacksmiths, $3.50 to $4 per 10
hours; foremen, $4 to $5 per day. The cost of driving tunnels or
drifts depends much on the nature of the rock ; in exceptional
places, where the ground is much broken, the cost is from $7 to $10
per foot; but in the solid tough diorite, from $10.50 to $15.50 per
foot. Shaft sinking depends upon the size, to some extent, but costs
from $18 to $30 a foot. The price for timber, lumber, wood
and other supplies, is now very reasonable.
THE BOUNDARY CREEK DISTRICT.
By S. S. Fowler, A.B., E.M. Nelson, B.C.
The Boundary Oreek portion of the Kettle River Mining
Division of Yale, two years ago, meant a territory of about 150
square miles in extent, drained by a small stream which joins Kettle
River from the North at Midway, where the river first crosses the
International Boundary. To-day the term " Boundary " has lost its
special significance by reason of the rapid extension of the area in
which valuable minerals are found, to points far distant from the
nucleus which first gave the district its reputation. ANNUAL  REPORT. 69
The records of the government office at Midway showed, on the
1st of January, 1895, that there had been staked, up to that time,
about 370 claims, many of which were, of course, re-locations. On
the 1st of January, 1896, all but 127 of these old claims had ceased
to exist j but in the year 1895, 771 new locations were made, and
during 1896, the number was 1,279.
This sudden taking on of a new life, in 1895, was largely due to
an influx of prospectors from Trail Creek ; while in 1896 it may be
attributed, in a great measure, to the failures experienced by
the many men who rushed into the Colville Reservation after its
opening, by Act of Congress, to mineral locations in February
of thac year.
The result has been that although the great majority of
locations are in that part of the country drained by Boundary
Creek, where the first claim was staked by W. T. Smith in May,
1886, many hundreds are scattered all the way from east of Christina
Lake near the eastern confines of the district, westward to the 119th
meridian near the mouth of Rock Creek, a distance nearly 40 miles;
and from the International Boundary northward for twenty miles,
up the valleys of the main Kettle River, Boundary Creek and the
North Fork (of Kettle River).
The valleys and water-sheds of these three southerly flowing
streams form three natural parts of the Kettle River Mining
Division, all connected by several transverse valleys. Each of these
parts deserve special consideration, and each has already begun to
be known by a name of its own, as its future and even prospects
demand. The central one, or " Boundary," however, is the oldest
and best known, and because it possesses features common to the
others, as well as many peculiar to itself, it is made the subject
of this article.
Topography.
The topography of this district, while it affords a considerable
diversity, is not very different to that of all the great interior
plateau of British Columbia. Whilst mountainous, its highest
points seldom exceed 5,500 feet in altitude above the sea, and the
greater number of its many well rounded mountains do not exceed £fev
5,000 feet—Kettle River, at the mouth of Boundary Creek, being
about 1,800 feet above sea level. The ruggedness and nakedness of
many parts of Kootenay are not at all in evidence, for these
rounded hills are splendidly forested to their veiy summits, with a
very great variety of coniferous trees. The eastern, southern and
western slopes are open and afford a prolific growth of bunch-grass,
and along the valleys are many ranches which are specially adapted
to diversified farming with the aid of irrigation. 70 vancouver board of trade
Climate.
The climate the year round is all that one can desire. The
mean temperature for the year ending June 30th, 1896, was 42,8
degrees, and the total precipitation was 13.3 inches;
Ores and Ore Deposits.
The Boundary District is essentially a gold district. The great
bulk of the ores is a mixture of the various iron sulphides with
copper pyrites, all more or less auriferous. This class of ore
is notably associated with the basic eruptive rocks, which are of so
widespread occurrence in southern British Columbia, and with the
older, metamorphic rocks near or at the contacts of these with the
former. The magnesian rocks above referred to also afford this ore.
This mineral mixture occurs in bodies which, at times, are so
elongated as to give the impression that they occupy fissures,
and again at others it occurs in apparently isolated shutes of limited
horizontal extent; finally what seem to be well-defined blanket
deposits hold the ore. The croppings of several of these deposits
consist of very large masses of (frequently polaric) magnetite,
through which are disseminated copper and iron pyrites. Where
denudation and wearing action have had sufficient opportunity these
cappings have been removed, and calcite, specular hematite and
quartz appear as the normal accompanying gangue. This class
of ores has a wide range in value, but, excluding the extremes, may
be said to carry about $15 in gold, with two or three ounces
in silver, per ton, and five per cent, copper.
THE SLOCAN.
The Slocan, according to the number of its shipping mines, and
the amount and value of the ore sold, now ranks as the most
productive mining district in the Province, and in point of
importance is not surpassed by any other.
In an area of fifteen by twenty-five miles, there have been
discovered many veins of high grade silver-lead ore, which are being
developed with great vigor and success, and among the mining men
is every feeling of confidence and hopefulness. This winter nearly
fifty of these properties are shipping high grade, ore that yields very
profitable returns, and a large number of other claims are being
opened up
So far but comparatively little imported capital has been
expended here, as in the case of nearly every mine now established,
sufficient money has been realised from ore extracted during development to pay for more extensive workings, new buildings, mills,
trails, roads, and  also  dividends, but  more  or less capital   wilj ANNUAL  REPORT. 71
be required to properly open up many other claims on which
the veins exist, but are not so easily accessible as those first
discovered. But as most of these veins are found along the steep
mountain sides and can be worked by tunnels, and the cost of mining
is low, requiring little or no machinery, capital will be necessary
mostly when tramways and concentrators are to be built, or in some
cases for hoisting plants and pumps when tunnel sites may not
be available.
Many of these mines are located near the summits of the high
precipitous mountains at an elevation of 5,500 to 6,500 feet above
sea level where erosion has cleared away nearly all debris from the
veins, but lower down also on the mountain sides and in the valleys,
are being found other veins or those discovered first much higher up,
to the highest of which now run good trails or waggon roads or else
wire rope tramways. The snow that lies deep on these summits
during the winter is in nowise detrimental to mining operations, as
most work is done after its fall, when the ore can be dragged down
the smooth snow trails in rawhides in larger loads and at lower prices
than are possible in the summer time, but the tracks of snowslides
must be carefully avoided.
During 1896, 18,215 tons of ore yielded 2,141,088 ounces
of silver and 19,210,666 pounds of lead, or an average of 117.4
ounces of silver per ton and 52.7% lead, which would have a net profit
of about $75 per ton, while many carloads were shipped that yielded
from 300 to 400 ounces of silver per ton.
The " Slocan Star" has, of course, the largest shute of high
grade ore yet found in this district, and we are kindly permitted to
state that from 11,529 tons of ore and concentrates sold during the
last three years, 912,600 ounces of silver and 13,482,000 B>s of lead
have been paid for by the smelters, and of these amounts 7,000 tons
yielded 600,000 ozs. of silver and 9,000,000 fts of lead during the
past season of 1896.
Many of the veins are small, varying from 2 or 3 inches
in width to 20 or 30 inches of solid ore, but the high value of silver
at present makes this ore very profitable, together with the low cost
of breaking ground. The small Reco-Goodenough vein, the width
of which is measured in inches, is probably the richest vein yet
mined, as from the smelter returns of about 600 tons, the average
was 407 ounces of silver per ton and 42% lead. The high percentage
of lead makes this ore a very desirable one for the smelters, and the
lead contents are usually sufficient to pay the freight and treatment
charges and the duty charges on the lead.
While most of the veins are not wide, the richness of their ores
greatly compensates, as may be seen from the lead and silver values
as per smelter returns from a few of the mines as :— 72 VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
Slocan Star  80 to   95 ozs. silver per ton,    70 to 75 % lead.
Reco  83 to 730 „ „ 19 to 67 % n
Good-enough 167 to 507 | n 15 to 67 % n
Noble Five  62 to 543 „ „ 30 to 75 % „
Last Chance 135 to 238 a A 35 to 78 % h
Wonderful 113 to 133 „ „ 70 to 76 % „
Ruth....;  40 to 125 „ „ 15 to 73% „
Monitor  -.: 142 to 367 „ >, 32 to 57 % fi
Wellington 125 to 328 „ „ 10 to 55 % ,.
Whitewater  72 to 326 „ ,. 10 to 65 % ■.,
Dardanelles 149 to 470 p n 15 to 55 % u
Enterprise 155 to 180 „ „ 18 to 30 % „
Two Friends 248 to 380 „ „ 38 to 52 % „
NELSON.
The Silver Silver King silver-copper mine of the Hall Mines
Co., Ltd., The Poorman gold (quartz) mine, and some small placer
workings, have yielded all the production credited to this district,
but other mines will be added ere long to this list. Since the
completion of the smelter at Nelson there has been greatly increased
activity at the mine of this Company.
The Silver King-mine has now shipped 31,000 tons of ore that
yielded 800,000 ounces of silver and 2,500,000 lbs of copper, and the
development of the property is rapidly being pushed, so as to permit
of a greatly increased out-put, while the smelter is being increased
so as to undertake the treatment of all classes of ore as may
be bought in the market.
The Poorman gold mine has given up about $100,000 from its
quartz ledge, and other properties in this locality that have similar
veins are now under bond and will be worked.
The new district, known as the Salmon River Country, lying
south of Nelson to the Boundary, and traversed by the Nelson and
Fort Sheppard R.R., was not visited, but during the past year many
claims were staked off on gold and silver leads on the ridges, between
which run the tributaries of this river. This winter considerable
work is being done here, and during the coming season much greater
interest will be shown in these veins, in which it is stated, ore
similar to that of Rossland, and also gold-silver quartz with galena
and other sulphides have been discovered, assays of which have given
high values.
AINSWORTH.
The out-put from Ainsworth for 1896 was much lowered
by the cessation early in the year of mining on the Blue Bell,
in which, it is reported, the ore has become rather low grade
for present conditions, but in several of the other mines west of the
town of Ainsworth, considerable progress was made. ANNUAL  REPORT.
The Skyline, Number One, Blue Bell, Highlander, Little Phil,
Mile Point, Neosho, Sunlight and Tariff, shipped ore, much of which
was the silvery " dry ore," and the remainder galena, which does not
carry as much silver as the Slocan veins, but averages 30 to
40 ounces in the solid ore.
This district suffered especially in the decline of silver prices,
but now vigorous prospecting is being done once more on both sides
of the lake, and new mining enterprises are being inaugurated.
The town of Kaslo, the eastern entrance to the Slocan, is growing
rapidly, and steamers run daily to Nelson to connect with the
railroads, while the only public sampling mill in Kootenay is here
located.
Means of Access and Transportation.
West Kootenay is now easily entered from two directions, and
almost any part important can now be reached with dispatch
and comfort, an agreeable surprise to all entering the country for the
first time. First—From the north, at Revelstoke, on the main
trans-continental line of the Canadian Pacific Railway between Montreal, Winnipeg and Vancouver, on the Pacific Coast, a branch line
runs down the Columbia River 32 miles to Arrowhead, at the north
end of Upper Arrow Lake, whence (a) a small steamer runs up the
north-east arm of Evansport, the port of entrance, to the Lardeau and
Trout Lake Districts; (6) the large stern-wheel steamers of the Can-.
adian Pacific Railway Company, for which Company a large boat is
being built at Nakusp, to be ready to go into commission next
spring, as the traffic has grown quite beyond the capacity of
the present equipment, runs as far south as Trail, connecting at
Nakusp with a branch line of the C.P.R. into the Slocan, and
at Robson with another branch of the same Company, into Nelson,
along the Kootenay River, and at Trail with the Columbia and
Western to Rossland. Second—From the south, from Spokane,
Wash., where direct connections are made from the main trunk
lines of the Great Northern and Northern Pacific Railways to all
parts of the United States, the Spokane Falls and Northern Railway
runs north to Northport, a few miles south of the boundary line,
whence (a) this road, known as the Nelson and Fort Sheppard Road,
follows up the east bank to Waneta and Sayward, in Canadian
territory, and thence across to Nelson, connecting directly with the
Kootenay Lake steamers at a point 5 miles east of Nelson, whence
the road switchbacks into the town ] (b) from Northport another
branch, or the Red Mountain Railway, crossing the Columbia
by large ferries, run to Rossland! (c) while daily steamers run
up the river to Trail, from which point again Rossland is reached, or
the steamers taken for Robson, Nakusp and Arrowhead as detailed
above.
^ 7i VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
C.P.R., Nakusp to Sandon.
This branch has a daily train each way. From Nakusp it is 28
miles to Roseberry, on Slocan Lake ; 32 miles to New Denver j 37
miles to Three Forks; and 41 miles to Sandon.
C.P.R., Robson to Nelson.
A train will run both ways daily to connect with the steamboats
on both Arrow and Kootenay Lakes.
Kaslo and Slogan Railway.
This road runs daily trains between Sandon and Cody, east to
Kaslo, on Kootenay Lakes, stopping at points whence roads or trails
lead directly to many of the Slocan mines.
Slocan Lake.
A large steamer is now be running on this lake between
Roseberry, New Denver Silverton, Brandon, Slocan City and any
other points on the lake desired.
Kootenay Lake.
Three commodious and rapid steamers, the Kokanee, Alberta
and International, run daily each way between Kaslo' and Nelson,
stopping at Ainsworth, Pilot Bay smelter, Balfour, or other points
along this route when called for. Other smaller boats traverse the
lake from the upper end down as far south as Bonner's Ferry,
stopping, among other places, at the terminals of the trails into East
Kootenay. Generally, if required, a small steamer can be engaged
to go to any point on these waters. ANNUAL REPORT. 75
CUSTOMS OF THE PORT OF VANCOUVER.
RATES  OF  COMMISSION.
Amended Schedule recommended by Special Committees and
adopted by the Board (1896)
XV. When no special agreement exists, the following shall be
collectable :—
1. On purchase of stocks, bonds, and all kinds of securi
ties, including the drawing of bills, for payment of the
same    2J per cent.
2. On sale of stocks, bonds, and all kinds of securities,
including remittances in bills and guarantee .... 2^ per cent.
3. On purchase and sale of specie, gold dust and bullion.. 1 per cent.
4. On sale of bills of exchange, with endorsement.. . 2£ per cent.
5. On sale of bills of exchange, without endorsement... % per cent.
6. For endorsing bills of exchange, when desired 1\ per cent.
7. On sale of produce and merchandise, with guarantee. 7 J per cent.
8. On goods received on consignment, and afterwards
withdrawn 2£ per cent.
9. On purchase and shipment of merchandise, on cos*
and charges 5 per cent.
10. For  collecting   and   remitting   delayed   or   litigated
account 10 per cent.
11. For collecting freight money, on amount collected. 1\ per cent.
12. For collecting general claims 5 per cent.
13. For collecting general average,—on the first $20,000
or any smaller amount 5 per cent.
14. For collecting general average—on any excess over
$20,000  2| per cent.
15. On purchase or sale of vessels 5 per cent.
16. For entering and clearing vessels and attending to the
Customs business of the ship $  25 00
17. For " Port Agency " attending to discharge of cargo
and transacting ship's business other than entering
and clearing at Customs :
On vessels not exceeding 250 tons cargo $ 25 00
ii      with 251 tons and not exceeding 500
tons cargo 35 00
it      with 501 tons and not exceeding 750
tons cargo 50 00
ii      with 751 tons and not exceeding 1,000
tons cargo 75 00
„      over 1,000 tons 100 00
„      in ballast  +0 OQ 76 VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE
18. For disbursements of vessels by consignees 2 J per cent.
19. For procuring freight or passengers    5 per cent.
20. For chartering vessels on amount of freight, actual or
estimated, to be considered as due when the "Charter
Parties" or memorandum of their conditions, etc.,
are signed 5 per cent.
21. For landing and  re-shipping  goods from vessels in
distress, on invoice value, or in its absence, on market value 5 per cent.
22. For   receiving   and   forwarding   goods—on   invoice
amount    2J per cent.
23. For effecting  marine  insurance—on the amount of
premium    5 Der cent.
24. The foregoing Commissions to be exclusive of Brokerage, and
every charge actually incurred.
25. Vessels to pay clerk hire and the labor, on wharf, sorting and
delivering cargo.
fRICHARD ALEXANDER,
,.-    , „ I     . .  E. E. EVANS,
Members of Special  H   ^r^g
Committee. |   Q   jQHNSON,
ROBT. H. PATERSON,
VANCOUVER CITY.
From the City Records.
June 13th, 1886, Vancouver destroyed by fire, one building
only left.
Jan. 1, 1890. Jan. 1, 1897.
Streets graded- 50.33 niiles       .77.44 miles
it       gravelled   8.35    | 10.95    |
Macadamized with broken rock               ij 1.9.85    n
Paved with bituminous rock                u 1.82    |
it       ii     wood blocks                ?i .05    y
Planked    6.30    „ 2.00    „
Water mains, cast iron    10.14    n 40.05    |
Sewers         7    i, 22.05    „
Number of houses    1,462 3,300
Hydrants       65  J 210
Assessed value, real property ..... .$8,077 505.00 $13,008,194.00
,,             I     improvements $1,326,940.00 $ 2,218,585.00
Being 50% of 'actual value.
1891. 1897.
Population, Dominion Census....... ,14,000        Estimated 19,000  
News-Advertiser, Printers, Vancouver, B.C.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcbooks.1-0222452/manifest

Comment

Related Items