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BC Historical Books

Hand-book and general guide to British Columbia. May 1893 Begg, Alexander, 1825-1905 1893

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Array  
THE NEW
Vancouver Coal Mining & Land Coy,
LIMITED.
(FORMERLY THE VANCOUVER COAL COMPANY.)
Are the Largest Coal Producers on the Pacific Coast.
Nanaimo  Coal.   §1   Southfield Coal.
(Used Principally for Gas and Domestic Purposes.) (Steam Fuel.)
|New Wellington Coal!
(HOUSE AND STEAM COAL.)
These Coals are Mined by this Company Only, and by Union
Labor.
THE " NANAIMO " COAL gives a large percentage of Gas, a high Illuminating
power, unequalled by any other Bituminous Gas Coals in the world, and a
superior quality of Coke.
THE ■ SOUTHFIELD" COAL is now used by all the leading Steamship
Lines on the Pacific.
THE " NEW WELLINGTON" COAL, which was reoently introduced, has
already become a favourite fuel for domestic purposes. It is a clean, hard
coal, makes a bright and cheerful fire, and its lasting qualities make it the
most economical coal in the market.
The several Mines of the Company are connected with their WharveB at Nanaimo
and Departure Bay, where ships of largest tonnage are loaded at all states of
the tide.   Special dispatch given to Mail and Ocean Steamers.
SAMUEL M. ROBINS,
Superintendent. Vol. I.
No. 2.
SEE   ADDENDA   FOR   LATEST    CHANGES.
BEGG & LYNCH'S
HAND-BOOK
AND
GENERAL   GUIDE
TO
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ALEXANDER   BEGG, EDITOR.
MAY 1893.
CORRECTED AND    PUBLISHED   MONTHLY.
Contains Railway, Steamer and Stage Time Tables, Distances, Fares and
other General Information About the Province Easy of Reference
on Almost Every Subject Connected with British Columbia
which Tourists, General Travellers or Prospectine
Settlers May Wish to be Informed Upon.
SEE   BUSINESS DIRECTORY AT END OF BOOK.
PUBLISHED    BY
THE B. C. GUIDE PUBLISHING COMPANY,
VICTORIA,   B. C.
Munroe Miller, Printer and Bookbinder, 77 Johnson Street. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Canadian Pacific Railway
HOTEL VANCOUVER
-%7j&.tt<3 OUVBR,
o/
<J". -A.. "VIJEt-TTXIE, 3VEa.zxa.sex>.
DRIAR
225 ROOMS
THE
DRIARD.
VICTORIA,   B. $■ Accommodation for 300 Guests
Main dining hall will seat 350 persons, also a large Cafe in the English style, and
a number of handsome private dining parlors.
Heated by steam.   Lighted by electric light and gas.   Bath with hot and cold
water in every room.
Elevator to every floor.   Widestaircases and well ventilated halls.
The only strictly first-class hotel in the city.
Cor. View and Broad Sts., VICTORIA, B. C.
REDON & HARTNAGLE, Proprietors,
THE DRIARD, HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PAGE
ABC Descriptive Guide       7
Agricultural Associations     66
Associations     80
Acreage of Districts 102
Addenda  109
British Columbia      5
Boards of Trade     78
Board of Underwriters     80
Banks and Bankers     78
Bank Holidays     78
B. C. Senators     84
B. C. Representatives     86
Boat Rates     92
Business Directory.  102
Bell Time on Shipboard 104
British Empire:
Population and Area 105
China Steamers, C.PR. and N.P.R.. 22
Coal Statistics  50
Coal Mines and Mining Companies.. 52
CUmate  68
Churches   83
Clubs  80
Cities  88
Census of Canada 105
Difference in Time     34
Dairying Districts     64
Dominion Government Offices     86
Express Offices     35
Exports     78
Education      76
Esquimalt Graving Dock Charges.. .106
Fish  72
Fishing, (lake)  40
Fishing, (river)  42
Farming and Farm Districts  62
Fruit (see addenda)  64
Fruit growing Districts (see addenda) 64
Foreign Consuls  80
Fog Horns 102
Game, where to find it     36
Gold and S.lver Mining Statistics...    54
Gold Commissioners     86
Government Agents     86
Governors of Canada 105
Hotels, Leading  24
Health and Pleasure Resorts  35
Hunting  36
Horticultural Society  66
Hack and Livery
Height of Western
PAGE
Rates     92
Mountains     96
Industries      70
Indians     82
Imports. .-     78
Kamloops 102
Lakes, how to reach them     40
Land Regulations     66
Lacrosse, for 1898 105
Light Houses 102
Legal Guide     80
Messenger Service  35
Mines  46
Mining Notes  54
Mining Laws :-  58
Money Order Offices  78
Military Guide   83
Mountains
Money Orders—Foreign
96
106
Newspapers and Periodicals  83
Nanaimo, City of  90
Navigation Guide  93
Notes, General .'  96
New Westminster, City of  90
Pacific Coast Steamship Co  22
Post Offices and Post Masters  26
Postal Guide  30
Population  93
Provincial Government and Departments   84
Places of Interest  99
Political Divisions 105
Rivers, for fishing  42
Railway and Steamer Ticket Offices. 92
Reminisce tee of the Gold Mines  60
Sleeping Car Tariff  22
Stock Raising  62
Stock Raising Districts  64
Salmon Pack  74
Salmon Shipments  76
Salmon Canneries   74
Salmon Canning Companies  74
Salmon Fleet  76
Savings Banks  78
Street Car Service  90
Stage Distances  96
Seal Hunting  76
Stipendiary Magistrates  80
Sheriffs  80
Societies  80
127342
J HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
PAGE
Tariff of Fares  21
Tides—May, 1893 104
Time Tables—
C.P. R .1  17
C.P.N. Co ;  17
City of Kingston (see addenda)... 17
N. P. RR  18
Great Northern Rr  18
Fairhaven & Southern RR  18
Vancouver to San Francisco  18
Esquimalt & Nanaimo RR  18
Shuswap & Okanagan RR  19
Columbia & Kootenay R. & N. Co. 19
Victoria to New Westminster  19
Victoria to Nanaimo & Comox  19
Victoria to Alberni ,... 19
Victoria to Northern Ports  19
Fraser River Steamers  19
Westminster to Steveston  19
Vancouver to Nanaimo  19
Nanaimo ,Vancouver&Westminster 19
Howe Sound & Squamish River... 20
Vancouver to Comox  20
Revelstoke to Little Dalles  20
Vancouver to Chilliwack  20
Okanagan Lake Steamers  20
PAGE
Golden to Windermere  20
New Westminster Ferry  20
Westminster & Vancouver Tramway Co. (see addenda)  21
^Steveston and Vancouver Stage Co. 20
Vancouver   to Northern  logging
camps  20
Vacouver to Moodyville  20
Vancouver to Alert Bay & Newitti
(see addenda)  109
Tickets & Baggage (Information)... 23
Telegraph Offices & Rates  32
Telegraph Offices (in cities)  34
Telephone Service  35
Timber of British Columbia  66
Timber Licenses  66
Table of Distances  96
Trade and Shipping  76
Transfer Companies  93
Tables of General Information.  94
Vancouver (city of)  88
Victoria (city of)  88
Westminster (city of)  90
BARER BROS k
u
J
S
s
Chapel Walks,
LIVERPOOL,
;ppii
1 MERCHANTS" Line of Vessels.
From Liverpool to B. C. Ports.
 :o:	
342-344 Watep Street,
VANCOUVER,
B. C.
ION MERCHANTS
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Foreign, Canadian and American Liquors.
BAKER BROS & CO., L'D.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
SEE
SEE
PAGE 47.
W. H. PERRY'S Hardware Advertisement,
Telephone No. 528,
Instead of 228. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The Province
 OF	
British  Columbia,
BRITISH COLUMBIA, which entered
the Canadian Confederation in 1871,
is the most westerly of the Canadian
Provinces. It has a coast line on the
Pacific Ocean of about 600 miles, that is,
in a straight line. If its almost innumerable indentations and bays were measured, the coast line would extend to several thousands of miles.
The area of the Province/according to
the census measurement, is 341,305
square miles. Its position on the Amer-
can continent is one of great commercial
importance, and its resources are in
keeping' with its position. If it were to
be described from the characteristics of
its climate, its mineral wealth, and its
natural commercial relations, it might be
said to be the Great Britain and California combined of the Dominion of Canada.
The Province is divided into two parts,
the Islands, of which Vancouver is the
principal, and the Mainland. Vancouver
is about 300 miles long, with an average
breadth of about 60 miles, containing an
area of about 20,000 square miles.
British Columbia has numerous harbours and rivers, some of which are of
importance, and all are remarkable for
their bountiful, in fact, wonderful supplies of fish. The scenery which it possesses is magnificently beautiful.
The climate on the coast is more equable and much milder in winter than in
any other part of Canada; but as the
mountain are ascended, greater cold prevails, with more snow, and the characteristics of greater dryness of atmosphere
which mark the climate of the interior of
the continent are found.
There is very little frost or snow. An
abstract of one year gives 201 fine!days,
96 overcast, 50 rainy, and 17 on which
snow fell. Gooseberry buds opened the
middle of February ; early plants came
in leaf the 2nd of March, and native
hemp 3 inches high; catkins in full
bloom on March 7th ; buttercups in flower March 29th; strawberries in bloom
April 13th ; apple trees in bloom May
6th ; beans in blossom May 12th ; strawberries ripe May 25th ; raspberries ripe
July 9th.
The climate of Victoria and its suitability for invalids is described by a traveller in the following words :—| Victoria
has a climate unequalled anywhere,
which is specially recommended to health
seeking invalids. The atmosphere is
charged with ozone peculiar to Victoria
only. It orignates in the snow cooled
breezes in the Olympian range (about 60
miles south-west of the city), mixes with
the salt air of the Pacific, giving it peculiar health restoring and life prolonging
qualities, which are fast making
Victoria the sanitarium of the Pacific
Coast."
Every part of British Columbia is
amply and well provided with excellent
wood for construction and for other purposes. The coast region has the pre-eminence at present, owing to the greater
facility of export. The gigantic size of
forest trees is due, according to Dr. Dawson, to the mildness and humidity of the
climate.
The fisheries of British Columbia are
as yet almost untouched industrially, except the salmon fishery, which has rapidly become an important industry. Its
chief seat at present is on the Lower
Fraser, in the rich agricultural districts
of New Westminster, through which the
railway passes. Salmon fishing is carried on, also, on the rivers Skeena and
Nass, and at various places on the coasts.
Nearly all the salmon are canned and exported t» England ; a few are salted and
smoked. >  .
Gold is known to be almost universally
distributed in the Province of British
Columbia. There is scarcely a stream of
any size in any part of the Province that
one cannot wash a few " colours," as they
say, out of, at the very least, and in 105
localities, which I catalogued in 1877,
actual mining had been carried on for
gold. The main auriferous belt of British   Columbia runs  from south-east to 6
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
north-west, just inside the Rocky Mountains, and includes the mining localities
which have been called Kootenay, Big
Bend, Cariboo, Omineca and Cassiar from
south to north.
Coal mining is one of the most important industries in British Columbia. The
deposits are very widely spread, both on
the main land and in the islands. The coal
of Nanaimo and vicinity, on Vancouver
Island, being so far the best that has been
found on the western coast of America.
All authorities agree, as to the extent and
value of the coal beds of British Columbia.
There is every indication that the silver mines of British Columbia will within the next few years prove to be the
most valuable ever discovered on the
American continent; the specimens of
ore so far assayed having given high
yields of silver. There are also deposits
of copper, iron, galena, ciannabar, platinum and other ores in large quantities
awaiting development.
Of British Columbia as a farming, grazing and fruit growing country, the Marquis of Lome says :—Wherever there is
open land the wheat crops rival the best
grown elsewhere, while there is nowhere
any dearth of ample provision of fuel and
lumber for the winter. As you get your
colonization roads pushed, you will have
a larger available acreage, for there are
quiet straths and valleys hidden away
among the rich forests, which would provide comfortable farms. As in the Northwest last year, so this year, I have taken
down the evidence of settlers, and this
has been wonderfully favorable.   To say
the truth, I  was   rather  hunting  for
grumblers and found only one.   There is
no reason why British Columbia should
not be for this portion of our territory
what California is to the States, in the
supply afforded of fruits.   The perfection
attained by small fruits is unrivalled, and
it is only with the Peninsula of Ontario
that you would have to compete for the
supplies of grapes, peaches, pears apples,
cherries, plums, apricots and currants.
The most richly endowed with gifts of
material advantage of all provinces, British Columbia excels them all in beauty.
In the magnificence of her rugged mountains,   the   charm  of   her  land-locked
waters, the lonely grandeur of her forests
and the quiet beauty of her prairies, she
possesses a wonderful variety—a combination of scenic beauty. Whether a traveller approaches from the east after crossing the apparently illimitable prairies, or
from the west at the  conclusion of  an
ocean voyage, he is filled with a sense of
relief, mingled with curiosity and pleased
expectancy.    The featurs that may be
found almost beautiful must depend on
the temperament of each spectator, but
it happens that nature has so arranged
the forms and attributes of this country
that whether coming from the east or
west the traveller finds a striking conT
trast to that which he is leaving behind
him, and as contrast is   a primary condition of excellence in that which is to
delight the eye, his aesthetic sense is sure
of gratification.
THE   ARCADE
IMPORTER OF
SILKS, DRY GOODS, CARPETS,
r; AND HOUSE FURNISHINGS.
Largest Dry Goods Store on the Pacific Coast.
Government Street Entrance,
No. 61.
Broad Street Entrance,
opposite Driard.
VICTORIA, B. C. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
A B G DESCRIPTIVE GUIDE
TO
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
See Bail way and Steamer Time-table, p. 15.
Abbotsfor d—Is on the crossing of the Mission extension of the C. P. R and the New
Westminster and Yale wagon road. Daily
train from Vancouver.
A.berdee n—Cassiar District, Skeena Division.
In the midst of a most important wealth producing country. Steamer from Victoria twice
a month.
Agassi z—On the Fraser River. The C. P. R.
has o station, also an express and telegraph
office. The Dominion government experimental farm is here. A. train east and west
each day.
Ainswort h—Situated on Kootenay Lake.
Steamer communication with Nelson and
Bonner's ferry, Idaho. There is also telephone communication with, Nelson.
A ] b e r n i—At the mouth of the Somass River,
near Barclay Sound—is a rising place. It is
the supply mart of the beautiful and fertile
Alberni Valley, and already several industries
have been established here, chief of which
is a large paper mill. A rich mining and agricultural country is tributary to Alberni.
Steamer from Victoria twice a month, also
stage from Nanaimo once a week.
Albert C a n y o n—A station on the C.P.R.
from which a splendid view of the neighboring Canyon can be obtained. Train east and
west each day, also daily steamer from Bevelstoke.
Albert Hea d—About 7 miles by water from
"Victoria and 12 miles by land,where the Dominion Quarantine Hospital is situated. A
pleasant drive from Victoria.
Aldergrove—About 22 miles east of New
Westminster near the boundary line. It is
in the midst of a farming country and has a
mail service twice a week and telegraphic
communication. Stage from New Westminster.
A l*e r t B a y—Is situated on Cormorant 1 sland.
There is a salmon cannery here and steam
saw mill. Steamer from Victoria twice a
month.
Alexandri a—About 18 miles from Cariboo
in the midst of a farming and stock-raising
country.   Stage from Ashcroft 185 miles.
Alkali Lake—On the road to Barkerville
about 90 miles from Clinton and on the left
bank of the Fraser Biver. Stage from Ash.
croft; change at Clinton.
Annievill e—On the left bank of the Fraser
where there is a brickyard and pottery, the
clay being of a very fine quality. Steamer
and train daily from New Westminster.
A s h c r o f t—Is a most important station on
the 0. P. B. as all the stages of the B. C. Express Co. for the upper country leave here.
It is situated on the south bank of the Thomp
son Biver near its junction with the Bonaparte. It is the great trading post for the
districts in the nortern interior of the Province.   A train east and west each day.
Anderson Cree k—Beached by stage from
Kamloops.
B a 1 f o u r—Daily steamer from Nelson, twice
a week from Bonner's Ferry, Idaho.
Barnston Islan d—Near Port Kells on the
Fraser Biver. Steamer and train daily from
New Westminster.
Barkerville—At the termination of the
Cariboo Road on Williams' Creek, about 285
miles from Ashcroft. Gold mining is the
principal industry, and it is confidently expected that great wealth will be taken out of
the district with the introduction of proper
appliances for hydraulic mining. The Government assay office is located here. Stage
from Ashcroft, 280 miles.
Beecher Ba y—Is 21 miles from Victoria by
land, and 15 miles by water, and is at the
southern end of Metchosen, a rural settlement on Vancouver Island. Livery from
Victoria.
Beaver Mout h—A station on the C.P.B.,
446 miles from Vancouver, in the midst of a
lumbering country. The headquarters of the
Columbia Biver Lumber Co. A train east
and west each day.
Beaver Cree k-^Nearly 12 miles from Alber-.
ni.   Contains excellent farming lands and
timber, there being a saw mill in operation.
A steamer twice a month from Victoria, and
a stage once a week from Nanaimo.
Beaver Point—Is on Salt Spring Island,
about 25 miles from Victoria, and the principal industry is fruit growing and farming.
Steamer from Victoria and Nanaimo twice a
week,
Bella Bell a—A picturesque village on the-
North West Coast district. Steamer from
Victoria twice a month.
Bella Cool a—A small village in the North
West Coast district. Steamer twice a month
from Victoria.
Big Bar Cree k—On the left bank of the
Fraser Biver. Chief industry, stock raising.
Connected by wagon road with Clinton.
Stage from Ashcroft.
Bonapart e—Near Cache Creek. Stage from
Ashcroft.
Blue Spring s—Stage from Vernon once a
week.
Bridge   Cree k—Is about 83 miles north of
Ashcroft.   A beautiful country for dairying
and stock raising.   A large area of good gov-
.  ernment land is open near here for settlement.   Stage from Ashcroft.
Brownsvill e—Opposite New Westminster.
Ferry every hour. 8
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Ba r c 1 ay S o u n d—Steamer twice a month
from Victoria.
Basque   RJa n c h—Livery from Ashcroft.
Black   Cree k—Livery from Comox.
Bloomfiel d—Steamer from Golden to Windermere and stage from latter place.
Boundary Ba y—Steamer to Ladner's Landing from Victoria or New Westminster and
stage from Ladner's Landing.
Burgoyne Ba y—On the west side of Salt
Spring Island. Steamer once a week from
Victoria to Nanaimo.
Burrard Inle t—C P.R. trains daily, electric cars.   Pleasant drive from Vancouver.
Burton Prairie—C. P. R. to Sicamous,
Shuswap & Okanagon R. B. to Vernon,
steamer to Mission and stage from latter.
Cache Cree k—An agricultural district about
6 miles from Ashcroft, from which there is a
daily stage.
C e d a r—About ten miles from Nanaimo. connected with it by a wagon road. Stage once
a week from Nanaimo.
Chemainus —A station on the E. & N. B, R.,
i in  the midst of a farming and  lumbering
country.    It is an exceedingly picturesque
spot.  There are large saw mills at this point.
Daily train from Victoria.
C h i 1 c o t e—A stock raising district connected
by trail with Ashcroft. Stage from Ashcroft
changing at Soda Creek,
Chilliwhac k—Bordered on the north by the
Fraser River, and on the south-west by Sumas Lake and River, and not far from Harrison Hot Springs. It is a splendid agricultural country, and one of the most productive districts iu the Province There are
. here two saw mills, a grist mill, fruit cannery and brick factory. It is a most desirable spot for jjthe tourist and sportsman, as
well as settlers. Steamers daily from New
Westminster.
C1 a y g a d t—Horseback from Alberni.
C1 a y t o n—An agricultural district near the
head of the Serpentine River. Daily train
from New Westminster—9 miles.
C1 i n t o n—On the Cariboo road, about 32 miles
from Ashcroft.   A Government Agent is located here, and quite a large general business
i   is carried on with the  surrounding  country
and mining districts.   Stage  from Ashcroft.
Gloverdal e—-Daily train from New West-
minster.?B
Clover Valle y—Twelve miles from New
..' Westminster, between Hall's prairie and 8ur-
rey Centre.   A fruit growing district.   Daily
train from New Westminster.
OobbleHi 11—A station on the E. & N. R. R.,
three miles from Shawnigan lake.   There is
> \ifti-iUlarge quarry of granite stone here- Daily
train from Victoria. )
Oolwood—Near Esquimalt harbor. A good
farming section.   Livery from Victoria.
Comox —On ,the east coast of Vancouver Island,
about 140 miles north of Victoria. The industries are coal mining, lumbering and agricnl-
ture, and the district around is one of the
£- best settled on the Island. Steamer weekly
from VictoriarVancouver and Nanaimo.
Constance C o ve—On the E. & N. B. B. line
where there is good clay and the B. C. Pottery & Terra Gotta Works are located. Daily
train from Victoria.
Corfield—In the Cowichan valley. A charming spot with good agricultural land surrounding it. Small fruits are raised here
extensively. It is about two miles from
McPhersons or Koksilah on the E. & N. B.B.
Daily train from Victoria.
C o u 11 e e—In the Yale district, between Kamloops and Spence's Bridge. Coal and iron
are found here and the mines are being
developed. In addition to this there is a good
agricultural country. Coutlee is a distributing point for the neighboring mining districts. C. P. R" to Spence's Bridge thence by
stage to Coutlee.
C o w i c h an—Near the E. & N. R. B.. a fertile
district with good roads and abundance of
game. Daily train from Victoria to McPhersons thence by stage to Cowichan.
Cowichan Lake- About 21 miles from Duncan's station on the E. & N- R. R. A delightful spot to visit.   Stage f rom Duncan's
Craigellachi e—A station on the C. P. R.
353 miles from Vancouver. Train east and
west each day,
Cranbroo k—About 12 miles from Fort Steele
in the Kootenay country. C. P. R. to Golden
thence by steamer to Windermere connecting
there with stage to Cranbrook.
Cadboro Ba y—A suburb of Victoria.   Livery.
Campbell River—Steamer from Vancouver
once a week.
Canoe Pas s—Steamer from Victoria or Westminster to Ladner's Landing thence by Livery.
CapeMudge— On Valdez Island at its southern
extremity. Near here is the Yucatus Indian
reservation with about 200 Indians living on
it.   Steamer once a week from Vancouver.
Cedar Hil 1—A suburb" of Victoria. A very
pleasant drive.
Centrevill e—On the Fraser River. Steamers daily from New Westminster.
Oh earn—Steamer from New Westminster twice
a week.
Cherry Cree k—A station on tbe C. P. R.
Train east and west each day.
Clan William—A station on the C.P.B.
Train east and west each day.
C is c o—A station on the C.P.B. Train east and
west each day.
Columbia Lakes—C.P.B. to Golden,thence
by steamer to Windermer, and from the latter, stage to the lakes.
Cordova Bay—A suburb of Victoria. A
pleasant drive.
Crbigflowe r—Near Esquimalt. Livery from
there. Electric tramcar to Esquimalt, or Livery from Victoria.
Denman Island—Near Comox with good
farming land on it. Steamers weekly from
Victoria, Vancouver and Nanaimo.
Departure Ba y—Three miles north of Nanaimo, the shipping port of the Wellington
coalmines. It has a good harbor and commodious wharves.   Stage from Nanaimo.
Dog Creek—About 42 miles north of Clinton,
with a wagon road connecting the two places.
Stage from Ashcroft, 132 miles.
Donald—An important station on the C.P.R.,
with railway workshops, stores, etc. It ia
the supply centre of the East Kootenay mining district.   Train east and west each day. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
9
Duncan 8—About half way between Victoria
and Nanaimo on the E. & N. R. R. There
are several industries here; saw mill, pump
factory, sash and door factory, etc., and the
place is growing rapidly. It is in the midst'
of a fertile district, and is a popular resort
for visitors, owing to the beauty of the scenery surrounding it. Daily train irom Victoria.
Duck & Pringl e—On the South Thompson
river about 300 miles from Vancouver, near
the line of the C. P. R. Stage from Duck
Station.
Duncan's   Ba y—Livery from Comox.
Douglas Lak e—C.P.R. to Kamloops, stage
from there to Quilshenaand thence by steamer to Douglas Lake.
D r y n o c k—A station on the C.P.R,, train east
and west each day.
Duck s—A station on the C.P.R., train east and
west each dav.
East   Sook e—Stage from Sooke.
East Wellingto n—On the E. & N. R. R.
about six miles from Nanaimo and close to
the Wellington coal mines. Daily train from
Victoria.   Livery from Wellington.
E 1 g i n—On the Nicomekl river, on the road to
Blaine and distant from New Westminster
about 13 miles. Stage and steamer from
New Westminster.
Empire Valle y—On west side Fraser, having
mail communication with Dog Creek once a
week. There are two mills here, a grist and a
saw mill. It is ninety miles from Ashcroft,
and is surrounded by a splendid stock raising
country. Stage from Ashcroft to Dog Creek
thence livery 18 miles.
E n d e r b y—In the district of Yale, on the Shuswap Biver about 26 miles from Sicamoos,
surrounded by the finest of wheat producing
land. Here is a large flouring mill capable
of grinding 100 barrels per day. Pork packing
and brick making is also carried on. It is, a.
station on the Shuswap and Okanagan Bail-
way. C, P. R. to Sicamous, Shuswap and
Okanagan R. R. to Enderby.
Erringto n—About 24 miles northwest of
Nanaimo. Weekly steamer from Nanaimo.
Stage from Comox.
Esquimal t—About 4 miles from Victoria
where the graving dock and the Imperial
naval station are located. The graving dock
is 457 feet long, 57 feet wide with a depth of
27 feet. Esquimalt harbor is a picturesque
spot and several English men-of-war are
usually lying at anchor in it. Esquimalt is
connected with Victoria by the Electric tram
car line and the E. & N. R. R. and the drive
by road is an exceedingly pleasant one.
Tramcar hourly and train from Victoria
daily.
Eighty-Three Mile House—Stage from
Ashcroft, 68 miles.
Elk   Lak e—Livery from Victoria.
English   Ba y—Livery from Vancouver.
Fairmoun t—In the Kootenay country, in east
Kootenay, in the midst of a wealthy mining
district. C.P.B. to Golden, thence steamer
to Windermere, and stage from there to Fair-
mount.
F i e 1 d—A station on the C.P.R., 500 miles from
Vancouver. There is a large saw mill here.
Train ea6t and west each day.
Fort Simpso n—On the north west coast.
Steamer from Victoria twice a month.
Fort S t e e 1 e—In east Kootenay. C.P.B. to
Golden, thence steamer to Windermere, and
from there by stage to Fort Steele.
French Cree k—About 28 miles from Nanaimo. Stage and steamer from latter place
once a week, also from Comox, and stage
from Alberni.
Findlay Cree k—C. P. R. to Golden, thence
steamer to Windermere, and from there stage
to Findlay Creek.
Fort Georg e—Stage from Ashcroft, change
at Quesnelle.
Fowl B a y—A suburb of Victoria, a pleasant
drive.
Gabriola Islan d—In the Gulf of Georgia,
and is an island about 9 miles long and 3
miles wide, fertile and very productive. It
is situated near Nanaimo. Steamer once a
week from Victoria and Nanaimo.
Galen a—On the Columbia River, 45 miles
from Golden, and 40 miles from Windermere.
Steamer to Windermere, stage from latter.
G e n o a—In the district of Cowichan. Is about
35 miles from Victoria, has a fine harbor, and
possesses large lumbering interests. Weekly
steamer from Victoria.
Georgetown—On the north west coast.
steamer twice a month.
Glacier Hous e—A station on the C. P. R.,
surrounded by some of the finest mountain
scenery on the line. Train east and west
each day.
G o 1 d e n—On the c. P. B. line, about 438 miles
from Vancouver. Mining is the principal industry, with lumber manufacture. The
steamers of the Upper Columbia start from
here. There is an excellent assay office and
• laboratory in this town. Train east and west
each day.
Goldstrea m—On the e. & n. b. b. , about 11
miles from Victoria. It is quite a summer
resort.   Daily train from Victoria.
Gordon Hea d—A point in the Haro & Ros-
airo Straits, where there is a small farming
community. The drive from Victoria to Gordon Head is a delightful one.
Grande Prairi e—In the Kootenay district
about 36 miles from Kamloops with which it
is connected by waggon road. Stock raising
and agriculture the principal industries. C.
P. R. to Duck's thence stage.
Granite Cree k—Nine miles f r om th e mouth
of Tulameen river in the Yale district in the
midst of a mining country, o. P. B. to
Spence's Bridge thence stage to Granite
Creek.
G r a n t h a m—In the Comox district connected
with Comox by wagon road 7 miles. Livery
from Comox.
GriffinLak e—A station on the c. P. B. 365
miles east of Vanco uver. Train east and west
each day.
G u i c h o n—About 13 miles from New Westminster and one mile from Ladner's Landing. It
is surrounded by a splendid agricultural
country. Daily steamers to Ladner's Landing.
Galbraith Ferry—c. P. B. to Golden
thence steamer to Windermere and stage
from latter place.
Galiano Island—Steamers weekly from
Victoria and New Westminster. 10
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Ganges Harbo r—On the east side of Salt
Spring Island. Steamer weekly from Victoria and Nanaimo.
Halls P r a i r i e Eighteen miles from New
Westminster in the midst of a fine farming
district. Stage from New Westminster 1914
miles.
Hancevill e—In the district of Cariboo*
Cattle raising and general farming are largely
carried on in the neighborhood. Stage from
Ashroft, change at Soda creek; distance 220
miles.
Harrison Hot Spring s—On Harrison
Lake about 5 miles from Agassiz station.
The springs are noted for their medical properties and curative qualities. The spot is
one of the loveliest in British Columbia. A
small steamer plies upon the lake and there
are also a number of small boats for the use
of pleasure seekers, hunters and fishermen.
The scenery in the neighborhood is grand and
a large number of tourists visit the springs
each summer. Train east and west each day.
Stage from Agassiz station to springs.
Hartley Bay—On the north west coast.
There is a large saw mill here. Steamer twice
a month from Victoria.
Hatzic Prairi e—An agricultural district
6 miles from Matsqui. c. p. B. to latter place
thence stage. Dally steamers from Westminster.
Hop e—In the district of Yale, and the head of
navigation on the Fraser River. Farming
and mining are the chief industries. 0. P. B.
train east and west each day. Fortnightly
steamer from New Westminster.
Hope B a y—On Pender Island where there is
an extensive blue freestone quarry. Steamer
weekly from Victoria.
Hornby Islan d—East of Denman Island.
It is a fertile and beautiful island. Steamer
fortnightly from Victoria and Nanaimo.
Hundred and Fifty Mile House—On
the Cariboo road where there is also a sawmill.   Stage from Ashcroft235 miles.
Hundred Mile Hous e—Another stopping place on the Cariboo road. Stage from
Ashcroft.
H u n t i n gd o n—At the junction of the 0. P. B.
Seattle. Lake Shore and Eastern and Belling-
ham Bay railways on the,International boundary. 0. p. B. from Vancouver to Mission
Junction thence train to Huntingdon.
H a m m o n d—Station on 0. P. B. 24 miles from
Vancouver. Train east and west each day;
also daily steamers from New Westminster
Han ey—Station on o. P. B. 26 miles from Vancouver.   Train east and west each day.
Happy   Valle y—Livery from Victoria.
H a r r i s o n—A station on o. p. B. 62 miles
from Vancouver. Train east and west each
day.
Hastings —Four miles from Vancouver on
the c. P. B. trains daily.
Hat   Cree k—Stage from Ashcroft.
H e c t o r—A station on the o. P. B. 517 miles
from Vancouver. Train east and west each
day.
H i g h 1 a n d—Livery from Victoria.
Horse   F 1 y—Stage from Ashcroft, change at
150 mile House.
Howe   Soun d—Steamer    from    Vancouver
twice a week.
Illecillewae t—A station on the o. P. B.«
407 miles from Vancouver. Silver and lead
are found near here. It bids fair to become
an important mining district. Train east
and west each day.
Invernes s—On the west coast. Steamers
twice a month from Victoria.
James Island—Stage from Victoria to
Prairie Tavern, thence by boat.
Johnson's Landin g—A station on the
C.P.B., called Nicomen, 53 miles from Vancouver. The soil is fertile around here.
Trains east and west each day.
Eamloop s—Is the largest town in British
Columbia on the o.p.b. east of Vancouver.
It is situated at the junction of the North
and South Thompson Rivers, and is in the
midst of a large ranching country. There
are also minerals in the neighborhood, but
the mines are as yet undeveloped. The town
is growing rapidly in size and importance,
and several industries have been started.
The climate is dry and healthy. Train east
and west each day,
K a s 1 o C i t y—At the mouth of the Kootenay
river. It is the centre of the great Kootenay
mining district and has every prospect of
becoming an important place. The great
Kaslo and Slocan silver mines are from 15
to 20 miles from here. Steamer from Nelson.
K e e f er s—A station on the c p. b. 140 miles
from Vancouver. Train east and west every
day.
Keithley   Creek—In the Cariboo country
about tl8 miles from the Quesnelle Forks. ■
Hydraulic mining is carried on in the vicinity.    Stage  from  Ashcroft,  change  at 150
Mile House.
Kensington Prairie—A farming section in the New Westminster district (P.O.
Address, Nikomekelo
Kettle Rive r—c. p. b. to Sicamous. s. &
o. R. R. to Okanagan, and thence stage and
livery.
Kings Islan d--On (the north-west coast.
Steamer twice a month from Victoria.
K a t a m a h—At the head of Douglas Channel,
on the north-west coast. Steamer twice a
month from Victoria.
K i 11 u p e—At the head of Gardiner's Channel,
on the north-west coast. The scenery about
here is grand in the extreme, mountains
and waterfalls. Prices cannery is located
here.  Steamers twice a month from Victoria.
K o ksi 1 ah—A station on the.E. &n. b. b., in
the Cowichan Valley. It is a lovely spot
and offers inducements to the farmer sportsman and tourist.
Kuper Islan d—Steamer weekly from Victoria.
Lac La Hache—In the district of Lill-
loet on the wagon road between Barkerville
and Lillooet. Farming, dairying and stock
raising are the principal industries. Stage
from Ashcroft 100 miles.
Ladner's Landin g—About 13 miles from
New Westminster on the Fraser River. The
steamers from Victoria, Vancouver and New
Westminster and Nanaimo all call here.
The district in the neighborhood is one of
the most important agricultural sections of
the Province. The soil, of which there is
40.000 acres in the settlement, is exceedingly HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
11
* rich, and large crops of roots and cereals
are produced. There are no less than
eight salmon canneries in the vicinity of
Ladner's so that it is an important shipping point. Daily steamers from Victoria,
New Westminster and Vancouver.
L a n g 1 e y—On the Fraser River near the
boundary line. It is in the midst of a rich
and beautiful agricultural district the settlers being of a superior class. The soil is
Well adapted to fruit culture and the growth
of hops. Steamers daily from New Westminster.
Lansdowne —In the Spallumcheen valley,
Kootenay district, o. p. b. to Sicamous
thences s. & o. B. B. to Enderby and from
there stage.
L i 11 o o e t—On the Fraser River about 60
miles from Ashcroft. Near here is Seaton.
Lake. The scenery arround is superb. There
is a fine bridge crossing the Fraser at this
point. The surrounding country which is
very fertile, is devoted ^chiefly to grazing
and agriculture. Stage from Ashcroft, change
at Clinton.
Little Qualicu m—About 24 miles northwest of Nanaimo, where farming and fishing are the chief industries. Weekly steamer from Nanaimo and stage from Comox.
Loch Enoc h—Nearest station, Harrison, on
o.p.b.   Train east and west each day.
Lowe Inlet—A small fishery on the north
west coast, where there is a cannery capable of turning out 1500 cases of salmon per
annum. Steamer twice a month frem Victoria.
Lower Nicola—In the district of Yale,
72 miles from Kamloops. c. p. b. to Kamloops or Spence's Bridge. Stage from either
place.
Lulu Islan d—On the south arm of the
Fraser. A farming district carrying on a
good trade with Victoria, Vancouver and
New Westminster. Steamer tri-weekly from
Victoria. Daily steamer from New Westminster.   Daily stage from Vancouver.
L u n d—Weekly steamer from Victoria.
L y 11 o n—At the junction of the Fraser and
Thompson Rivers, a station on the o.p.b.
Mining and farming carried on in the vicinity. Its position makes it a busy place..
Train east and west each day.
Lak e—Stage from Victoria.
Langford   Plain s—Livery from Victoria.
Langley Prairi e—Stage from New Westminster.
Leanchoi 1—A station on the o. P. B., 495
miles from Vancouver. Train east and west
each day.
Maple B ay-Is a pretty place on the east
coast of Vancouver Island, with a commodious harbor. Steamer weekly from Victoria.
Maple Ridg e—A large district on the Eraser, devoted chiefly to dairying. If dyked,
it would be splendid agricultural land. The
c.p.b. runs through the district. Station
at Hammond.   Train east and west each day.
M a s s. e 11—A small place on the north west
coast. Steamers twice a month from Victoria,
M a t s q u i—Distant 44 miles from Vancouver,
and 35 miles from New Westminster. The
St. Mary's Mission is located here, and  the
o.p.b. crossing the Fraser at this place
makes it a central point. Station called
Mission.   Train east and west each day.
Mayne Island—Situated at almost equal
distances from Victoria, New Westminster
and Nanaimo. Indications of coal exist.
Steamer from Victoria twice a week.
Mamette Lak e—c. P. B. to Kamloops
thence stage to Coutlee.
McPherson's Statio n—In the district
of Cowichan and a station on the E. & n. b b.
Like most of the places along this line of
railway it is a beantiful spot, surrounded
by farms.   Daily train from Victoria.
Metchosin—A beautiful district about 15
miles from Victoria, where picnics, hunting
and fishing can be enjoyed during the summer months. Fruit, hay, grain and root
crops are raised here in large quantities
and the whole district contains many places
of interest and beauty which are dealt with
elsewhere.   Stage from Victoria.
Menzies Bay—Steamer weekly from Vancouver.
Metlakahtl a—A beautiful village on the
north-west coast. Steamers twice a month
from Victoria.
M illsicam—e. & n. b. b. to Goldstream
daily,
Missio n—See Matsqui.
Missio n—See Okanagan.
Mobeily—A station on the c. p.B. 468 miles
from Vancouver. Train east and west each
day.
Moodyvill e—About three miles from Vancouver with which it has communication
by 4 trips daily ferry. There is a large saw
mill here and there is an excellent harbor.
Mount Lehma n—On the Fraser river
about 30 miles above New Westminster.
Splendid farming country. Daily steamer
from New Westminster.
Mount Pleasan t—A suburb of Vancouver.
Mount  Tolmi e—A   suburb   of    Victoria
where   a   splendid   view   of    surrounding
country may be obtained.   A pleasant drive.
Mud B a y—At the junction of Semiamho,
Kirkland and McLellan roads with good
bottom lands in the vicinity. Stage from
New Wesminster.
N a k u s p—Steamer from Robson.
N a n a i m o—For description see cities of British Columbia. Daily train on e. & n. e, b.
from Victoria.
Nanoose Ba y—Eight miles north of Nanaimo and five miles from Wellington
mines.    Stage and Livery from Nanaimo.
Napier Lak e—o. p. b. to Kamloops thence
stage
N e 1 s o n—On the Columbia and Kootenay b. b.
and within 23 miles of Kootenay Lake. It
is the distributing point for West Kootenay.
Steamers ply regularly from here to Bonner s
Ferry, Idaho, Ainsworth, Balfour. Nelson
owing to its proximity to the great Kootenay mining district and its central position
is destined to become a very important
place and railway centre, c. p. b. to Revelstoke thence by Columbia and Kootenay B. B.
and Navigation Co. rail and steamer.
New Denver—Steamers from Makusp and
Nelson, also from Bonner's Ferry, Idaho. 12
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
New Westminster—For description see
cities of British Columbia, Daily train on
c.p.b. Electric tramcar from Vancouver
hourly and steamers daily from Victoria.
Nicola Lak e—In the district of Yale, about
60 miles from Kamloops. It has a flour,
saw, shingle and planing mill. o. p. b. to
8pence's Bridge and Kamloops, thence
by stage.
Nicomen—A station on the c.p.b. and a
steamboat landing on the Fraser, 53 miles
from Vancouver. Train east a.nd west each
day, and daily steamer from New Westminster.
North A r m—A settlement in the New Westminster district, including part of Lulu
Island. Industries, farming, market gardening, and there are also two canneries in
operation. Steamer daily from New Westminster.
Northfield—On the E. & n. e. e. A coal
mining town, the Northfield mine being in
the neighbourhood. The coal from this
mine is said to be the best in the province.
Daily stage from Nanaimo.
North Saanic h/7 About 18 miles from Victoria. A fine farming district. Stage from
Victoria.
North Ben d—A station on the o. p. E. 129
miles from Vancouver. Train east and west
each day.
Notch H i 11—A station on the 0. P. E. 300
miles from Vancouver. Train east and west
each day.
Oak B a y—A suburb of Victoria, reached by
tramcar.
O k a n a g o n—Terminus of the Shuswap &
Okanagan R. R. c. p. e. to Sicamous connecting there with s. & o. b. e. Dailyktrain
to Okanagan.
Okanagan Miss ion—c. p. b. to Sicamous.
s. & o. b. b. to Enderby thence stage.
O s o y o o s—On the lake of the same name
which is the most southerly lake in British
Columbia. It is a beautiful spot and the
chief industry is stock raising. Livery
from Okanagan Mission.
Otter Point—Stage from Victoria once a
week.
O tte rt ai 1-A station on the 0. P. e., 501
miles from Vancouver. Train east and west
each day.
Oyster Ba y—On the E. & N. E. E. Daily
train from Victoria.
Oyster   River—Livery from Comox.
O w a y Ken o—A small place at the head of
Rivers Inlet, where there is a large cannery. Steamers twice a month from Victoria.
P a 11 i s e r—A station on the O.P.B., 487 miles
from Vancouver. Train east and west each
day.
Parksvill e—24 miles north west of Nanaimo, the chief industry being farming. Stage
from Nanaimo, weekly steamer from Victoria.
Parson's   Bridge—Livery from Victoria
Pavillion Mountain—23 miles from
Clinton. A fine grazing and farming district. Stage from Ashcroft, change at Clinton.
Peace Rive r—Stage from Ashcroft, shange
at Quessenelle.
Pemberton Meadows—On the right
bank of the Fraser, and is the only part of
the Lillooet district where irrigation is unnecessary. The land is very fertile. Connected by trail with Lillooet.
Pender Islan d—About 35 miles from Victoria, on the route to the Fraser River.
There is excellent building stone on this
island, and .much good agricultural land.
It also seems destined to become a favorite
pleasure resort, owing to the good bathing,
boating and fishing to be had. Steamers
from Victoria and New Westminster twice a
week.
Penny' s—A station on the c.p.b., 219 miles
from Vancouver. Train east and west each
day.
Pennieston—c. p. b. to Savonas, thence
livery.
Penticton—At the foot of the Osoyoos
Lake, distant from Vernon, 85 mile with
which place it is connected by steamer.
o.p.b. to^Sicamous thence s. &o. B. B. to
Vernon, and from there steamer.
Perry Creek—c.p.b. to Golden, thence
steamer ,to Windermere, and from there
stage.
Pilot B a y—Steamers' daily from Nelson,
also steamers from Bonner's  ferry, Idaho.
Pitt Rive r—In the municipality of Maple
Ridge, where there are large meadows, only
good however for dairying, as the land is
subject to annual overflows from the Fraser
River. 0. p. B. to Hammond, the nearest
station.
Plumper Pas s—36 miles from Victoria-
Fruit growing, general farming and fishing
are the industries of the place. Steamer
from Victoria, New Westminster 'and Vancouver, almost daily.
P o p c u m—Daily steamer from New Westms'r.
Port Essingto n—On north-west coast.
Steamers twice a month from Victoria..
Port Hane y—Is a istation on the 0. p. B.,
about 26 miles from Vancouver, and a
steamboat landing for Fraser River steamers. There fare several large brick yards
here. Fruit growing and farming are also
carried on largely and salmon freezing for
shipment in winter to the east is an important industry of the place. Trains east and
west. See flaney—Also steamers daily from
New Westminster.
Port Hammon d--24 miles from Vancouver, in the municipality of Maple Ridge,
where a town site has been laid out. Train
east and west each day. Also daily steamers from New Westminster.   See Hammond.
Port Kell s—On the Fraser river about 10
miles from New Westminster, where there
is an immense deposit of iron ore not yet
developed. Steamer from New Westminster
and daily train on the New Westminster &
Southern R. R.
Port Mood y—On the c. P. E. about 12
miles from Vancouver. It was at one time
the terminus of the c. P. B. and in consequence property advanced greatly in value
and the town was growing rapidly when the
railway company changed their headquarters
to Vancouver. This gave Port Moody a set
back but it is still a thriving place and a
large lumber business is carried on. It is
also becoming a favorite health resort owing to the good bathing there. Daily o.p.b.
trains. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
X3
Port Simpson—An important place on
the north-west coast. There is a shingle
miU there a sash and door factory and the
Hudson's Bay Co. have a large store and
wharf. It has one of the finest harbors in
British Columbia. Steamers twice a month
from Victoria.
Prevost Island—Steamer twice a week
from Victoria.
Quamicha n—About a mile and a half from
Duncan's on the e. & n. b. E. It is essentially a farming district. A branch of St.
Ann's convent is established P here. Daily
train from Victoria to Duncan's
Quatheski Cove—Between Cape Mudge
and Gowlland Harbor on Valdes Island. A
stopping place for steamers. Steamer once
a week from Victoria.
Q u a d r a—Steamer once a week from Victoria.
Quesnell e—In the Cariboo district at the
junction of the Quesnelle and Fraser Rivers
230 miles from Ashcroft. It is a supply
mart of farm produce for the miners around
Barkerville. There is also a flour mill in
the  neighborhood.     Stage  from  Ashcroft.
Quesnelle Forks—In the district of Cariboo. There has been gold mining since 1859,
and with hydraulic works the industry will
be largely increased and made more valuable. There is a wagon road trom 150-Mile
House to this point. Stage from Ashcroft
change at 150-Mile House.
Qui! chena--In the district of Yale connec-
. ted with Kamloops by stage. It is an agricultural district.
Queen Charlotte I s 1 a n d---On the
north-west coast due west from Port Simpson. Coal has been discovered and there
is a good deal of rich land but there is as
yet little settlement of whites. Steamer
twice a month from Victoria.
Bead Island--East of Valdez Island, containing a number of good farms. Steamer
once a week from Victoria.
Revelstoke—On the o. p. e. 387 miles
from Vancouver and the centre of supplies
for the West Kootenay district. The Columbia is navigable to this point to about 200
miles southward to the international boundary. It is a thriving place. Trains east
and west each day.
Richmond Island—Steamer and Stage
from Vancouver.
Bisk e—Stage from Ashcroft, change at Soda
Creek.
Rivers Inlet—Steamer from Vancouver
and Victoria.
Riverside—On Matsqui Prairie, near the
Mission extension of the 0. P. B. and the
New Westminster and Yale wagon road,
c. p. b. to Mission, and steamer to New
Westminster.
R o b s o n—The river terminus of the Columbia & Kootenay B. B. c.p.b. to Revelstoke,
thence Columbia & Kootenay b. e.
Rock Cree k—Is in Yale district, 210 miles
from Spokane and an old mining camp.
c.p.b. to Sicamous, thence by s. & o. B. B.
to Enderly, stage from thence to Mission,
and thence livery to Rock Creek.
R o c k f o r d—In Yale district on the road
leading to Kamloops. Stock raising, farming and mining are carried on largely.
Stage from Kamloops 35 miles, or from
Spence's Bridge 75 miles.
Rocky Point—A pituresque point between
Albert Head and Pedder Bay. Stage from
Victoria, 22 miles.
Roger's Pas s—A station in the mountains on the c. p. E. Train east and west
daily.
Ross Peak Sidin g—A station on the
o.p.b.   Train east and west daily.
R o s s B a y—A suburb of Victoria. A pleasant
drive.
Royal O a k—At the junction of the East
and West Saanich roads. A stoyping place
for hunters and pleasure seekers. A pleasant drive from Victoria.
RubyCree k—A station on the o. p. E, 81
miles from Vancouver. Train east and west
each day.
Russels—A station on the e. & N. E. E.
daily train to and from Victoria.
S a 1 m o n A r m—A station on the 0, P, E. 316
miles from Vancouver; a farming district.
Train east and west each day.
Salmon   Rive r—c.   P.   E.   to   Kamloops
thence stage to  Quilchena and from there
to Salmon River on horseback.
Salt Spring Islan d—In the electoral
district of Islands. The island separates
Stuart channel from Trincomolie and Swan-
son channels. There are salt springs on the
island and farming is carried on largely.
The scenery on parts of the island is grand
and the lands are generally fertile. Steamer
once a week from Victoria,
Samuel Islan d—Near Plumper Pass.
Steamer from Victoria twice a week.
S a n d w i c k—In   Comox   distaict,   about   65
miles from Nanaimo. A fine farming district. Livery from Comox. Weekly steamers from Vancouver and Nanaimo.
Sapperto n--23 miles from Vancouver on the '
Westminster branch of the c. p. E.   Trains
daily.
S a r d i s—About 50 miles from. New Westminster. A splendid farming country. Communication by steamer from New Westminster to Centreville.
Sangster's Plain--12 miles from Victoria, a beautiful plain.   Livery.
Saturna Islan d—Near Plumper Pass.
Steamer twice a week from Victoria.
S a v o n a s—Situated on Kamloops Lake at
mouth of Thompson river. It is also a
station on the 0. p. E. There is fine scenery in the neighbourhood and hunting and
fishing are good. Train east and West each
day.
Sander's Harbor—On the north-west
coast. Steamer twice a month from Victoria.
S a y w a r d—Steamer twice a month from
Victoria.
Sea   Island—Stage from Vancouver,
Seventy Mile Hous e—On tne Cariboo
road.   Stage from Ashcroft.
Shawnigan Lake—A station on the e. &
n.b.b. The lake is very beautiful and a
favorite 'summer resort. There is a comfortable hotel for tourists and visitors, and
boats are provided for guests. A saw mill
is in operation near the station. Daily train
from Victoria.
S h u s w a p—A station on the c.p.b., 284 miles
from Vancouver. Train east and west each
day. 14
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Shoal Harbor—In North Sannich, where
there is a large flour "mill and fine wharf.
Livery from Victoria,
S h o p 1 a n d—About 4 miles from Duncans, on
the e. & n. e. b. Daily train to Duncans
from Victoria.
Shortreed—About IS miles from Langley, in district of New Westminster. Fruit
growing and farming being largely carried
on. Steamers daily to Langley from New
Westminter.   Stage from Langley.
S i c a m o u s—In the district of Yale at the
north end of Mara Lake, and is a station
on the C.P.B. Lumbering is the chief industry. It is destined to become a most
important point, owing to it being a railway junction of the c. p. B. The Shiswap
and O'Kanagan B. B. connects here with
the C.P.B.   Trains east and west each day.
S i dn e y—Weekly steamers from Victoria.
Six Mile Creek—A station on the c.P.B.
441 miles from Vancouver. Train east and
west each day.
Silverdal e--Daily stmrs. from New Westminster.
Skeena Riv e"r—A great cannery locality
on the north-west coast, there being no less
than seven large concerns located here,
having a capacity of from 12.000 to 15,000
cases per annum. Steamers twice a month
from Victoria.
Skidegat e—On Queen Charlotte Island,
north-west coast, where there are large oil
refineries. Steamers twice a month from
Victoria.
Soda Creek—A village in Cariboo on the
Fraser river. It is the shipping point for
•part of the Cariboo district. There is
steamboat communication with Quesnelle.
The scenery around here is grand. Stage
from Ashcroft 165 miles.
S o m e n o s—A sub-division of the Cowichan
district, on the e. & n. b. b., and is purely
a farming section. Daily trains from Victoria to McPhersons.
Sook e—23 miles from Victoria. Is a thriving
agricultural settlement possessed of a fine
harbor. It is a very fertile district and all
kinds cereals, fruit and vegetables thrive
well. There is also good hunting and fishing.   Stage from Victoria
'South Saanic h—In the electoral district
of Victoria. The whole Saanich district is
very picturesque, the numerous small lakes
in it teeming with fish and the woods with
game. It is also a fine agricultural country.
Tourists and visitors in Victoria enjoy a
trip to Saanich and the many beautiful
drives in the district.
'South Westminste r—Connected with
New Westminster by a ferry running hourly.
iSpallumee n—This valley situated in the
district of Yale and is termed the garden of
British Columbia owing to its fertility,
genial climate and thriving settlements. It
is also a paradise for sportsmen and is
without doubt the richest agricnltural
section in the interior of the province,
c. p. e. to Sicamous thence by Shuswap
and Okanagan R. R. to Vernon.
Spotgum—A station on the c. P. E. 190
miles from Vancouver. Train east and
west each day.
Spences Bridg e—On the Thompson
River on the c. P. e. 173 miles from Vancouver.   Train east and west each day.
Sproats Landing—Nowknown as Robson.
See Robson. |
C
J
S p r i z z u m—A station on the c.P.B. 114 miles-
from Vancouver. Train east and west each
day.
Squamish Valle y—At the head of Howe
Sound, about 35 miles from Vancouver, and
is well adapted to hopgrowing, which is
likely to become an important industry
there. Hard coal has also been found in
that locality. It is a good agricultural district. Steamer from Vancouver once a week.
St. Elm o—o. P. b. daily trains to Ruby
Creek Station.
St.   Mary's   Mission—See Matsqui.
Stamp Harbor—The extreme eastern end
of Alberni Canal. Steamers from Victoria
twice a month.
S t a n 1 e y—Is a mining town in the Cariboo
district, distant from Ashcroft 280 miles.
Stage from Ashcroft.
St.   Eugene   Missio n—Stage."1
Steveston—On the north bend of the south
arm of the Fraser River, at its entrance to
Gulf of Georgia. It has a fine harbor, and
indeed the gateway to the great Fraser Biver
Valley. It has also a great farming country
behind it. There are two large canneries at.
this point. Steamers from Victoria twice a
week, and daily from New Westminster.
S t e p h e n—A station on the C. P. B. 519 miles
from Vrncouver. Train east and west each
day.
Stump Lak e—o.p.b. to Kamloops, thence
by stage.
Stuarts Lak e—Stage from Ashcroft change
at Quesnelle.
S u m a s—In the district of _ New Westminster,
surrounded by a fine agricultural and dairying country. The settlers are generally prosperous. Daily steamers from New Westminster.
Surrey Centre—At the junction of the
coast meridian and the McLennan roads.
Watered by the Serpentine. Daily train
from South Westminster.
Tappen Sidin g—A station on the C.P.B.
309 miles from Vancouver. Trains east and
west each day.
Terra Ros a—Stage from S Vancouver every
day except Sunday.
Texada Islan d—An island to the north of
the Gulf of Georgia. Mining is the chief
industry. Steamer from Vancouver once a
week.
Trail Creek—The distributing point for
Trail Creek and Sheep Creek about 23 miles
from Robson. c p. R. to Revelstoke thence
by Columbia  & Kootenay  B. E. to Robson.
Tumbo Islan d--Near the International
boundry line in the Gulf of Georgia. The
Tumbo Island Coal Company is operating
here.   Steamer from Victoria twice a week.
Turgoos e--Livery from Victoria.
Tatla Lak e—Stage from Ashcroft change
at Soda Creek.
Tr anqui 11 e--A station on the C. p. E. 242
miles from Vancouver. Trains east and
west each day, HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
15
Twin Butte~A station on the o. p. e. 891
miles from Vancouver. Train east and west
each day.
U n i o n—A coal mining section in Comox, the
coal being mined is of good quality and
finds ready market. The Onion Colliery Co.
ship large quantities.    Livery from Comox.
Upper Sumas—In the New Westminster
district, noted for dairying, stock raising
and fruit, growing.
Valdese Island—Separated from Vancouver Island by Discovery passage. At its
most south-westerly point are the Seymour
Narrows, which at spring time is a dangerous spot for small craft, and grand sight to
view from the shore. The climate is good,
and the country is suitable for stock raising and small farming. Steamer from Victoria once a week.
Vancouver—For description see cities of
British Columbia. Daily o. P. B. trains to
and from the east. Steamers to and from
Victoria and all ports on Vancouver Island
and Mainland,
in   the   Cariboo
from   Ashcroft.
Van Winkle—A village
district, about 280 miles
Stage from Ashcroft.
V e r n o n—Is the centre point of   the largest
and richest agricultural district in the interior of British Columbia. It is the distributing point for the Osoyoos division of
the Yale district. It is owing to its position, destined to become a great railway
centre. It is the principal station now on
the Shuswap & Okanagan Railway. There
are thriving settlements all round Vernon,,
and tributary to it. o. P. B. to Sicamous,
thence by s. & o. b. b. to Vernon.
Vesuvius Bay—Steamer once a week from
Victoria.
V i c t o r i a—For description see cities of Bri
tish Columbia. Connected by daily steamers with Northern Pacific R. B. at Tacoma
and Seattle and o. p. e. at Vancouver and
New Westminster also aU ports on Vancouver Island and mainland, and E. & N. E. B.
to Nanaimo, Wellington and intermediate
points.
W a 8 a—o. p. b. to Golden thence by steamer
to Windermere and from there stage.
Wades Landin g—Daily steamers from
New Westminster.
Websters Corners—o. p. b. daily to
Haney.   Drive to Webaters Corners tyi miles
Wellingto n—The terminus of the e. & n. b.b.
and about 6 miles from Nanaimo. It is a
coal mining town, the great Wellington mines
of R. Dunsmuir and Sons being here.
Daily train from Victoria.
Westham Islan d—At the mouth of the
south arm of the Fraser river. Chief industry, farming. Steamers from Victoria
twice a week and dally steamer from New
Westminster.
Wells Landin g—Daily steamers from
New Westminster.
West mi n s t e r—For description see cities
of British Columbia. Daily c. p. E. trains.
Hourly tramcar to Vancouver. Steamers to
and from Victoria .and Vancouver daily, and
steamers to ports on mainland and Vancouver Island.
Westminster Junctio n—A beautiful
and thriving village on the c. p. B., and a
junction station for Vancouver and New
Westminster. Daily o.p.b. trains east and
west.
Westholm e—A flag station on the e.& n.b.b.
near Chemainus. Some fine farms in this
neighborhood.
W h a r n o c k—A flag station on rthe c. P. B.
33 miles from Vancouver. A farming district.
Windermer e—A fine farming district in
East Kootenay. c. p. B. to Golden thence
by steamer to Windermere.
Yale—One of the principal. stations on the
0. p. E. 102 miles from Vancouver. The
scenery around it is very beautiful and it
is a favourite stopping place for tourists.
Train east and west each day.
Y o u n g—Stage  twice a week from Victoria,
'
F. 0. INNES,
Notary Public.
. S. O. RICHARDS,
Barrister & Solicitor of Ontario.
FINANCIAL
s <£ Richards,
REAL ESTATE,
AND INSURANCE AGENTS, 16 HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
i
fe'W^
THE WINDSOR,
V
H. DEMPSEY, RROP.
THE TOURIST HOTEL OF NANAIMO,
Commanding a Fine View of the Harbor.
Excellent Accommodation for Commercial Men,
CHURCH   STREET,
H _" NANAIMO, B. C.
E. G. Prior & Co.,
HLMITED LIABILITY.
DE ALE RS    IN
ron, Steel, Hardware, Wagons, Carts,
Carriages, Agricultural Implements
and   Machinery.
Agents for MASSEY-HARRIS CO.
WATSON MANF'G CO.
BRANTFORD CARRIAGE CO.
AMERICAN BAIN WAGON CO.
CANADIAN BAIN WAGON CO.
&c,       &c,       &c.
Victoria. Vancouver. Kamloops. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
17
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY.
ALLAN CAMERON, JAS. SOLATER,
Ticket Agt., Victoria. Ticket Agt., Vancouver.
Office, cor. Government and Fort Streets.
GEO.MoL. BROWN, Dist. Pass. Agent,
Vancouver, B. C.
Read Down.
Read Up.
CO _,  P-l
lip
Daily Continental Express.
CO
U
CD
Eh
B
a
cfl
u
a)
fe
eh
f>
Victoria	
0     Vancouver	
4 Hastings	
12 Port Moody	
17 Westminster Jen
25 Westminster	
24 Hammond	
26 Haney	
33 Wharnock	
43 Mission	
53 Nicomen	
62 Harrison	
70 Agassiz	
81 Ruby Creek	
89 Hope	
102 Yale	
114 8puzzum.. 1	
129 North Bend	
140 Reefers	
149 Cisco	
156 Lytton	
171 Drynock	
178 Spence's Bridge.
190 Spatsum	
203 Ashcroft	
219Pennys	
225 Savonas	
226 Cherry  Creek...
242 Tranquille	
251 Kamloops	
268 Ducks	
284 Shuswap	
300 Notch Hill	
309 Tappen Siding..
316 Salmon Arm	
335 Sicamous	
351 Craigellachi	
362 Griffin Lake	
370 Clan William...
379 Revelstoke	
391 Twin Butte	
400 Albert Canyon..
407 Illecillewaet —
422 Glacier House..
427 Rogers Pass	
441 Six Mile Creek.
446 Beaver  Mouth..
458 Donald	
468 Moberly	
475 Golden	
487 Palliser	
495 Leanchoil	
501Ottertail	
508 Field	
517 Hector	
519 Stephen	
525 Laggan	
535Eldon	
543 Castle Mountain
553 Cascade	
559 Banff	
641 Calgary.    ...
821|Medi'ne Hat|§
$ 3
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
6
7
7
7
90
10
ro
20
65
10
60
00
70
70
45
00
50
80
8 60
8 90
9 50
10 25
10 95
11 25
11 90
12 10
12 50
13 35
14 15
14 95
15 40
15 80
16 75
17 55
33 10
18 50
18 95
19 50
20 00
20 35
21 10
21 20
22 05
22 30
22 90
23 40
23 75
24 35
24 75
25 05
25 40
25 80
25 95
26 25
26 75
27 15
27 65
28 95
32 10
10 1st
00 2d
18 00
12 50
12 38
12 19
12 11
12 40
11 47
11 41
11 26
10 53
10 35
10 15
9 55
9 85
9 15
8 45
8 15
30
10
25
56
46
19
31
34
24 37
24 15
23 43
23 25
23 00
22 10
21 32
20 05
19 48
19 00
18 25
17 54
17 32
17 02
16 17
15 47
15 20
13 55
13 35
12 40
12 20
12 35
12 08
11 52
1108
10 43
10 25
10 00
8 50
8 39
8 15
7 47
7 28
7 00
6 45
2 30
18 45
Read Down
Read Up.
cc
eg
Miles
from
Van'r
Daily Continental Express.
CO  rt U
h o m
03   M  AS
§3
CO
CO
21 55
1083
10 00
1349
17 45
1481
3 45
1614
13 15
1913
4 30a.m
2772
2 45p.m
2992
0 OOa.m
2786
8 OOa.m
2906
3 OOp.'m
3078
8 50p.m
3246
7 OOa.m
....
1 40p.m
3387
11 lOp.m
3664
Moose Jaw.
Brandon...
Winnipeg..
Rat Portage
Port Arthur
Toronto....
Detroit	
Ottawa	
Montreal...
Quebec....
Boston	
New York..
St.Jhn	
Halifax ....
(50 00
V 35 00
J50 00
t 35 00
] 50 00
#35 00
550 00
t 35 00
5 50 00
(35 00
J 70 80
1 55 80
5 70 80
(55 80
j 77 70
1 60 50
j 77 70
|60 50
5 79 20
(62 50
5 78 00
(62 50
j 79 00
|61 50
5 87 20
(68 50
591 70
(70 50
25
30
10
00
30
OOp.m
45p.m
25a.m
40p.m
15p.m
OOa.m
25p.m
45p.m
30p.m
Canadian Pacific Navigation Company, Limited.
Office—C.P.N.Co., Wharf St., Victoria.
VICTORIA TO VANCOUVER, CONNECTING
WITH  C. P. R.
Leave Victoria daily (except Monday) at 2 a.m.
Leave Vancouver daily (except Monday) on arrival  of  C. P. R. Eastern train 13  o'clock.
City of Kingston.
Connecting with Northern Pacific Railway at
Seattle and Tacoma.
Ticket Office, Victoria,
E. E. BLACKWOOD, Agent,
79 Government Street.
VICTORIA TO TACOMA.
Leave Victoria, 8:30 p.m. except Saturday.
"    Port Townsend, 12 p.m.
"     Seattle, 3:30 a.m.
Arrive Tacoma, 5:15 a.m.
TACOMA TO VICTORIA.
Leave Tacoma, 8:00 a.mA except Sunday.
f    Seattle, 10:15 a.m.
"    Port Townsend, 1:30 p.m.
Arrive Victoria, 4:30 p.m. 18
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
!
Northern Pacific Railroad.
DIRECT LINE TO-ALL. POINTS EAST.
E. E. BLACKWOOD,     A. D. CHARLTON,
Victoria Agent,      Asst. Gen. Pass. Agent,
79 Government St. Portland, Oregon.
TACOMA TO PORTLAND.
Leave Tacoma daily at 9:30 a.m. and 11:25 p.m.
Arrive Portland daily at 5:35 p.m. and 7:00 a.m.
Leave Portland daily at 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Arrive Tacoma daily at 4:30 p.m. and 11:10 p.m.
PORTLAND TO CHICAGO.
VANCOUVEE, NEW WHATCOM AND
FAIRHANEN.
Read down.
Read up.
Leave.
Stations.
Arrive.
5 00 p.m.
6 15  a.m.
7 55  a.m.
11 30  a.m.
 Ellensburg.  - •.
 Pasco	
7 00  a.m.
4 00  p.m.
2 45  p.m.
11 25  a.m.
5 50 p.m.
12 40 p.m.
 Helena	
5 35  a.m.
1 30 p.m.
6 35 p.m.
2 30  a.m.
11 40  a.m.
12 15 p.m.
7 15  a.m.
 Bismarck	
 Minneapolis	
 St.    Paul	
9 22  a.m.
1 40  a.m.
4 55 p.m.
4 15 p.m.
10 45 p.m.
GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY.
TO SEATTLE.
STEAMER   TO   NEW   WESTMINSTER   OR VANCOUVER.
FROM  VICTORIA.
Through Trains Daily.
Read down.
Read up.
10 05 a.m
11 30 a.m
05 p.m
35 p.m
OOp.m
18 p.m
40 p.m
1
1
3
4
5
.Soath Westminster.
 Blaine	
...New Whatcom...
 Eairhaven	
...Mount Vernon...
 Everett	
 Seattle	
5 15 p.m
3 50p.m
2 15 p.m
1 45 p.m
12 20 p.m
11 03 a.m
9 40 a.m
FAIRHAVEN & SOUTHERN RAILWAY, NEW WESTMINSTER &
SOUTHERN RAILWAY.
North
Bound.
Distance
from
Seattle.
*Flag Stations.
South
Bound.
Daily.
Daily.
9 30
1103
12 18
12 45
1 45
2 05
2 15
a.m
a.m
p.m
p.m
p.m
p.m
p.m
p.m
p.m
p.m
p.m
p.m
p.m
p.m
p.m
p.m
0
33
68
79
95
97
98
119
120
123
124
128
133
140
142
144
 Lv. Seattle Ar..
 Everett	
 Mt. Vernon ...
..E. & S. Junction
..Lv. Fairhaven Ar
B.B. & K.C. Crossing
.... New Whatcom..
 Blaine	
....Douglas, B.C...
 Hazelmere *...
.. Royal City Spur
 Cloverdale	
 Port Kells....
....Bon Accord *..
 Liverpool *...
... S.  Westminster.
50 p.m
18 p.m
02 p.m
36 p.m
40p.m
30 p.m
10 p.m
45 a.m
27 a.m
17 a.m
13 a.m
00 a.m
42 a.m
18 a.m
10 a.m
05 a.m
THROUGH TO SAN FRANCISCO.
Canadian Pacific, Northern Pacific and Southern,
Pacific.
Read down.
Read up.
Daily.
Dis.
Fares
Daily.
9 00
11 06
11 22
11 36
12 05
12 20
13 00
6 05
Mission Junc'tn
Abbotsford	
Huntingdon	
Sumas City.....
New Whatcom.
Seattle	
$1 70
2 00
2 15
2 15
2 25
2 95
5 95
6 70
12 95
18 08
16 17
15 40
15 30
15 15
15 00
14 20
9 30 a.m
11 OOp.m
7 OOp.m
9 18 p.m
Take N.P.R.R.
Tacoma	
Portland	
Take S.P.R.R.
Salem	
3 40 p.m
8 00 a.m
5 26 a.m
10 23 p.m
Albany 	
4 23 a.m
10 50 a.m
4 35 a.m
Sacramento ....
10 50 p.m
8 15 a.m
San Francisco.
7 OOp.m
ESQUIMALT  & NANAIMO RAILWAY.
A. DUNSMUIR,
President.
JOS. HUNTER,
Gen'l Supt.
H. P. PRIOR, Freight and Passenger Agt.
North Bound.
(Read Down.)
South Bound.
(Read Op.)
'O   •
a .
o
p.
o ce
ED
is t»>
^ o
'o c6
fi
<D   O
cS P
-H'lH
0Q0Q
tc
|s
CD
t-
• iH
cS
cS
Pn
«
P.M
2 30
2 34
2 44
6 14
6 26
A.M.
800
• • • ■
8 04
1
8 14
4
8 39
11
9 14
20
9 34
28
9 44
31
9 57
35
10 07
38
10 12
40
10 22
43
10 48
52
11 09
59
11 50
11 89
73
P.M.
12 14
78
Victoria...
Russel's...
Esquimalt
Goldstream  	
Summit Siding...
Shawnigan Lake.
Cobble Hill	
McPherson's	
Koksilah	
Duncan's	
Somenas	
Chemainus	
Oyster Bay.
jj£* I Nanaimo. \
ar.
78 Wellington.
P.M.
12 24
12 20
12 10
A.M.
1145
11 10
10 50
10 40
10 27
10 17
10 12
10 02
9 36
9 15
8 34
8 25
P.M
5 58
5 54
5 19
50
24
14
45
49
44
34
12
55
14
8 10 1 59 HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
19
SHUSWAP & OKANAGAN RAILWAY.
C. P. R.
Trains South.
Read Down.
Trains North.
Read Up.
a
eg
60
a
cS
M
O
S to   •
n O O
"a*
co 3 o
-S-sg
Stations.
00
08
8 05
8 44
9 15
9 45
10 05
10 30
10 45
11 00
0.0
12.9
23.4
31.7
38.0
46.1
51.0
de
Sicamous Junction ar.$
 Mara	
 Enderby t
  Armstrong	
 Larkin	
fe\\ V«non...4] £
ar. Okanagan Landing.de.
18 50
18 00
17 30
17 00
16 40
16 15
16 05
15 40
COLUMBIA .&    KOOTENAY  RAILWAY ANJD NAVIGATION OO.
Going North.
Read Up.
W. & Sat. 15.00
To. & Fri.21.00
M.Tu.T.F.16.00
M.Tu.T.F.14.00
Tu. & Fri.18.20
Tu. & Fri.12.30
Tu. & Fri. 7.00
Stations.
Revelstoke .d
 by etr....
 Nakusp ...
de...Robson...
„„Robson. C. &j-
arK. Railway.de
de... Nelson	
de... Nelson	
de.LittleDalles ar
jq.. Spokane..„„
de.... Falls....ar
Going South.
Read Down.
M. & Thu. 4.00
M. & Thu. 8.00
M.Tu.T.F.18.00
M.Tu.T.F.20.00
Tu.
Tu.
&Fri.
&Fri.
5.00
9.00
Tu. & Fri.17.00
0. P. N. Co.
Office—C. P. N. Co., Wharf Street, Victoria,
VICTORIA    TO     NEW     WESTMINSTER     AND
WAY     PORTS.
Leave Victoria for New Westminster, Ladner's
Landing and Lulu Island. Wednesday and
Friday at 7 o'clock, Sunday at 23 o'clock
Sunday's steamer connects with C. P. R.
train Monday, going east.
Leave Victoria for Plumper Pass Wednesdays
and Fridays at 7 o'clock.
Leave Victoria for Morseby Island at 7 o'clock,
Friday.
Leave Victoria for Pender Island at 7 a.m., Friday.
The New Westminster steamer connects each trip
with steamer for Chilliwack and way landings
RETURNING:
Leave New Westminster for Victoria at 13 o'clock
Thursday and Saturday at 7 o clock p. m.
JOAN.
VICTORIA TO NANAIMO AND COMOX E.& N.R.R.
Office—E. & N.Depot, Victoria.
Leave Victoria every Tuesday at 5 a. m.
"    Nanaimo for Comox Wednesdays at 7 a.m.
|    Comox for Valdez Island every Thursday
at 7 a.m.
returning to Comox same day.
"    Comox for Nanaimo every Friday at 7 a.m.
"    Nanaimo for Victoria every Saturday at 7
a. m. arriving at Victoria about 3 p.m.
same day.
C. P. N. Oo.
Office—C. P. N. Co. Wharf Street, Victoria.
victoria to alberni.
Steamer Maude.
Leaves Victoria for Alberni and sound ports the
1st and 15th of each month.
VICTORIA TO FORT SIMPSON AND NORTHERN
POINTS.
Steamers leave Victoria every Monday morning
at 8 o'clock, and if sufficient inducements
offer they call at points on West Coast and
Queen Charlotte Islands. Enquire at office,
Wharf Street, Victoria.
FRASER RIVER STEAMERS.
C. P. N. CO.
Office-C. P. N. Co., Wharf street. Victoria.
Steamer William Irving.
Leaves New Westminster for Chilliwhack and
Way Ports Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 7 a. m Returning leaves Chilliwhack
Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays at 8 a. m.
Steamer Gladys.
Leave Westminster for Hammond, Haney, Langley, Mount Lehman, Mission, Sumas and.
ChiUiwhack, on Mondays, Wednesdays and
Fridays at 7 a. m. Returning leaves Chilliwhack Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays
at 7 a. m.
Steamer Delaware.
Leaves Westminster for Hammond/Haney, Langley, Mount Lehman. Mission, Sumas and.
Chilliwhack, on Mondays, Wednesdays and
Fridays at 7 a. m.
Steamer Bon Accord.
Leaves New Westminster every day on arrival of
1.20 car from Vancouver for Langley.
Returning arrives at New Westminster at 8 a. m.
NEW WESTMINSTER TO STEVESTON.
Steamer Telephone.
Leaves New Westmineter daily at 3 p. m. for
Ewen's Cannery, Brodie's Cannery, Wood-
wood Slough, Ladner's Landing, Guichon's
Landing, Canoe Pass, Westham Island, Lulu
Island, Duncan and Bachelor's Cannery,
English Cannery, Steveston and Garry Point
Cannery.
VANCOUVER TO NANAIMO.
R. M. S. S. CUTCH.
Leaves Nanaimo daily at 8 a. m. Returning
leaves Vancouver at 1 p. m.
NANAIMO, VANCOUVER AND NEW
WESTMINSTER.
S. S. City of Nanaimo.
Leaves Nanaimo for Vancouver and Westminster
Tuesdays and Saturdays at 7 a. m.
Leaves Nanaimo for Vancouver only on Thursdays and Fridays at 7 a. m.
Returning, leaves New Westminster Mondays at
6 a. m., and Wednesdays at 7 a. m.
Leaves Vancouver Mondays at 2 p.m., Tuesdays
at 12 noon. Thursdays at 2 p. m, and Saturdays at 11 a. m. 20
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
HOWE    SOUND   AND   SQUAMISH
RIVER. j
Steamer Sattjrna.
Leaves Vancouver Tuesdays and Fridays at 9
a. m. for Howe Sound.
Returning Wednesdays and Saturdays.
Leaves Vancouver Mondays for Squamish River.
Returning same night.
VANCOUVER TO COMOX.
S. S. Comox.
Leaves Vancouver every Monday at 11 a. m. for
Comox and Way Ports via Malaspina Straits.
Returning, leaves Comox every Tuesday at
8a. m.
REVELSTOKE TO LITTLE
DALLES.
Steamers Lytton, Columbia and Kootenay.
Leave Revelstoke on Tuesdays, Thursdays and
Saturdays (one of the above steamers each
day) at 4 o'clock for Robson.
Returning Wednesday, Friday and Monday
mornings.
VANCOUVER  TO   CHILLIWHACK.
Steamer Sunbury.
Leaves Vancouver for Chilliwhack via North
Arm, calling at New Westminster Wednesdays and Saturdays.
Returning, leaves Chilliwhack Tuesdays and
Fridays.
GOLDEN TO ADELA.
Steamers Hyak and Duchess.
Leave Golden for Saw Mill, Carbonate, Hog
Ranch, Jubilee, Spallumacheen Galena. Sinclair, Windermere, and Adela Tuesdays and
Fridays at 7 a.m.
Returning, leaves Adela Thursdays and Sundays.
Tramway from Adela to Upper Columbia Lakes,
makes close connection with above steamers
and the steamer Pert for Thunder Hill and
Canal Flat.
Stage connection from Canal Flat to Fort Steel
and St. Eugene Mission.
Steamers leave Golden May 2,16 and 20 ; June 6
and 20 ; July 4 and 18 ; Aug. 1, 15 and 29 ;
Sept. 5 and 19; Oct. 3 and 17.
OKANAGAN LAKE STEAMER.
S. S. Penticton.
Leaves Mission for Vernon Tuesday 10 a. m. and
Thursday 1.80 p. m.
Returning leaves Vernon Wednesday 8.30 a. m.
and Friday at 6 p. m.
Leave Mission for Penticton Wednesday 1.80 p m
Returning leaves Penticton Thursday 8.30 a. m.
NEW WESTMINSTER FERRY.
Leaves New Westminster-6 30, 7 00, 8 00, 9 00,
10 30, 1125, a. m., 1 00, 2 00, 3 00, 4 00,4 50, 5 35
and 7 00 p. m.
Leaves South W estminster—6 40, 7 30,8 80, 9 30,
, 10 50,11 50, a. m., 1 30, 2 30, 3 80, 4 25, 515, 5 50
and 7 30 p. m.
SUNDAYS.
Leaves New Westminster—9 30,10 30, a. m., 4 50
p. m.
Leaves South Westminster—10 00,10 45 a. m. 5 25
p. m.
WESTMINSTER AND VANCOUVER
TRAMWAY COMPANY.
Daily [Except Sunday.]
Leave Westminster—7, 8, 9,10,11,12 a. m.
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,10 40. p.m.
Leave Vancouver—7 20, 8 20, 9 20,10 20,1120,12 20
a. m.
1 20, 2 20, 8 20. 4 20, 5 20, 6 20, 7 20, 8 20, 9 20
10 55. p. m.
STAGE   LINES.
Steveston & Vancouver Stage Co.
Stage leaves Steveston daily (except Sundays) at
7 o'clock. Returning, leave the Gold House,
Water St., Vancouver at 2.80. Distance, 15
miles. Fare. ,50 cents. Will notify if any
further change.
 F. STEVES. Manager.
VANCOUVER TO NORTHERN LOGGING CAMP.
Steamer Comox.
Steamer Comox leaves Vancouver every Wednesday at 11 a.m. for Port Nevill and way ports,
via Seymour Narrows, returning on Friday.
VANCOUVER TO MOODYVILLE.
Steamer Senator.
Steamer Senator leaves Vancouver every two
hours daily for Moodyville, returning every
two hours. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
21
Tariff ef  Fares.
STEAMER.
Victoria to Nanaimo $ 3 00
do       New Westminster .... 3 00
do       Port Townsend  2 00
do       Seattle  3 00
do       Tacoma  3 50
do      Vancouver  3 00
do       San Francisco  20 00
Vancouver to Bowen Island  1 00
do           Gambie Island  1 50
do           Nanaimo  2 00
do           Squamish  2 00
New Westminster to Chilliwhack.. 2 00
do       do         - Steveston ... 0 50
Revelstoke to Little Dalles  9 00
do          Port Sheppard  8 25
do          Robson  5 00
do          Trail Creek......... 8 25
Golden to Windermere &Adela(r.t.) 8 00
< stage;
Ashcroft to Alexandria $33 00
do      Alkali  15 00
do       Barkerville  42 50
do       Bonaparte Valley     3 25
do       Bridge Creek  13 50
do      Cache Creek     1 00
do       Clinton     5 00
do      83 Mile House  11 00
do      HanceviUe 35 00
do       Hot Creek    2 25
do       Lac La Hache  16 00
do      150 Mile House  22 50
do      Pavillion     5 50
do      Quesnelle  37 00
do       70 Mile House     9 00
do       Soda Creek 28 00
do      Stanley .'.... 41 00
Agassiz to Harrison Hot Springs.'.    1 00
Cowichan to McPherson     0 50
Clinton to Lillooet     5 00
Enderby to Lansdowne     0 75
do       O'kanagan     2 00
do       O'kanagan Mission...    6 50
do       Vernon     3 00
Kamloops to Lower Nicola    5 00
do Coutlee    5 00
do Quilchena j     5 00
do Rockford     3 50
Mission to Burton Prairie     1 50
Nanaimo to Beavtr Creek     3 00
do       French Creek     2 00
New Westminster to Aldergrove....   2 50
do do      Clayton    0 75
do do      Clover Valley.   1 00
do do      Halls Prairie..   1 25
New Westminster to Langley Prar.   1 00
do do      Mud Bay    0 45
do do       Surrey Centre   0 75
Savona to Duck and Pringle    3 00
Spence's Bridge to Coutlee    5 00
do       do Nicola Lake...    5 00
do       do Rockford     7 50
Vancouver to Richmond Island...   0 50
do Sea Island     100
do Steveston     1 00
Victoria to Chicago  71 50
do       East Sooke    150
do       Helena  30 38
do        Prairie Tavern     1 50
do        Lake     0 50
do        Metchosin     100
do        Minneopolis 60 00
do        Portland     9 75
do        Rocky Point    100
do   Saanich   0 50
do   Spokane  20 15
do   St. Paul  60 00
Windermere to Crankbrook 13 00
do Fort Steele 10 00
do Wasa    8 00
RAILWAY.
Vancouver to Ashcroft $10 25
do Agassiz     3 10
do Albert Canyon  20 00
do Abbotsford     2 00
do Beaver Mouth 22 30
do Banff.  28 95
do Brandon  50 00
do Boston, Mass 78 00
do Cisco     7 50
do Cherry Creek 11 90
do Craigellachi  17 55
do Clan William  18 50
do Castle Mountain 27 15
do Cascade  27 65
do Calgary.  32 10
do Drynock     8 60
do Ducks 13 35
do Donald  22 90
do Detroit, Mich 70 80
do Everson     2 55
do Eldon  26 75
do ■ Field 25 40
do Griffin Lake 33 10
do Glacier House 21 10
do Golden 23 75
do Hastings        20
do Hammond        80
do Haney        90
do Harrison     2 65
do Hope    4 00
do Hector 25 80
do Huntingdon     2 15 22
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Vancouver to Halifax, N.S  91 70
do        Illecillewaet  20 35
do        Reefers     7 00
do Kamloops  12 50
do Lytton     7 80
do        Loggan 26 25
do Leanchoil  24 75
do Mission Junction...    1 70
do Mission Junction...    1 65
do        Mission     1 70
do        Moberly  23 40
do        Medicine Hat  41 10
do Moose Jaw......... 50 00
do        Montreal, Que 77 70
do        New Whatcom     2 95
do        Nicomen     2 20
do        North Bend     6 45
do        Notch Hill  14 95
do        New York  79 00
do Ottertail  25 05
do        Ottawa, Ont  77 70
do        Palliser  24 35
do        Port Moody        60
do        Pennys  10 95
do Port Arthur  50 00
do        Portland, Ore  12 95
do        Quebec  79 20
do        Ruby Creek     3 60
do        Revelstoke 18 95
do        Rogers Pass  21 20
do Rat Portage, Man... 50 00
do        Spuzzum     5 70
do Spence's Bridge     8 90
do        Spatsum     9 50
do        Savonas  11 25
do        Shuswap    14 15
do        Salmon Arm  15 80
do Sicamous  16 75
do Six Mile Creek .... 22 05
do        Stephen  25 95
do        Sumas City     2 15
do        St. Johns, N. B 87 20
do San Francisco, Cal.. 33 30
do        Seattle, Wash     5 95
do        Tacoma     "         7 05
do        Tranquille  12 10
do        Tappen Siding  15 40
do Twin Butte  19 50
do        Toronto, Ont  70 80
do Westminster Junc'tn       80
do        Westminster     1 00
do        Wharnock     1 20
do        Winnipeg, Man  50 00
do        Yale    4 70
Victoria to Ainsworth  33 65
do        Balfonr  33 65
do        Cobble HiU     1 75
do        Chemainus     2 50
do        Duncans     2 25
do        Esquimalt        25
Victoria to Goldstream        75
do        Koksilah     2 00
do        Kaslo «.. 33 65
do        McPherson's     2 00
do       Nanaimo    3 00
do        Nelson 31 65
do        Oyster Bay     2 75
do        Pilot Bay  33 65
do        Russells        25
do        Shawnigan Lake     1 50
do        Summit Siding     1 00
do        Wellington     3 25
The publishers would feel obliged if
managers of railway, steamer and stage
lines will send in a further list of fares
and corrections on or before the 15th of
each month.
SLEEPING CAR TARIFF.
Vancouver to Montreal $20 00
Ottawa $20
Winnipeg 12 00
St. Paul 13 50
Halifax 24 00
Quebec 21 50
Portland 22 00
Banff    6 00
Toronto 18 50
Port Arthur 15 00
Boston 20 50
St. John's, N. B. 22 50
New York 22 00
Chicago 15 50
PACIFIC  COAST   STEAMSHIP CO.
E.   P.   EITHET   &   CO.,
Agents, Wharf Street.
SAILINGS FOE APEIL FOE SAN FEANCISCO
From Victoria:
Walla Walla.  May 4
Umatilla-.  " 9
City of Puebla  i. 14
Walla Walla  " 19
Umatilla  " 24
City of Puebla  " 29
Arrive Victoria:
Umatilla  May 3
CityofPuebla  " 8
Walla Walla  " 13
Umatilla  " 18
CityofPuebla  " 23
Walla Walla  " 28
CHINA   STEAMERS—C.P.R.
SAILINGS FOE MAT, 1893.
Empress  of China  leaves Victoria,   May
15th; arrives at Yokohama about May 29th;
Shanghai June 2nd. and Hong Kong June 6.
CHINA   STEAMERS—N.P.R.
S. S. Victoria, May 10th } S. S. Tacoma, June
l'th; S. S. Mogul. July 2nd ; ;S. S. Victoria,
July 23rd ; S. S. Tacoma, Aug. 23rd. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
23
Information regarding Tickets & Baggage.
Rates at which tickets may be sold are fixed by
the management of transportation companies,
and cannot be changed by the ticket agent.
Unlimited first class ticket entitles the holdor to
ride in first-class coaches. They are good for
an indefinite period, and allow stop-overs at any
point subject to the regulations of the line or
lines over which they read.
Limited first class ticket entitles the holder to
every privilege accorded to an unlimited ticket,
but must be used within a specified time from its
date of sale. It is usually limited to two or three
days longer than the actual time required to
reach destination. Stop-overs may be had within such limit.
Second class ticket entitles the holder to ride in
a second class coach. It does not allow stopovers at any point.
Children 5 years of age, and under 12, are
charged half fare; those under five, free.
Contract Tickets—Ifgrou attempt to travel on
a ticket bought for another person and usually
marked "Not Transferable, | it is the duty of the
conductor to take it up and collect full fare, of
which the passenger cannot expect a refund nor
the return of the lifted ticket.
Unused tickets are generally redeemed by the
^company as an act of courtesy. Unused tickets,
or parts of tickets, should be forwarded to the
General Passanger Agent of the issuing line,
with an explanation of why they were not used.
The return portion of a round-trip ticket is generally redeemable at a difference between the
amount paid for it and the regular trip rates
between the points for which sold.
Stop-Overs—If you wish to stop off atany point
and your ticket allows it, you must ask the .conductor for a stop-over check, without which you
will be obliged to pay fare on resuming your
journey.
Lost Tickets—If you lose your ticket you are
out of pocket the value thereof. Give notice of
your loss to the conductor, pay your fare to him
taking a receipt for the amount paid. Then
write the General Passenger Agent on the road,
enclose receipt, and explain the circumstances.
The railway company will adjust the matter.
BAGGAGE.
Baggage to the Amount of 150 Pounds is allowed on each full ticket; 75 pounds on half
tickets.
A single piece of baggage weighing over 250
pounds will not be checked, but must be shipped
by express or as freight.
Baggagemen are not allowed to check baggage
until they have examined your ticket.
Baggagemen are not allowed to check to a
point short of the destination of your ticket, unless such ticket allows stop-over privileges.
Baggagemen cannot knowingly check anything
but personal apparel and travelling effects; all
other articles must be weighed and charged for
as excess baggage.
As a matter of precaution, have your name and
address plainly marked on your trunk; and make
a note of your check number, for in case of losing
your check you will be called upon to prove your
property."
These rules are based on judicial decisions and
are therefore beyond dispute.
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HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Leading Hotels in British
Columbia.
Agassiz—The Bella Vista.
Ainsworth—The Vancouver.   The Ainsworth.
Ashcroft—Ashcroft Hotel.
Ashcroft Statien   Ashcroft House.
Beaver—Homestead Hotel.
Burrard Inlet—Brighton House,
Balfour—The Balfour House.
Blue Springs—Earns Horn.
Beaver Point -Herman's Hotel.
Beaver Creek—Alberni Hotel.
Brownsville—Punch's Hotel.
Chemainus—Louisville Hotel.
Chilliwack—Harrison Hotel.   Queen's Hotel.
Coutlee—Coutlee's Hotel.
Clover Valley—Star Hotel.
Cloverdale—The Starr.
Clinton—Clinton Hotel.
Cobble HD1—Station Hotel.
Cedar—Cranberry Hotel.   Wheat Sheaf
Duncan's  Station—Quamichan Hotel.   Aderlea
Hotel
Dog Creek—Dog Creek Hotel
Duck & Pringle— Brunswick House
Esquimalt—Howard's Hotel
Elgin—Samuel Clay Hotel
French Creek—Hirst's Hotel
Fort Steele—Levett's Hotel
Fairmont Springs—Brewer's Hotel
Fort Simpson—Fort Simpson Hotel
Goldstream—Golds tream House
Golden—Kootenay House.   Queen's Hotel
Galena—Spillmachene Hotel
Hatzec—Mrs. Woodside's Hotel
Heal—Steven's Hotel, Mount Newton Hotel.
Huntingdon—American Hoi el
Hope—Fort Hope Hotel.   Columbia Hotel
Harrison Hot Springs—St. Alice Hotel
Ulecillewaet—Maple Leaf.   Merchants
Kamloops—Grand Pacific.   Cosmopolitan
Ladner's Landing—Delta, Hicks
Lillooet—Pioneer
Lulu Island—London's
Lund—Hotel Malaspina
Mission City—The Albion
Moodyville—Moodyville Hotel
North Bend—Webb
Nicola Lake—Driard
New Westminster—The Colonial, Queen's, Hotel
Douglas, Depot Hotel, Central Hotel.
Nanaimo—Windsor House, Wilson
Nakusp—Hotel Nakusp, Leland, Madden House
Northfield--Wall's. Eoger's
New Denver—Slocan
Penticton—Penticton
Port Hammond —Dale's
Pilot Bay—Blanchard, Clark
Port Haney—The Cosmopolitan
Parksville—Parksville, The Errington
Eiverside—Eiverside
Eobson—Eo bson
Eevelstoke—Victoria
Eogers Pass—Queens
Eockford— Eockford House
Sidney—Sidney Hotel
Savonas's Ferry—Lake View
Steveston—Commercial
Sandwich—Courtenay House, Eiverside Hotel
Salmon Arm—Balmoral
Sicamous—Lake View
Surrey Centre—Boothroyd's
Salt Spring Island—Stevens House
Trail Creek—Trail House
Twigoose—Truly Eural
Vernon -Kalemalka, Coldstream, Victoria, Vernon, O'kanagan.
Van Winkle—Cottonwood, Stanley
Vancouver—Vancouver, Manor, Leland
Victoria— Driard, Dallas, Victoria, Wilson,
Poodle Dog, Occidental, Metropole, Brunswick, Oriental
Wellington—Wellington, Wren
Westholme—Chemainus Hotel
Windermere—Stoddert's
Wasa—Hansen's
The Hotel Dallas,
DALLAS    ROAD,   VICTORIA.
The  TOURIST'S  HOTEL
OF VICTOEIA.
Commanding a splendid view of the Straits
O XT
of San Juan de Fuca and entrance to harbor.
The Hotel is conducted on the American plan.
RATES, PER DAY, FROM $3 to $5.
-        Proprietor.
i HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
25
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C. EDWARDS, PROP.
Cor. Howe & Dunsmuir Sts.
VANCOUYEB,      -      B. 0.
TS  A  MODEL HOTEL.
It is heated with hot air throughout, supplied with all modern conveniences.
The rooms are large and so arranged as to be used in suit or
singly.
Good Sample Eooms either in the
house or down town, will be furnished Commercial Travellers.
Best Conducted Hotel on the Pacific Coast. Polite Porters with
covered carriages and baggage wagons meet all trains and boats.
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HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
British Columbia   Post  Offices
and Postmasters.
Abbottsford, Frank Monroe.
Aberdeen, W. H. Dempster.
Agassiz, L. A. Agassiz.
Ainsworth, Robt. Green.
Alberni, Agnes Erickson.
Aldergrove, J. P. Alport.
Alert Bay, S. A. Spencer.
Alexandria, Alex. D. Mclnnis.
Alkali Lake, John Bowe.
Armstrong, Danl. Babbitt.
Ashcroft, M. J. Cornwall.
Ashcroft Station, Wm. B. V. Bailey.
Balfour, Chas. W. Busk.
Barkerville, Jas, Stone.
Beaver, W. Neilson.
Beaver Creek, Chas. F. Bishop.
Beaver Point, Alex. McLennan.
Big Bar Creek, Philip Grinder.
Blue Springs, Alex. McDonell.
Brownsville, James Punch.
Burgoyne Bay, Saml. Maxwell.
Burrard Inlet, Geo. Black.
Cache Creek, Jas. Campbell.
Cedar, Jonn Hill.
Cheam, C. S. Byder.
Chemainus, E. J. Palmer.
Chilcoten, Gerald Dester.
Chilliwack, Saml. Mellard.
Clayoquot, John L. Penny.
Clayton, C. C. Cameron.
Claxton, A. S. Robertson.
Clinton, A. Le Bourdais.
Cloverdale, Geo. Campbell.
Clover Valley, D. McKenzie.
Cobble Hill, John T. Porter.
Colwood, Arthur H. Peatt.
Comox, J. B. Holmes.
Coquitlam, R. B. Kelly.
Corfield, Geo. T. Corfield.
Cortez Island, M. Manson.
Coutlee, Gilbert Blair.
Cowichan, G. B. Ordano.
Cowichan Lake, A. C. Fraser.
Denman Island, R. T. Swan.
Departure Bay, Jas. Harper.
Des Roches, Ernest Des Roches.
Dewdney, John Barker.
Dog Creek, Jno. S. Place.
Donald, R. W. Patmore.
Douglas Lake, J. B. Greaves.
Duck & Pringle's, Wm. Seely.
Duncan's Station, W. P. Jaynes.
East Sooke, Jas. Keill.
East Wellington, W. S. Chandler.
Eburne, W. H. Eburne.
Elgin, C. F. Roland.
Empire Valley, A. J. Boyle.
JEnderby, Oliver Harvey.
Errington, J. A. McCarter.
Esquimalt, Wm. S. Goodwin.
Fairmount Springs, Saml. Brewer.
Fairview, T. Elliott.
Field, H. G. Parson.
Fort Simpson, C. W. D. Clifford.
Fort Steele, Chas. Clark.
French Creek, Wm. H. Lee.
Gabriola Island, Jas. Gray.
Galena, Geo. McMillan.
Garnham, Wm. Garnham.
Genoa, W. B. Baker.
Glenwood, Wm. Beavis.
Golden, Chas. A. Warren.
Goldstream, Jas. Phair.
Grande Prairie, R. M. Clemitson.
Granite Creek, W. T. Thompson.
Grantham, Margaret Grieve.
Hagan, Jas. Hagan.
Hall's Prairie, D. W. Brown.
Hanceville, O. T. Hance. '
Harrison Hot Springs, Jno. R. Brown.
Harrison River, C. W. Menton.
Hatzic, F. T. Lazenby.
Hatzic Prairie, vacant.
Heal, Fredk. Heal.
Hope, Jas. Wardle.
Hornby Island, Geo. Ford.
Howe Sound, G. W. Gibson, Sr.
Huntingdon, T. F. Truswell.
Illicillewaet, A. C McArthur.
Kamloops, E. H. Jones.
Kaslo, S. B. Green.
Keithley Creek, G. A. Veith.
Kelowna, Thos. Spence.
Keremeos, Thos. Daly.
Kettle River, Ernest Spraggett.
Koksilah, Chris. Crosier.
Kootenay, David Griffith.
Kuper Island, G. T. Donekels.
Lac La Hache, Wm. Abel.
Ladner's Landing, Thos. McNeely.
Langley, Jas. M. Drummond.
Langley Prairie, Wm. Murray.
Lillooet, C. A. Phair.
Loch Erroch,L3Tom Wilson.
Lower Nicola, R. M^Woodward.
Lulu Island, W. H. London.
Lund, C. A. Thulin.
Lytton, Arthur Stevenson.
Mamette Lake, L. Quienville.
Maple Bay, Walter Morley.
Metlakatla, John Cunningham.
Millstream, Jos. Wriglesworth.
Mission City, M. Des Brisay.
Moodyville, A. N. C. Kiiag.
Mount Lehman, D. W. Sutherland.
Mount Pleasant, T. B. Morrow.
Mount Tolmie, Thos. Nicoll. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
29
Box 76.        Established 1858.        Telephone 413.
Phillips Bros.
SODA WATER,
Syrup, Sarsaparilla,   Ginger  Beer
and Cider Manufacturers.
LOWER YATES ST.,
Near Wharf St. -        Victoria, B. C.
RUBBER STAMP MANUFACTURER
—AND—
GENERAL   COMMERCIAL
Job Printer
28 Broad St., Victoria, B. C.
r!
PIONEEE
Steam Coffee & Spice
MIXjXiS ,
STEMLER  & EARLE.
Established 1875.
Manufacturers of Coffee, Spices, Cocoa,
Cream Tartar, Mustard and
Baking Powder.
Pembroke st., between Government and Douglas
VICTORIA, B. C.
Victoria Steam Bakery,
MANUFACTURERS   OF
CRACKERS AND BISCUITS,
Wholesale and Retail.
M. R.SMITH&CO.
57 FORT STREET.
P. O. Box 289. Telephone 121.
THE PIONEER.
MANUFACTURER OF
anorter
ESTABLISHED 1885
f
Carp*
Linoleum, and House Furnishings of Every Description.
Undertaking in all its Branches.   The Largest Establishment of its kind on the
Mainland.
12-23 CORDOVA STREET, - VANCOUVER, B. C.
P. O. Box 2.   Telephones :—Office 52, Factory 75, Residence 259.
THOS. DUNLAP.
GEO. W. COOKE.
JOS. SHEASGREEN.
DUNLAP, COOKE & CO.,
CLOTHIERS AND IMPORTERS OF
».»
HATS   AND   CAPS.
DUNLAP BBOS. & CO., AMHERST, N. S.
DUNLAP, M'KIM & DOWNS, WALLACE, N. S.
DUNLAP, COOKE & CO., AMHERST, N. S.
VANCOUVER, B. C. 30
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
POSTAL.   GUIDJE.
List of Principal Articles
transmuted by Mail,
with Rates of Postage.
Canada
Rates.
Rates
to
United
States.
Rates
to all
other
Coun-
tries.
Rank Pass Books..	
Bank and Broker's Quotations 	
Blank Forms	
Books	
Book or Newspaper MSS
by type-writer	
Botanical & Entomolog
ical Specimens	
Bulbs	
Cards (Xmas & Visiting
Circulars (printed)	
Circulars  by cyclostyle
or multiplying process
City Letters  (drop)..
Commercial Papers ..
Customs Manifests...
Cuttings	
Deeds	
Drawings	
Drop Letters	
Engravings	
Examination   Papers
(School and CoRege)..
Exhibition entry Tickets
Eyeglasses	
Fatty Substances	
Grafts	
HandbiUs	
Insurance PoRcies	
Legal Papers \
Letters	
Letters, Registered, 5 cts
in addition to postage
Liquids	
Lithographs	
Maps (with or  without
mountings)	
Manuscript (of Books or
Newspapers & Music
Merchandise (open to in
spection)	
Microscopic Slides.....
Militia and   Municipal
Returns	
Music	
Music Instruction o. k..
Newspapers (transient).
ORe	
Parcels.
Pamphlets	
Patterns —	
Pass-Books	
Periodicals	
Photographs	
Policies of Insurance...
Post Cards	
Post Cards in bulk	
Prices Current (printed)
Printed Forms (stationery	
Roots	
Samples	
Seeds	
Stationery	
Voters' Lists, printed or
written	
oz.
4
2
2
4
2
4
2
4
2
1
4:
1
2
4
2
2
1
2
2
2
1
1
4
4
2 .
4
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
4
4
1
4
4
4
4
2
2
each
2
4
2
4
4
4
2
ft   oz.
lc.   2
V   oz.*
Io.   2
P. Post
do
1       2
1      2
2    1
2    1
1      1    P. Post
12    12
12    12
1
1
1
2
2
2 *
1
1
2
2
2
4
1
none
?ealed
allowed
1      2
P. Post
do
do
1      2
1      2
P. Post
1      2
P. Post
2
2
2
rts.v'ry
do
1
2   11
2 *1
2
2t
2 *
2
2
2 *
1 each 2 each
2
2
2
1
2f
1
2
1      2
P. Post
1      2 *
P. Port
1     2
Postal Guide—Continued.
*  A minimum prepayment of 6c is required,
covering rate of 10 ozs.
t A minimum prepayment of 2c is required,
covering rate of 4 ozs.
§ Except for British Bechuanaland, Orange Free
btate; and other more remote places, in the
interior of Africa, the rate for which is lOcts.
per H oz.
X See rate for merchandise to U. S. when open
to inspection.
Newspapers and Periodicals.—Transient
Newspapers for any place in Canada or United
States, 1 cent per 4 oz; but a paper not more than
1 oz. wRl go for YiO. Local newspapers and
periodicals not weighing more than 1 oz., for
deRvery in the city Yzc each.
Books, etc.. and Miscellaneous Matter.—The
postage on Books, Pamphlets, Circulars (whoRy
in print), occasional publications, etc., addressed
to Canada is lc per 4 oz.; to the United States,
Newfoundland, Great Britain, and all European
countries, lc per 2 ozs. The postage on Printer's
Proof sheets, Maps, Pr'nts, Drawings, Engravings. Lithographs, Photographs, Sheet Music,
(whether printed or written, including music
books, whether stitched or bound), etc. addressed to Canada, the United States, Newfoundland. Great Britain or any European country is
lc per 2 oz. No package must exceed 2 feet in
length by 1 foot in width or depth. The limit
of weight for Canada and United States is 5 lbs
for other postal union countries 4 5>s.
Seeds, Cuttings, Bulbs, Roots and Scions or
Grafts can only be sent to the United States as
5th class matter; when posted for delivery in
Canada, the postage is 1 cent per 4 oz., and the
limit of postage 5lbs. ^
Commercial Papers and Legal Documents
may be sent to Great Rritain, Newfoundland,
United States, and aR Foreign countries, except
Orange Free State. British Bechuanaland, and
other more remote places in the interior of Africa
served by the way of Cape Colony or Natal, at 5
cents for the first 10 ounces and 1 cent for every
additional 2 oz. These papers when posted for
delivery in Canada, must be prepaid at Letter or
Parcel Post rates—but Deeds and Insurance
PoRcies may be sent if prepaid 1 cent per 2 oz.
Patterns and Samples.—Bona fide Patterns
and Samples of Merchandise, not exceeding 24
ounces in weight, may be sent to any place in
Canada, at 1 cent per 4 oz. Must be put up so as
to admit of inspection. Goods sent in execution
of an order, however small the quantity may be
or articles sent by one private individual to another, not being actually Trade Patterns or
Samples, are not admissable. The limit of weight
to United Kingdom is 5 oz.; dimensions, 12 in.
in length, 8 in. m width and 4 in. in depth; postage, 2c for the first 4 oz. and lc for every additional 2 oz.
The limit of weight to all countries in Europe
Newfoundland and United States is 8 oz.; dimensions, 8 in. in length, 4 in. in width, and2in
in depth; postage, 2 cents for the first 4 oz. and 1
oent for every additional 2 oz.
Fourth Class Matter—Closed Parcels.—
Parcels for Canada must be prepaid 6 cents for 4
oz., and must not exceed 5 fi>s. in weight, nor 2
feet in length, by one foot in width or depth;
No correspondence must be enclosed.
Fifth Class Matter.—Comprises such articles of general merchandise as are not entitled to
any lower rate of postage. Postage, 1 cent per
ounce or fraction of an ounce. Limit of weight
5 lbs.-, of size, 2 feet in length, by one foot in HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
31
R.  J. WEN BORN,
MACAINIST,
All Kinds of Machinery, Boilers,
Etc., Repaired on Short
Notice.
machine Works,
Eraser Street,       Nanaimo, B.C.
CEO.   S.   RUSSELL'S
p    SHAVING PARLOKS,
48 Yates Street,     VICTORIA.
Porcelain lined baths. Hot and cold water
William   Lindley,
Practical   Taxidermist.
Birds, Animals, Deer Heads, Stuffed and Mounted
to order from fresh specimens or dry skins.
First-class work guaranteed.    Cases, Heads and
Horns cleaned.   Mo. 7 Oriental Alley.
P. O. Box 605. Victor, B. C.
After years of experience I am prepared
to shoe horses in a practical manner.
Interfering and Tender Feet a Specialty.
17 Broughton St., near   Transfer   Co's
Stables.       Victoria, B. C.
Japanese   Store,
Importers of all kinds of
JAPANESE    MERCHANDISE
Direct from Japan.
150 Grov'ment St., DeCosmos block, Victoria,B.C
T. W. FLETCHER,
3VXuus»±o    Store.
American and Canadian Pianos and Organs from the Leading Makers.
Also Sewing Machines.
37 Fort Street, VICTOEIA, B. C.
LEWIS HALL, D. D. S,,
DENTIST.
Special attention given to frail and diseased teeth.
Gas and Ether administered for the painless extraction of teeth.
Jewell Block, cor. Yates and Douglas Sts.
THOMAS KITOHIN.
HARRY FORESTER,
THE NANAIMO
Reality, Investment and
Trust Agency.
Heal Estate Agents, Insurance Brokers,
Auctioneers and Valuers.
P. O. Box 64.
Telephone 82.
NANAIMO, B.C.
LDlRECTORcM
J. C.LI ASK
FASHIONABLE
TAILORS,
86 Government Street,
Victoria,      -       -       -       B. C.
i 32
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
width or depth. Matter claimed to be 5th Class
must be open to inspection and there must be no
correspondence enclosed.
Parcel Post with the United Kingdom Japan
Newfoundland Barbadoes and certain other countries.—Closed parcels may be sent to places in
Newfoundland, Jamaica, the United Kingdom.
Japan, Barbadoes and all other countries and
colonies with which the United Kingdom maintains a Parcel Post. No correspondence must
be enclbsed. A Customs declaration of the contents and value of each parcel must be filled up
at the Post Office, or one of the branches by the
sender.
Parcels for Newfoundland must be prepaid 15
cents per lb. or fraction of a B>. and must not exceed 7 B>s. in weight, nor 2 feet in length by 1 ft.
in width or depth.
Parcels for Jamaica and Barbadoes must be
prepaid 20c. per lb or fraction of a B>., and must
not exceed 7 lbs in weight nor 2 feet in length by
1 foot in width or depth
Parcels for Japan must be prepaid 25c per lb.
or fraction of a lb. and must not exceed 5 lbs.
in weight, nor 2 ft. in length by 1 ft in width or
depth.
Insufficiently prepaid letters posted in or addressed to Canada are charged with double the
amount of postage due thereon.
When posted wholly unpaid, they will be sent
to the Dead Letter Office.
Insufficiently prepaid letters to and from the
United States are charged with the deficient
postage on delivery. Letters for the United
States must be prepaid at least one full rate, 3c.
Wholly "unpaid letters for or from the United
Kingdom or other countries are charged double
postage on delivery, and insufficiently prepaid
letters double the deficiency.
Letters addressed to mere initials, to ficticious
names, will not be delivered unless a street ad-
dress,the number of a box or some other definite
direction is added.
Letters bearing mutilated stamps or stamps so
soiled and defaced as to make it impossible for
the sorting clerks to decide whether they have
been used before or not will be sent to the Dead
Letter Office.
Postal Cabds.—Nothing whatever may be attached to a postal card, nor may it be cut or altered in any way. A previously used post card,
bearing a one cent stamp will not be accepted as
a post card.
Useful Hints about Mailing Letters.
Eegister all valueable letters, and use, except
on those for hot countries, sealing wax for letters
containing money.
Transmit money by money orders.
Make complaints and enquiries in writing.
Preserve and requestlcorrespondents tojpreserve
envelopes of mis-sent or delayed letters.
Send to Postmaster envelopes of letters about
which you seek information or make complaint.
Business men should be careful to authorize
but a limited number of persons to receive their
letters and only those in whom they have full
confidence.
Report promptly to the Postmaster or at the
Enquiry Office undelivered letters or other mail
matter.
Letters and papers should be addressed to the
street and number at which they are to be delivered.
Notice of change or residence should be promptly given to the Postmaster in writing, and renewed at the end of three months or it will then
lapse.
In addressing letters, add the name of the county in which the Postoffiee addressed is situated;
if to a city, add street and number.
Letters to the United States should be addressed to the State as well as the Postoffiee*
A letter addressed to a particular street will be
taken out by the letter carrier and not delivered
at the wicket unless returned by the letter carrier
A letter or packet once posted becomes the
proper.y of the persen to whom it is addressed,
and must be forwarded to its destination. On
no application, however urgent, can it be delivered bock to the sender.
10
Telegraph Offices in B. C. and
Rates.
Between offices in the same section, 25c and
2c from offices in section 9 to those In section
10, and vice versa, 40c and 3c.
Sec.   Office.
10   Agassiz   Sec. 10   Ashcroft.
..   Alberni, by mail Nanaimo.   9 Albert Canyon
..   Alder Grove, by mail New. Westminster
Barkerville, 75 5 Day, 50 3 Night, mora than
sec. 10
9   Beavermouth.   Bear Creek.
Bridge Creek, 25 2 Day, 25 1 Night, more than
sec. 10.
Chemainus.   Sec. 10. Brownville.
Cache Creek, by mail Ashcroft
Cedar, by mail Nanaiino
Chilcoten, by mail Soda Creek
Clover Valley, by mail New Westminster
Coutlees, by mail Spence's Bridge
Cowichau, by mail Koks
Crahbrook, by mail Golden
Chilliwhackj
Clanwilliam
Clinton, 25 2 Day, 25 1 Night, more  than section 10.
Cobble Hill
Departure Bay, 10 0 Nanaimo
Dog Creek, by mail Clinton
Donald
Ducks
Duncans
East Wellington, by mail Nanaimo
Elgin, by mail New Westminster
Enderby.
Esquimalt^ 25 0 special delivery, or by mail
Victoria.
Field
Port Simpson, by mail Nanaimo
Gabriola Island, by mail Valdez
Glacier Hotel
Golden City
Granite Creek, by mail Spence's Bridge
Griffin Lake
Grohman, by mail Golden
Hammond
Harrison Hot Springs, 10 0 Agassiz
Hector
Hope Station
Hot Springs Mining Camp, by mail Bevelstoke
Illecillewaet
Kamloops
Keefers
Keremeos, by mail Sicamous
Koksilah
Kootenay, by mail Golden
Ladner's Landing, 25 2 New Westminster
Lac La Hache, by mail Bridge Creek
Langley
Langley Prairie, by mail New Westminster
Lillooet, by mail Clinton
Lower Nicola, by mail Spence's Bridge
10
9
9
*9
ib
9
10
'9
9
10
ib HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
33
C. C. McKENZIE,
r       ■■■■-■ ... ....	
Land Agent,
Conveyancer and Accountant.
Office :—Front Street, Nanaimo.
Town Lots and Farms for Sale.   Money
to Loan on Mortgage at Low Rates.
AGENT FOR THE
City of London Fire Insurance Co.
CITY MABKET
m HEMANS & WAMSLEY,
Wholesale & Retail Butchers !
Beef, Veal, Mutton, Pork & Sausages.
COMMEECIAL   STEEET,
w8h£?78?- Nanaimo.
CHAS. R. HARDY & Co..
REAL   ESTATE
—AND—
Financial Brokers
Notaries Public, Conveyancers,
Nanaimo,
B. C.
P. O. Box 380. Telephone 7-6
CHAS. DEMPSTER "& CO.,
Land, Insurance and Financial Agents,
Auctioneers and Valuers,
also
General Commission Merchants.
Commercial Street,      NANAIMO, B. 0.
THE   NANAIMO  PHARMACY'
W. E. McCartney, Manager.
A full line of Drugs, Chemicals, Patent Medicines, Perfumery and Toilet Articles.*
Prescriptions Made   Up.
P.O.Box 325.
P.O.Box  90.
Telephone 21.
Telephone 20.
Morgan & Oomeford
The Leading Merchant Tailors.
New Fall Goods, Latest Novelties in Suitings, Coatings, Pantings and
Overcoatings.
Commercial St. Nanaimo, B. C.
FOR THE   FINEST
BOOTS AND SHOES IN TOWN
 GO TO	
Whitfield's,
Victoria Crescent, Nanaimo, B.C.
Nanaimo Fishing Co
Gr.    MAR.SH,
Commercial Street Bridge, Nanaimo.
FRESH GOODS ARRIVING DAILY.
P. O. Box 327.
Marcus Wolfe {■HllyB
Life, 42 Commercial Street, Nanaimo, B.C.
Agent for—The Great West Liie Assurance Co.
Scottish. Union & National Fire Insurance Co.
Hartford Fire Insurance Co. [of Edmburg,Scot.
London Guarantee and Accident Co.
Commercial and all kinds of risks taken at current rates. Money to Loan on approved security.
WALTER H. THOMPSON.
WM. SOOVILLE.
I. X. L. TRANSFER CO.,
Livery, Stage and Feed Stables,
THOMPSON & SCOVILLE, Prop'rs.
First-class Single and Double Turnouts to Let at
Reasonable Bates.   All orders for teaming,
etc.,will receive careful attention.
Chapel Street, NANAIMO. 34
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
10
• •
10
io
io
io
•
10
m
10
9
10
*9
9
9
io
'9
9
10
Lulu Island, by mail New Westminster
Lytton
Maple Bay, by mail Koksilah
Matsqui.   (P O Eiverside
Metchosin, by mail Victoria
Mission
Moodyville. 25 2 Vancouver
Mount Lehman, by mail New Westminster
Nanaimo
Nelson Mining Camp, by mail Bevelstoke
New Westminster I'M)
Nicola Lake, by m&il Spence's Bridge
North Arm, by mail New Westminster
North Bend
North Saanich, by mail Victoria
Okanagan
Okanagan Mission, by mail Sicamous
150-Mile House, by mail Bridge Creek
Oosyoos, by mail Sicamous
PaUiser
Pavilion, by mail Clinton
Plumpers Pass, by mail New Westminister or
Victoria.
Port Moody
Port Haney.by mail Hammond
Princeton, by mail Sicamous
Quamichan, by mail Duncan's
Quesnelle.  50 3  Day, 30 2  Night, more [than
section 10.
Quilchena, by mail Sicamous
Revelstoke
Itiyerside    (See Matsqui)
Rock Creek, by mail Sicamous
Roger's Pass
Ross Peak
Salmon Arm
Salt Spring Island, by mail Victoria
Savonas
Sea Island, by mail New Westminster
Shuswap
Sicamous
Skeena, by mail Nanaimo
Soda Creek, 50 3 Day, 30 2 Night, more than
section 10.
Somenos, by mail Duncan's
Sooke by mail Victoria
SpaUumcheen, by mail Sicamous
Spence's Bridge
Sproat's Landing» by mail Revelstoke
Stanley tariff same as and check BarkerviUe
Snmse   Tw mail Ohilliwack
10 Victoria (M)
10 Wellington
.. Westminster Junction
10 Yale
Note—M Money transfer offices.
1
RATES FROM VICTORIA TO POINTS  OUT-
RATES VIA MACKAY-BENNETT CABLE.
B. C. to  Great B't n,  France and
G-erany $0 37 per word
Australia (via Eastern)  1 53 to 2 68 " "
" (viaNorthern) ... 3 27 to 3 53 " "
Austria      46" "
Belgium      42"      '
Denmark      47' '•
Gibraltar       55'- '
Holland      44'' "
India (via lastern)  1 35  ' "
Italy      44 " "
Japan   (Hakodadi, Hiogo,  Nagasaki, Osaka,) Tokio  (Yeddo)   and
(Yokohama) via Northern  2 33 " "
Java (via Eastern)  1 84 " "
Norway      47" "
Portugal      51" "
Russia in Europe      55'* "
Spain (via Eastern)      52" •'
Sweden      51" "
Turkey in Europe (via France)      49 " "
Turkey in Europe (via Eastern)       55 " "
DIFFERENCE   IJV   TIME
Between the Principal Cities of the World and
Victoria.
H. M. Slower
Amsterdam    8 19 "
Athens    9 35 «'
Auckland  19 37 "
Berlin    8 53 "
Berne     8 29 "
Bremen     8 35 "
Brussels     8 17 "
Bombay 12 51 "
Christiania \     8 43 "
Constantinople    9 56 "
Copenhagen,.    8 50 "
Calcutta  13 54 "
Cairo  10 05 "
Chicago    2 00 "
Hamburg....    8 39 «'
Hongkong 15 37 "
Honolulu    2 31 Faster.
Lisbon    7 24 Slower
London    8 00 |
Madrid    7 46 "
(Moscow  10 30 "
Munchen ;     8 48 "
Montreal    3 00 "
Melbourne  17 40 "
New York    3 00 "
New Orleans    2 00 "
Paris    8 09 "
Panama     2 38 "
Borne     8 50 "
Rio de Janeiro    5 08 "
St. Petersburg  10 01 "
Stockholm    9 12 %
Stuttgart    8 37 "
Shanghai  16 06 "
Singapore  14 56 "
San Francisco   "
Sidney  18 04 "
Toronto    3 CO '"
Vienna.     9 05 "
Winnipeg    2 00 "
Yokohama  17 19 "
TELEGRAPH OFFICES.
Victoria.—Canadian Pacific—William Christie,
Agent.
Vancouver.—C. P. R—F. W. Dewling, Agent.
New Westminster—C. P. R.—H. A. Wilson,
Agent.
Nanaimo.—C. P. R.--J. A. Callaghan, Agent. HAND-BOOK TO BEITISH COLUMBIA.
35
MESSENGER SERVICE.
Victobia—B. C. District Telegraph and
Delivery Co.. Five Sisters Block, Fort
street, Fred White, Manager.
Vancouver—Vancouver District, Telegraph and Delivery Co. (L'td.), 305 Abbott street,
EXPRESS   OFFICES.
VICTOBIA.
Dominion Expbess—Agent, F. Oliver,
Office, 383^ Yates street. Office hours,
9 a.m. to 6 p.m.   Closes 6 p.m. Arrives
7 p.m.
Nobth Pacific Express—Office, corner
Government street and Treunce avenue.
Agent, E. E. Blackwood.   Office hours,
8 a.m. to 6 p.m.   Closes 4 p.m. Arrives
4:30 o.m.
Weij-ls Fargo Expbess—Corner Government st. and Trounce ave. Office
hours, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Agent, F. H.
Worlock.
VANCOUVER.
Dominion Expbess Co.—C.P.E. Station.
Gbeat Northern—Corner Carrol and
Hastings street.
NEW WESTMINSTER.
Dominion Express Co.—J. B. Johnson,
Agent.
Great Northern Express Co.—Wright
Bros., Agents.
NANAIMO.
Dominion Express Co.—Wm. Dennison,
Agent, Commercial street.
British Columbia Express—Ashcroft,
B. C. Headquarters.
TELEPHONE   SERVICE.
Victobia—Victoria & Esquimalt Telephone Co. (L'td.), E. Crow Baker, Sec,
Office over Bank of B. C.
Vancouveb—New Westminster &" Burrard Inlet Telephone Co. (L'td.), H. W.
Kent, Manager. Office, Le Fevre
Block, Hastings street.
New Westminster—New Westminster
& Burrard Inlet Telephone Co. (L'td.),
G. C. Hodge, Manager. Office 707
Columbia street.
Nanaimo—Nanaimo Telephone Co., G.
E. T. Pittendrigh, Manager.
Steveston—New   Westminster
rard Inlet Telephone Co., J.
long, Local Manager.    Office,
avenue.
& Bur-
C. For-
Second
Health and. Pleasure Resorts.
B a n f f—On the C. P. B. main line. Celebrated
for its hot springs, Splendid mountain scenery and superior hotel accommodation. A
favorite stopping place for tourists on their
way to the Pacific coast.
Burrard Inlet.—This resort near Vancouver is popular in winter and summer, owing to its superior hotel accomodation and
attractions for visitors.
Duncan's—Is recommended by the leading
medical faculty in Victoria as a fine health
resort, and during the summer many families
from Victoria reside here.
Groldstream—A pleasant pleasure resort with
good hunting and fishing, and a comfortable
hotel.
Harrison Hot Springs—About five miles
from Agassiz station with regular stage meeting each train. These springs are celebrated
for their curative powers, especially for rheumatism, sciatica, etc. There is an excellent
hotel (The St. Alice), good boating and fishing on the lake. Splendid scenery and hunting. This resort is becoming more popular
each season.
H o p e—A most desirable spot for all wishing to
spend a quiet and restful holiday, orjthose
fond of hunting.
Oak B a y--On the outskirts of Victoria, is a
most charming spot, where the Mount Baker
Hotel, Ja splendid house, is now open for
guests Ii is a lovply spot where tourists and
others may visit with much pleasure to themselves.
Pilot Bay—This whole district with its pure
air and water, lying some 2000 feet above^ sea
level, is most healthful and invigorating.
No more striking or enjoyable trips can be
taken through the whole length of this section of country.
Shawnigan Lak e—On the e. & N. B. E.
A delightful spot for camping, fishing and
hunting, with excellent hotel accommodation
and pleasure boats on the lake.
Westham   Islan d—There is good accommodation at the beach—a pleasant place to visit
in the summer.
There are many resorts for the sportsman as
may be  seen by referring to "Hunting"  and
"Lake and Biver Fishing."   Other health and
pleasure resorts will be added from time to time. 36
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
HUNTING.
Hi
Where and When to Find.  Game in
British Columbia.
EXTRACTS FROM GAME PROTECTION ACT 1892.
NONE of the following animals or birds shall
be hunted, trapped, taken, killed, shot at. wounded or injured, at all or at any time, viz.: —Cow
wapiti (commonly known as elk), cow moose,
English blackbird, chaffinch, hen pheasant, linnet, skylark, thrush, robin, Virginia quail and
partridge, or any bird known here by any of these
names, except as regards robin, as is provided
below.
No person shall in any one year kill more than
two bull wapiti or elk, and two bull moose.
No person shall at any time buy or seU, or offer
or expose for sale, any pheasant or doe of any
age, or any deer under the age of twelve months.
CLOSE SEASON FOR CERTAIN ANIMALS.
Caribou, deer, wapiti (commonly known as
elk), moose, hare, mountain goat, mountain
sheep, or reindeer, from the first day of January
to the fourteenth day of September, inclusive:
Grouse, meadow lark, partridge, prairie fowl,
quail, or any bird known in this Province by any
of these names, from the first day of February to
the first day of September, inclusive; provided
that the birds known in this Province as "robins"
may be destroyed in an orchard or garden at any
time between the first day of June and the first
day of September:
Cock pheasants, from the first day of February
to the thirtieth day of September, inclusive; wild
duck of aU kinds, from the first day of March to
the thirty-first day of August, inclusive.
None of these animals or birds shall be hunted,
taken, killed, or shot at during ANY NIGHT
throughout the year.
No person shall buy or seU, or have in his or
her possession, any of the said animals or birds,
or any part ov portion of such animals or birds,
during the period in which they are so protected:
Provided, always, that if lawfully killed and obtained they may De exposed for sale for three
days, and no longer, immediately after the commencement of such periods of protection; but
in all cases the proof of the time of killing or
taking shall be upon the party in possession.
It shall not be lawful at any time of the year to
shoot at any guU in the Victoria Harbor, Esquimalt Harbor, New Westminster Harbor, Nanaimo Harbor, or Vancouver Harbor, or m any
arm, lagoon, fiord, river or creek extending from
or flowing into either of the said harbors, or within half a mile of any wharf.
It shall be unlawful to kill deer at any time for
their hides alone, in any portion of this Province.
Nothing in this Act shall be construed into preventing any resident farmer from killing at any
time Deer that he finds depasturing within his
cultivated fields.
On the Mainland it shaU be unlawful for any
person to shoot, trap, capture, or by any means
destroy, Cock Pheasants or Quail.
It shall be lawful for any constable or peace
officer to search any person in any highway,
street, or public place whom he shall suspect of
having in his possession any animals, birds, eggs
or fishes unlawfully obtained, and also to j stop
and search any cart or other conveyance in or
upon which he shall suspect that any sucl} animals, birds, eggs, or fishes are being carried by
any such person, and to search the premises of
any person engaged in selling, buying, or trading,
or any steamer, sailing vessel, or boat, or any
hotel or restaurant, and should such constable or
peace officer discover any such animals, birds,
eggs, or fishes as aforesaid, he shall thereupon
take possession of the same, and otherwise proceed as authorized by law.
Any person found committing any offence under
this Act may be apprehended without a warrant
by any constable or peace officer, and be forthwith taken before a Justice of the Peace, to be
dealt with according tovlaw.
Any person giving information leading to the
conviction of any person under this Act shall be
entitled to receive one-half of any pecuniary penalty inflicted under this Act.
Game Found in British Columbia.
LARGE GAME.
Beer
Mountain Goat
Mountain Sheep
Cariboo
Hear
Land Otter
Porcupine
Wolves
Panthers
Elk
Mink
Coon
Wild Cats
Cougar
Beaver
Moose
Martin
SMALL GAME.
Grouse
Duck of all kinds
Snipe
Prairie Chic'ien
Geese
Partridge
Babbits
Swan
Hare
Pheasant
Pigeons
Quail
Crane
Where to Find Game*
In the neighborhood of the following places :
Agassiz—Deer,    grouse,    duck,    snipe,  etc.
Guides can be procured here.
Ainswort h—Deer,  mountain goat, cariboo,
bear aud small game.
A s h c r o f t—Deer, grouse, prairie chicken, etc.
Alkali   Lak e—Grouse, ducks and other small
game but very few deer.'
A 1 b e r n i—Deer, elk.
Alert   B a y—Beaver, land otter and deer generally abundant.
B e a v e r—Ducks, geese, partridge, etc.
Big    Bar    Oree k—Numbers   of   mountain
sheep, deer, rabbits, wild geese, ducks, etc.
Burrard   Inle t—Bear, deer, ducks, grouse,
geese, etc.
B a 1 f o u r—Cariboo, mountain goat, black bear,
ducks, geese, swan, etc.
Blue   Spring s—Deer, hare, bear, porcupine,
wolves, mountain goat, grouse in abundance.
Beaver     Poin t—Deer,    grouse,    pheasant,
ducks, geese, etc.
Beaver   Cree k—Deer p1entif ul, bear, panthers, wolves and elk.
Chem ainu s—Deer plentiful, grouse, etc.
C 1 a y g a d t—Deer, ducks, geese, mink, coon, etc.
Chilliwhac k—Deer,   bear,    snipe,    ducks,
grouse, etc.
0 o u 11 e e—Deer abundant, grouse, prairie chick* HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
37
The B.C. Land and Investment Agency, Ld.
(SUCOESSOBS TO AUJSOP & MASON.)
Paid up Capital, §250,000.
Reserve, $80,000.
In view of the low rate of interest given by the Dominion Savings Bank Department, and the restrictions imposed as to the
amount to be deposited, this Company is now prepared to receive
money on deposit, in large or small amounts, at interest at the rate
of 5 PER CENT PER ANNUM, and on favorable terms as to
notice, etc.
I
mi.
THE LEADING
Furniture Manufacturers !
AND DEALERS IN
CARPETS,. LINOLEUMS,	
 CROCKERY. &. GLASSWARE,
.. . .AND. GENERAL HO USE. FURNISHINGS....
air   Fixtures  a  ^^eoialty-
66-68 GOVERNMENT STREET,
VICTORIA, B. C. 38
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
en, blue grouse, duck and geese. Parties organize and start from here for sheep and goat
hunting.
Clover Valley—Bear, deer, grouse, rabbits, etc.
Clover dal e—Grouse, ducks, pigeons, bear,
deer, etc.
C1 i n t o n—Black bear, mountain sheep, deer,
blue grouse, prairie chicken, geese, duoks,
rabbits, etc.
Cobble Hil 1—Deer, bear, panthers, grouse
etc.
C e d a r—Deer, bear, panther, grouse, etc.
C 1 a y t o n—Bear, deer, wild cats, coons, grouse,
ducks, etc.
Duncan's Statio n—Deer and grouse
abundant.
Dog 0 r e e k—Ducks, prairie chicken, grouse,
rabbits, deer, bear, etc.
Duck & Pringl e—Deer, prairie chicken,
grouse, duck, etc.
E 1 g i n—Bear and deer plentiful, wild cats and
cougar frequently. Beaver, mink, ducks, exceedingly plentiful. A favorite duck shooting place.
EmpireValle y—Deer, mountain goat, bear,
grouse, ducks, prairie chicken, etc.
East Sook e—Deer, grouse, pheasants, quail,
ducks and geese.
French Cree k—Deer, elk, bear, geese, duck,
grouse, snipe, widgeon, teal, etc.
Port Steel e—Bear, cariboo, deer, mountain
goat and sheep, etc.
Fairniount Spring s—Deer, bear, mountain goat and sheep, etc.
Fort Simpso n—Bear, mountain goat and
deer very plentiful, ducks, geese, etc,
Goldstrea m—Bear, deer, grouse, pheasants,
quail, etc.
Grande Prairi e—Deer, bear, prairie chicken, grouse and rabbits, but not numerous.
G o 1 d e n—Bear, mountain goat and sheep, cariboo, grouse, ducks, geese, etc.
G e n o a—Grouse, pheasants, ducks, deer, etc.
Galen a—Bear, deer, mountain goat and sheep.
Hornby   Islan d—Deer and blue grouse.
H a t z e c—Bear, deer, coon, wild cat, panther,
grouse and duck, abundant.
Howe   Soun d—Bear, deer, grouse, etc.
Hunting do n—Good duck shooting.
Hop e—Headquarters for the famous Smilkaman
& Asholia hunting grounds. Bear, deer, big
horn mountain goats, etc
H e a 1—Deer and all kinds of birds of B. 0.
Illicellewae t—Cariboo, bear, mountain
goat.
Kettle River—Cariboo, deer, sheep, bear,
grouse and prairie chicken.
K a m 1 o o p s—Deer, bear and birds generally.
Keithley Oree k—Deer, cariboo, ducks and
geese.
Kuper Islan d—Grouse, partridge, and a
few deer.
Ladner's Landing—Deer, bear, grouse,
ducks, geese and snipe.
Lower Niool a—Prairie chicken, willow
grouse, deer, etc.
Loch    Erroc h—Grouse,    partridge,   bear,.
deer.
Lillooet—Deer,  bear,   mouniain   goat   and
sheep, grouse and ducks in the fall.
Lulu   Islan d—Ducks, geese, snipe, grouse,.
etc
Lac   La   Hach e—Deer, bear, geese,   ducks,
grouse and prairie chicken.
L u n d—Deer, bear, grouse, ducks and geese.
Mission Cit y—Good duck, grouse an<l deer
hunting in autumn and winter.
Millslica m—Deer, bear, panther and pheasants and sometimes bear.
Mount   Pleasan t—Ducks and geese.
North Ben d—Deer, bear, mountain goat and
sheep.
Nicola Lak e—Deer, bear, grouse and prairie chicken plentiful.
MoPherson's Statio n—Panther, deer,
bear, willow and blue grouse.
N a k u s p—Silver tips, bear, cariboo, deer, beavr
er, martin, mink, otter, duck, geese, grouse,
e
Northfiel d—Deer, bear, partridge, grouse,
etc.
New   Denve r—Deer, cariboo, mountain goat
and sheep, bear, geese, duck, swan, grouse, etc,
0 ' k a n a g a n—Deer, bear, mountain goat and
sheep, geese, ducks, grouse and partridge.
Penticto n—Deer, mountain goat and sheep.
Plumpers   Pas s—Deer and grouse.
Port   Hammon d—Deer, bear, grouse, duck.
Pilot   B a y—Cariboo, bear, deer.
Pender   Islan d—Deer, grouse, quail, duck,
etc.
Port Hane y—Deer, bear, mountain goat and
sheep, geese, duck, grouse.
Parksvill e—Elk, deer, bear, panther, beaver,
grouse, partridge.
Port   Kell s—Grouse, deer, bear, duck, beaver,.
etc.
Biversid e—Grouse, duck, geese. Large game,
deer, bear, etc., in abundance.
R o b s o n—Deer, bear, cariboo, partridge, duck,
grouse, geese.
Revelstok e—Cariboo, black, brown and cin-
amon bears, mountain goat.
Rivers   Inle t—Mountain goat and bear.
Roger's   Pas s—Mountain goat, bear, etc
R o c k f o r d—Deer, grouse, prairie chicken, partridge, a few bears and wolves.
S h o p 1 a n d—Deer, grouse, ducks, etc.
Silverdal e—Deer, black bear, grouse.
S i d n e y—Pheasant, grouse, duck, geese and
deer.
St. Eugene Missio n—Deer, bear and
beaver.
Savona's    Ferry—JDeer,  prairie  chicken,
duck, etc
Stevesto n—Ducks and geese.
S q u a m i s h—Duck, grouse, bear, deer and
mountain goat, wolves and panthers.
8 a n d w i c k—Grouse, duck,  geese,  deer, elk
panther, bear and wolves.
Salmon Arm—Deer, bear, grouse, duck,
geese, prairie chicken, swan, snipe, rabbits.
S u m a s—Geese, ducks, swan, crane. The tw$
former being very plentiful. I\
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. 39
SPENCER & PERKINS,
■CASH ONLY,-
IHy Drapers. I Bpy Goods,
A —*   * Mantles.
One Price.       w*„. ^
Millinery and
! Oarpeis.
UNION STEAMSHIP CO., B. | LIMITED.
HEAD OFFICE AND WHARF, VANCOUVER, B. j
Vancouver and Nanaimo—SS. Cutch leaves C. P. R. wharf
daily at 1 p.m., returning from Nanaimo at 7 a.m. Cargo at Company's wharf until noon.
Vancouver and Comox—SS. Comox leaves Company's wharf
every Monday at 8 a.m. for Comox direct, returning on Tuesday.
Vancouver and Northern Logging- Camps and Settlements—
SS. Comox leaves Company's wharf every Wednesday at 11 a.m.
for Gibson's Landing, Sechelt, Welcome Pass, Lund, Cortez and
Read Island, returning the same route; and to Port Neville and
way ports every alternate week.
Jt^01 Steamers and Scows always available lor Excursion, Towing and Freighting Business. Ample storing accommodation on
Company's wharf.    Particulars on application to office.
WM. WEBSTER, Manager.
Telephone 94, P. O. Box 217. 40
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
II:
Book e—Grouse, quail, blue grouse, duck, geese,
wolves, bear, panther, coon.
Sicsmou s—Deer, bear, cariboo, grouse, duck,
geese, swan.
St.   Elm o—Peer, bear, mountain gnat, grouse,
ducks, etc.
Surrey   Centr e—Grouse, deer and bear.
Shortree d—Deer, duck, grouse, bear, wild
cats and panthers.
Salt Spring Islan d—Deer, grouse, quail,
pheasant, land otter, mink, coon.
Tanpen Sidin g—Grouse and deer plentiful.
Trial   Cree k—Grouse, pheasant and deer.
Terra Eos a—Ducks, geese and snipe. Mr.
Buxton and Lieut. Hewett of H. M. S. ^V ar-
spite, on 21st Oct., '92, shot 104 snipe and a few
ducks at this place.
Turgoose—Pheasant, grouse, quail, pigeon,
geese, duck, deer, bear, panther, etc.
Y e r n o n—Cariboo,   deer,  mountain  goat (big
horn), prairie chicken, grouse, duck, geese.
Van    Winkl e—Grouse, bear, deer, cariboo.
Wellingto n—Deer, bear, wolves, grouse.
Westham Islan d—All kinds of ducks,
mallards, pintails, wigec-n, canvasback, teal,
and geese.   Deer and bear not plentiful.
Webster's   Corner s—Deer, bear.
Westholm e—A few deer and grouse.
Y o u n g—Deer, grouse, quail and pheasant.
The above will give some idea of the kind of
game in British Columbia, and where it is to be
found. Other districts and further information
regarding hunting in the Province will be given
in subsequent issues of the Hand Book.—Ed.
LAKE      FISHING.
Alphabetical Jist of lakes in  British Columbia,
where good fishing can be enjoyed :
Anderson
Arrow
Big
Beaver
Beautiful
Boundary
Big Bar
Brown
Cariboo
Cushion
Central
Coquitlam
Chemainus
Chilco
China
Christina
Cameron
Columbia
Copeland
Comox
Diver
Dick's
Elk
Fish
Fish Hook
Eoords
Green
Glide
Harrison
Hemers
Horn
Hatzec
Jack of Clubs
Kootenay
Kelly's
Kennedy
Kamloops
Little Shawne-
gan
Long
Lillooet
Mammet
Minnie
Michael's .
Moser
McKenzie
Matheson
Nilson
Nikhomekl
Nicola
Nimkish
O'kanagan
Pitt
Prospect
Quesnelle
Robert
Starks
Sproat
Somenos
Summit
Sumas
Squakim   or
(Loch Erroch)
Seatcn
Salmon River L
Slocan
Stump
Stave
Shuswhap
Swan
Tatla
How to Reach the Lakes.
Alphabetical list of places nearest to them.
Agassi z—Harrison lake, good fishing.
Ainswort h—Kootenai lake, best of fishing,
A 1 b e r n i—Sproat lake, good fishing.
Alert   B a y—Nimkish lake, good fishing
B e a v e r—Fish lake, fine fishing
Big   Bar   Cree k—Big Bar lake, teeming with
trout as heavy as 1% pounds
B a 1 f o u r—Kootenay lake, 70 miles long by 3
"miles wide, west arm 20 miles long by % wide,
good trout fishing and land-locked salmon up
to 18 pounds, fly and troll.
Beaver Poin t—Cushion, Brown and Roberts
lakes, best of fishing,
Beaver Cree k—Central lake, full of trout
and salmon in season
Brownsvill e—Pitt, Coquitlam and Anderson lakes, abundance of fish
Chemainu s—Chemainus lake, fine fishing
C o u 11 e e—Nicola, Mammet and Minnie lakes.
0 1 i n t o n—Kelly's lake, renowned for its trout
Chilco te n—Up the Chilcoten river is Chilco
or Tatla lake, where there is good fishing
Cobble Hill—Little Shawnigan lake, good
trout fishing
C e d a r—Michael's, Stark's, Fish Hook and He-
mer's lake, all have excellent trout. The last
two named are especially attractive to visitors.   Boats and good board obtainable
C 1 a y g a d t—Kennedy lake, great quantities of j
salmon
Dog Cree k--Moser Lake, finest quality of
trout, large and plentiful.
Duncan's Statio n—Somenos lake, good
fishing
Duck   &   Pringl e—Summit  lake, 3  miles ;
long, 1 mile wide, trout
E 1 g i n—Nichomekl lake, good fishing
Empire Valle y—China lake, very fine fishing
East   Sook e—Dick's, McKenzie's • and Mathe-!
son's lakes, good fishing
French   Cree k—Cameron and Home lakes,]
full of trout
Fort   Steel e—The Columbia lakes, good fish- \
shing
G o 1 d e n—Lower  and  Upper  Columbia lakes,;]
good trout fishing
G e n o a—Somenos lake, good fishing
H a t z e c—Hatzec and Sumas lakes, good salmon
and trout fishing
Huntingdo n—Sumas  and   Boundary lakes, I
full of fish
H e a 1—Prcspect and Elk lakes, good fishing
Kettle River—Christina lake all kinds of
fish
K a m 1 o o p s—Kamloops lake, good fishing
Keithly   Cree k—Cariboo lake, good fishing j
Lower   Nicol a—Mammet lake, best of  fish- \
ing
Loch   Erroc h—Squakim lake (now Loch Er- !
roch), good fishing
Lilldoe t—Seaton  and  Anderson  lakes, good I
fishing HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
41
IMPORTERS OF
SHELF AND HEAVY HARDWARE,
Paints, Oils and Glass,
jS
iiifc
J3a3>(l«a
bsImsSJ.
sjiiCTi»-y/jRj
5§5SyiEfiS>
oooooooooooo
<SBiV(5jSii
Sp&afcS/b
/SSSvtf&fo
^s>^s
IF
Leather and Rubber Belting,
Saw Mill and Mining Supplies,
Agricultural Tools,
Bar Iron, Steel,
Picks, Shovels, Axes.        'f£
■AGENTS FO'R-
Tudson Powder & Dynamite.
ORDERS BY MAIL PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
Vancouver and New Westminster. 42
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
%.
Mission   Cit y—Hatzec lake, good fishing
Moodyvill e—Lake beautiful, trout fishing
North   Ben d—Salmon River lakes, very large
trout
Nicola   Lak e—Nicola lake, good fishing
N a k u s p—Upper Arrow and Slocan  lakes, good
fishing
Northfiel d—Long lake, good fishing
New   Denve r—Slocan  lake, 30  miles  long,
2Jg miles wide, good fishing
Otter   Poin t—Glide lake, trout fishing
O ' k a n=a g a n—O'kanagan and Long lakes, good
fishing
Penticto n—O'kanagan lake, good trout fishing
Port Hammond—Pitt and Lilloot lakes,
good fishing
Pilot B ay—Kootenay lake, 90 miles long, 3%
miles wide. Fishing with the troll yields admirable sport in the season, and the fly sometimes takes. The numerous brooks in the
neighborhood are full of small barred trout,
and heavy baskets can be made
Quesnell Fall s—-Quesnell lake, 90 miles
long, goodiflshing
Revelstok e—The Arrow lakes, 25 miles
south, only fair fishing
R o e k f o r d—Stump and Nicola lakes, good fish-
ing in<the latter
Silverdal e—Stave lake, trout
Savona's Perr y—Kamloops lake, good fishing
S a n d w i cth—Comox lake, good fishing
Salmon   Ar m—Shuswap lake, good fishing
S u m a s—Shuswap lake, salmon and sturgeon
3 i c a m o us—Sumas and Mara lakes
Salt Spring Island—Cushion's,Brown's,
Robert's, Foord's, Nilson's and Oopeland's
lakes, all good fishing
Tappen Si din g—Shuswap, only fairly good
fishing
V e r n o n—O'kanagan, Long and Swan lakes,
good fishing
Van Wi n k 1 e—Jack of Clubs and Beaver Pass
lakes, good fishing in both
W e 1 ] i n g t o n—Diver, Long, Big and Green
lakes, very good fishing in last two named
Webster Corner s—Lillooet lake, excellent fishing
Westholm e—Chemainus lake, good fishing
Additional lakes and further information about
lake fishing in British Columbia will be given in
subsequent issues of .the .Hand Book.—En.
BIVER   FISHING.
Alphabetical list of rivers and creeks in British
Columbia, where fishing may be obtained.
Anderson
Bonaparte
Bear
Columbia
C< quitlam
Chemainus
Coldwater
Chilcoten
Cowichan
Coquahalla
Chase
Clearromisht
Courtenay
Englishman's
Elk
Eagle
Fraser
Beaver
Bonsell
Bear
Coffee
Campbell
Chum
Cayuse
Capilano
Carpenter
Deer
Dog
Fish Trap
RIVERS.
Goldstream
Harrison
Isolum
Jordan
Kettle
Kicking Horse
Koksilah
Kootenay
Little Qualicum
Lillooet
Lardo
Muir
Nimpkish
Nicomekl
Nicola
Nanaimo
Naas
O'kanagan
Pitt
Quesnelle
Swift
Squamish
Sta^e
Slocan
Swamp
Salmon
Skeena
St. Marys
Sooke
Sumas
Serpentine
Stamps
Shuswap
Thompson
Willow
CREEKS.
Freds
French
Georgetown
Hatzic
Joh   nson
Kanaka
Lake
Lightning
Morning Star
Milk
Millstream
Nicomen Sloiu
111 Mile
Peter
Pedder
Perry
Quartz
Ruby
Seymour
Sand Hill;
Skuzzie
Woodbury
Wolf
h Wilson
How to Reach the Rivers.
Alphabetical list of places nearest the above
rivers and creeks:
Agassi z—Buby creek, very fine trout
Ainsworth—Coffee and Woodbury   creek,
finest trout fishing in Kootenay district
A1 b e r n i—The Sumas, good fishing j
Ashcrof t—The Thompson river, very good
trout fishing with fly, the same in the Bonaparte.
Alert B a y—Nimpkish river 2*4 miles distant,
very good fishing
B e a v e r—Columbia river and Quartz creek,
very good fishing
Big Bar Cree k—The Fraser river salmon
in season
B a 1 f o u r—Mountain streams with brook trout,
and the lower Kootenay river about 80 miles
distant with fine trout
Blue Spring s—Shuswap river, plenty of
fish
Beaver Cree k—Stamps river, good salmon
and trout fishing, Beaver and Deer creeks
also afford good trout fishing
Brownsvill e—The Fraser, Coquitlam, Serpentine, Nicomekel and Pitt rivers, all contain abundance of fish
Claygad t—Bear river 18 miles away, plenty
of salmon and trout
Chemainns—Chemainus river and Bonsell
creek, good fishing
Coutle e—Nicola and Coldwater rivers meet
here, the latter of. which affords good trout
fishing HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
PEMi «£ COMPANT,
Coffee & Spice Merchants,
JLl^ U UfiSi
49 FORT STREET,
VICTORIA, B. O.
-FALCONER'S-
Vinegar k Pickle Works.
MANUFACTURER OF
Vinegars, Pickles,  Sauces and
Apple Ciders,
Blue Bell Ketchup, Etc., Etc,
Yates Street, VICTORIA, B. C.
The Victoria Oyster Parlors,
Cor. Yates and Broad Sts., Victoria, B.C.
are under new management, and will
be open night and day with large private dining parlors for ladies and
families. Ladies entrance, Broad
Street.
Oyster Parlors.—Olympian and Eastern Oyters on the half shell.
Bestaurant and Lunch Counter.—All
the delicacies of the season served at
reasonable prices.
JACOBS & WARD, Props.
C. D. RAND, President.       H. A. BERRY, Manager.       F. G. BELL, Secy-Treas.
Vancouver Gurney Cab and Delivery Co., Ld.
PASSENGERS, BAGGAGE AND FREIGHT
Transferred to and from all Trains,  Steamers, etc., or Delivered to any Part
of the City.'
Special Attention given to the handling of Machinery, Safes, and all freight
requiring extra care.   Moderate Rates and Uniform Charges.
Office : No. 234 Abbott St., - VANCOUVER, B. C.
Telephones : Office 68, Stables 192. 1
46
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
S o o k e—Sooke and DeManual rivers, good fish-
Sicamon s—Eagle river, fishing good
St.   Elm o—The Fraser and half mile distant
a beautiful stream with tront in abundance
Surrey   Centr e—Nicomekl and Serpentine
rivers, good tront fishing
S h or tree d—Fish Trap creek and   salmon
river, good fishing
St.   Eugene   Mission—St.  Marys river
and   Perry creek,  good fishing,  generally
salmon trout
Trail   Cree k—Columbia, very fine trout fishing
Terra   Rosa— North Arm Fraser river, plenty
of salmon fishing
Turgoo s e—Sand Hill creek, trout fishing
Y e r n o n—Shuswap river and several creeks
with fish
Van    Winkle—Swift   and Willow rivers,
! Lightning and Peter creeks, fish in all
Wellington—Englishman's  river, 20 miles
away on road to Alberni, where there is fine
fishing
Westham   Islan d—Fraser river and Canoe
Pass, plenty of salmon
Webster's      Corner s—Kanaka    creek,
trout fishing
W©etholm e—Chemainus, fishing rather uncertain
Additional rivers and creeks where
good fishing may be enjoyed, will be
given in future issues of the hand-book
MINES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The following list wilj be added to as
particulars of mines are received. See
mining notes.
Agassi z.—Ledges have been discovered, and there is every appearance of
large mineral deposits at Harrison
Lake.
Ainsworth. — A mining country.
The following are in the neighborhood:
Syline, No. 1 United, Neostro, Highlander^ Krao,Blue Bell, Sam, and others.
A s h c r o f t.—A coal mine in the Hat
Creek valley, a little placer mining on
Thompson and Bonaparte.
Alkali Lak e.—Only Chinamen on
the Fraser.
Alert B a y.—The coal measures extensively seen. Drilling for coal in
operation at Port McNeill, 5 miles distant.
B e a v e r.—The Quartz Creek Mining
Co.
Big Bar Creek.—Hydraulic and
placer mining.
Burrard Inlet. — Several mines
have been discovered and a few worked.
B a 1 f o u r.—The Ainsworth mines, silver and lead, 8 miles distant, with many
promising claims. Galena and ironi in
process of development.
Blue   Springs.—Placer mining at
Cherry and Kettle creeks, and quartz'
in the vicinity.
Beaver    Point. — Indications  of
gold and silver, and there is coal in the
neighborhood.
Chilliwhac k.—Coal and limestone
near here, but not worked at present.
C o u 11 e e.—Coal here, but only mine**
for local use.
C 1 a y g a d t.—Iron and copper, prospecting at Bear River.
Cobble Hil 1.—Quartz silver mine
12 miles distant, granite quarry 4 miles
distant.
C e d a r.—The Southfield coal mine, successfully worked by New Vancouver
Coal Co.
Dog Cree k,—Chinese work at placer
mining along the Fraser, and make fair
wages.
Empire Valle y.—Churn Creek is
a mineral section. Chinese at placer
mining on the Fraser make from $1 to
$2 per day, no white miners.
East Sook e.—Iron in the neighborhood.
Fort Steel e.—A mining country
with large deposits of mineral only
waiting for capital to develope.
Fairmount Springs.—Windermere copper mines. Thunder Hill,
copper, gold and silver. Good prospects around here. %
Fort Simpso n.—Nearest mining,
the Omneica gold mine up the Skeena
river.
Goldstrea m.—Some good quartz
ledges in this vicinity, but undeveloped.
Grande Prairi e.—One ledge being worked at each end of prairie by
tunnel.
Golden.—The Thunder Hill mine.
Carbonate Mountain district contains
several mines. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
49
NORTHERN
PACIFIC R.R
oooooooooooo o o o o o o oooo. ooooooo
FROM Terminal or Interior Points, the
Northern Pacific Railroad is the line to
take to all Points East and South. It
is the Dining Car Route. It runs Two
Through Vestibuled Trains every day in the
year to St. Paul and Chicago, (no change of
cars). Composed of Dining Cars, unsurpassed. Pullman Drawing Room Sleepers
of Latest Equipment. Tourist Sleeping
Cars, best that can be constructed and in
which .accommodations are both free and
furnished to holders of first and second-class
tickets.
ELEGANT  DAY   COACHES.
A Continuous Line connecting with all
lines, affording direct and uninterrupted
service, jj Pullman Sleeper Reservation can
be secured in advance through any agent o
the road. Through Tickets to and from all
points in A merica, England and Europe can
be furnised at any ticket office of this
company.
Full information concerning rates, time
of trains, routes and other details furnished
on application to any agent, or
A. D. CHARLTON, Asst. Gen'l Pass. Agt.,
121 First St., Cor. Washington,
Portland, Oregon-
ESK£&SB£=^i£CU3J3E
BL1CEWOOD,
'i
79 Government Street,
VICTORIA, B. C. 50
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
!
Silverdale. —Indications of coal
and iron.
S a v o n a s.—" The Rosebush," a cinnabar mine, and the Tenderfoot copper.
S a n d w i c k.—The Union  Coal Mines.
S o o k e.—Copper, iron and coal indications here, but undeveloped.
Sicamous .—Mining prospects good
here.
Salt Spring Island. — Gold
mine at south end of island being worked. There are also copper and coal,
but undeveloped.
St. Eugene Missio n.—A lately
discovered mine near here was sold by
Joseph Bourgeois for $10,000.
Trial Cree k.—Copper, gold, silver,
lead and free milling gold. The chief
mines are Le Roi and Centre Star.
Van Winkl e.—The following mining companies are in operation :—South
Wales Co., Timon Creek Co., Slough
Creek Co., Davis Creek Co., Rushion
Creek Co., Moonraker Co., Snowden
Co., Chisholm Creek Co., Bashford
Creek Co., Dunbar Flat Hydraulic Co.,
Chisholm Creek Hydraulic Co., Burns
Mountain Quartz Co., Van Winkle
Creek Co. There aire on Nelson Creek
five hydraulic companies, on Slough
Creek two, on Burns Creek three, on
Coulter Creek one. The | Big Bonanza Mining Co." is situated on Lower
Lightning Creek. Most of these claims
are paying well. There are numerous
prospectors out around here.
Websters Corners—Strong indications of coal along Kanaka Creek.
Wellington.—The celebrated Duns
muir coal mines are here.
Other mines and fresh discoveries will
be given under this head from time to
time.
Coal   Output*
TONS.
1860...    14,247
1861    13,774
1862    18,118
1863    21,345
1864    28,632
1865    32,819
1866    25,115
1867    31,239
1868    44,005
1869    35,802
1870    29,843
1871-73 148,459
1874    81,547
1875 110,145
1876 139,192
1877 154,052
ajosa;
1878  170,846
1879  241,301
1880  267,595
1881  228,357
1882  282,139
1883  213.299
1884  394,070
1885  365,596
1886  326,636
1887  413,360
1888  489,301
1889  579,830
1890  578,140
1891 1,029,097
1892  826,335
Coal Output for 1893.
NUMBER OF TONS.
Nanaimo Colliery 433,386
WeUington Colliery 290,370
East Wellington Colliery 33,650
Union Colliery  68,928
826,334
Coal Exported..
NUMBEB OF TONS.
Nanaimo 307,623
WeUington 238,400
East WeUington  28,000
Union  66,556
640,579
Coal Miners .Employed..
Nanaimo 1367
Wellington  815
East WeUington  152
Union  520
2854
Miners earnings per day during 1892,
ranged from $3.00 to $5.00.
137 Cordova Street, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Saddlery & Harness Manufacturer,
HOESE CLOTHING, TURF GOODS, ETC.
TRUNKS   AND VALISES.
Repairing Neatly and Promptly Done.   Commercial Travellers' Sample Cases a
Specialty.   Special attention given to maU orders.   Note address.
Sold Agents in British Columbia for Myers & Co's Horse Ointment.
D. WILSON, 137
P. O. Box 384.
Cordova Street,
VANCOUVER, B.
C. IV
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
51
Green, "Worlock &  Co.,
Successors to Garesche,  Green &  Co.
(Established 1873.)
VICTORIA, - - B. C.
Deposits received on liberal rates of Interest.
Drafts, Orders, Telegraph Transfers and Letters of Credit issued on the principal cities in the United States, Canada, Europe,
Mexico & China.
Collections made at every point.
PRINCIPAL CORRESPONDENTS.
United States.—Wells, Fargo & Co., New York and San Francisco ; Continental
National Bank, Chicago, 111.; L add & Tilton, Portland, Or.
Canada.—Merchants Bank and Canadian Bank of Commerce and Branches.
AGENTS FOR
1    WELL, FARGO & COMPANY.
P. O. Box 867
m
HE ANG
r\
\j
r\
Telephone 140.
MBIAN COT, LTD.,
OF LONDON, ENGLAND.
VANCOUVER BRANCH, 32 WATER STREET,
GENERAL IMPORTERS  OF
Hardware, Liquors, Teas, Groceries, Flour, k, k
G. D. MACKAY, Managing Director. 52 HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
COAL MINES AND COAL MINING COMPANIES.
The New Vancouver Coal Mining and Land Co. (L'td.)
The mines and works of the New Vanconver Coal Mining and Land Company,
Limited, are the main resources of Nanaimo, the whole population being directly
or indirectly dependent upon the coal industry. Forty years ago coal was discovered at Nanaimo, and from then on mining operations have been continually
carried on, though it is only recently that the production has assumed its present
gigantic dimensions. In 1884, when Mr. S. M. Robins took over the management
of the company, the output rose to over one hundred thousand tons and now the
annual foreign export reaches half a million tons annually. The company has at.
present five mines in operation: No. 1 Esplanade, No. 2 Southfield, No 5 South-
field, Northfield shaft, and Protection Island shaft; another mine, No. 3, South-
field, is all but worked out.
No. 1 shaft (Esplanade) is the largest mine in operation m British Columbia.
The depth of the shaft is 650 feet, size 18 feet in diameter.
No. 2, Southfield is worked by slope, 800 yards in length.
No. 5, Southfield, has a depth of 508 feet, the shaft being of rectangular shape
8x18.
The depth of the Northfield shaft is 440 feet, size 8x18 feet.
The Protection Island shaft is a new undertaking and one   that promses to
prove the most successful of any in operation..   It is the outlet for coal mined
from two seams, the upper one 5 feet thick, and the lower one, 4 feet.   The depth
of this shaft is 740 feet, rectangular in shape; size, 12x19 feet.
This company employs 1,500 men. The rates of wages being: For miners, $3
to $5 per day; to other hands, from $2.50 to $3.50. The present daily output is
1,900 to 2.000 tons. San Francisco takes most of the coal exported, other shipments being made to the Hawaiian Isles, Portland, Ore., and to Alaska.
From the Protection Island mines shipments from the upper and lower seam
is now being made from the new wharves. As a domestic coal the lower seam is
superior to any coal hitherto, mined at Vancouver Island.
The head office of the company is in London, England, J. Galsworthy, Esq.,
President. The company's land property covers some 30,000 acres and is being
rapidly improved and settled up. Their city property is of course very valuable
and is sold on monthly payments.
THE EAST WELLINGTON COLLIERY.
The East Wellington Colliery, of which Mr. W. S. Chandler is superintendent,.
is situated about three miles to the Northwest of Nanaimo. There are the shafts-
No. 1 and No. 2, but the latter is the only one in operation. The coal produced is
of a hard bituminous nature. The colUery is connected with Departure Bay by a
narrow guage railway. Mr. Richard C. Chandler, of San Francisco, the principal
owner of the mines and a large dealer, controls the output, which generally averages 150 tons per day.
The "longwall" system of working is followed in this colliery. No. 1 shaft is
270 feet deep; No. 2, 200 feet deep.   About 150 men are employed.
THE WELLINGTON   MINES.
Owned by R. Dunsmuir & Sons, employ between 8C0 and 900 hands, and consist of pits 1, 4, 5 and 6. The output of these mines in 1892 was 290,370 tons of
coal, of which 238,400 tons were exported principaUy to San Francisco. In connection with the mines there are five mUes of railway with sidings and branches,
six locomotives and 250 coal cars. There are also thirteen statinary engines, nine
steam pumps, and the company own four wharves with bunkers for loading
vessels. The mines are connected by rail with Departure Bay, where the shipping
is done. The coal from the Wellington mines is famous aU over the Pacific coast,
and therefore finds a ready market wherever shipped.
ALEXANDRA MINE.
This mine belongs to Messrs. Dunsmuir & Sons, and is about one mile south
of the Southfield mine, of the Nanaimo Colliery, and only a few yards from the- f\
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
53
Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway. There has not been any work done here during the past year, but the company renewed operations at the beginning of the
year, and it is hoped there will be a good account of this mine at the close of 1893.
TUMBO ISLAND COAL MINING COMPANY.
This Company having made considerable exploring and boring on this Island
are continuing to energetically prospect their seam.
UNION COLLIERY.
The Union Coal Mines are situated near Comox, about 60 miles from Nanaimo, the principal owners being the Dunsmuirs. There are four shafts and tunnels in operation. No. 1 and No. 2 tunnels being adit levels, no machinery is
required. The mode of working is on the longwaU system. These levels are now
in: No. 1, 700 feet; No. 2, 1200 feet.
In connection with the coUiery there are 13 nules of railway. Coal from these
mines is shipped to San Francisco.
A steam sawmiU with a daily capacity of 20,000 feet is run in connection with
the coUiery,    F. D. Little is general manager of the mines.
G. R. MAJOR.
C. C. ELDRIDGE.
Ulajor & JSldridge,
Produce and Commission Merchants,
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Hams, Bacon, Lard, Butter, Eggs, Cheese, Flour, Grain, Feed, etc.
125 Water Street, - VANCOUVER, B. C.
P. O. BOX 316.
TELEPHONE 74,
GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
AND  WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Grain, Butter, Cheese, Eggs, Poultry & Green Fruits     m
CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED.
121 and 123 Water Street, VANCOUVER, B. Ca
Agents for Bateman & Co.'s Celebrated Biscuits and Confectionery.
O".   3ML.   BTJXTOJNr    cfc   Oo.,
o NOTABLES  PUBLIC, o
MINING, FINANCIAL AND REAL ESTATE AGENTS
GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C. 54
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Gold Yield from '58 to '92   inclusive.
1858(6 months) | 520,353
1859.   1,615,072
1860  2,228,543
1861  2,666,118
1862-3  4,246,266
1864  3,735,850
1865  3,491,205
1866  2,662,106
1867  2,480,868
1868  2,372,972
1869  1,774,978
1870  1,336,956
1871  1,799,440
1872  1,610,972
1873  1.305,749
1874  i;844,618
1875  2,474,904
1876  1,786,648
1877  1,608,182
1878  1,275,204
1879  1,290,058
1880  1,013,827
1881  1,046,737
1882  954,085
1883  794,252
1884  736,165
1885  713,738
1886  903,651
1887  693,709
1888  616,731
1889  588,923
1890  494,436
1891-  429,811
1892  399,525
Total $53,512,652
Yield of Gold from Districts, 1892.
Cariboo,—
BarkerviUe $ 76,600
Lightning Creek  41,500
QuesneUemouth  23,500
Keithly Creek  52,400
Additional  10,000
Cassiar  28,950
East Kootenay  29,700
Lillooet  39,763
Minor Districts  97,112
Total $399,525
Number of Gold Mining Companies
Working in B. C. In 1892.
Cariboo 159
Cassiar  26
Kootenay 34
Tale 158
477
In West   Kootenay,  the  following
claims were recorded in 1892.
Revelstoke     71
Big Bend      4
TUeciUewaet , 98
Slocan  750
Ainsworth 470
Trail Creek     67
Nelson  244
1704
JMinin&r Notes.
Record during 1892 of the Great Slocan and Ainsworth districts of West
Kootenay.
SLOGAN.
Three hundred and forty transfers and
biUs of sale were recorded in 1892, aggregating $550,000, and it is estimated that
the sum of $201,000 in cash changed
hands by reason of transfers during the
year.
To illustrate the activity in mining in
this district, the foUowing statistics,
which have been kindly furnished by Mr.
J. L. RetaUack (whose accuracy and
sources of information may be safely re-
Ued upon), may be of interest:
On the Noble Five group of claims,
situated on Carpenter Creek, the sum of
$6,000 has been expenned, principally in
driving a tunnel 150 feet, and a trail
seven miles long. Only samples of ore
have been shipped from this camp, but a
large body of ore has been exposed.
On the Slocan Star claims, situated on
Sandon creek, development work, consisting of 180 feet of tunneling has been done
and a trail two miles long has been burltf.
Extensive machinery will be put on this
group during the spring, when the output is expected to reach 300 tons of concentrates per month.
On the Payne group of claims, situated
on Carpenter Creek, upwards of $4,000
have been expended in development work
and trails. No ore has been shipped at
present.
On the Blue Bird claim upwards of
$10,000 have been expended on 600 feet
of tunneling, and also six miles of trail.
One hundred tons of ore from this mine
have beeu shipped via the Kaslo wagon
road.
On the Freddy Lee, situated on Cody
Creek, upwards of $20,000 have been expended in development work, and $4,500 1\
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
55
9!
Si
SI
I*
3
Ni
Best Collection of Japanese Goods and Curios
JIN & TAMURA, 72 Cordova St., VANCOUVER, B. C.
Q 0 M     Booksellers, Stationers
' General   News   Agents.
GUIDE FOR SALE AT ABOVE BOOKSTORE.
11 Cordova Street, VANCOUVER, B. C.
S.T.T
T. R. MORROW
Wholesale and Retail Chemist and Druggist.   Dispensing of Physicians' Prescrip-
J   tions Carefully Attended to.   Orders by
———wm—^^mmm^^—mmmm^——   Mail or Telegraph Promptly Attended to.
426 & 428 Cordova St., and Mount Pleasant, VANCOUVER, B. C.
P. O. BOX 432. TELEPHONE 73.
ID
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN
116 CORDOVA STREET,
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Nanaimo P. O. Box 386.
TELEPHONE 100.
Vancouver P. O. Box 387.
TELEPHONE 144.
GEO. CASSABY & GO.,
MANUFACTURERS AND WHOEESALE DEALERS IN
Rough and Dressed Lumber, Shingles, Laths, Mouldings, Doors,
Sashes, Blinds, Etc.,'Etc.
INTaxieilriaLO dfe "\7"»3a.ooxi.Treir. 56
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
on trails, etc. Over 400 tons of ore have
been shipped from this mine.
On the Washington, situated on Carpenter Creek, 200 feet of tunnels have
been driven, and good mountain trails
have been built. It is estimated that
1,500 tons of ore has been shipped from
this claim.
On the DardeneUes group, situated on
McGuigan Creek, about $4,500 have been
expended on development work, and a
trail four miles long has been built.
About ten tons of ore has been shipped
from this camp, showing satisfactory
returns.
On the Best Claim, situated adjacent
to the Dardanelles, over $10,000 have
been expended on development work, and
a traU three miles long has been built.
About fifteen tons of ore have been shipped from this claim.
On the Idaho Claim, situated between
Four-Mile Creek and Hansen Creek,
about $2,400 have been expended on development work, and a traU, costing
about $1,000 has also been built. About
fifteen tons of ore nave been shipped
from this claim.
On the Great Western group, situated
about one mile east of the Washington,
200 feet of tunnels have been driven, and
three miles of trail have been built. No
ore has been shipped from this group.
On the Queen Bess, situated on Cody
Creek, the sum of $5,000 is at present
being expended on development work,
and a trail costing $500 has been built.
No ore has been shipped from this claim.
On the Lucky Jim and Roadley group,
situated on Seaton Creek, about $10,000
have been expended on development
work and trails. No ore has been shipped from this group.
Of other claims in this district, on
which considerable development work
has been done, may be mentioned :—
The Northern Belle, on Jackson Creek.
This claim has been bonded for $45,000.
The Slocan Boy, adjoining the Washington. On this claim there is a large
quantity of ore in sight.
The Reco and Wonderful, situated between the Noble Five and Blue Bird.
There is a large amount of ore in sight
on these claims. Thirteen men are steadily employed developing.
The Silver Glance group, situated two
miles north-west from the town of Watson.   Development work has been going
on for some time, and the claims have
been bonded for $45,000.
The sunset claim, near the Blue Bird,
has been bonded for $20,000.
The R. E. Lee, situated about three-
quarters of a mile south of the Washington, has been bonded for $20,000.
The Chambers group, situated on Cody
Creek, has been bonded for $50,000.
The Big Bertha, an extension of the
Dardanelles, has been bonded for $45,000
The Utica, on the same creek, has been
bonded for $30,000.
AINSWORTH.
Immediately in vicinity of Ainsworth,
rich strikes have been made, among
which may notably be mentioned the
Mile Point claim, assaying as high as
400 ounces in silver per ton.
On the Skyline silver claim it is the
intention of the owners to erect a stamp
mill.
On the Highlander claim considerable
development work has been done.
On the Lady of the Lake group of
claims, it is estimated that $25,000 wiU
be expended during the coming season
on development work and general improvements.
KASLO  PORTION OF AINSWORTH.
On the Solo group, situated on Lyle
Creek, extensive development work has
been done, and good trails built. There
is a large body of ore in sight.
On the Wellington claim, situated on
Whitewater Creek, steady work has been
done, exposing large bodies of ore. It is
the intention of the owners to put extensive machinery on this property. Ten
tons of ore have been shipped from this
mine, showing good returns.
On the claims of the Brennand group,
situated on Lyle Creek, about $2,000 have
been expended on development work and
a good trail has been made.
On the Whitewater claim, situated on
Whitewater Creek, about $2,500 have
been expended on development work.
About eight tons of ore have been shipped
from this claim.
The Beaver group of claims, situated
fifteen miles north of Kaslo, have been
bonded for $75,000.
On the Montezuma and Mexico claims
about $3,000 have, been expended in getting in supplies and erecting buildings
preparatory to developing the property,
which is now bonded for the sum of
$20,000. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
57
Vlount Baker Hotel
-*$j—cjp—v&—igj- •
•-qyj—ccpr
-tJP"
Will be open for the reception of Guests on or
about the 20th May, 1893.
•§*!-^
OAK BAY is one of the most delightful
pleasure resorts in British Columbia.
Within easy distance of Victoria by
tramway to the heart of the city.
The Hotel will be under the able management of
j.  A.  VIRTUE,
Late of the Canadian Pacific Hotel Vancouver. 58
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
iff
The Twilight, situated on Twelve-Mile
Creek, has been bonded for the sum of
$20,000.
The Fourth of July and Viola claims,
situated on Spring Creek, have been
bonded for the sum of $50,000.
The Yosemite, Homestake and Eureka,'
in the Brennand camp, have been bonded
for the sum of $65,000.
The aggregate sum of the above, and
bonds given for smaller amounts on other
claims, amount to nearly $334,000.
A wagon road has been built from
Kaslo to Bear Lake by private subscription, costing in the neighborhood of
$20,000. _.
Mining-   Laws.
FREE MINERS.
1 Free Miner " only can have right or
interest in mining claims or ditches. A
" free miner " must be over 16 years of
age. His certificate may be for one year
($5), or three years ($15), and is not transferable.
RECORD, ETC., OP  CLAIMS.
Claims must be recorded ($2.50), and
re-recorded ($2.50). Time allowed for
record is three days after location, if within ten miles of office—one additional day
for every additional ten miles, or fraction thereof. Transfers of claims or mining interests must be in writing and
registered. Free miner's certificate (for
each year) $5.00, may hold any number
of claims by purchase, but only two by
pre-emption, except in certain cases. A
free miner can, by record, get a fair share
of water necessary to work claim. A
claim is deemed open if unworked for 72
' hours on working days, unless for sickness or other reasonable cause.
NATURE AND   SIZE   OF   ORDINARY   MINING
CLAIM.
Claims, as far as possible, are rectangular and must be staked by post or tree.
Sizes are, I bar diggings," 100 feet wide
at high-water mark, and thence extend
into the river at lowest water level.
1 Dry diggings 1100 feet square. " Creek
claims " 100 feet long, measured in the
direction of the general course of the
stream, and shall extend in width from
base to base of the hill or bench on each
side, but when the benches or hills are
less than 100 feet apart the claim shaUbe
100 feet square. | Bench claims" 100
feet square. " Hill claims," base line
fronting a stream 100 feet—parallel side
lines at right angles thereto - at summit
of hill. Posts 100 feet apart. Measurements horizontal, irrespective of surface
inequalities.
DISCOVERERS'   CLAIMS.
To one discoverer, 300 feet in length.
To two discoverers, 600 feet in length.
To three discoverers, 800 feet in length.
To four, 1000 feet in length, and to each
member of a party beyond four in number, a claim of the ordinary size only.
Creek discovery claims shaU extend
1000 feet on each side of the centre of
the creek, or as far as the summit.
LEAVE OP ABSENCE.
On discovery of a new lode or vein containing minerals, six months. On proving expenditure, in cash, labor, or machinery, $1,000 on each full interest (without reasonable return) one year. Under
other conditions Gold Commissioner has
option.
MINERAL CLAIMS.
1 Mineral claims,"—that is claims containing, or supposed to contain minerals,
precious or base (other than coal), in
lodes or veins, or rock in place—shall be
1500 feet long and 1500 feet wide, and, as
nearly as possible, in rectangular form.
To lawfully hold a Crown grant for a
mineral claim, it mast be surveyed by a
surveyor approved by the Land Office ;
notice of application for the grant must
be posted conspicuously on the land and
on the Government office of the district,
also inserted for sixty days in the Government Gazette and a newspaper, if any,
circulating in the district, and proof must
be given to the satisfaction of the Government officers that $500 have been
bona fide expended in money or labor
upon the claim, exclusive of all houses,
buildings and other like improvements.
Or a Crown grant may be got by paying
$25 per acre to the Government in lieu
of representation and expenditure on the
claim.
COAL PROSPECTING LICENSES.
A twelve months' prospecting license
for 480 acres of vacant coal land in one
block, may be granted by the Government on payment of $25.00. The licenses
may be extended for another year if the
licensee has actually explored for coal on
payment of $50.00. The license is not
transferable without notice being given
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works. If a licensee wishes to purchase
the coal lands, he may do so under the
land Act for $2.50 per acre. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. 59
f\
Eobert  Ward  &  Co., Represented in London by
Limited Liability Messrs. H. J. Gardiner & Co.
Victoria, R C. 1 Gresham Buildings,
Eoyal Swedish and Nor- Bashinghall, st., E. C.
wegian Consulate.
ROBERT WARD & Co.
Xjiaaa.ited XaiaToility.
Merchants and Importers.
Execute Indents for every description of British and Foreign Merchandise, Lumber, Timber, Spars, and other products of British Columbia,
Shipping and Insurance Agents,
CHARTERS   EFFECTED
General Agents :
Royal Insurance Company.
London and Lancashire Fire Insurance Company.
Standard Life Assurance Company.
London and Provincial Marine Insurance Company, L'td,
London Assurance Corporation.
Western Assurance Company..
Risks Accepted.   Policies issued and losses promptly adjusted in Victoria.
Managers and Agents
British Columbia Corporation,   Limited,
Mortgages, Land Debentures, Trusts, Etc.
Sole Agents :
Curtis's and Harvey's Sporting and Blasting Powder.
John Kirman & Son's (Gold Medal, Inventions Exhibition, 1885), pianofortes.
J. and K. Stuart's Patent Double-Knotted Fishing Nets, Twines, Etc.
A. Rodriguez, Havana Cigars.   Messrs. Kynoch L'td.
Agents for the following brands of British Columbia Salmon,
Ewen & Co., "Lion," "Bonnie Dundee." Bon Accord Fishery Co., "tBon
Accord," "The Consuls." A.J. McLeUan's "Express." Canadian Pacific
Packing Co., "Flagship."   Boston Fishing & Trading Co., Alaska, "Sea Lion."
Agents for Victoria Lumber & Manufacturing Co., Chemainus.
Hugtoitt & Mclntyre, Genoa Saw Mills,
Limited Liability.
76 Wharf Street, Victoria, B. C, •
I
60 HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
A Reminiscence of the Gold Mines, British Columbia.
The history of the gold mining industry of British Columbia is an interesting
one. Although discoveries of the existence of gold in several parts of the country were made as far back as 1850, it was not until 1856 that Governor Douglas
officiaUy reported to the Colonial Office that the precious metal was to be found
in paying quantities. In 1857 James Cooper testifying before a committee of the
British House of Commons predicted a rush of people at an early day into the
colony to search for gold. This prediction came true, for in 1858 between thirty
and forty thousand people flocked into British Columbia attracted by the gold
mines. The utmost excitement prevaUed in California over the reported discoveries in British Columbia, and thousands of prospectors and miners left the former
to, try their fortune in the latter. During six months of 1858 over half a miUion
dollars constituted the yield of the newly discovered mines. In 1859 the yield
amounted to $1,615,072, and in 1863 it had risen to $3,735,850 from which year it
graduaUy decreased owing to the lack of proper appliances for working the mines
and the absence of suitable means of transportation to and from them. Since
1858, however, the total yield of gold has been very considerable, amounting altogether to $53,512,652.
Probably no institution has been more closely identified with the gold mining
of British Columbia than the banking house of Green, Worlock & Co., formerly
known as Garesche, Green & Co. In the early days, up to 1873, Wells, Fargo
& Co., of which Mr. F. Garesche was then agent, took an active part in the
purchase and export of gold from British Columbia. In 1873 Garesche,
Green & Company took over the business form Wells, Fargo & Company the latter confining themselves to handling express matter between Victoria
and San Francisco in connection with their immense system throughout the
United States. The banking house of Garesche, Green & Co. grew in wealth and
importance until the name of the firm became a household word in British Columbia whenever the gold mines were mentioned.
In 1892 Mr. F. H. Worlock became a member of the banking house and since
then it has been known as Green, Worlock & Co., the interest of the late Mr.
Garesche having been purchased from the trustee of the estate.
At the present time there is no banking establishment more popular or more
flourishing than Green, Worlock & Co., and the high position they now hold is
due in a large measure to their connection with the gold mining interests of
British Columbia.
Although the yield of gold has been chiefly from the mainland of the Province it is believed that Vancouver Island is also very rich in the precious metal,
and at Leech River where there are a number of white miners, good wages are
made and with improved appliances the yield of this district wiU be very large.
Green, Worlock & Co. handle most of the gold from Leech River which they
declare to be of a very fine quality, and for which they pay almost the highest
price of any produced in British Columbia. The cross presented to Bishop Hills
on his departure for England lately, was made from Leech River gold furnished
by this firm.
Another pleasing incident in this connection with gold mining in this Province is that the key to be used by Her Majesty Queen Victoria at the opening of
the Imperial Institute in London, England, was made from British Columbia
gold.
It is expected now that proper machinery and appliances are being introduced into the mines of Cariboo and Cassiar that the annual gold product wiU
rapidly increase and the purchase and shipment of the precious metal will become
more and more important. Mr. F. H. Worlock is now the'agent for Wells, Fargo
& Co., and the facilities for handling gold thus afforded to Green, Worlock & Co.
will keep them in the front rank as purchasers and shippers. The connection
therefore between the great Express Company and the banking house in Victoria
has been a long and close one for over thirty years.
i IK
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
61
P. O. Box 167.
Telephone 21.
A. E. PLANTA | CO.,
Real Estate and Insurance Agts.
Farm Property on Vancouver Island a Specialty.
New York  Life Assurance Society.    ,
Commercial Union Assurance Company.
Accident Assurance Company of North America.
Canadian Mutual Loan & Investment Company.
Loans Negotiated, Interest Collected.
Office: 46 Commercial Street, Nanaimo, B. C.
w:
Grocers and Importers.
Headquarters for California and Tropical Fruits.
Our Stock will be found well assorted at all times, as it is our aim
to meet competition in all lines.
8-10 Yates Street,
L C. 62
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
t
Farming.
Although the general surface of British
Columbia is rugged and mountainous,
there are thousands of acres of valley
land, as fertile and productive as any the
sun shines upon in its daily round. This
land is of three classes—the alluvial bottoms lying along the water courses ; the
more level portions of the uplands of the
islands and coast, and the mountain districts of the interior, now covered with
timber, but possessing exceUent soil and
yielding largely when cleared and cultivated; the treeless benches and tablelands of the interior, which are highly
productive when watered by irrigation.
These embrace a total of not less than
ten thounand square miles of arable soil,
so diverse in character, climatic conditions and location, as to be suitable for
the production of every fruit, cereal,
vegetable, tree, plant and flower known
to the temperate zone.
General Farming Districts.
General farming, the raising of grain,
roots and vegetables, dairying and stock-
keeping is carried on in the foUowing
districts:
Agassiz.
Alberni.
Ashcroft.
Big Bar Creek.
Burrard Inlet.
Blue Springs.
Beaver Point.
Beaver Creek.
Brownsville.
Chemainus.
ChiUiwhack.
Coutlee.
Clover Valley.
Cloverdale.
Clayton.
Cedar.
Duncans
Dog Creek.
Elgin.
Empire Valley.
East Sooke.
French Creek.
Grande Prairie.
Golden.
Genoa.
Huntingdon.
Hope.
Heal.
Kamloops.
Ladner's Landing.
Moodyville.
Nicola Lake.
Nakusp.
Northfield.
Okanagan.
Port Haney.
ParksvUle.
Plumper Pass
Port Kells.
Robson.
Rockford.
Seymour Creek Val.
& Capilano Val. near
Shopland.'
SUverdale.
Steveston.
Squamish.
Sand wick.
Salmon Arm.
Sidney.
Sumas.
Sooke.
Sicamous.
Surrey Centre.
Shortreed.
Salt Spring Island.
St. Eugene Mission.
Tappen Siding.
Terra Rosa.
Turgoose.
Vernon.
Lower Nicola. Westham Island.
Lulu Island. Webster's Corners..
Mission City. Westholme.
Young.
More districts to be heard from, andi
wiU appear from time to time.
Yield of Farm Products.
Wheat    30 to   40 bush, per acre.
Oats.     50 "     75   do       do
Potatoes  150"   200   do       do
Turnips     20"     30 tons     do
Hay      2M       3   do       do
Hops 1200 " 2000 lbs.       do
Orchards wUl return from $250 to $300
per acre.
Stock Raising'.
There is one branch of farming peculiar
to the grass ranges of the interior, where
exceUent facUities are afforded for its
proseciition. The rolling hill-sides of
the eastern slope of Coast range, and the
many similar table lands found throughout this elevated region, are clothed with
a natural grass of the most nutritious
qualities. This, the famous " bunch
grass" of the stock-raiser, provides a better feed than any pasture known. Unfortunately, in those districts which have
been longest occupied, this invaluable
grass has been in many places destroyed
—eaten out by overstocking. Where
this has taken place it has been generally
superseded by the sage bush, which although a tolerably good food, does not
compare with the grass. Bunch grass is
not found much to the north of latitude
53 °, where it yields to red top, blue joint
and other natural grasses. There are,
however, exceUent facilities for stock-
raising even so far north, for these
grasses make good fodder, and grow to a
height which makes it profitable to cut
them for winter feed.
Stock-raising is ' pre-eminently the
farming of the rich man. It cannot be
engaged in successfully without considerable capital, and though the profits are
large the risks are usuaUy greater than
those undertaken by the small farmer.
Yet in none of its forms can farming be
regarded as a risky occupation in this
province. There are, of course, the vicissitudes of the seasons to .expect, as
elsewhere, but it is questionable whether
any other country could be pointed put
having greater immunity from the terrors of the farmer—drought, storm, and
destructive pests. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. 63
FOR SALE
On Vancouver Island and the Mainland of British Columbia.
Some of the finest Farms and Farming properties in British Columbia, ranging from 40 acres up to 7000 acres, situated
in the most favorable farming localities.
II PEMBERTON t£ SON,
Real Estate and Financial Agents.
P. O. Box 246. VICTORIA, B. C.
TELEPHONE 488. P. O. BOX 505.
Dalby & Claxton,
..    AGENTS, .?§
The Great West Life Assurance Co., Victoria & Winnipeg.
The Yorkshire Guarantee & Securities Corporation, England.
The Alliance Assurance Company (Fire), England.
The British Columbia Fire Insurance Company, Victoria, B. C.
The Royal Canadian Packing Co., Claxton & Skeena.
W 64 YATES STREET,
1 VICTORIA, B. C. M
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Stock Raising Districts.
Stock-raising is carried on in the
lowing districts :
fol-
Ashcroft.
Alkali Lake.
Big Bar Creek.
Burrard Inlet.
Blue Springs.
BrownsviUe.
ChilUwhack.
Coutlee.
Clover VaUey.
Clinton.
ChUcoten.
Cedar.
Dog Creek.
Duck & Pringle.
East Sooke.
French Creek.
Lower Nicola.
Lac La Hache.
Lund.
Mission.
Nicola Lake.
McPhersons.
Otter Point.
Okanagan.
Penticton.
Pender Island.
ParksviUe.
Plumper Pass.
Rockford.
Savonas
Salmon Arm.
Shopland.
Fairmount Springs. Sumas.
Grande Prairie.
Golden.
Genoa.
Galena.
Hornby Island.
Hatizic.
Huntingdon.
Kamloops.
Kettle Biver.
St. Elmo.
Surrey Centre.
Salt  Spring Island.
St. Eugene Mission.
Tappen Siding.
Turgoose.
Vernon.
Westholme.
Young.
Other districts to be heard from.
Dairying Districts.
Dairying is a special feature of the following districts
Blue Springs.
Beaver Creek.
Chilliwack.
Cloverdale.
Clayton.
Hatizic.
Ladner's Landing.
Lulu Island.
Lac La Hoche.
North Bend.
McPhersons.
Okanagan.
Port Hammond.
Port Haney.
Riverside.
Robson.
Shopland.
Steveston.
Sandwick.
Salmon Arm.
Sumas.
St. Elmo.
Surrey Centre.
Fruit   Growing.
Not only is the richness of the soil "of
British Columbia an important factor in
its admirable adaptability for fruit culture, but its greatest advantage lies in
the humidity of the atmosphere and the
mildness of the climate, modified and
tempered as it is by the Japan currents,
so that even on the seemingly poorest
and lightest soil fruits grow and yield
the most magnificent returns.
Here, where the land is directly affected by the sea breezes, where the atmos
phere is humid and the climate genial,
grapes can be raised in great abundance,
such early and hardy varieties as the
Warden, Moore, Concord, Brighton, Delaware and Niagara being especially recommended. Peaches, prunes, apricots,
filberts and, in fact, any fruit grown in
the temperate zones attain here their
very highest perfection, and some of the
finest specimens exhibited at eastern
fairs have been the production of this
section of Canada.
Fruit of British Columbia.
Apples. Grapes. Peaches.
Apricots. Nectarines.        Pears.
Cherries. Plumbs. Prunes.
And berries of every description.
Hops yield from 1200 to- 2000 lbs. per
acre, and are of the finest quality.
Fruit Growing Districts.
This industry is largely on the increase,
the soil and climate being speciaUy adapted in many parts of the Province to fruit
growing. Fruit growing is now carried
on successfully in the foUowing districts:
Alberni.
Mount Pleasant.
Agassiz.
North Bend.
Ashcroft Station.
Nicola Lake.
Big Bar Creek.
Northfield.
Blue Springs.
Otter Point.
Beaver Creek.
Okanagan.
Chilliwhack.
Port Haney.
Clayton.
Port Moody.
Cedar.
Penticton.
Cache Creek.
Port Hammond.
Cariboo.
Port Kells.
Cowichan.
. Riverside.
Delta.
Robson.
Duck & Pringle.
Somenos.
Elgin.
St. Mary's Mission.
Empire Valley.
Saanich.
East Sooke.
SpaUmacheen.
Golden.
Shopland.
Genoa.
Steveston.
Hornby Island.
Salmon Arm.
Hatizic.
Sumas.
Howe Sound.
Sicamous.
Huntingdon.
St. Elmo.
Hope.
Surrey Centre.
Heal.
Shortreed.
Johnson's  Landin
g.Salt Spring Island
Ladner's Landing.
TurgoOse.
Lower Nicola.
Victoria.
Loch Enoch.
Veinon.
LiUooet.
Westholme.
Lund.
Young.
Matsqui.
Yale.
Mission City. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. 65
JOHN HENDRY, DAVID McNAIR, 0. M. BEECHER
President. Land Commissioner. Vice-Peesident.
B. C. Mills, Timber & Trading Co.,
Lumber Manufacturers and Merchants, f|
Head Office, Hastings Saw Mill, - - VANCOUVER.
HASTINGSSAW MILL,
BURRARD   INLET. I
Vessels Chartered  for all  tbe  Usual  Lumber  Ports.    Cargoes   of
Rough   and   Dressed   Lumber.     Timber  and   Spars
Supplied   with   Utmost   Despatch.
Lumber Yard, North End of Dunlevy Avenue.
RICHARD H. ALEXANDER, Local Manager.
aning Mills Branch,
Royal C.
Wholesale & Retail Lumber Yard, False Creek,
Foot of Carrall Street.
R. C. FERGUSON, Local Manager.
HASTINGS   MILL   STORE,
North End of Dunlevy Avenue,
T7"ua.KTOOXJTr3E33FL,
IMPORTERS AND DEALEES IN
GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS
Hand-Loggers' and Camp Supplies—a full range always on hand.
Ships' Stores in Bond.     Inspection Invited.
TOWING STEAMERS—Active, Comet, Belle.   15 Scows & Barges.
NEW WESTMINSTER BRANCH,
Royal City Saw &, Planing Mills.
Wholesale and Retail Lumber Yards, Richard St.
R. JARDINE, - - Local Manager. 66
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
II
B. C. HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY &
FRUIT GROWERS ASSOCIATION.
Vancouve r.—President, W. J. Harris. 1st Vice-President, T. Cunningham. 2nd Vice-President, N. Butchart.
Secretary-Treasurer, A. H. B. Mac-
gowan.
AGRICULTURAL   ASSOCIATIONS.
B. C. Agricultural Association,
Victoria.—President, W. H. Ellis.
Treasurer, G. A. McTavish. Secretary,
W. H. Bambridge.
Vancouver Association.—
President, W. T. Salsbury. Vice-President, H. F. Ceperley. Secretary, A. H.
B.Magown.
Chilliwhack Association.—
President, G. W. Gillanders. Treasurer, S. Willard. Secretary, G. W. Chad-
sey.
Land Regulations.
Any person, being the head of a family,
a widow or single man over 18 years of
age, being a British subject, or alien purposing to become a British subject, can
pre-empt 160 acres at $1.00 per acre ; but
no Crown grant can issue until the pre-
emptor or his family shall have bona-fide
occupied the pre-emption not less than
two years; and further, in the case of an
alien, until he has become a British subject. Two months leave of absence under
the Land Act, and an additional four
months for sufficient cause, when applied
for to the Chief Commissioner, can be
had in each year till Crown grant is obtained. A certificate of improvement,
showing that the claim has been improved to the extent of $2.50 per acre, is
necessary before Crown grant can be
issued.
Timber and hay lands can be leased
from the government, the former for not
more than twenty-one and the latter for
not more than five years. Timber lands
pay a yearly rental of ten cents per acre,
and a royalty of 50 cents per 1,000 feet on
all logs cut. Leases of land for other
purposes may also be granted by the
Lieutenant-Governor-in-Council.
British   Columbia Timber.
PRINCIPAL.   TREES.
Alder.
Arbutus.
Birch.
Cedar.
Crab Apple.
Cypress, Yellow.
Fir, Red.
Hemlock.
Maple.
Oak.
Pine, White.
Spruce.
White Thorn.
Yew.
QUALITIES OF A PEW VARIETIES.
Douglas Sprue e.—Good for lumber, planks, framing, bridging, ties,
masts and spars.
Western Hemlock.—Of great
height, makes good lumber, bark for
tanning.
Englemann Spruce. — Tall,
straight, good wood and durable.
Menzies Sprue e.—A very large
tree, wood white, and used for general
purposes.
Balsam   Spruce. — Building, etc.
White   a nd   Red   Pine. — Also
used for building and general purposes.
Black   Pin e.—Only for rough work.
Western Cedar. —Valuable for
shingles.   Is very durable.
Yellow Ceda r.—Fine grained, used
in boat building, etc.
Western Larch (Tamarac). —
A large tree—strong durable wood..
TIMBER   LICENCES.
Unlicensed persons, except for farm or
mining purposes, etc., are not permitted
to cut trees on Crown lands. A timber
license may be granted for 1000 acres for
four years on payment of $10 annually,
and 15 cents for each tree (except hemlock) felled, payable half-yearly. No person can hold more than one license at the
same time, and it is not transferable.
Mill-owners cannot saw logs taken from
Crown lands (in which are included lands
leased at less than 10 cents an acre) until
the timber dues of 20 cents per thousand
feet, board measure, are paid.
Any person desirous of obtaining a
special timber license, shall comply with
the following provisions :—
(a.) He shall first stake out the land
sought to be included in such special
license in the manner prescribed by
the law relating to the purchase of
land from the Crown :
- HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. 67
jthographing and engraving, book k job printing,
Salmon and Fruit Label Printing
In every style of the art are executed on The Colonist Presses at fair prices. The
best of material, the most capable workmen and careful attention
to work has earned for the product of The Colonist Presses a provincial reputation.
THE COLONIST PRINTING PUBLISHING COMPANY, LD.
VICTORIA, B. C.
o THE_^>
Weekly Times.
The Weekly edition of the Times is a 16-page paper; contain ing all the news of
" the week, general, provincial and city.   It is the only independent political paper in British Columbia, and has a very large circulation
within the Province.
Subscription, $2 per annum in advance ; postage in addition to foreign countries.
A Ci n T*^Q£t
THE TIMES P. & P. CO., Victoria, B.C.
LANGLEY & CO.,
Wholesale and Retail Druggists,
21 & 23 YATES STREET,
W. S. SANTO & CO.,
NANAIMO,        -       B. C.
IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN
andL  Farm Produce,
Fancy Groceries and Provisions, Cheese, JHams, "Bacon, Fruit, Fish, Teas,
Coffee, Sugar, Spice, Pickles and a General Assortment of Fancy Groceries.
THE TRADE AND FAMILIES SUPPLIED.
Capitol and other Popular Brands of Flour onf Hand. 68
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
M\
(&.)]He shall, after making the application
for the special license, publish for a
period of thirty days in tbe British
Columbia Gazette, and in any newspaper circulating in the district in
which the lands lie, notice of his application for such license, and shall in
such notice give the best description
of the land applied for, specifying
metes and bounds and such further
particulars,if any, as maybe required
by the Chief Commissioner.
A special timber license is not granted
for a larger area than 1,000 acres of land,
or for a longer period than, one year.
The license is not transferable, and may
be surrendered at any time. No person
is entitled to more than one special
license at the same time. The licensee is
required to pay to the Chief Commissioner, for the use of Her Mrjesty, the sum of
$50.00 for said license ; payment to be
made upon the granting of the license.
Leases of surveyed unpre-empted
Crown timber lands may be obtained, for
a period not to exceed 21 years, to any
person, persons, or corporation duly
authorized in that behalf, for the purpose
of cutting spars, timber, or lumber, and
actually engaged in those pursuits, who
have tendered the highest cash bonus,
subject to the payment of an annual rental of 10 cents per acre, and of a royalty of
50 cents per thousand feet on the scaled
measurement of the logs cut on the leased premises. The lease shall contain
provisions binding the, lessee to erect in
such part of the Province, as may be approved by the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works, a lumber mill appurtenant to the limit, and capable of cutting
not less than one thousand feet of lumber in inch boards per day of twelve
hours for each and every four hundred
acres of land inclnded in such lease ; and
any such lease is subject to any general
stipulations which the Lieutenant-Gov-
ernor-in-Council may see fit to impose.
Any tender which may be made by any
person who is not the owner of the properly equipped saw mill in some part of
the Province appurtenant to the limit
desired, will not be considered unless accompanied by a certified cheque equal to
10 cents per acre for each and every acre
contained in the limit tendered for, as a
guarantee for the erection of a suitable
mill within two years.
The Climate.
The climate of the Pacific Province is
spoken of by all who visit this coast as
one of its great attaactions; it can hardly
fail to please since there are several climates to chose from. The person who
cannot stand cold weather and shudders
at the sight of ice, can find ample space
for enterprise or temptation to idleness
in a land that might have suggested
''The Lotos Eaters." On reaching Vancouver Island or the coast line of the
mainland, like them, he need "no longer
roam," for there he will find a climate
such as he desires.
"What strikes an Englishman most
about the climate is its serenity, the absence of the biting east winds, and the
less need than iu England of an umbrella during the spring, summer, and
the prolonged autumn. He notices, also,
with surprise and pleasure, that rainy
weather here does not tend to depress
the spirits as it does in England. The
invigorating quality of the climate remains throughout the year.
"The cool nights in Vancouver Island,
and in all parts of the Province, freshens
the heat-worn, denizens of California and
the Atlantic States. Such visitors linger
before leaving the Province, and long to
return."
Opinions of residents :
The climate is very good, only one man
has died near Ainsworth in 5 years.
Robert Green, Ainsworth.
Splendid climate and very healthy.
Mrs. H. P. Cornwall, Ashcroft.
The climate is somewhat humid. In
summer however, the weather is delightful.   Good health reigns supreme.
S. A. Spencer, Alert Bay
Cannot be beaten—we have no doctor
and need none.
Philip Ginder, Big Bar Creek.
The climate cannot be beaten for tourists and health-seekers.
Alex. McDonnell, Blue Springs.
Good for health. Dry winter and summer here. Attractive for pleasure seekers. Gilbert Blair, Coutlee.
Best in the whole world.
Jos. S. Place, Dog Creek.
As healthy as any in the world. The
finest climate for consumptive people.
J. R. J. Brown, Empire Valley. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
69
GEO. H. WILLIAMS, Prop.
COLUMBIA  STREET,
Tourist Hotel of Westminster.
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
NANAIMO MEAT MARKET
HULL BROS. & CO.'S BRANCH SHOPS,
Victoria Crescent, NANAIMO, B. C.
Calgary, Canmore, N.W.T., Anthrasite, N.W.T., Banff, N.W.T., Golden, N.W.T.
Donald, B.C., Revelstoke, Nanaimo, Wellington, Karnlpops.
PURVEYORS  OF   MEATS,
English Cured B. C. Bacon, Lard, Home Rendered Lard.
ALL STALL FED CATTLE. Telephone No. 7-9.
THE REMINGTON
Standard
ewriter
The Best Machine in the World.
M. W, WAITT & CO.,
64 Government St.,
Agents, VICTORIA.
W. MUNSIE.
E. MORRISON.
S
11 x
Ml
I
i
111
Rough
x      JJllllU   UUIU.
Ewen Morrison, Manager.
MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF
ressed Cedar &
T. ELFORD.
I .
'J
mber
Rustic Clapboards, Flooring, Mouldings, Lath, Shingles, etc., kept in Stock
or Cut to Order.
Yard : Discovery Street, between Store and Government St.,
VICTORIA, B. C.
Address all communications to P. O. Box 98.
'J HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Dry and healthy. Plenty of hot springs
here. S. Brewer, Fairmont Springs.
Excellent for persons in poor health
who will give it a fair trial.
Chas. A. Warren, Golden.
Climate unexcelled.
Geo. Ford, Hornby Island.
Very fine climate for health.
T. F. Fruswell, Huntingdon.
Climate mild  all  through the  year.
Sickness practically unknown here.
Jas. Wardle, Hope.
Could not be better for health seekers.
A. C. McArthur, Illecillewaet.
No sickness has ever appeared here.
Ernest Spraggett, Kettle River.
The climate is good, I don't think it
can be beaten anywhere.
C. M. O'Keefe, Okanagan.
Climate perfect.   Very healthy.  Much
sought after by invalids and pleasure
seekers.
W. T. Collenson, Plumper Pass.
Could not be excelled.
John Latta, Port Kells.
The climate is exceedingly good, an
is very suitable for health-seekers.
Robt. Scott, Rockford.
Climate excellent, dry and healthy.
Ji H. McNab, Savonas Ferry.
During the two years I have been here
the health of the place has been excellent. Wm. Mashiter, Squamish.
None healthier.
John Muir, Sooke.
Best of climate and healthy.
R. Shortreed, Shortreed.
Healthy except for the doctors.
Nicholas Cocola, St. Eugene Mission.
The climate is very healthy, and there
is very little sickness here.
Jas. Mellis, Terra Rosa.
The climate is unexcelled for invalids.
Laura McDodd, Van Winkle
Fresh evidence in regard to the climate
of   British Columbia will be  published
each month. WM
INDUSTRIES OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Agassi z.—Saw and shingle mill.
Albern i.—Paper mill and saw mill.
Ashcroft. — Flour   mill,   carriage
works.
Alert   B a y.—Saw mill.
B e a v e ,r.—Two saw mills.
Big   Bar   Cree k.—Two flour mills,
one saw mill.
Burrard Inle t.—Saw mill, sash
and door factory and shingle mill.
B a 1 f o u r.—Three saw mills and one
smelter.
Blue   Spring s.—Saw mill.
Beaver   Poin t.—Two saw mills.
Beaver   Cree k.—Saw mill.
Chemainu s.—Saw mill.
Chilliwhack .—Three saw mills,
carriage works, flour mill, brick yard,
fruit cannery and cheese factory.
C o u 11 e e.—Two flour mills, two small
saw mills.
Clover   Valle y.—Logging.
C h i 1 c o t e n.—Saw mill and two flour
mills.
•Cobble   Hil 1.—Lime kilns.
Duncan s.—Carriage works, saw mill
and pump factory.
-Saw and flour mill.
-Dry dock and ship re-
P o g   Creek.
Esquimalt.
pairing.
Empire   Valle y.—Saw and flour
mill.
E n d e r 1 y.—Flour mill.
French   Cree k.—Making dog fish
oil.
Fairmount     Springs. — Saw
mill.
Fort   Simpso n.—Saw mills.
Goldstrea m.—Saw mill.
G o 1 d e n.—Two saw mill and smelter.
G e n o a.—Saw mill.
Hornby Islan d.—Saw and shingle
mill.
Huntingdon .—Saw   and  planing
mill.
Kamloops. —Carriage  works,  saw
miU, tannery and soda water works.
Kettle   Rive r.—Flour mill.
Ladner's Landin g.—Oil factory
and saw mill.
Lower   Nicola.—Flour  and  saw
mill.
L i 11 o o e t.—-Tjlour and saw mill. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
71
sign op the big bottle.
o—J. C. DOUGLAS,—o
Wine and Spirit   Merchant, Wholesale
and Retail, 242 Cordova Street,
VANCOUVER B. C.
P. O. Box 245. Telephone 258.
TheOCCIDENTAL
Cor. Wharf and Johnson Sts.,
R. H. BERRYMAN, Proprietor.
This Hotel is in the very center of the
business portion of the city. The travelling public will find this to be the most
convenient as well as the most comfortable and respectable in the city.
Rates: $1 to $1.50 per day, according to
room.
Hot and cold water baths.    Bar and Billiard room attached.   Bass' xxxx 8
year old Ale  on   Draught.
P. O. BOX 465. VICTORIA, B. C.
532 Hastings St., Vancouver, B.C.
WHOLESALE IMPOKTEES OF
WINES&SPIRITS
AGENTS FOR
Gonzalez, Byass & Co., Jerez de la Fron-
tera.
Hunt, Raspe, Teage & Co., Oporto.
Barkhousen & Co., Bordeaux.
P. O. Box 44.
Telephone 33.
Geo. Bevilockway,
Red House, Commercial St. Nanaimo.
Importer. Wholesale and Itetail Dealer in tfener-
al Merchandise, etc.   Highest cash price paid
for Hides, Fur and Country Produce.
pRESCENT HOTEL, J. Bennett,
^ Prop., cor. Victoria and Winfield
Crescent, Nanaimo. Fire-proof brick
building. First-class accommodation.
Rates $1 per day and upwards, according
to rooms. The best Wines, Liquors and
Cigars.
The Leading- Boot & Shoe Store.
Dealer  in   Ladies', Gents', Misses'
and Childrens'
Boots   and    Shoes,
OE EVERY DESCRIPTION.
Custom   Work   and    Repairing
Neatly Done.
18 Cordova St., Vancouver, B. C.
arcus
Insurance Agent,
Empire Mutual Loan and Investment Co.
Union Assurance Society of London
England.
See Marcus Wolfe's advertisemet, page 33
R. HILBERT
Importer   of   all
Boots,   Shoes
& Rubber Goods.     The cheapest and best
house in the city.   The one price store.    H fair
deal and a square deal to all.
The choicest Havana and Domestic Cigars,
Tobaccos, Pipes, Fancy Goods, Etc.
Lion HousE,com\ne™faai st .Nanaimo.
W. J. ORR.        P. O. Box 67.     ED. RENDELIi..
Orr   &   Rendell,
BOOT AND SHOE EMPORIUM
Commercial St., Nanaimo.
Repairing neatly and promptly executed..
W. VanHouten. A. E. Randle
VanHouten &  Randle,
HARDWARE    MERCHANTS,,
Stoves,   Tinware,   Paints,  Oils,
Varnishes, Etc.
Tel. 3-2. Commercial St., Nanaimo.. 72
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
1
Mission City. —Sash and door
factory.
Mount Pleasant. —Lager beer
brewery, nail and bolt factory and tannery, soda water factory.
New Westminster. — 6 boat
builders, 1 book bindery, 1 box factory,
2 iron works, 1 brick yard, 5 carriage
works, 1 cigar factory, 3 cornice works,
3 foundries and machine shops, 2 furniture factories, 1 galvanized sheet iron
works, 1 marble works, 3 lumber mills,
3 shingle mills, 1 woolen mill, 2 planing
mills, 2 sash and door factories, 1 soda
water factory, 1 tannery.
N a n a i m o.—2 boat builders, 1 boot
and shoe factory, 1 brick yard, 1 candy
factory, 2 carriage works, 1 cigar factory, 3 coal mines, 2 foundries and machine shops, 1 iron works, 1 marble
works, 1 Lumber mill, 1 shingle mill, 1
pottery, 1 sash and door factory, 1 soap
factory, 2 soda water factories, 1 tau-
nery, 2 brewries.
Nicola Lak e.—Roller flour mills,
shingle, planing and saw mills.
Northfiel d.—Powder and dynamite
factory.
New   Denve r.—Two saw mills.
Pilot Bay. — Extensive smelter
works, 1 brick yard.
Port   Hane y.—Large brick yards.
Rivers   Inle t.—Saw mill.
Riverside. —Sash, door and blind
factory.
Revelstok e.—Lumber mills, smelter, and 1 brewery.
R o c k f o r d.—Saw mill.
Silverdal e.—Saw and planing mill.
S a n d w i c k.—Saw and planing mill.
S i d n e y.—Saw mill.
S u m a s.'—Saw mill.
Sook e.—Saw mill.
Shortree d.—Saw mill.
St. Eugene Mission. — Saw
and flour mill.
Tappen   Sidin g.—Saw mill.
Vernon.—Brewery, brick yard, saw.
mill, jam and fruit canning factory.
V i c t o r i a.—Coffee and spice mills,
15 boat builders, boot and shoe factory,
2 box factories, brass foundry, 5 breweries, 5 brick yards, brush factory, 5
candy factories, 11 carriage factories, 8
cigar factories, 2 clothing manufactories, 1 cooperage, 2 cornice factories, 2
engine and boiler works, 4 foundries
and machine shops, 2 furniture factories, 1 jam factory, 4 marble works, 9
lumber mills, 2 flour mills, 1 shingle
mill, 1 planing mill, 1 pottery, 1 powder
factory, 6 printing offices, 2 sail lofts, 5
sash and door factories, 2 soap factories, 3 soda water factories, 1 tannery, 1
vinegar factory, 2 book binderies, 1
fruit cannery, 1 match factory.
Vancouve r.—5 boat builders, 2 boiler works, 2 book binderies, 3 breweries,
2 brick yards, 2 candy factories, 4 carriage factories, 1 cigar factory, 1 clothing manufactory, 1 cornice factory, 3
foundries and machine shops, 1 fruit
cannery, 2 furniture factories, 2 iron
works, 1 marble works, 11 lumber mills,
4 shingle mills, 1 sail loft, 6 sash and
door factories, 3 soap factories, 1 soda
water factory, 1 sugar refinery.
Wellingto n.—Coal mines, saw mill.
Y o u n g.—Saw mill.
The Fisii of  British Columbia.
EOOD EISH.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
•26
27
28
29
commonly called
Rock Cod
Halibut,
Red Bass (2 kinds),
Black Bass,
Cod,
Cod (2 kinds),
Cod—kelp Trout,
Black Cod,
Whiting,
Tom Cod,
Hake,
Flounders (3 kinds),
Herring,
Oolachan,
Smelts (2 kinds),
Anchovy,
Capelin,.
Shad,
Skate (2 kinds),
Salmon (5 kinds),
Trout (2 kinds),
S turgeon,
Prawns,
Crabs (2 species),
Lobsters (small burrowing kind of no
econonic value),
Clam (3 kinds),
Cockle,
Whelk (3 kinds),
Oysters (3 kinds),
Mussels. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
78
CHAS. McDONOUGH,
WHOLESALE AND IRETAIL MERCHAB
FRONT STREET, NEW WESTMINSTER.
m
Hi
Dry Goods and  General Furnishings, Flour, Feed, Grain and
Vegetables.
Fresh Eggs and Butter a Specs!
D. S. Curtis & Co
DRUGS A SPECIALTY,
NEW WESTMINSTER,    B. 0.
D. LY
•9
DEALER  IN
BOOKS & STATIONERY,
Views of the Province, Novelties, Etc., Etc.j
NEW WESTMINSTER,     B.C.
R. G. Macpherson
EMIST & DRUGGIST,
mm
Burns' Block, Columbia St.,
NEW WESTMINSTER,     B.C.
r\T
U
DALL k SINCLAIR,
Grain, Flour, Feed and Commission Merchants,
Front Street,
NEW   WESTMINSTER,   B.C.
.
m 'i 74
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
-it-1 •
j
OIL-PRODUCING PISH.
1 Dog-fish,
2 Tope Shark,
3 Babbit-fish,
4 Basking Shark,
5 Whale (2 kinds),
6 porpoise,
7 Seal (2 kinds),
8 Sea Lion,
9 Sea Otter,
10 Lutra Canadensis, or Land Otter.
SALMON   PACK.
YEAR. CASES.
1876     9,847
1877  67,387
1878 113,601
1879  61,093
1880.  61,849
1881 177,276
1882 255,061
1883 196,292
1884 141,242
1885 108,517
1886 161,264
1887 204,083
1888 184,040
1889 414,294
1890 409,464
1891 314,893
1892 228,470
British    Columbia    Canneries  and
Canning   Companies.
eraser biver. Agents.
B.C. Packing Co.. Bell-Irving & Patterson
Bon Accord Fishing Co... R. Ward & Co.
Bon Accord Fishing Co. No. 2        "
Ewen & Co  "
Laidlaw & Co R P. Rithet & Co.
Delta Canning Co  "
Harlock Packing Co.. "
Wadhams, E. A. .Bell-Irving & Patterson
Canadian Pacific Pkg Co.. R. Ward & Co.
Hunt & CosteUo Dalby & Claxton
Wilson & Co Turner, Beeton & Co.
Short & Co.
Lulu Island Canning Co.
Terra Nova Canning Co.
Beaver Canning Co J. H. Todd & Son
Phoenix Pkg Co.. Bell-Irving & Patterson
C. G. Hobson & Co.. Turner, Beeton & Co.
Canoe Pass Canning Co	
 A.B.F. Pkg Co., Vancouver
Duncan Batchelor & Co.
Wellington Pkg Co... .R.P. Rithet & Co.
British Am. Pkg Co Bell-Irving & P.
SKEENA RIVER.
British Am. Pkg Co Bell-Irving & P.
R. Cunningham R. P. Rithet & Co.
North Pacific Pkg Co... Dalby & Claxton
Standard Pkg Co R, P. Rithet & Co.
Balmoral Can'g Co.. Turner, Beeton & Co.
Royal Canadian Dalby & Claxton
Richmond Pkg Co J. H. Todd & Son
B.C. Fishing Co	
 Findlay, Durham & Brodie
Inverness Can'g Co.. Turner,Beeton & Co.
NAAS RIVEB.
Federation Brand Salmon "Canning Co.,
Limited R. Draney.
Victoria Packing Co Findlay, D. & B.
Wannuck Packing Co.. R. P. Rithet & Co.
Rivers Inlet Canning Co.. Findlay, D. & B.
Alert Bay Canning Co T. Earle
Price's Preserving and Canning Co.,
Gardner's Inlet.
SA1.M01V PACK, 1892.
Pack by Canneries.
FRASEB BXVEB. Cases.
Ewen & Co     7,800
Bon Accord Fishery Co 117,960
Anglo-British Columbia Pkg Co.. 31,917
British Columbia Canning Co     1,758
Victoria Canning Co  14,313
Richmond Canning Co     3,483
Beaver Canning Co     9,039
Terra Nova Canning Co     3,945
SKEENA RIVER,
British Columbia Canning Co  11,680
Inverness Canning Co  11,181
Balmoral Canning Co  11,255
Victoria Canning Co  10,766
Skeena Packing Co  11,073
Anglo-British Columbia Can'g Co. 22,500
Royal Canadian Packing Oo  11,325
ALERT   BAT.
Alert Bay Canning Co     3,598
NAAS RIVEB.
A. J. McLellan  11,000
British Columbia Canning Co     7,022
Victoria Canning Co     7,412
RIVERS INLET.
British Columbia Canning Co 10,248
Wannuck Packing Co    4,878
LOWE INLET.
Lowe Inlet Packing Co     8,161
Gardner's inlet.
Price's Packing Co    6,156
Total pack 1892 228,470
"       "    1891 314,893
«       «    1890 409,464
1 HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
75
JOHN LECKIE       |
531 Granville St.,      |fe  VANCOUVER, B. C.
—IMPORTER   OF—
Fishing Supplies.       Cotton Ducks.      Twines.      Oiled Clothing.
Ropes.       Blocks.        Flags.       Bunting, Etc.
A Full Stock Always on Hand.
AGENT—For W. and J. Knox's Celebrated double Knot and Cured Salmon
Nets, Twine, Etc.
For the Finest and Best Footwear in the
City, go to
Mills & Bethune,
20 Cordova Street, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Poodle   Dog   Hotel
Restaurant.
DEPOT HOTEL,
Opposite C. P. R. Depot,
Columbia St., New Westminster, B. C.
First-Class Accommodation. Charges Moderate.
P. O. BILODEAU, - PROPRIETOR.
LOUIS   MARBOEUF,
PROPRIETOR.
Yates Street, between Government and
Broad,
52 Rooms—lighted by gas and electricity
All modern conveniences.
Rates from $1 upwards, according to room
P. O. Box 127.
The Japanese Bazaar !
Great Variety ot Porcelains,
Curios, Ivory, Sandal Wood, Silks,
Dressing Gowns, Etc.
TEAS,    RICE,    MATCHES,
CIGARS.
T. S. FUTCHER,
41 Fort Street,       Victoria, B. C.
VICTORIA,
B. C. 76
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Pack toy Districts.
h
1892
Fraser River... 80,215
Skeena River.. 89,780
Naas River 25,434
Rivers Inlet.... 15,126
Lowe Inlet     8,161
Gardner's Inlet   6,156
Bute Inlet	
Alert Bay     3,598
Total.... 228,470
1891
178,954
78,135
10.323
34^24
8,031
3,876
650
1890
241,889
90,995
23,906
32,961
6,087
3,719
2.627
7,280
Education in British Columbia.
314,893   409,464
Salmon Shipments in Detail.
England—           1892 1891        1890
London  61,864 122,850 ) 0Qo oqq
Liverpool.... 101,447 97,911 J zy6>6y6
Canada 59,350 60,950     78,566
Australia     1,498 23,534     29,162
United States..       350           50
Orient  350
Local Sales and
Stocks on hand   4,311 8,948       8,293
Total... .228,470   314,893   409,464
Salmon Fleet, Season 1892.
Sailed
Martha Fisher. .Oct. 18... .34,002
Glengarry Nov.  3 37,352
Chili Dec. 15... 30,093
Liverpool direct  101,447
The Frederick. .Dec. 18... .32,403
Riyer Ganges.. .Dec. 19....29,461
London direct  61,864
Total shipments per sailing 	
vessels  163,311
Seal  Hunting1.
Sealing Fleet of 1891.—49   vessels-
tonnage 3,342 tons, 16 canoes, 384 boats,
69fi whitps     SFift Tn^innia
STATISTICS FOR 1892.
Total number of pupils enrolled.. 10,773
Average daily attendance  6,227
Total number of teachers employed    228
Number of schools in operation...     149
CL ASSIFICA TION.
High Schools     4
Graded Schools  14
Ward Schools     7
Rural Schools 124
149
Expenditure for the year—
Teachers'   Salaries $148,377 22
Incidental Expenses—
Rural Schools       5,205 76
Education Office       7,044 82
$160,627 80
An average of $25.79 for each pupil based
on average daily attendance.
Statement   of   total   expenditdre for
Education during 1892.
School Houses $ 43,497 20
Furniture, repairs, &c, rural
districts       3,695 38
Educatian   proper
as above $160,627 80
Less refund from
city districts....    34,441 85 126,185 95
$173,378 53
COMPARATIVE    STATEMENT.
1872.       1882. 1892.
Number of schools 14          48 149
Pupils enrolled.. .412       2,653 10,773
Teachers employed 16          62 228
Expenditure—1872,     $11,575.12; 1882,
$49,268.63;   1892,  $160,627.80.
Average per. pupil—1872,$57.20 ; 1882,
$36,26; 1892, 25.79.
TRADE AND SHIPPING.
The report of the British Columbia
Board of Trade for 1892 says:—"The
short pack of salmon, followed by exceptionally low prices ; the peremptory
closing of sealing in Behring Sea in the
middle of the hunting season of 1891;
the collapse of the South American
lumber markets, and the slackness of
the California coal trade, have all combined to injuriously affect the trade of
the year under review. ' However, notwithstanding such adverse conditions it HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
77
JOSEPH SEARS,
Established 1876.
PAINTER,
GLAZIER,
PAPER HANGER.
—DEALER IN—
Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Brushes, Window
Glass, Plate Glass and Wall Papers.
114 Yates Street,
Victoria, B. 0.
Shawnigan ILake Hotel,
Shawnigan Lake! Vancouver Island, E.&N.R.R,
The best fishing and hunting to be found on the
Island. AJso furnished cottages to be let by the
week or month. Skiffs and pleasure boats for
hire at Victoria rates; charming scenery; the first
station on the line for refreshments; every train
stops at the door of the hotel. GrEO.KoKNie, Prop
o
Seattle, Wn.
European and American Plan.
THOS. GUINEAN,       Proprietor,
Front St., between
Marion & Madison,
All modern improvements. First-class in every
 respect.	
Estimates   Given  on  Shortest  Notice.
H. HATCH,
PRACTICAL.
Tin,  Sheet Iron and   Copper
Worker.
Chimney Tops and Ventilators, Roofing,
Hot Air Furnaces and Stove Repairing.
All kinds of Jobbing  Promptly Done.
Copper Smithing and Ship Work a
Specialty.
34 Powell St.    Vancouver, B. C.
:
—o—BAILEY    BROS.,—o—
Booksellers & Stationers. Picture Frames
and Mouldings.     Landscape Photographic Views of C. P. R. from
Ocean to Ocean.
158-162 Cordova St.
Vancouver.
R. J.W. ATWOOD & Co.
CHEMISTS
-AND	
DRUGGISTS,
68 Douglas Street,
Victoria, B. C.
Ice Cream Parlors and City Candy Factory,
Manufacturer of all kinds of Plain and Fancy
Candies, also Importer and Dealer in Foreign
and Domestic Fruit, Nuts, Cigars, etc.
105 Douglas St., bet. Johnson & Pandora.
o—B.  F.  HENEY,—o
'   SPECIAL AGENT
CORK-FACED HORSE COLLAR,
AND DEALER IN
Saddles, Harness, Whips. Horss Covers,
Lap Robes, &c.
326 Cordova Street,
VANCOUVER,        -|     B. C.
BOOTS and SHOES,
304 COEDOVA ST„
Vancouver,      -      -      B. C.
9
ARTISTIC TAILORS,
62 Yates St. Victoria, B. C. I
I
iii
I'll
78
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
is satisfactory to find that the Customs
returns for the Province exceed those of
the previous year, which were the most
favorable on record."
Reference to the export and import
returns will show the steady and satisfactory growth of trade in the Province.
The heaviest imports in the shape of
agricultural products into British Columbia are as follows:—Horned cattle,
horses, sheep, lard, bacon and hams,
mutton, pork, flour, canned goods,
butter, cheese, malt, poultry, eggs, potatoes, wheat.
Out of a total annual import value of
$1,792,970 of agricultural products, on
which an amount of $178,411.19 was paid
in duty the above articles represented
the sum of $1,414,441 in value and
$143,111.83 in duty, showing the need of
an increase in the farming population—
British Columbia is capable of raising
her own food supplies instead of importing them so largely aa at present.
The exports of British Columbia in
1892 were as follows:—
The Mines $2,979,470
The Fisheries  2,351,083
The Forest     425,278
Animals and their Produce      390,854
Agricultural Produce       25,018
Manufactures      117,942
Miscellaneous       31,976
Not the Produce of the Province    253,868
$6,574,989
Imports.
1882 Total imports into B. C.
1891
1892
do
do
do
do
Exports.
1882 Total exports from B. C.
1891 do do   ..
1892 do do   ..
.$3,348,991
. 5,478,883
. 6,495,589
$3,080,841
6,257,158
6,574,989
BOARDS OF TRADES  IN   BRITISH
COJLUMBIA.
V i c t o r i a.—President, Thos. B. Hall.
Vice-President, A. C. Flumerfelt. Secretary, F. Ellworthy.
Vancouver. —Geo. E. Bertaux, President. T. J. Salesbury, Vice-President.
A. H. B. Macgowan, Secretary.
Nanaim o.—President, J. H. Pleace.
Vice-President, W. H. S. Perkins. Secretary-Treasurer, M. Wolfe.
New Westminster .—President,
T. J. Trapp. Vice-President, Wm.
Wolfenden. Secretary-Treasurer, D.
Robson.
BANKS   AND   BANKERS.
V i c t o r i a.—Bank of British Columbia,
Bank of Montreal, Green, Worlock &
Co., Bank of British North America.
Vancouve r.—Bank of British Columbia, Bank of Montreal, Bank of
British North America, Wulfpohn &
Berwick, Casement & Creary.
New Westminster. — Bank of
British Columbia, Bank of Montreal.
Nanaimo .—Bank of British Columbia.
Kamloop s.—Bank of British Columbia.
N e 1 s o n.—Bank of British Columbia,
Bank of Montreal.
BANK  HOLIDAYS.
New Years, Good Friday, Easter Monday, Queen's Birthday, Dominion Day,
Thanksgiving Day, Christmas, also any
day appointed by proclamation for a
general fast or thanksgiving.
SAVINOS   BANKS.
V i c t o r i a.—Dominion Savings Bank.
POST     OFFICE    SAVINGS    BANKS.
Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster,
Nanaimo, Kamloops, Ashcroft Station,
Chilliwhack, Comox, Ladner's Landing,
Nicola Lake, Port Hammond, Quami-
chan, Wellington.
MONEY ORDER OFFICES.
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Agassiz, Alberni, Ashcroft, Barkerville,
Burgoyne, Bay, Chilliwack, Chemainus,
Clinton, Comox, Corfield, Coutlee, Donald, Duncan's Station, Enderby, Esquimalt, Field, Golden, Hope, Kamloops,
Ladner's Landing, Lulu Island, Langley,
Lytton, Mission City, Nanaimo, New
Westminster, Nicola Lake, Plumper
Pass, Port Hammond, Quesnelle, Revelstoke, Soda Creek, Spence's Bridge,
Sumas, Union, Vancouver, Vernon, Victoria Wellington. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
79
GEO. E. TROVEY,
MANUFACTURING JEWELLER,
DEALER   IN
Watches, Diamonds, Jewelry and Silverware. Diamond Setting,
Wedding: Ring's and special designs of Jewelry made to
order.   Watch and Jewelry Repairing, and Satisfaction guaranteed,
105   Cordova  Street,
P. O. Box 416.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
RALPH CRAIG,
Nanaimo Steam CarriageWorks
Bastion Street Bridge, Nanaimo,
General Blacksmith and Horse-
shoer, Carriage Builder, Etc.
Wagons and Farming Implements made
to order and repaired.
Miners' Auger Drilling Machines made
to order on short notice.
OFFICE TEL. 256.
SAM.   GINTZBURGER,
TOBACCONIST,
Holland Block, Junction of Water and
Cordova Streets,
Smokers supplies in every branch.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Telephone 408.
o-—THOMAS  VEITCH, o
519 Homer St., Vancouver.
All kinds of Teaming done. Heavy Work
a Specialty.
Heavy Draught Horses for Sale.
RESIDENCE TEL. 342.
A. Murray Beattie,
Real Estate and General Auctioneer,
Appraiser and Notary Public.
Lessee of the Market and City Waigh Scales,Sales
conducted in the City or District, Real Estate and
Cattle Sales a Specialty, Advances made on all
kinds of Goods, regular Fruit and Produce Sales,
on Fridays, the Market day appointed by the City,
also General Auction Sale same day. a Register of
Farm Lands for Sale in the Province kept.
P. O. BOX 392.
Westminster Avenue,    VANCOUVER, B.C.
WATSON & GEIGER,
Plumbers, Gas, Steam and Hot Water
Fitters.
ESTIMATES FUKNISHED.
69 Pandora Street, Victoria, B. C.
W. COLLIER, Prop.
Centrally Lorated.   Newly Furnished.   Choicest
Wines, Liquors aad Cigars.
CORNER  COLUMBIA AND ALEXANDER STREETS,
P. O. Box 101. New Westminster.
J). J. McLEAN & CO.,
DEALER IN
Clothing, Hats, Caps and Gents'
Furnishings.
1
18 Cordova Street,
VANCOUVER. 80
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Rill it
I
FOREIGN  CONSULS.
TJjn ited State s.—Le&i W. Meyers,
Victoria. F. Pierce, Counsular Agent,
Vancouver. W. B. Dennison, Counsular Agent, Nanaimo.
German y.—Carl Lowenberg, Victoria.
Franc e.—N. P. Snowden, Victorio.
Norway & Swede n.—E. Ward,
Victoria. B. Spring, Vice-Consul,
Moodyville.
J a p a n. Kito, Vancouver.
H a w a i i.—R. P. Rithet, Victoria.
C h i 1L—M. P. Morris, office, C. Gardiner, Johnston & Co., 532 Hastings Street,
Vancouver.
BOARD OF UNDERWRITERS.
Messrs. Heisterman & Co., R. P. Rithet
& Co., L'td., Turner, Eeeton & Co., Findlay, Durham & Brodie, Robert Ward &
Co., Thos. C. Nuttall, R. Hall & Co., B.
C. Land and Investment Co., Lowenberg,
Harris & Co., Nicholles & Renouf, H. E.
Crasdaile, W. Monteith, Jno. J. Austin,
Henry Croft, H. Dallas Helmcken, Dalby
& Claxton, Beaumont Boggs, Jones &
Bridgman, Kobert Irving, H. M. Yates,
A. W. More & Co., F. G. Richards, jr.,
Holland & Co., J. E. Kinsman.
Executive Committee.—R. HalL H.
F. Heisterman, J. C. Maclure, F. G.
Richards, jr., N. P. Snowden. Chairman,
R. Hall.   Inspector, J. G. Elliott.
LEGAL   GLIDE.
Supreme Court.
Chief Justice, Sir Matthew B. Begbie,
Victoria.
PUISINE JUDGES.
Hon. H.P. P. Crease, Victoria.
Hon. G. A. Walkem, Victoria.
Hon. J. F. McCreight, New Westminster.
Hon. W. T. Drake, Victoria.
County Court.
Nanaimo, His Honor, Eli Harrison, Jr.
New Westminster, His Honor, W. Norman Bole.
Yale, His Honor, W. Ward Spinks.
Sheriffs.
County of Victoria, J. E. McMillan.
County of Westminster, W. J. Armstrong.
County of Yale, A. G. Pemberton.
County of Cariboo, John Stevenson.
County of Kootenay, Stephen Redgrave.
County of Nanaimo, Samuel Drake.
Stipendiaiy    Magistrates.
Donald, A. C. Cummins.
Esquimalt, E. B. Reid.
Kamloops, W. W. Spinks, G. C. Tunstall.
Laketon, Jas. Porter.
Nanaimo, J. P. Planta, Eli Harrison.
New Westminster, N. W. Bole.
Revelstoke, N. Fitzstubbs.
Vancouver, J. H. Hallett.
Vernon, M. Lumby.
Victoria, S. Y. Wootton.
CLUBS.
V i c t o r i a.—The Union Club (established 1879), cor. Courtney and Douglas
Streets. Victoria Club, cor. Fort and
Broad Streets. Anglo-American Club,
cor. Government and Yates Streets.
Vancouve r.--Vancouver Club, Lef-
ever Block, cor. Hastings and Seymour
Streets.
New WestmiDste r.—Westminster Club, Columbia Street.
Associations.
British Columbia Rifle Association.—
President, Lt. Col. Prior j Secretary,
Capt. Fletcher.
Vancouver Rifle Association.—President,
R. H. Alexander ; Secy-Trea., J. Duff
Stuart.
New Westminster   Rifle Association.—
President, Capt. Townley ; Secy-Treas.,
H. R. Townsend.
Provincial Exhibit Association.—President, David Oppenheimer; Secretary,
W. D. Burdis, Vancouver.
Marine Engineers' Association.—President, James A. McArthur.
Poultry Association.—President, C. E.
Renouf; Secretary, R. P. McLennan.
British Columbia Pioneer Society.—President, J. B. Lovell; Secy-Treas., J. J.
Austin.
National History Society of British Columbia.—President, Ashdown Green;
Secretary, C. F. Newcombe.
Societies in   British Columbia.
Agassi z.—Y. M. C. A.
Ainswort h.—Miners' Union.
Brownsvill e.—Odd-Fellows, Temperance Society, Orange Lodge.
C h e m a i n u s.—I. O. G. T.
C h i 11 i w h a c k.—I.O.O.F., A.O.F., A.
O.U.W., I.O.G.T., L.O.D,
Clover Valle y.—I.O.O.F., A,O.U.
W., I.O.G.T. ^
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
81
SHBLTON & Co.,
518 and 520 Hastings St., VANCOUVER, B.C.
DEALERS IN
CARPETS, LINOLEUMS, BLINDS & PICTURES.
Largest and   Best Assorted Stock in the City.
FURNITURE AND CARPETS
Just received a Large Stock of
CARPETS   AND   RUGS !
We still continue the cost Cash Sale of
EveJything in Stock.
Call and Be Convinced.
 P.  PEEBLES,	
o-
 o
Of Eighth (Douglas) Street.
NEW WESTMINSTER.
THE TORONTO SHOE STORE,
New Westminster, B.C.,
The place for all kinds of reliable Footwear, Leather and Rubber Goods,
At Prices heretofore unknown in
British Columbia.
A call solicited.
M. W. MINTHORN.
McColl's old stand, Columbia St.
J. S. Stannard & (
CRESCENT STORE,
Importers & Dealers in
Staple & Fancy Dry Goods
Millinery, Mantles and   Gents'
Furnishings,
NANAIMO,
B. C.
-N AN AI MO-
STEAM DYE WORKS
Frank Charlton, Prop.
Nevil Street. NANAIMO.
Cleaning, Scouring and Dyeing in all its branches.
Gents' Clothing Cleaned, Dyed and Repaired.
Ladies' Dresses and Curtains cleaned by our ne^
process.   Feathers cleaned dyed and curled.
Grlo\es cleaned.
Strangers Should Not Fail to Visit
The Summerset House,
The Pleasure Resort of Wellirgton,
About two miles out, along a beautiful
drive.
J. D. DIXON, Proprietor.
Hayden & Mylius
BOAT BUILDERS.
All Kinds of Pleasure Boats to Hire in
Yachts, Pic-Nic, Single and Double
Scull,   Out-Riggers,   Etc.
Boats of Every Description Built to Order
Boat House, Foot of Cambie Street,
Next to Lumber Yard.
P. 0.187.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
I 82
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
lit
Oloverdale .—I.O.O.F., A.O.U.W.,
I.O.G.T.
C e d a r.—Agricultural Society.
Duncan s.—I.O.O.F.
Esquimal t.—Blue Ribbon Club.
H a t i z i c—Masonic, I.O.G.T., I.O.O.F.
H e a 1.—Canadian Order of Odd-Fellows.
Kamloop s.—Masonic, Odd-Fellows,
Forresters.
Ladner's Landin g.—Odd-Fellows, United Workmen, Orangemen.
Mission Cit y.—Masonic, I.O.G.T.,
Forresters.
Mount Pleasant.—Odd-Fellows,
Foresters, K. of P., United Workmen.
N a n a i m o.—Masonic, Templars of
Temperance, I.O.G.T^K. of P., A.O.F.,
I.O.O.F., U.A.O.D., Sons of England,
Miners' Protective Association, United
Workmen, Knights of Labor, C.O.O.F.,
American Legion of Honor.
New Westminste r.—I.O.O.F.,
C.O.O.F., I.O.R., Royal Templars, Foresters, K. of P., C.O.F., Masonic.
N a k u s p.—Masonic.
N o r t h f i e 1 d.—I.O.G.T., K. of P., M.
&M.L., K. of L., C.O.O.F. M.U., A.O.
of Druids.
Port Haney— Masonic, Odd-Fellows, Temperance Society.
Parksvill e.—Band of Hope.
Port   K e 11 s.—I.O.G.T.
Revel stok e— Masonic, I.O.G.T.
Steveston .— Odd-Fellows, Good
Templars.
S a n d w i c k.—K. of P., United Workmen, Good Templars.
S u m a s.—I.O.G.T.
Surrey Centre .— Odd-Fellows,
Orangemen, Good Templars.
Shortree d.—I.O.G.T., C.O.O.F.
Terra Rosa.—Good Templars, W.
C.T.U.
TJu r g o o s e.—North and South Saan-
Umich Agricultural Society, L.O.L.
V ancouver. —Orangemen, K. of P.,
MLOO. F., Masonic.
V i e t o r i a.—B. C. Pioneer Society, St.
Georges, Sons of Erin, C.O.O.F., CO.
F., Foresters, Canadian Order of Odd-
Fellows, K. of P., Masonic, I.O.G.T.,
Orangemen, St. Andrews, A.O.U.W.,
I.O.O.F.,Y.M.C.A.
V e r n o n.—I.O.O.F., A.O.U.W., I.O.G.T.
W e 11 i n g t o n.—I.O.O.F., I.O.G.T., A.
O.F.
Y o u n g.—Orangemen, Agricultural Society.
Secretaries of Societies will please notify
us of any omissions in above.
The Indians of British Columbia.
POPULATION BY AGENCIES.
Cowichan
West Coast
Kwawkwelth
Dower Fraser
Williams Lake
Kamloops
Okanagon
Kootenay
N. W. Coast
Babine and Upper Skeena River
Agency,
do .
do .
do .
do
do .
do .
do .
do .
Agency
2048
2864
1732
4338
1803
2401
878
696
4001
2645
Total  23406
COMPARATIVE      STATEMENT
INDUSTRIES.
Indians.
British Columbia... .23,406
Manitoba & N,W.T.. .24,210
Ontario  1,708
Quebec  6,638
New Brunswick 1,531
Nova Scotia  2,076
P. E.  Island      314
OF     INDIAN
Value of
Industries.
$684,995
240,233
176,783
166,507
23,210
31,717
6,400
AVERAGE- OP ABOVE PER   INDIAN.
British Columbia  $ 29 27
Manitoba and N. W. Territories.       9 90
Ontario     109 50
Quebec      25 08
New Brunswick      15 16
Nova Scotia       15 28
P. E. Island      20 38
It will thus be seen that the value of
the industries appertaining to the Indians of British Columbia exceeds that
of all the other provinces and territories
of the Dominion combined, and the
average per Indian is next to Ontario
the largest.
The Indian schools of British Columbia
I by the last returns to hand have 685
pupils attending them. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
83
ft
INDIAN   AGENCIES.
A. W. Vowell, Superintendent, Victoria.
P. O'Reilly, Indian Reserve Commissioner, Victoria.
H. Moffatt, Superintendent's assistant,
Victoria.
W. H. Lomas, Agent, Cowichan.
H. Guillod. Agent, West Coast.
R. P. Pidcock, Agent, Kwawkewlth.
P. McTiernan, Agent, Fraser.
J. W. MacKay, Agent, Kamloops.
M. Phillips, Agent, Kootenay.
C. Todd, Agent, North West Coast.
W. L. Meason, Agent, Williams Lake.
R. E. Loring, Agent, Babine.
INDUSTRIAL INDIAN SCHOOLS.
Metlakahtla—Principal, J. R. Scott.
Kamloops—Principal, M. Hagan.
Kuper Island—Principal, Rev. G. Donc-
kele.
Newspapers  and.  Periodicals    Published in British  Columbia.
V i c t o r i a.—Colonist (morning), daily
and weekly. Times (evening), daily
and weekly. Commercial Journal,
weekly.   Monthly Recorder, monthly.
Vancouver.—News Advertiser (morning), daily and weekly. World (evening), daily and weekly. The Institute,
monthly. Home Cheer, monthly. B.
C. Commerce and Maritime Review,
semi-annually, The Monitor, weekly,
The People's Journal, weekly.
New Westminster. — British
Columbian, daily and weekly. Churchman's Gazette, monthly. Commonwealth, weekly.
Nanaimo .—Free Press, daily & semi-
weekly. St. Alban's Church Monthly,
monthly.
Kamloops.—Inland Sentinel, weekly.
Revelstoke.—Kootenay Star, weekly.
Verno n.—Vernon News, weekly.
Stevesto n.—Steveston Enterprise,
weekly.
N e 1 s o n.—Nelson Miner, weekly.
G o 1 d e n.—Golden Era, weekly.
MILITARY   GUIDE.
Victoria is Headquarters of Military District
No. 11, Province of British Columbia.
Deputy-Adjutant General, Lieutenant Colonel
J. G. Holmes, K. C A. District Paymaster and
Superintendent of Stores, Capt. A. W. Jones;
Foreman of Stores, Chas. Ireland.
PERMANENT CORPS.
C Battery, Regiment Canadian Artillery—Stationed at Artillery Barracks, Work Point.
Commander, Lieut.-Col. J. Gr. Holmes; Major, James Peters; Lieutenants, Benson, T.
Bvt, Captain; Gr. Ogilvee Bvt, Captain; Surgeon, J. A. Duncan, M. D-; Quartermaster,
E. Palmer, Hon. Captain.
LOCAL CORPS.
B. C- Brigade of Garrison Artillery—Lieut-Col.,
E.^G. Prior, M. P. A. D- C-, commanding,
Major, John Nicholles, Adjutant; Caot. P.
M. Irving; Surgeon, E Hasell; Paymaster,
W- Shears, Hon, Captain; Quartermaster, W.
H. Dorman, Hon. Cap ain.
No. 2 Battery—Captain, vacant; Lieutenant, A.
G. Sargison, commanding; Second Lieutenant, Ross Munroe
No. 3 Battery—Captain, W- Quinlan; Lieutenant, B. Williams; Second Lieutenant, vacant.
No. 4 Battery- Captain, W. B. Smallfield; Lient.,
C. S. A. Pearse ; Second Lieutenant, vacant.
All the above are stationed at Victoria.
AT NEW WESTMINSTER
No. 1 Battery is stationed- Captain, T. O.
Townley; Lieutenant, E. H. Port; Second
Lieutenant, vacant. And at Nanaimo there
is an infanry company lately organized •
CHURCHES.
Church oe England—Alert Bay, Cariboo, Cedar, Chemainus, Chilliwack,
Comox, Cowichan, Esquimalt, Kamloops, Metchosin, Nanaimo, New Westminster, Northfield, Saanich, Salt
Spring Island, Sooke, Trenant, Vancouver, Victoria, Wellington, Yale.
Methodist—Agassiz, Aldergrove, Ainsworth, Bella Bella*, Bella Coola, Cheam,
Chilliwack, Delta, Donald, Howe
Sound, Langley, Maple Ridge, Maple
Bay, Mission City, Naas, Nanaimo,
New Westminster, Northfield, Nicola,
Nelson, Port Essington, Port Simpson,
Queen Charlotte Island, Revelstoke,
Richmond, Salt Spring|Island, Saanich,
Salmon Arm, Similikameen, Sumas,
Surrey, Union,Upper Skeena, Vancouver, Victoria, Wellington.
Presryterian—Alberni, Chilliwack, Comox, Kamloops, Kaslo, Ladner's Landing, Langley, Nanaimo, Nelson, New
Westminster, Nicola Lake, Northfield,
Revelstoke, Spallumcheen, Spence's
Bridge, Sooke, Surrey, Vancouver,
Vernon. Victoria, Warnock,Wellington.
Baptist—Nanaimo, New Westminster,
Vancouver. Victoria.
Reformed Episcopal—Abergeldie, New
Wessminster, Victoria. 84
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Roman Catholic—Alberni, Claydquot,
Comox, Cowichan, Hesquiat, Kuper
Island, Kamloops, Kyuquot, Kootenay,
Nanaimo, New Westmigster, Okanagan, Matsqui, Stuart's Lake, Vancouver^ Victoria, Williams Lake.
Jewish—Victoria.
PROVINCIAL.      GOVERNMENT     OF
BRITISH   COLUMBIA.
Lieutenant-Governor: The Honorable Edgar
Dewdney.
Private Secretary:   Herbert Stanton.
EXECUTIVE   COUNCIL.
The Hon. the Attorney-General: Theodore
Davie, Q-C.
The Hon. the Minister of Finance and Agriculture:   J. H. Turner.
The Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works: I. Gr. Vernon.
The Hon. the Provincial Secretary and Minister
of Mines :   J. Baker.
The Hon. the President of the Executive Council:
C. E. Pooley, Q.C.
Clerk of the Executive Council: Theodore
Davie, Q. C.
THE   LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
Anderson, G W, Lake District, Victoria.
Baker, Hon J Cranbrook, Kootenay, East Kootenay.
Beaven, Hon R, Victoria, Victoria City.
Booth, J P, Salt Spring Island, The Islands.
Brown, J C, New Westminster, New Westminster
City.
Cotton, F C, Vancouver, Vancouver.
Croft, Henry, Victoria, Cowichan.
Davie, Hon T, Victoria, Cowichan.
Eberts, D McE, Victoria, Victoria.
Fletcher, T, Alberni, Alberni.
Foster, T C, New Westminster, Nanaimo.
Grant, John, Victoria, Victoria City.
Hall, R H, Fort Simpson, Cassiar.
Higgins, Hon D W, Victoria, Esquimalt.
Home, J W, Vancouver, Vancouver.
Hunter, Josep'i, Victoria, Comox.
Keith, Thomas, £anaimo, Nanaimo City.
Kellie, J M, Revelstoke, West Kootenay.
Kitchen, T E, Chilliwack, Westminster.
Martin, G B, South Thompson River, Yale.
Milne, G L, Victoria, Victoria City.
McKenzie, C C, Nanaimo, Nanaimo.
Nason, I B, Barkerville, Cariboo.
Pooley, Hon C E, Victoria, Esquimalt.
Punch, J, Brownsville, Westminster.
Rogers, S A, Barkerville, Cariboo.
Semlin, C A, Cache Creek, Yale.
Smith, A, "Wellington, Lillooet.
Stoddart, D A, Clinton, Lillooet.
Sword. C B, Matsqui, Westminster.
Turner, Hon J H, Victoria, Victoria City.
Vernon, Hon F G, Victoria, Yale.
Watt, Dr., Cariboo, Cariboo.
DEPARTMENTAL OFFICES.
Attorney-General's Office:
Attorney-General, Hon. Theodore Davie, QC
Deputy Attorney-General. Arthur G Smith.
Crown Solicitor, Gordon Hunter.
Clerk, E J Thain.   Stenographer, R E Brett.
Provincial Secretary's Office.
Provincial Secretary and Minister of Mines,
Hon. James Baker.
Deputy  Provincial  Secrelary, A Campbell
Reddie.
Clerk   J Fortescue Foulkes.    Lispector of
Mines, A Dick
Printing: Branch:
Queen's Printer, R Wolfenden.
Treasury  Department:
Minister of Finance and Agriculture, Hon J
H Turner.
Auditor-General,  J  McB  Smith;  Assistant
Auditor, J A Anderson.
Deputy Treasurer, A Flett.
Clerks, HAS Morley, Chas B Nairne.
Lands and Works :
Chief Commissioner, Hon*F G Vernon.
Deputy Commissioner, W L Gore.
Surveyor-General, T Kains.
Draughtsman, E B McKay.
1st Asst Draughtsman, E M Roberts.
2nd Asst Draughtsman, T Bamford.
Clerk of Records, S Phipps.
Book-keeper, T E Woodridge.
Clerk and Typewriter, H Cathbeart.
Clerks, T C Boulton, G V.Cuppage.
Supreme Court:;
Registrar, J C Prevost.   Deputy, A Keast.
Clerk. A R Robertson; Asst Clerk, J C Dock-
erill; Official Stenographer, J Gilbert.
County Court:
Registrar, H W H Combe;   Deputy, A Keast.
Land Registry Office:
Registrar-General, J. C. Leggatt.
1st Clerk. EM Fort; 2nd Clerk, S Y Wooton;
3rd Clerk, M G Phipps; 4th Clerk, W B
Charles; 5th Clerk, G E Simon; 6th Clerk,
F H Lang; Book-keeper, Geo Cruick-
shank.
Assessor and Supervisor of the Rolls
C Booth; Assistant, C W Jenkinson; Clerk,
W O Carter.
Museum:
Curator, J Fannin.
Superintendent of Police:
F Hussey.    Sergeant, John M Langley.
Constables,    Jas   Mellon,   Wm  McNeil,   J
Hunter.
Provincial Timber Inspector:
Inspector, R J Skinner; 2nd Inspector, D
McRae.
Assay Office:
Ass^yer, Herbert Carmichael.
Britisli Columbia Senators:
For Cariboo, Hon James Reid, residence,
Quesnelle.
For Westminster, Hon T R Mclnnes; Residence, Victoria.
For Victoria, Hon W J McDonald; Residence, Victoria. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
85
Canadian Pacific
Navigation Co
®
lEAMEFl HANDER,
On the Alaska Route from Victoria and Vancouver.
Office: Wharf Street,
G. A. CARLETON, rh>
General Agent.
VICTORIA, B. C.
JOHN IRVING,
Manager. 86
HAND-BOOK TO BEITISH COLUMBIA.
»
ffl<
British Columbia Representatives:
Cariboo, F S Barnard; Residence, Victoria.
New Westminster, G E Corbould; Residence,
New Westminster.
Vancouver Island, vacant.
Victoria, T Earle: Residence, Victoria.
Victoria, Col E G Prior; Residence, Victoria.
Yale, J A Mara; Residence, Kamloops.
DOMINION GOVERNMENT OFFICES
IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Customs.
Victoria—Collector A. R. Milne.
Vancouver—^Collector J M Bowell.
New Westminster—Collector J S Clute.
Nanaimo—Collector B H Smith.
Marine:
Victoria—Harbor Master, Capt W R Clarke.
Nanaimo—Harbor Master, E Quennel._
Vancouver—Harbor Master, M W Thain.
New Westminster—Harbor   Master,   J W
Draper.
Indians:
Victoria—Superintendent, Arthur Wellesley
Vowell; Chief Clerk, Hamilton Moffatt.
Inland Revenue*
Victoria—Inspector, W Gill;   Collector, R.
Jones.
Vancouver—Collector, J E Miller.
Nanaimo—Deputy Collector, W K Leighton.
New Westminster—Deputy  Collector,   Wm
Wolf enden.
Kamloops—Deputy Collector, E H Jones.
Nelson —Deputy Collector, R Blundell.
Revelstoke—Deputy Collector, J Kirkup.
-Steamboat Inspection:
Inspactor, J. A. Thomson, Victoria.
Inspector of Hulls:
R Collister, Victoria.
Dominion Lands:
Superintendent of Mines, W Pearce,. MLB,
New Westminster.
Agent, John McKenzie, D L S.
Crown Timber Agent, T S Higginson.
Inspector of Homesteands, J S Macdonell.
Marine and Fisheries:
Agent, Capt Jas Gaudin, Victoria.
Public Works:
Resident Engineer, F C Gamble, Victoria.
Quarantine:
Quarantine   Officer,   Dr   W   McNaughton
Jones, Victoria.
Saving's Bank:
Victoria—Manager, J H MacLaughlin.
Weights and Measures*
Victoria—Inspector, R Jones.
' Nanaimo—Assistant Inspector, W K Leigh-
• ton.
GOLD COMMISSIONERS.
For the Province—The Hon F G Vernon,
Victoria.
Cassiar District—James   Porter   Laketon,
Cassiar.
Lillooet District—Frederick Soues, Clinton.
East Kootenay District—A P Cummins,
Donald.
West Kootenay District—N Fitzstubbs, Nelson.
Yale District—M Lumby, Vernon; J C Tun-
stall, Kamloops; W Todd, Yale.
GOVERNMENT    AGENTS:
Alberni—G A Smith.
Cariboo—J Bowron, Barkerville.
Clinton—F Soues.
Cowichan—H 0 Willburn, Duncan's.
Comox—S Creech.
Cassiar—James Porter, P O Laketon.
East Kootenay—A P Cummins, Donald.
Fort Simpson—J Flewin.
Kamloops—G C Tunstall, Kamloops.
Nanaimo—M Bray.
Nelson—Capt Fitzstubbs.
New Westminster—C Warwick.
Nicola—John Clapperton.
Quesnelle—Wm Stephenson.Forks Quesnelle.
Revelstoke—J Kirkup.
Vernon—M Lumby.
Yale—W Dodd.
JOHN   BARNSLEY &  CO.,
119 Gov. St., near Jonson, Victoria, B.C.
Gunsmiths and Machinists*
Headquarters for Sporting Goods.
Correspondence attended to.
H. MOREY & CO.,
(-BOOKSELLERS & STATIONERS,-)
New Westminster, B. C. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
87
Au Bon Marche
HATS,
41
IMPORTER   OF |      Qj^jjf^
ENQLISH AND FOREIGN   8 B5E    i XTTV
«» CAPS, AND
STAPLE AND FANCY     • '
5] MEN'S FURNISHINGS, Etc.
DRY GOODS.
—:o.—
0
0
0
MM
H. B. Shadwell & Co.,! H. B. Shadwell & Co.,
0
624 Columbia St., ft 626 Columbia St.,
0
0
NEW  WESTMINSTER, B. C. $ NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
0
Letter Orders receive prompt and careful attention.
Peterboro Canoe Co
VICTORIA,
9
B. CA
Pi
.aemKuanoe
Canoes are fast gaining popularity in British Columbia, and special sizes are made
for exploring and hunting parties.
Send for Catalogue.   Prices of Steam Launces  also furnished in
Catalogue.
P. O. Box 803. 88
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
THE CITIES OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
VICTORIA.
Situated at the southern extremity of
Vancouver Island, is a city of nearly
24,000. It is remarkable for its delightful situation and the beauty of
its surroundings. In addition to its
inner land-locked harbor, extensive.docks
have been constructed at its entrance,
capable of accommodating a large fleet of
ocean steamers and sailing vessels. Victoria enjoys a very large wholesale trade
with all parts of the Province, and being
a favorite resort for tourists who visit the
Pacific coast, considerable retail business
is transacted with these visitors, making
the general trade of the city very large.
Victoria is well laid out, and in the business portion of the city there are numerous handsome business blocks and public buildings. It is the seat of government in British Columbia, and the new
government buildings about to be erected to take the place of the present structures will be very handsome. Victoria is
celebrated for its beautiful parks and
drives and the splendid scenery surrounding it. It has a perfect water system,
gas and electric light, the streets being
lighted by the latter—electric tram-cars
run on the principal streets. Victoria is
connected by daily steamers with Vancouver, New Westminster and the Puget
Sound cities, Seattle and Tacoma. By
this means the city is in direct connection with the Canadian Pacific, Northern
Pacific, Union Pacific and Great Northern railroads. The Pacific coast steamers
to San Francisco have their northern
headquarters here. It is also the terminus of the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway, and there is a regular tramway service to Esquimalt. A large fleet of steamers run between Victoria and all the
mainland and island ports. It is the
headquarters of the sealing fleet and of
the cannery interest, most of the trade of
the latter being held by Victoria merchants. It is therefore an important commercial centre, as well as a favorite tourist resort. For places of interest in and
around Victoria, see " Places of Interest
in British Columbia."
CIVIC   OFFICERS.
Mayor—Robert Beaven. Aldermen—
North Ward—Jas. Baker, Munroe Miller,   Ed.   Bragg.   Centre  Ward—S.   T.
Styles,   A. L. Belyea, Wm. McKiffican.  Ward 3—H. P. MoCraney, Wm. Cargill
South Ward—Anton Henderson, G. A.
McTavish, H. A. Munn. ^ity Clerk—
W. J. Dowler, B. A. Treasurer—Chas.
Kent. Auditor—J. L. Raymur. City
Surveyor—E. A. Wilmot. Sanitary Engineer—E. Mohun. Librarian—J. McGregor, L.L.D. Building Inspector—W. W.
Northcott. Police Magistrate—F. Mac-
Rae. Chief of Police—H. W. Sheppard.
Chief of Fire Department—Thos. Deasy.
VANCOUVER.
Vancouver is the Pacific terminus of
the' Canadian Pacific Railway, and
although its existence only dates
back a few years, it is already the
next city in size and population to
Victoria. Its population to-day is estimated at between 17,000 and 20,000.
There are many handsome and substantially built blocks along the business
streets of Vancouver, and its streets are
regularly laid out. It has gas, electric
light, water works and an excellent tramway service. There are quite a number of
industries established in the city amongst
which may be mentioned, a sugar refinery, foundries and machine shops, tanneries, canneries, soap works, breweries, saw
mills, planing and shingle mills, etc., etc.
The C.P.R. workshops are also stationed
here, so that the local trade of Vancouver
is large. It enjoys an extensive
wholesale trade, and is a strong rival to
Victoria in this respect. Daily steamers
connect Vancouver with Victoria, Nanaimo and New Westminster, and a large
fleet ply between it and the smaller ports
of British Columbia. The C.P.R. line of
steamers to China and Japan has its head
quarters here. The Northern Pacific
Railway expect soon to gain an entrance
into Vancouver, and when this takes place
it will be the British Columbia terminus
of two great transcontinental lines. In
fact it will also have close connection via
New Westminster with a third important
road, the Great Northern. Owing to its
superior position, Vancouver will undoubtedly become one of the most important commercial and shipping ports
on the North Pacific coast.
CIVIC   OFFICERS.
Mayor—F. Cope. Aldermen—Ward
1—W. F. Salisbury, R. A. Anderson.
Ward 2—Hy. Collins, Jas. W. Hackett. HAND BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. 8»
JAS. W. HARVEST,
DIRECT IMPORTER OF
Dry Goods, Mantles, Millinery and House
!l     Furnishings.  jjB   |
RIBBONS, FEATHERS, FLOWERS, FANCY-WEAR.
Douglas & Elliott Block,       - -       NEW WESTMINSTER.
o THE     LEADING-
DRY GOODS AND MILLINERY HOUSE.
. .LARGEST AND BEST ASSORTED STOCK.
 INTHECITY	
GORDON DRYSDALE,
150 Cordova Street, VANCOUVER, B. C£
^ 90
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Ml
lfS
Ward 4—J. L. Franklin, Geo. W. Hobson.
Ward 5—C. L. Brown, Wm. Towler.
City Clerk—T. F. McGuigan. Treasurer
—Geo. Baldwin. City Engineer—Thos.
H. Tracy. City Solicitor—A. St. George
Hamersley. Health Officer—Dr. McGuigan. Auditor—J. Leask. Street Inspector—T. Stevenson. Comptroller—C. Tet-
ley. Police Magistrate—Geo. A. Jordan.
Chief of Police—John McLaren.
NEW WESTMINSTER
Called the Royal City, is situated on
the north bank of the Fraser river,
fifteen miles from its mouth, and has
a population of nearly 9,000. It is the
distributing point for all the commerce
along the Fraser river and adjoining
country and is the fresh water terminus of the Canadian Pacific Railway, and the western terminus of the
Great Northern, which reaches it over
the New Westminster Southern. It is
also connected with Vancouver by electric tramway. Several Provincial public buildings, the penitentiary, lunatic
asylum and central prison are located
here. The city is well laid out, and contains a number of handsome buildings,
business blocks and numerous beautiful
private residences. It is provided with
good systems of waterworks, gas, electric
light, telephone and Iram car service. In
addition to the large trade done by New
Westminster with the canneries along
the Fraser, it has also a fine agricultural
country tributary to it, so that commercially it has a very substantial footing.
CIVIC  OFFICERS.
Mayor—D. S. Curtis. Aldermen —
Ward 1—J. Jaggers, Thomas Levi.
Ward 2-A. M. Herring, H. Hoy. Ward
3—T. R. Pearson, M. Sinclair. Ward
4—T. G. Gifford, T. Ovens. Ward
5—Geo. McKenzie, W. H. Keary. City
Clerk—D. Robson. Treasurer—W. T.
Cooksley. City Engineer—Wm. Noot.
City Solicitors—Corbould, McColl, Wilson & Campbell. Auditor—C. G. Mayor.
Police Magistrate—T. C. Atkinson.
NANAIMO
Incorporated in 1871, has now a population of nearly 7,000. It is delightfully situated on rising ground, overlooking one of the finest harbors in
British Columbia. Its trade is chiefly
witti the miners employed by the New
Vancouver Coal Co., and with the numerous vessels calling there for coal. It
has also  large  lumbering mills, owned
by Mayor Haslam, which do an immense local and foreign trade, machine shops, foundries and other industries which serve to swell the trade of the
city. The New Vancouver Coal Co. have
mines at Nanaimo, Southfield, Chase and
on the Nanaimo river, as well as at North-
field, and have about 150,000 tons of shipping chartered to carry their coal, in addition to the numerous vessels chartered
by the buyers. The company employs
about 1,500 hands, so that their trade is
of great importance to Nanaimo. The
city has excellent systems of waterworks,
gas, electric light and telephone. The
streets are well laid out and kept in good
order, and the class of buildings erected,
especially some of the business blocks
and public builomgs, are of a high class
order. Nanaimo is the most important
station on the E. & N. R. R. north of Victoria, and has connection by steamer
with Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster and nearly all ports on the main
land. There are a number of excelent
hotels in the city, the Windsor being one
of the most comfortable in the Province.
CIVIC   OFFICERS.
Mayor—A. Haslam. Aldermen—North
Ward—R. Craig, R. Nightingale, W. Xed-
dy. Middle Ward—E. Quennel, J. Gan-
ner, W. Hilbert. South Ward—J. H.
Cocking, G. McKennill, J. Frome. City
Clerk and Treasurer—Samuel Gough.
City Surveyor—Roly. Heyland. Street
Superintendent—B. Baker. Police Magistrate—J. P. Planta, J. P. Chief Constable— Thos. O'Connell. Health Officer—
E. A. Praeger, M. D.
STREET CAR SERVICE.
Victoria—National Electric Tram and
Light Co., 14 miles of track, Hon. D.
W. Higgins, President; Major Dupont,
Secretary.
Victoria & Esquimalt—The cars of the
National Electric Tram and Light Co.
make hourly trips between Victoria
and Esquimalt.
Vancouver—Vancouver Electric Railway & Lighting Co. (L'td.), Barnard
street, Westminster avenue, W. E.
Browne, Business Manager.
New Westminster—Westminster and
Vancouver Tramway Co. (L'td.), 16%
miles of track connecting with Vancouver, T. Oppenheimer, President; L. N,
Smith, Sec.-Treas.; G. F. Gibson, Traffic Manager. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. 91
"A   HOME   IN    SICKNESS."
Telephone 260. P. O. Box 765.
MISS WILKINSONS
Home and Nurses' Institute,
EVELEIGH    STREET,
ili Vancouver, B. C.
SELF-SUPPORTIjYG Institution for the nursing of Surgical, Medical and Midwifery Patients,
etc., under the superintendence of Miss
Wilkinson (trained for three years
and certificated from The London
Hospital, England, and with five
years' experience at the County Hospital and Eye Infirmary, Gloucester,
and the Royal Hospital, Portsmouth),
assisted by Miss Woodward, (for three
years at the City Hospital, Vancouver).
TERMS   MODERATE,   TO   BE   HAD   ON   APPLICATION.
' 92
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RAILWAY AND STEAMER TICKET
OFFICES.
VICTORIA.
0. P. R.—Corner Government and Fort.
Agent, Allan Cameron.
N. P. R.—Coiner Government & Trounce
avenue.   Agent, E. E. Blackwood.
C. P. N. Co.—Wharf street. Capt. John
Irving, Manager. Gen. Pass. Agent,
C. S. Baxter.
E. & N. R. R.—Broughton street. H. K.
Prior, Gen. Freight and Pass. Agent.
Union Pacific—100, Government street.
Agent, R. Hall.
VANCOUVER.
C. P. R. Co.—Geo. McL. Brown.
C. P. N. Co.—Geo. Sclater.
Union SS. Co.—Wm. Webster.
Northern Pacific R. R.—Frank V.
Bodwell.
Ocean Steamships.—C. Gardiner, Johnston & Co., 532 Hastings Street.
NEW WESTMINSTER.
C. P. R. Co.—J. B. Johnson.
Northern Pacific R. R.—A.  B.   McKenzie.
Great Northern—C. Cline.
Westminster-Vancouver Tramway Co.
G. F. Gibson.
C. P. N. Co.—T. L. Briggs.
Mainland & Nanaimo S. N. Co.—T. L.
Briggs.
Steamers—Delaware, Bon Accord, Telephone & Edgar—Brackman, Ker & Co.
Steamer Courser—J. E. Wise.
NANAIMO.
C. P. R. [Wm. DennisoD,   Agent,
Union SS. Co. f    Commercial street.
E. & N. R.R.—At Station.
Northern Pacific R. R.—W. A. Wood.
HACK   AND LIVERY   RATES.
VICTORIA HACK  RATES.
Haoks $1.50 per hour, so long as required.
Driving one or two persons any place
within the city limits 50 cents. For
every passenger over two, 25 cents
each. To or from any steamer or train,
50 cents per head, not including special
orders. Trunks taken from any wharf,
train, or house to any point within the
city limits, 25 cents each; baggage carried ia the hand of a person being conveyed in a licensed vehicle free.
LIVERY RATES.
Per day $2.50 to $5. Sundays and holidays, $3.50 to $5.50 per day.
VANCOUVER HACK. RATES.
Driving by the hour $1.25. Calling by
the hour $1.00. Theatre and return,
4 persons or less, $2.00. One or two
persons to ball and return, $2.00. Three
or four persons, $3.00. From C. P. R.
wharf or station, one person, 25 cents.
No charge for ordinary hand baggage.
LIVERY RATES.
Per day, $2.50 to $5.00. Sundays and
holidays, $3.50 to $5.50.
NEW WESTMINSTER HACK RATES.
Conveyance of passengers from station
or ferry to hotels, 50 cents. Hack,
$1.50 per hour. After 1st hour, $1.00
per hour. Hack, $7 per day. Saddle
horse, $3.50 p6r day.
LIVERY RATES.
Single horse conveyance, $1.50 per hour*
Single horse conveyance, $5.00 a day
ordinary driving.
NANAIMO LIVERY   RATES.
Single rigs per day, $3.50. Single rigs half
day, $2.50. Double rigs per day, $7.00.
Double rigs half day, $5.00. No regular hack rates.
ROAT RATES.
VICTORIA.
Rates—Per hour, 25 cents. Per day, from
$1 to $7, according to boat
VANCOUVER.
Per hour, 25 cents.   Per day, from $1 to
$7, according to boat.
NEW WESTMINSTER.
Per hour, 25 cents.    Per day,* from $1 to
$7, accordidg to boat.
NANAIMO.
Per hour, 50 cents for sailing boats.   Per
hour, 25 cents for row boats. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
93
TRANSFER COMPANIES.
Victoria—Victoria Transfer Co., 21 and
23 Broughton street, Frank S. Barnard,
President; Alex. Mouat, Secretary; A.
Henderson, Superintendent.
Vancouver—Vancouver Gurney Cab &
Delivery Co., office, 234 Abbott street,
C. D. Rand, President; F. G. Bell, Sec.
& Treas.; H. A. Berry, Manager.
Nanaimo—City Transfer Stables, W.
Keddy, Proprietor, Chapel street.
Population.
According to Dominion census of 1891:
Victoria j 16,849
Civic census same year j 23,153
Vancouver...M 13,685
New Westminster 6,641
Nanaimo 4,595
British Columbia 92,767
\
NAVIGATION  GUIDE.
Prominent Points, Direction and Distance from each other, Compiled from Coast Survey.
Cape Flattery to Race Island IE by N.
Cape Flattery to New Dungeness |E 8-4 N
Dnngeness to Point Wilson	
Point Wilson to Marrowstone Point	
Point Wilson to Point Hndson        	
Point Hudson to Port Townsend Bay	
Point Marrowstone to Hood's Canal ,
Foul Weather Blnff to Port Gamble *..»
Mid channel abreast Port Gamble to
Brown's Point	
Brown's Point to Hazel Point	
Hazel Point to Seabeck	
Marrowstone Point to Donble Bluff	
Doable Blaff to Pointno-Point	
Point no-Point to Apple Cove Point	
Apple Cove Point to Point Jefferson	
Point Jefferson to West Point	
West Point to Four-mile Book	
Four mile Bock to Seattle	
Point Jefferson to Point Madison.	
Point Jefferson to Restoration Point	
Point Restoration to Colvos Passage	
Point Vashon to Point Command	
Point Command to Point Sandford. IS by E 1-2 E
Point Sanford to Point Richmond S8E1-2E
Point Richmond to Point Defiance S 1-4 E....,
Restoration Point to Robinson's Point ' 8 E 1-2 8   ,
E1-2N
EgE.,
SEbySl-2S
ss w	
SEbyS 1- 8
S E 1-4 E • -. •
SbyWWW
88-4 E	
ssw	
SE	
E S E	
SE1-2S	
SEbyS	
S8E	
SEI-2E.....
E12S	
8 W	
8 by E 3-4 E
S1-2E	
B 1.4 W	
Robinson's Point to Da«h Point
Dash Point to Brown's Point	
Brown's Point to Tacoma.	
Point Defiance to Evan's Point....'	
Evans Point to Day Island	
Day's Island to Steilacoom	
Day's Island to Point Fox Island	
Fox Island to Point of McNeil's Island.
McNeil's Island to Balch's Passage....
Course through Balch s Passage	
Balch's Passage to Devil's Head and
clear of Park Point	
Park Pointto Moody Point	
Moody Point through Dana's Passage.
clear of Doffiemire's Point	
Doffiemire'e Point to Olympia	
m'le
Sby W1-2W
s by W	
S1-2E	
SE34S.....
S1-4W	
8 1-2E	
81-2 W	
8SW1-2W
SW1-2 W ••
West	
SS w	
WbyN I
SWbyS....
S by E 1.2 El
52
70
16
» 1-2
2 1-4
10
5
9 1-4
3 1-2
4
9 1-4
4
7
4
5
2
4
5
10
4 1-4
4
3 1-2
1 1-2
3 1-2
12 1-4
6
1 1-1
2 1-2
1-2
1-2
1-2
3-4
2
2
4
1
3
1 1-
1 1-
3
3 1-4
4 1-2
5 1-2 u
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Tables of General Information.
WEIGHTS AND MEASURES,
MEASURES OF LENGTH.
Ins.   Ft.   Yds. Pis Chs Fur
Foot         12      1
Yard         36      3       1
Rod. pole or perch     198    16%    5%   1
Chain....*..,....       792    66      22      4      1
Furlong     7,920   660    22o    40    10
Mile    63,860 5,280 1,760   320    80     8
Mile, Geographical 6,08266 feet.
PARTICULAR MEASURES OF LENGTH.
A hand, 4 inches. Link, 7*92 inches. Cubit, 18
inches. A pace military, 2 ft 6 in. Pace geometrical 5 ft. Fathom, 6 ft. Cables length 120 fms.
League, 3 miles. Admiralty knot 6,080 feet. De.
gree, 69% miles, equal to 60 nautical knots or
geog miles.
SQUARE OR SURFACE MEASURE.
Ins.    Ft.    Yds. Pis Cs Rs
Square foot  144       1
Square yard       1,296       9        1
Rod.pole or perch     39 204     272%   30%   1
Square chain     627,2B4 4,356    484 16   1
Rood 1,568,16010,890  1,210 40   2% 1
Acre 6,272,640 43,560 4,840 160 10    4
A square mile contains 640 acres—2,560 roods,
6,400 chains, 102,400 rods, poles or percheB, or
3,097,600 szuare yards.
A sqare acre is 209 feet (nearly) or 12% rods on
each side.
CUBIC OR SOLID MEASURE.
,1728 cubic inches =
27 cubic  feet  =
40 cubic ft of rough, or 50 of
hewn timber  =
42 cubic feet of timber =
108 cubic feet       =
128 cubic feet 4x4x8   =
40 cubic feet merchandise.. =
FLUID MEASURE.
1 cubic foot.
1 cubic yard.
1 ton or load.
1 shipping ton
1 stack wood.
1 c'rd of wood
1 ton shipping
60 minims = 1 fluid drachm.
8 drachms  =1 ounce
20 ounces  =1 pint.
8 pints  =1 gallon
APOTHERCARIES' WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.
20 grains  =1 scruple  =     20 grains.
3 scruples = 1 drachm =    60      „
. 8 drachms = 1 ounce  =   480*     „
12 ounces  = 1 pound lb... = 5760*     „
* The avoirdupois ounce of 437% grains, and
the pound of 7,000 grains are the weights named
in the London Pharmacopoeia, and the drugs are
purchased by Avordupois weight.
TROY WEIGHT.
3'17 grains (U.S.3'2).
24 grains	
20 pennyweights	
12 ounces	
1 carat.
1 pennyweight
1 ounce
1 pound.
AVOIRDUPOIS    WEIGHTS.
27% grains = 1 drachm =27.34875 grains.
16 drachms ~ 1 ounce (oz.) = 487*5 grains.
16 ounces = 1 pound (lb) = 7000 grains.
25 pounds = 1 quarter (qr.).
4 quarters == 1 hundredweight (1002)).
Wheat per Bushel 60 lbs.
Indian Corn  „ 56 ,,
Peas  „ 60 „
Barley  „ 48 „
Malt  „ 36  „
Oats  ,, 34 „
Beans  » 60  „
Clover Seed  60 „
Timothy  „ 48  „
Buckwheat  „ 48 „
Flaxseed  ,• 56 „
HemD Seed  „ 44  „
Blue Grass  ,, 14 „
Roots, Potatoes, Turnips, Carrots,   Parsnips,   Beets   and
Onions  „ 60 „
HAY.
A ton—when settled in stack—8x8x8 =» 512 feet.
When hay is measured 7 ft- and 7% ft. square to
a ton.
COAL.
Anthracite (broken) 54 B>s to cubic ft.
Bituminous 49 lbs to cubic ft.
"         70 B>s to bushel.
One ton loose occupies 43 to 48 cubi« feet.
A OAR LOAD.
The standard C.P.R. cars hold 40,090 B>s. The
maximum load of grain carried is as follows:—
Wheat, 666 bushels; Oats, 1100; Barley, 800; Flax
Seed ....; Potatoes, 666; Apples, 180 barrels;
Sugar, 130 barrels.
ENGLISH CURRENCY.
The pound (sovereign, 26s. gold piece),
equals about $5 00
The % pound (% sovereign, 10s. gold piece),'
equals   about  2 50
The 5 shillings crown (rare) silver — about  1 25
The 2 shillings and 6 pence, half-crown,
silver, equals   about      62
1 be 2 shillings, silver, equals  50
Thel      " " *            £ 25
The6 pence % "            | 12
The4      " '• |            " 08
The 3      " g "            " 06
Thel      "        copper   §!            "
The%    " " "            |
and Bank of England notes for 5,10,20, 50,
100, 500x and 1,000 (and may be more) pounds
respectively.   A guinea is *^1 shillings.
FRENCH CURRENCY.
A Napoleon (20 franc gold piece)  equals
 about $4 00
% Napoleon (10 franc gold piece)....     "      2 00
% 5   " "   '   "     ....     "      100
5 franc, silver      "      100
2 " "          " 40
1 » "           " 20
%   "      50 centimes, silver  % 10
1-5 ** 20      "             "               .... " 04
2 sous, 10      "          copper'.!'..".!!.. " 02
1     "        5      "            n        " 01 HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
95
ENGLISH VALUE OF FOREIGN CURRENCY.
Eng. value about s. d.
America—1 dollar or 100 cents  4 2
Austria—1 florin or 100 cents  1 11
France, Belgium, Switzerland, or Italy -
1 franc or 10 0 centimes  0 Wz
German Empire—100 pfennings or 1 marc 1 0
" 20 marcs or 1 gold piece 20 0
Greece—Drachma or 100 leptas  0 8
Holland—1 florin or 100 cents  1 8
Portugal—1 Milrei or 1,000 reis  4 5%
Russia—1 silver rouble or 100 kopecks.. 3 2%
Spain—1 dollar or 20 reals  4 2%
FACTS FOR BUILDERS.
One man can lift with both hands 236 fi>s.
One man can support on his shoulders 330 lbs.
A single load of sand, earth, rubbish, or a
measure or hundred of lime = 1 cubic yard.
A single load of square or hewn timber, deals,
etc. = 50 cubic feet.
A single load of unhewn timber = 40 cubic ft.
A single load of bricks = 500 bricks.
A single load of tiles = 1000 tiles.
15J4 cubic feet of chalk weighs 1 ton.
18 I        "        clay
21      "        "        earth     |
19 "        "        gravel   "
21      "        "        sand
A bricklayer can lay about 1,500 or 1,600 bricks
in a day of 10 hours, where the joints are left
rough; about 1,000 per day when both faces have
to be worked fair, and not more than 500 a day
when carefully jointed, and faced with picked
bricks of a uniform color.
A cubic yard of rubble masonry will, as a rule,
require 1-5 cubic yard of mortar and 11-5 cubic
yard of stone.
According to experiments made by Tredgold.
the adhesive force of fresh-made glue, cementing
together two pieces of dry ash after being left
for twenty.four hours, was found to be 715 lbs.
to the square inch.
Ordinary London bricks are called 9x4j6x2%
inches, though as a rule they only run 82£x4%
x2%iaches.
It requires 1 cubic yard of clay! to make 460
bricks.
1,000 stock bricks stacked = 56 cubic feet.
H 00 old bricks cleaned and stacked = 70 cu. ft.
306 cubic feet, or 11 yards 9 feet = 1 rod of
brickwork.
272 feet superficial = 1 rod of brickwork in
walls 1% brick thick.
498 feet superficial = 1 rod of brickwork in
waUs 1 brick thick, called in London the standard thickness, to which all brickwork, of whatever thickness, is reduced.
4,350 stock brick to 1 rod reduced, 4 courses 1
foot high.
A rod of brickwork requires 1% cubic feet of
chalk lime, and 8 single loads or yards of road
drift or sand, or 1 cubic yard of stone lime, and
8% yards of sand, or 36 bushels of cement, and 86
bushels of sharp sand.
A rod of brickwork containing 235 cubic feet
of bricks, with 71 cubic feet of mortar, wiU,
upon an average, weigh 15 tons.
16 bricks to one foot of reduced brickwork.
7 bricks to one foot of superficial facing.
Plain Tiles.—A square of 100 feet superficial
will require, if laid to an 8-inch gauge, 600 plain
tiles, 1 bundle of laths, 1 fl>. of 4d. nails, 1 peck
•f tile pins, and 3 hods of lime and hair mortar.
4.300 stocks, or 4,500 place bricks, are sufficient
for a rod of reduced brickwork, which will require 'about 180 hods of mortar.
A load of mortar = 27 cubic feet, and requires
9 bushels of lime and 1 yard of sand.
A bricklayer's hod will hold 20 bricks; the
ordinary load, however, is 16 walling, or 1*
facing bricks, or nearly % a bushel of mortar.
Amount of Barbed. Wire for Fences.
Estimated number of pounds of Barbed# Wire
required to fence space or distances mentioned,
with one, two, or three lines of wire, based upon
each pound of wire measuring one rod (16% feet):
1 Line.      2 Lines.   3 Lines
1 Square Acre    50% lbs.   101% fl>s.   152 fi>s.
1 Side of Sq. Acre..   12% "        25% "        38 fi
1 Square Half-acre.   86     §        72     "      108 %
1 Square Mile, 1280    ''     2560     "     3840 B
lSideofSq. Mile.. 320     "      640     "      968"
1 Rodin Length...     1     " 2     "' 3"
100 Rods in Length 100    "      200    "      800 "
100 Feet in Length 61-16 "       12% " 188-16" ,
Names of the months.
January.—The Roman Janus presided over
the beginning of everything; hence the first
month of the year was called after him.
February.—The Roman festival Februs was
held on the 15th day of this month, in honor of
Lupercus, the god of fertility.
Mabch.—Named from the Roman god of war,
Mars.
Apbil.—Lat. Aprilis, probably derived from
aperire, to open; because spring generally begins, and the buds open in this month.
Mat.—Lat. Maius probably derived from
Maia a feminine divinity worshipped at Rome
on the first day of this month.
June.—Juno, a Roman divinity worshipped as
the Queen of Heaven.
July.—Julius Caesar was born in. this month.
AuGUST.^-Named by the Emperor Augustas
Caesar, B.C. 30, after himself, as he regarded it as
a fortunate month, being that in which he had
gained several victories.
Septembeb (septem, or 7).—September was the
seventh month in the old Roman calendar.
October (octo, or 8).—Eighth month of the old
Roman year.
November (novem or 9).—November was the
ninth month in the old Roman year.
December (decern, or 10).—December was the
tenth month of the early Roman year. About the
21st of this menth the sun enters the Tropic of
Capricorn, and forms the winter solstice.
Days of the Week.
Sunday. (Saxon) Sunnandseg, day of the sun.
MoNDAf, (German) Montag, day of the moon
Tuesday, (Anglo-Saxon Tiwesdaeg, from Tiw,
the god of war
Wednesday, (Anglo-Saxon) Wodnesdreg, from
Odin, the god of storms.
Thursday, (Danish) Thor, the god of thunder,
Friday, (Sax^n) Frigedseg, the day of Freya,
the goddess of marriage.
Saturday, day of Saturn, the god of time.
The names of the seven days of the week originated with the Egyptian astronomers. They
gave them the names of the sun, moon and five
planets, viz., Mars, Mercury, Jupiter, Venus and
Saturn.
The Chinese and Thibetans have a week of five
days, named after iron, wood, water, feathers
and earth.
P
i
J 96
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
1
i
Origin of the Dollar.
Previous to July 6,1785, the English pound
was in use in C S. On that date the Continental
Congress established the dollar, although the
exact weight was not fixed until August 8, 1786,
when it was made to equal about that of the old
Spanish dollar. The dollar did not originate
with the Spanish, but was first coined at Joa-
chimsthal, a mining town in Bohemia.
Time—The 24-hour System, Etc.
The 24-hour system is in use on the Western
and Pacific Divisions of the Can. Pac R'y (Port
Arthur and west to Pacific Coast). By this system the a. m. and p. m. are abolished, and the
hours from noon to midnight willTbe from 12 to
24 o'clock.
Eastern time is adopted east of Port Arthur and
St. Thomas.
Central time, Port Arthur to Brandon and
branches in Manitoba.
Mountain time, Brandon to Donald, Pacific to
Vancouver. Thus, when it is 12 noon at Montreal, eastern time, it is 11 at Winnipeg, Central
time; 10 at Brandon, Begina and Donald, Mountain time ; 9 at Vancouver, Pacific time.
TABJLE   OF   DISTANCES.    Miles.
Victoria to San Francisco    750
"       "   Portland    274
«'      "  Tacoma    115
8  Seattle    100
|       "   Port  Townsend      «8
"      "  Westminster      75
|       "   Port Angeles      18
"      "  Nanaimo <      73
"      "  Eaquimalt -.       3
"      "  Skeena     514
" Vancouver-.      72
"      "  Yokohama  4406
U   Sydney  7506
1   Montreal 2990
"  New York 3374
"      "  Metchosin*.      25
"  Saanich      24
"      "  Sooke    .26
"   Spences'Bridge    262
"-      "   FortTongas    561
1   FortWrangle    709
•'       "   Juneau    858
"   KiUisnoo    962
"   Chilcat    958
"   Glacier Bay      940
"   Sitka  1034
Liverpool to Quebec 2660
"   Halifax  2480
"   Boston 2894
"   New York  3094
Montrealto.  New York    384
P   Quebec    172
"   Toronto    844
"   Winnipeg 1424
"   Donald  2448
" "   Vancouver 2906
" " Yokohama 4384
| " Sydney  7434
New York to San Francisco  8876
STAGE DISTANCES.
Miles.
Aldergrove from New Westminster..   22
Alexandria from Ashcroft  185
Barkerville frpm Ashcroft,,,,,,,,,. 280
Beaver Creek from Nanaimo  16
Bonaparte Valley from Ashcroft  20
Bridge Creek from Ashcroft  85
Cache Creek from Ashcroft  6
Clayton from New Westminster.... 9
Clinton from Ashcroft  32
Clover Valley from N. Westminster.. 13^
Coutlee from Spence's Bridge  40
Cranbrook from Windermere  87
Dog Greek from Ashcroft  132
Duck & Pringle from Savona  40
83-Mile House from Ashcroft  68
Elgin from New Westminster  12
Empire Valley from Ashcroft  18
Fairmont Springs from Windermere   15
Fort Steele from Windermere  75
Hall's Prairie from N. Westminster. 19^>
Hanceville from Ashcroft  220
James Island from Victoria  12
Lac La Hache from Ashcroft  100
Lansdowne from Enderby  6
Lillooet from Clinton  47
Mamette Lake from Kamloops  60
Saanich from Victoria  16
Okanagan Mission from Enderby. .. 61
Okanagan from Enderby  18
150-Mile House from Ashcroft  135
Pavilion from Ashcroft  45
Quesnelle from Ashcroft  230
QuilcheDa from Kamloops  50
Rockford from Kamloops  35
Eockford from Spence's Bridge  75
Rocky Point from Victoria  22
70-Mile House from Ashcroft  55
Soda Creek from Ashcroft  165
Sooke from Victoria  26
South Saanich from Victoria •   13
Stanley from Ashcroft  265
Surrey Centre from Westminster.. .113^
Vernon from Enderby  26
Wasa from Windermere  64
Mountains of British Columbia.
ESTIMATED HEIGHT. feet.
Mount Lyon  1000
"    Geoffery  1076
"    Douglas  1500
'"    Finlayson   1500
"    Sooke  1500
Camel Hump  1650
Granite Peak  2000
Salt Spring Island (Mount Baynes) 2000
Mount Shepherd 2000
Clayquet Range  4000
Golden Ears 4000
Mount Slallicum  5000
"    Sumas  5000
"    Benson  5366
Beanfort Mountains  5400
Mount Arrowsmith  5970
Hermit Mountain  6000
Mount Stephen  7000
Macdonald Mountain  7000
Mount Suey         8000
CheamPeaks  9000 HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
97
m
m
HEIGHT OE WESTERN MOUNTAINS.
Adams. W. T  9577
Baker, W. T 10807
Blackmore, Mon 10189
Blanca, Col 14460
Brown, Cal 13882
Constance, W. T  7775
Delano, Mon 10209
Diamond Peak, Ore  5590
Electric, Mon 10994
Emigrant, Moo 10624
Estes,Id 10056
Fremont, Wy-T:  13760
Gardner, Cal 14000
Globe Peak, Not 11230
Grand Teton, Id 13691
Holy Cross, Col 14176
Hood, Or 11025
Jefferson, Or 9020
Kaweah, Cal 14000
Long's. Col 14271
Nebo, Utah 12000
Pike's, Col 14U7
Pitt, Or 9265
Rainier, WT 14444
Snow's, Wy.T 1S5T0
San Bernardino, Cal 11600
Scott. Or..:  8500
Shasta, Cal 14442
Snow's, Wy-T 18570
Sphinx, Mon 10889
St. Helens. W-T   9750
Thielson,Or  9260
TyndaU.Cal 14385
♦Whitney, Cal 15088
WiUiams. Cal 14500
♦Highest Peak in the United States.
NOTES
Esquimalt Harbor was named Valdes
by Manuel Quimper in 1790.
Victoria Harbor went by the name of
Cordoba in 1790.
Vancouver Island was called Quadra
and Vancouver in 1792.
British Columbia is in the latitude of
England.
'There can be no doubt," says Palmer
of the Royal Engineers, "that in point of
salubrity the climate of British Colombia excels that of Great Britain, and indeed is one fo the fii est in the world."
In the early days wherever the officers
and servants ef the Hudson's Bay Company had the country to themselves
there was little trouble with the natives.
Their management of them was perfect.
British Columbia in 1841 was a silent
wilderness.
For many years all the supplies for the
Western Pacific slope were brought from
England to Fort Vancouver round Cape
Horn
The first circulating library on the
Pacific slope was started in 1833 and
lasted until 1843.
The dividing line between British and
American territory on the Pacific was
established by the treaty of 1846, and surveyed in 1859.
In 1836 the little steamer Beaver came
round the Horn from England.
Fort Victoria was established in 1843
by James, afterwards Sir James, Douglas.
The town of Victoria was first laid out
into streets in 1852.
Victoria went by the name of Camoson
until 1845, when it was called Fort
Albert, but before the end of that year it
was duly christened Fort Victoria.
Forts Yale and Hope were established
in 1848.
Victoria was the nearest point of supply for the California gold mines in 1848.
Coal at Nanaimo was first reported by
an Indian in 1849, and in the following
year it was discovered and mining commenced. In 1852-3 2000 tons of coal
were shipped from Nanaimo.
Vancouver Island was granted to the
Hudson's Bay Co. on 12th January,
1849.
In 1853 Vancouver Island had a white
and mixed population of 450 persons and
about 17,000 Indians.
Richard Blanchard, the first governor,
arrived in Victoria 10th March, 1850.
James Douglas was made governor
(succeeding Blanchard) in September,
1857. He was also chief factor of the
Hudson's Bay Company until 1859. He
was governor of British Columbia until
1864; was knighted in 1863, and died in
Victoria on 2nd August, 1877.
The first elections for legislators were
held on the 4th August, 1856, and on the
12th day of the same month the first
legislature of British Columbia assembled, J. S. Helmekea being the first
speaker.
In 1856 gold was discovered in the bed
of the Fraser River.
In 1858 the British Parliament passed
an act for the government of the main
land of British Columbia.
David Cameron was the first chief
justice, appointed in 1857. He was superseded by Need ham in 1864, and in
1867 Matthew (now Sir Matthew) Begbie
took office as Chief Justice of the united
colonies of Vancouver Island and British
Columbia, which he has held ever since. 98
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
p»>#
nil
>■$
Gold was discovered as early as 1850,
but in 1856 Governor Douglas notified
the colonial office of its existence in paying quantities.
J. D. Pemberton was colonial surveyor
in 1859, and the first land office in Victoria was opened under him.
The first collector of customs in British
Columbia was Mr. Sangster, then A. C.
Anderson, then W. T. W. Hamley became
collector in 1860.
New Westminster, under the name of
Queensborbugh, was laid out as a town
early in 1859. On the 20th July of that
year it was publicly proclaimed as New
Westminster and declared a port of
entry.
Richard C. Moody was appointed in
September, 1858 chief commissioner of
lands and works for British Columbia by
the British government and to act as
lieut.-governor in case of absence or incapacity of governor.
New Westminster was incorporated
16th July, 1860.
The Gold Fields Act under which gold
commissioners were appointed was proclaimed 31 August, 1859.
Matthew Baillie Begbie (now Sir
Matthew) was appointed chief justice of
British Columbia 2nd Sept., 1858.
George W. Bell was the first white
man hanged on Vancouver Island. His
execution took place on 5th Nov., 1872.
Wells, Fargo & Co. shipped gold from
Victoria in 1858 amounting to $337,765;
in 1859, $823,488, and in 1860, $1,298,466.
In 1860 the population of Vancouver
Island was estimated at 5000, and all the
Mainland at 5000.
William Dietz,the discoverer of William
Creek, one of the richest gold creeks
ever worked in British* Columbia, lived
until 1877, and died in that year a pauper in Viotoria.
In October, 1869, Robert Dunsmuir
made a rich discovery of coal.
On 11th June, 1863, a Legislative Council was organized by authority on the
Mainland, and met at New Westminster
21st January, 1864.
In October, 1863, the announcement
was received that Governor Douglas had
been knighted.
In April, 1864, Governor Seymour successor to Douglas, arrived at New Westminster.
In 1864 Kennedy was Governor of
Vancouver Island.
In 1864 the white population of Vancouver Island was 7,500.
In 1866 the authority of the Executive
Government and Legislature of British
Columbia was extended over Vanoouver
Island.
Governor Seymour died June, 1869, on
board H. M. S.Sparrowhawk.
Anthony Musgrave, C.M.G., succeeded
Seymour as governor, and held office
until 1st July. 1871.
On 20th January, 1871, the union of
British Columbia with the Confederation
of Canada was consummated, and July of
the same year British Columbia duly
joined the Dominion.
On the 14th February, 1871, the British Columbia Legislative Council was
abolished and a Legislative Assembly
substituted iu its stead.
A synopsis of the articles of agreement
of the Pacific Railway Construction Company appeared in the Colonist of May
14th, 1873, among the names being that
of J. H. Helmcken.
In 1874 British Columbia complained
to the Home Office of a breach in the
terms of union with Canada.
In 1873 Esquimalt was seleoted as the
terminus of the C. P. R., and the first
stake for the location survey driven.
In August, 1883, a contract was made
for the construction of the Esquimalt &
Nanaimo Railway.
The first newspaper published in British Columbia was the Viotoria Gazette.
In   1858 Amor DeCosmos established
the Daily and Weekly Colonist.
.  The  Canadian   Pacific  Railway   was
completed to Port Moody in 1885.
Vancouver was destroyed by fire in
1886.
In 1849 Vancouver Island was constituted a Crown Colony—the mainland in
1858, and in 1867, the two colonies were
united under the name of British Columbia.
In 1847 Fort Victoria became the headquarters of the Hudsons Bay Company,
and in 1858 it became the centre of attraction for thousands of miners owing
to the discovery of gold on the Fraser,
Now it is a city of over 25,000.
A Dominion Experimental Farm is
located at Agassiz.
-At Oyster Bay (near Cedar) are valuable oyster beds.
At Port Haney is located the Fraser
River Fish Freezing Company. HAND BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
]
School for
Kuper
on
The Dominion Industrial
Indian children is located
Island.
The first through train from Montreal
over the C. P. R. arrived in Vancouver
May, 1887.
In 1886 Vancouver had 600 inhabitants
when it was swept away by fire. It has
since been re-built and is estimated to
contain over 18,000 people.
Jubilee Hospital in Victoria was formally opened May 22nd, 1890, by H. R. H.
the Duke of Connaught.
East and West Kootenay districts embrace together about 16,500,000 acres.
The origin of Nelson was through the
discovery of the famous Toad Mountain
mines.
Prior to September, 1891, the existence
of minerals in the Slocan district was
merely a conjecture, now it is known to
be one of the richest districts in B. C.
Vast deposits of coal exist in Crow's
Nest Pass. Petroleum fields have been
discovered in the eastern corner of the
district.
The first tramway line in British Columbia was built by D. W. Higgins. It
was opened by Governor Nelson at Victoria February 22nd, 1890.
The first canned salmon put up in the
Province was by John Syme at New
Westminster about 1870. His idea was
improved upon by Capt. Stamp, who exported a few hundred cases in 1872 to
England. There then laid the foundation
of the pxesent vast fishing industry.
The first newspaper printed on the
British Pacific coast, was printed at Victoria, by A. Whifcton, an American.
On January 4th 1871, Dr. Helmcken
was appointed Speaker of the Legislative Council.
On January 11th 1871, an adverse vote
was passed by the Legislative Council
against the Esquimalt Dry Dock.
On February 23rd 1871, Mr. Dunsmuir
found a 9 foot seam of coal at a depth of
120 feet at Departure Bay.
On April 1st 1871, the terms of Confederation passed the Dominion House of
Commons by 18 majority.
On April 5th 1871, the terms of Confederation passed the Dominion Senate
by 17 majority.
The Victoria Pioneer Society was organized on April 28th 1871.
Mr. James M. Yale of the H. B. Co.,
after whom Yale was named, died on the
7th of May 1871.
July 1st 1871 was the first Dominion
day.
On June 16th 1871, the first Dominion
flag in British Columbia was received by
Dr. Powell.
Direct telegraph communication with
Cariboo was established on July 15th '71.
On July 25th 1871, Governor Musgrave
left for England.
The Right Rev. Bishop Demers died at
Victoria July 28th 1871.
At the first meeting of the Provincial
Legislative   Assembly,   February   15th
1872, James Trimble was elected Speaker.
On September 2nd 1872, Messrs. Nathan and DeCosmos were elected members of the Dominion House of Commons.
The first Provincial Agricultural Exhibition of British Columbia was held in
Victoria under the auspices of the Farmers' club, on October 10th 1872.
On December 14th 1872, there was a
heavy earthquake on the Mainland and
Island of Vancouver, accompanied by a
slight tidal wave.
Mr. S. M. Driard, after whom the
Driard House was named, died on February 15th 1873.
The news was received on August 28th
1873, of the discovery of gold in the Cassiar district by Heary Thibert.
The foundation stone of the Victoria
water works was laid on October 7th '73.
The city of Nanaimo was incorporated
December 21st 1874.
On July 21st 1875, a by-law was passed
by the Municipal Council of Victoria,
prohibiting the employment of Chinese
on city work.
The loss of the steamship Pacific off
Cape Flattery, took place November 4th
1875, when 300 to 400 passengers were
drowned.
Beaver Rock in Victoria harbor, was
blown up April 8th 1876.
Lord Dufferin, Governor-General of
Canada arrived in British Columbia on a
visit August 15th 1876.
In February 1877 there was a strike by
the miners of Wellington Colliery, and in
April the militia companies (rifles and
artillery) were placed in active service to
enforce the law there.
The first shipment of thoroughbred
stock from Canada, imported by J.
Steele, arrived May 14th 1877.
The first Thanksgiving day observed
by British Columbians was November
22nd 1877.
i
i 100
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUxMBIA
111
The first locomotive for the C.P.R., arrived at Yale May 15th 1881.
The steamer R. P. Rithet, now running
between Victoria and New Westminster;
was launched April 20th 1882.
On September 19th 1882, H. M. S. Co-
mus arrived with the Marquis of Lome,
Governor-General of Canada, and H.R.H.
Princess Louise, on a visit to British
Columbia.
The B. C. Agricultural fair and show
was opened by His Excellency the Marquis of Lome and H.R.H. Princess Louise on September 27th 1882.
Largest gold nuggets found in British
Columbia :—1864, Lightning Creek, Cariboo, value $500 ; 1875, Dease Creek, Cassiar, $800; 1877, McDames' Creek, Cassiar, $1,300 ; 1878, Defoe Creek, Cassiar,
$412.50.
Fresh notes will be inserted each month
in the Hand-Book.
PLACES OF INTEREST
VANCOUVER.
Brocton Point—Recreation Grounds.
Cambie Street—Recreation Grounds.
Zoological Gardens.
T.IS.t'.A. Parlors, Frfee Library and Reading Rooms, Hastings Street.
Bathing  Grounds.
Stanley Park,     1
Hastings Park, VBeautiful resorts.
South Park, )
VICTORIA.
Beacon Hill Park—Overlooking Straits
of San Juan de Fuca, commands a view of
surpassing beauty and grandeur. The park
is a popular resort of the people of Victoria
and games of all kinds are constantly going
on there in tbe day-time. Nature and art
have combined in making it one of the loveliest parks on the Pacific coast.
Clover Point—A short distance east of Beacon Hill.
Fo wl Bay—Is a charming spot, and the drive
there is delightful.
Gorge—The beauty of the scenery srrrounding
the Gorge is exquisite, and a drive there will
well repay the pleasure-seeker. A most enjoyable way of going there is by row-boat
from Victoria harbor. It is the picnic camp
ing ground of the residents of Victoria, and
visitors to the city should not fail to see this
beautiful spot.
Holland. Point—Commands a fine view of
the Straits and entrance to the harbor.
Old Cemetery—Quadra street. Now never
used, but well worth a visit by strangers
Ross Bay—Wherethe new cemetery is, will
amply repay visiting, as the drive is a charming one.
Carey Castle-
Governor.
-Residence of the Lieutenant -
Dunsmuir Castle—Erected by the late
Hon Robert Dunsmuir, with its beautiful
grounds, is the finest) residence in Victoria
and cost over half a million dollars.
Provincial Museum—Government Buildings; contains a most interesting collection
of minerals, fossils, Indian curios, specimens of natural history, &c, &c., which
should be seen by all visitors.
Victoria Gardens—A
the Gorge road.
pleasure resort on
Cordova   Bay) Are   beautiful   drives for
Oak   Bay >       visitors to take.
Cadboro   Bay)
Hfount Tolmie Park—Probably the finest
view of Victoria and surrounding country
can be had from the top of Mount Tolnrie,
and the drive there is a delightful one.
Rock Bay—On the road to Esquimalt.
Esquimalt—No visitor should fail to pay a
visit to the British naval station, where the
Dominion Government have built an immense dry-dock, 400 feet in length, 26 in
depth, and 90 wide at the entrance. There
are always several men-of-war lying in
Esquimalt harbor, and visitors are not only
allowed on board, but every attention paid'
to them in showing them over the ships. It
can be reached in fifteen minutes by tram
car, but the drive by hack will also be found
most enjoyable.
Outer Wharf—Where ocean steamers land
will repay a visit.
Indian Reserve—A large number of Indians are generally camped on this reserve,
which is situated on the west side of the
harbor.
Agricultural Grounds—Contain a fine
exposition building. The electric cars run
out to the grounds.
Caledonia Park—Is used daily during the
summer months for athletic sports.
Shawnigan Lake-Is a delightful spot on
the E. AN. Railway, and is well worth a
trip. There is a hotel, pleasure boats and
good fishing in the lake.
Duncan's—Is another place worthy of a, visit,
there being excellent fishing in the neighborhood. In fact, a couple or three days can be
well spent in visiting one or two of the
beautiful places on theE. &N. R.R. line.
The scenery along the road at several points
is grand.
Goldstrearn—Also on the E. & N. R. R.
line, where there is a comfortable hotel and
good fishing.
Saanich £North and South]—The drive out
the Saanich road is one of the most beautiful
in the neighborhood of Victoria.
Nanaimo Restaurant SSmhSX
Commercial St., Nanaimo,
Mrs. M. Schneider, Proprietress
Eastern and Olympian Oysters in Every Style. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
101
NEW WESTMINSTER.
Queen's Park—The ^ ark comprises about 80
acres only a portion of which is improved,
the rest being native trees. In this park are
Athletic Gr unds, the Exhibition Buildings,
and the park green house. The situation of
the park is excellent, commanding a view of
the Fraser river and Mount Baker.
Sawmills— The  Royal City Mills and Factories and the Brunette Sawmilis are within
the city limits, while the Ross-Maclaren Sawmills are about two miles distant.
Canneries—There is one cannery intheciiy,
and about 15 on the river between the city
the straits.    All these are easily reached by
steamer from the city daily.
The Provincial Penitentiary and the Provincial
Asylum  are  situated  in   the city    Tha Public
Library Buiiding was erected by the corporation
al a cost of $24,000,  and is well   equipped as a
library and reading room.   The Y.M.C.A. Building is a fine brick building
OUTSIDE THE CITY. 1
Pitt Lake—This is a beautiful sheet of water
about 20  miles  distant, easily reached  by
water.   The scenery is exceedingly fine, and.
it is a place of resort for excursionists.
Burrard Inlet -Port Moody, at the head of
the inlet, is distanc about six miles from the
city by wagon road and 12 by railway.   From
the head of the inlet to English  Bay, a distance of 12 miles, there is fine scenery on
both sides.   The North Arm of Burrard Inlet
enters tho inlet a shore distance below Port
Moody, and presents some  splendid views.
Vancouver and Moodyville are distant about
12 miles by electric tram-way or wagon road.
Boundary Bay—This wate ing place is on
the Straits of Georgia, 21 miles from the city
by wagon road, and six miles from Ladner's.
Daily steamer to Ladner's, and wagon road to
the  bay.     Fiae sand beach  and  excellent
bathing grounds in a most clean and healthy
part of the country.
The cities of Vancouver and New Westminster,
connected by railway  and  steamers with every
part of the province, and by rail as well with
the United States.
WA1VAIMO.
The Mines—No. 1 shaft of the New Vancouver
Coal Company's mines, on the esplanade, a
few minutes walk from any part of the city
will well repay a visit. Here are located the
company's offices, the power house for the
subterranean electric tramway, and the stabling accommodation for the mules and horses.
Visitors are allowed to descend the shaft, per-
mission being first obtained from the manager. The other mines belonging to this company are also well worth visiting.
The Bastion.—An old Hudson Bay Fort, situated on the waterfront at the end of Fitzwil-
liam or Bastion street. It is one of the picturesque relics of the early days.
The  Government Offices and Jail,
Containing many curiosities and relics, also
Stewart's famous artillery.
Chase River, ) To the south of the city.
Nniiaim • Kiver, [ These places afford a beau-
Oyster Bay, ) tiful    drive  for  visitors.
Good trout fishing in the rivers and excellent
shooting in the neighborhood.
Moulit Benson.—About four miles from
the centre of the city, from which one of the
most magnificent views on the Island can be
enjoyed. A good road has been constructed
almost to the summit.
Departure Bay.—A short drive from the
city or an easy pull in a rowboat. The
scenery here is beautiful. The view across
the bay to the far distant Cascade Mountains
cannot be equalled.
Nanoose Bay.—A charming settlement to
the north of the city, will well repay a visit.
Excellent fishing and shooting can be obtained
Protection Island.—Immediately opposite
the city. Can be reached in a few minutes.
Here is situated another shaft of the N V
Coal Coy.   Good shooting can be enjoyed.
Gabriola Island, or Big Island, is a favorite resort of of sportsmen and artists. The
island is easily reached either by sail or row
boat, or by the weekly steamer.
Newcastle Island.—North of Protection
Island, is beautifully situated and is the
favorite picnicking ground for the ctty.
Boa tin sr can be enjoyed in Nanaimo under
the most favorable circumstances. In every
direction are scattered the beautiful Islands
which make Nanaimo's harbor the best protected on the coast, all worthy the visitor's
inspection. Sail and rowboats can be easily
obtained at low rates.
Chinatown, just at the northern end of the
city limits, though not very extensive, is an
interesting spot.
The Public Hospital, Beautifully situated at the top of Franklin street, is a model
of cleanliness and all that such an establishment should be. Visitors are admitted during
the afternoon.
Brunswick Hotel
—TEMPERANCE   HOUSE—
Jewel Block,Cor.Yates& Douglas Sts,
Victoria, B. 0.
Newly furnished, Four-story, brick building. Fire-escapes. Electric Bells and
Lights. Baths and other modern
conveniences.
P. O. Box 541. RATES MODERATE.
J. A. GRANT, Prop.
Clark's  Toronto  Variety Hall,
136 Cordova Street, Vancouver.
DEALER IK
Crockery, China,  Glassware and
Fancy Goods.
P. O. Box 723.
127342
1
J 102
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
KAMLOOPS.
Is an outpost of British Columbia, and
is the most important and contains the
largest population of any town between
Calgary and Vancouver. It is now about
to be incorporated as a city,, and is des-.
tined without a doubt to be a large commercial centre. Kamloops in the Indian
vocabulary signifies " The meeting of the
waters," which is most appropriate, as
the town is situated at the confluence of
the North and South Thompson Rivers.
The site on which Kamloops is built is a
beautiful one, and the surrounding country a perfect paradise for the sportsman,
and pleasure and health seeker.
From here the stage for Nicola leaves
the Dominion Hotel every Monday at 6
a.m., and returns on Friday at 6 p.m., in
time for the C.P.R. trains east and west.
The town is lighted by electric light,
and possesses a fine system of water
works, both under the direction, of Mr.
James Mcintosh. It has also a telephone
system under the management of W. T.
Slaven.
Among the industries may be mentioned the Shuswap Milling Co., C.P.R. machine shop?, carriage works and a tannery, with J. I>. Ross as manager. The
Kamloops coal company, as yet in its infancy,, are now working about 20 men,
and the coal1 has been tested by the 0. P.
R. and pronounced of the finest quality.
There are many beautiful drives
around Kamloops, among which may be
mentioned the one to Duck and along
the North Thompson, east and west side,
also the Nicola, Cherry Creek and Tran-
quille roads are delightful. Then there
is Kamloops Lake about 7 miles distant,
where splendid trout fishing and shooting may be enjoyed, and visitors- going
there have'the option of driving along a
good road or by row boat on the river.
The town has a fine half mile driving
park, race track grounds, and among the
public buildings may be mentioned the
Post Office, Bank of B. C, Agricultural
Hallr Court House, St. Anne's Convent,
eta, etc.
Kamloops is the centre of a large agricultural ranching and mining trade, and
is destined to retain its position as the inland capital of British Columbia.
It has an excellent police force under
Chief E. T. W. Pearce, and an efficient
fire department under Captains E. C.
Davidson and Jas. Blair.
In the June number, Kamloops will
occupy its position in the Hand-Book
among the cities of British Columbia,
with further particulars regarding this
rising place.
Light Houses and Fog Horns on
British Columbia Coast.
Cape Beal e—Revolving light; revolves
every 30 seconds ; east entrance to
Barclay Sound. Kept by E. Cox
Carmanah Point—Group flashing
lights, flashing every 10 seconds, with
' an interval of 30 seconds ; north entrance to Juan Fuca Straits ; a fog horn
(steam) sounds a blast of 5 seconds
every minute. W. P. Daykin is the
keeper. This is a meterological and
telegraph station also.
Race Rocks—Flash light every 10
seconds. A 12-inch steam whistle gives
a blast of 5 seconds every 72 seconds.
F. Eastwood, keeper.
F i s g a r d—Fixed white fight; entrance
to Esquimalt.   Jos. Dare, keeper.
Berens Island—Fixed blue light;
entrance to Victoria harbor. A fog
bell to answer steamer whistles. A.
McKinnon, keeper.
Discovery Islan d—One fixed white
light. Haro Strait. Steam fog horn ;
blasts of 8 seconds every minute. R
Brinn, keeper.
East Point (SaturnaIsland) —Revolving white light every 30 seconds. Jas.
Georgesbn, keeper.
Plumper Pass—Fixed white light.
A fog whistle is about to be put in
operation.   Henry Georgeson, keeper.
Sand Heads—Fixed white light.
Hamilton Armour, keeper.
Point Atkinson—Revolving white
light. Steam fog horn. Walter Ewin,
keeper.
Brocton Point—White light. A
fog bell every 20 seconds. W. D. Jones,
keeper.
Entrance Islan d—White light.
Robert Gray, keeper.
Yellow Island—White flash light.
F. H. Piercey, keeper.
Acreage of Districts in British
Columbia.
Kootenay, East and West 16,500,000
Yale 13,500,000
Lillooet 12,500,000
Westminster 36,000,000
Cariboo 59,250,000 HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.*
103
-FINE
amily Grocer
All Dainties and Epicurean
Delights in Season
39-41 JOHNSON ST.,   -   VICTORIA
c
ANADIAN
THE ONLY TRANS-CONTINENTAL LINE.
Gives a Greater Chance of Routes than any other   Railway
Leaving the Pacific,
Rates $ 10 and $5 Lower than any other Road.
Luxurious Drawing Room and Sleeping Cars.
Magnificent   Dining    Cars—Upholstered   Tourist    Cars—Free
Colonist Cars.
No Change of Cars between Vancouver and Montreal.
The line passes through 600 miles of the grandest scenery in the world, embracing
the wildest canyons, the highest mountain peaks, and greatest glacier.
Fares $10 First-Class and $5 Second-Class LESS than any other
Route from San    rancisco.
or to
For information as to Rates, Time, Etc., apply to any Agent of the Company
GEO. McL. BROWN, Dist. Pass. Agent,
VANCOUVER. 104
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
BELL TIME ON SHIPBOARD.
Time,
AM.
Time.
A.M.
Time,
P.M.
Time,
P.M.
1 Bell ...
12.30
 1.0
1.30
   2.0
2.30
3.0
.   .  3.30
4.0
4.30
5.0
5.30
 6.0
5 Bells ..
 6.30
1 Bell   , ,
2 Bells
3 "
4 "
5 "      ...
6 %
7 "
8 "
1 BeH
2 Bells
3 *
.3   "
12.30
1.0
..... 1.30
. 2.0
2.30
3.0
,; 3.30
  4.0
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
BeU   ..
Bells
a
ei
Bell
Bells
M
u
it
(1
il
(i
  6.30
2 Bells ..
6   "
 7.0
  7.0
3   I
7   "
 7.30
 7.30
4   "
8   "
 8.0
 8.0
5   "
1 Bell   ..
 8.30
  8.30
6 "
7 "
2 Bells
3 "
9.0
  9.30
9.0
  9.30
8   "
4   "
 10.0
 10.0
1 Bell   ..
5 |   .:
 10.30
  4.30
5
.... 10.30
2 Bells ..
6   "
 11.0
5.0 6
5.30,7
  6.0 -8
 11.0
3 "
4 "
mm  ..
8   "
11.30
.... Noon.
11.30
Midnight
One Knot, 6,174 ft.   One Statute Mile, 5,280 ft. (5-6 knot.)
MAY TIDES 1883,
HIG
h.m.
1st  3.35
5.48
2nd 3.52
6.37
3rd  4.06
7.25
4th 4.18
8.15
5th 1 4.30
9.06
6th  4.53
9.55
7th 5.20
10.41
8th 6.30
11.22
9th 9.13
11.58
10th 11.32
11th 30
12.57
12th 59
2.00
13th  1.28
3.00
14th  1.57
3.57
15th  2.27
453
16th	
17th
2.57
5.48
3.27
6.43
H.
feet.
9.7
9.7
- 9.6
9.8
9.4
10.0
9.2
10.0
9.0
10.3
8.5
10.4
8.2
10.5
7.6
10.5
7.0
10.4
7.0
10.3
7.2
10.0
8.2
10.0
9.2
10.0
9.8
10.1
10.2
10.2
10.8
10.3
11.0
LOW.
h.m.    feet.
10.25
10.30
10.57
11.11
11.31
11.55
12.09
.50
12.48
2.10
1.34
3.25
2.53
430
3.17
5.30
4.18
6.20
5.21
6.57
6.20
7.23
7.15
8.04
8.07
8.42
8.56
9.24
9.44
10.07
10.33
10.54
11.27
1.6
6.7
1.2
6.9
1.0
7.4
0.9
7.9
1.0
8.1
1.3
8.2
1.6
7.7
2.1
7.0
2.8
6.4
3.3
5.4
4.3
4.2
5.1
2.8
5.7
1.7
6.5
0.6
6.7
0.3
7.0
0.8
7.6
HIGH.
LOW.
18th	
19th	
20th	
21st	
22nd	
23rd	
24th	
25th	
26th	
27th ;
28th	
29th	
30th	
5.47
31st   2.42
0.31
Note.—The times
h.m.
. 4.01
7.39
. 4.40
8.33
. 5.28
9.25
6.39
10.12
. 8.39
10.55
.10.31
11.37
.12.03
. 0.12
1.21
. 0.43
2.23
. 1.11
3.21
.  1.40
4.13
. 2.08
5.02
. 2.27
feet.
10.0
11.0
9.5
10.9
8.9
10.8
8.1
10.8
7.1
10.7
7.3
10.5
10.2
7.6
10.0
8.2
10.0
8.8
9.9
9.1
9.9
9.6
9.7
9.9
9.5
10.3
of tide
h.m.
11.42
0.27
12.32
1.38
1.25
3.02
2.18
4.38
3.14
5.47
4.17
6.38
5.22
7.13
6.14
7.48
7.05
8.22
7.51
8.54
8.36
9.25
9.20
9.55
10.06
10.20
10.57
are
feet.
0.9
7.9
0.6
8.1
0.0
7.7
0.9
7.1
1.9
6.3
2.9
5.3
42
4.3
5.2
3.3
6.2
2.3
6.7
1.4
6.7
0.9
7.2
0.5
7.6
0.2
8.0
Pacific
standard (120th meredian) eight hours
slower than Greenwich mean time. The
heights are reckoned from the plan of
reference of the coast and geodetic
charts, which is the average of a selected
few lowest low waters. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
105
P'
Population and Area of British
Empire.
POPULATION.
United Kingdom  38,103,527
British India 284,614,147
Dominion of Canada     4,833,239
Australasia     4,124,951
Possessions in America     1,889,352
" in Europe        394053
in Asia     4,232,257
| in Africa 28,082,643
Total 366,274,169
ABEA.
square miles.
United Kingdom    121,115
British India. 1,533,726
Dominion of Canada 3,436,542
Australasia 3,171,978
Possessions in America, not including Canada    264,627
Possessions in Europe  121
" in Asia    170,715
" in Africa 2,491,689
 Total 11,190,513
Political  Divisions   of   British
Columbia.
MAINLAND.
NewWestminsterCity
Vancouver City.
Cariboo.
Cassiar.
East Kootenay.
West Kootenay.
Yale.
Lillooet.
Westminster.
THE    ISLANDS.
VictoriaOCity. Nanaimo City.
Victoria. Nanaimo.
Esquimalt. Alberni.
Cowichan. Comox.
The Islands.
Lacrosse.
SCHEDULE OF GAMES FOB  1893.
May 13—Westminster v. Vancouver, at
Vancouver.
May 24—Victoria v. Westminster, at
Victoria.
June 3—Victoria v. Vancouver, at Victoria.
June 17—Vancouver v. Westminster,
at Westminster.
July 1—Vancouver v. Victoria, at Vancouver.
July 15—Westminster v. Victoria, at
Westminster.
Governors of Canada.
From Confederation 1867 "until November 1868—The Right Hon. Viscount
Monck, G.C.M.G.
From November 1868 until May 1872—
The Right Hon. Lord Lisgar, G.C.M.G.
From May 1872 until November 1878—
The Right Hon. the Rarl of Dufferin,
K.P.K.C.B., G.C.M.G.
From November 1878 until October 1873
—The Right Hon. the Marquis of
Lome, K.T., G.C.M.G., P.C. Etc.
From October 1883 until June 1888—The
Most Hon. the Marquis of Lansdown,
G.C.M.G., Etc.
Present Governor-General— The Right
Hon. Sir Frederick Arthur Stanley,
Baron Stanley of Preston, P.O., G.C.B.
now Lord Derby.
Census of Canada 1891.
Ontario 2,114,321
Quebec 1,488,535
Nova Scotia     450,396
New Brunswick    321,263
Prince Edward Island    109,078
Manitoba    152,506
British Columbia     98,173
Territories, etc      98,967
Total 4,833,239
BBITISH COLUMBIA.
1871 33,586
1881 49,459
1891 98,173
r\ I Cor. Gov. and
Brown Jus:c^fce8^
U ported Wines,
Liquors and Cigars.   Commercial Lunch
from 11 a. m. to 2 p. m.
M. POWERS, Prop.     VICTORIA, B.C.
COLONIAL HOTEL
J. B. Latremonille, Prop.
Neat clean and airy rooms, by day,  week or
month.   Rates, room and board from
$1.00 upwards.
KAMLOOPS, B. C.
J. S. SMITH
FliOXJR AND FEED
Dealer in all kinds of Fruits, Wedding Cakes
specialty.
KAMLOOPS.
i 106
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
ESQUIMALT GRAVING DOCK.
SCALE OF CHABGES.
1. Length of Dock on blocks 430 feet, can be made 480 feet.
2. Width of Gates  65 feet.
3. Depth of water, varying from 27 ft. to 29 ft. 6 in. at springs, according to season
of year.
The use of the Dock will be subject to the following tariff, viz.:
For each f ollow-
Forthe ing day
first day of      including the
Gross Tonnage of Vessels. docking.      undocking day.
TONS. FEB TON.
For all vessels up to 1000 .$400 00 10 cents.
From 1000 to 2000  500 00 8 cents.
%     2000 to 3000  600 00 6 cents.
"     3000 to 6000  700 00 5 cents.
All fractional parts of 50 tons to be counted and paid for as 50 tons. Cargoes
to be charged at the same rates as tonnage, and no charge for ballast. Each day
to be counted from 7 a.m. to 7 a.m., and each fractional part of a day will be
charged as one day.
No reduction will be allowed for Sundays and holidays. jf||
N. B.—No vessel will be admitted into the Dock until she has been duly
entered in accordance with rule and regulation No. 1, on the entry books in the
Dock Master's office, nor until after the sum of two hundred dollars ($200.00) shall
have been paid to the Dock Master as an entrance fee.
Money Orders on Foreign Countries, &c, Valued in   English
Money.
Table showing the amounts in Canadian money to be paid for Money Orders
drawn on the United Kingdom, Constantinople, Panama, Smyrna, Jamaica,
Queensland, Victoria, New South Wales, Tasmania, New Zealand, Barbados,
Bermuda and Leeward Islands.
Amount
payable in
Dollars
and
Amount
payable in
Dollars
and
Amount
payable in
Dollars
and
Amount
payable in
Dollars
and
cents.
English
English
English
English
Money.
Money.
Money.
£  s.   d.
Money.
£  s.   d.
$     c.
£   s.   d.
$
c.
$   c
£ s. d.
1   c.
0   0     1
0       2
0   0   11
0
22
0   10   0
2     44
10   0
4   87
0   0     2
0       4
0   10
0
24
0   11   0
2     68
2   0   0
9   74
0   0     3
0       6
10   2     0
0
49
0   12   0
2     92
3   0   0
14   61
0   0     4
0       8
j 0   3     0
0
73
0   13   0
3     17
4   0   0
19   48
0   0     5
0     10
0   4     0
0
97
0   14   0
3     41
5   0   0
24   35
0   0     6
0     12
0   5     0
1
22
0   15   0
3     65
6   0   0
29   22
0   0     7
0     14
0   6     0
1
46
0   16   0
3     90
7   0   0
34   09
0   0     8
0     16
0   7     0
1
71
0   17   0
4     14
8   0   0
38   96
0   0     9
0     18
0   8     0
1
95
0   18   0
4     38
9   0   0
43   83
0   0   10
0     20
0   9     0
2
19
0   19   0
4     63
10   0   0
48   70
. P. GORDON,
Every Description of
FUMWITOME
Funeral Director and Embalmer.
KAMLOOPS. HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
109
toi
ADDENDA.
Received too late for insertion nnder proper heading
Additional Fruits and Fruit Growing Districts,
FRUITS.
Crab Apples,
Prunes,
Cherries,
jQuince,
Strawberries,
Raspberries,
Black Caps,
Blue Berries,
Gooseberries,
Red, White and
Black Currants.
FRUIT-GROWING DISTRICTS.
Penny's Station, C.P.R.
VANCOUVER TO ALERT BAY AND
NEWITTI.
Steamer Mermaid
Leaves Evans, Coleman & Evans' wharf every
Monday at 12 noon, calling at Gibsons', See-
chelt, North West Bay, Welcome Pass, Nelson
Island (Quarry), Thunder Bay, Frock, Texada
Island (East Side), Grief Point, Savory Island, Lund, Hernando, Cortez Island. Reid
Island, Iron MineRedonda Island, Shoal Bay,
Bickley Bay.Thurlow Island, Port Neville,
Alert Bay, Port Alexander and Ncwitti.
Returning, leaving Newitti every Wednesday
afternoon, arriving at Vancouver Thursday
evening.
Fares—Vancouver to Gibson's. $1.50 s to Seech-
elt, $2.00 ; to Cortez, $3,00 ; to Port Neville,
$5.00 ; to Alert Bay, $7.50, and Newitti, $8.00
Kamloops,
Tranquille.
Tram cars between Vancouver and
Westminster on Sundays run every
second hour after 8 a.m., till 10 p.m.
All Oriental steamers of the C.P.R. and
N.P.R. leave the outer wharf, only 5
minutes from Dallas Hotel.
Steamer City of Kingston leaves Victoria every evening except Monday for
Seattle and Tacoma. Leaves Tacoma
Seattle every Morning except Monday
for Victoria.
June number of Hand-Book will contain latest alterations in Mining Laws.
Dominion Hotel, Kamloops, the oldest
house in that town, inadvertantly omitted from list of leading hotels.
Time Table .Esquimalt  & Nanaimo R. R.
Sat.  aad
Sundays
only.
1
cS
00
9.
H
cS
Em
n
•r-l
eg
Sat.   and
Sundays
only.
P.M.
3 04
A. M.
8 00
8 04
8 14
¥$■ 8 39
9 14
9 34
9 44
9 57
10 07
10 12
10 22
10 48
11 09
ABll 50
DE 11 59
P.M.
12 14
"i
4
11
20
28
31
35
38
40
43
52
59
73
78
P. M.
12 24
12 20
12 10
A. M.
11 45
11 10
10 50
10 40
10 27
10 17
10 12
10 02
9 36
9 15
DE8 34
AR8 25
8 10
P.M
8 00
3 08
25c
25c
75c
1 00
1 50
1 75
2 00
2 00
2 25
2 25
2 50
2 75
3
3 CO
3 25
7 56
'  3 16
7 48
3 36
4 05
4 27
4 37
Goldstream	
Cobble Hill	
7 28
6 59
6 37
6 27
4 49
6 15
4 59
605
5 04
600
5 12
5 52
5 32
Chemainus	
5 32
5 49
5 15
6 22
4 42
6 34
4 30 114>
HAtfD-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Corner Government and Johnson, Sts., VICTORIA, B. C.
Finest Sample Rooms Free to Commercial Men.    The only First-
Class Hotel in the City of Victoria.
On American & European Plan.   Artistically Furnished.   Exclusively First-Class
Fj
MANUFACTURER OF
SODA WATER, LEMONADE, GlNGERALE, BITTERS
Essences of Peppermint and Ginger and all Kinds
of Syrups.
Brick Building, Waddington Alley, VICTORIA, B. C.
P. O. BOX 66.
S@~ MASON -Wt
1S/L&13LG&   G sl n dy-
24 Viotoria Orescent, Nanaimo, B. C.
The  SJoooxrci  House,
Cor. Powell and DunlevieStreets.
MRS. A. WYtDS,   -   -   PROPRIETRESS.
W«ll-furnished Rooms, with Board by the day,
week or month.   Baths—hot and cold water, with
•very convenience.   Tske Powell street Tram.
Rates from $5 per week upwards.
Tel.No.2 BRITISH COLUMBIA MARKET. P.O.Box55
British Columbia Cattle Co.,
LIMITED.
Wholesale & Retail Butchers & Packers.
Cor. Government & Yates St., Victorir, B. C.
Branches: Vancouver, New Westminster.
Paper, Raper & Co.,
Pioneer Book nnd News House,
Established 1875.
books, stationery & fancy goods.
Victoria, Crescent, Nanaimo, B. C. HAKD-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Wl
BUSINESS DIRECTORY.
For  Address  and  particulars   see  advertisement indicated by
number of page.
VICTORIA.
Barbers: page
Geo. S. Russell 31
Biscuit Manufacturer
M. R. Smith & Co 29
Bariks*
Green, Wollock & Co 51
Booksellers
Kerr & Begg Cover
Butchers
B. C. Cattle Co 110
Candy Factory
H. A. Lilley 77
Canoes
H. C. Macaulay 87
Coffee and Spice Mills:
Stemler &  Earle 29
Chemists:
D. E. Campbell 28
R. J. W. Atwood & Co 77
Dry Goods:
David Spencer 6
Dentists:
Lewis Hall 31
Druggists (Wholesale):
Langley & Co 67
Financial Agents:
Lowenberg, Harris & Co 27
B. C. Land & Investment Agency
(L'td) 37
Pemberton & Sons 63
A. W. More & Co 115
A. W. Taylor & Co 115
Furniture:
Sehl & Co 37
Grocers:
FeHr<& Co 45
H. Saunders 115
Erskine, Wall & Co 43
Hotels:
Driard  2
Poodle Dog 75
Mount Baker Hotel, Oak Bay. .57
The Occidental.., 71
Hotel Dallas 24
Shawnigan Lake Hotel 77
Grand Hotel, Seattle  77
Brunswick Hotel 110
Hotel Victoria  110
Point Comfort Hotel 115
Horse Shoer: page
R. Ray 31
Hardware:
Nicholles & Renouff 27
E. G. Prior & Co 16
W. H. Perry 47
Marvin & Tilton Cover
Insurance:
Lowenberg, Harris & Co 27
Hy. Croft 47
R. Ward & Co 59
Dalby & Claxton < 63
A. W. More & Co 116
A. W. Taylor & Co 115
Japanese Goods:
Japanese Store ., 31
T. S. Futcher 75
Lunch Rooms:
Brown Jug 105
Lumber Mills:
Shawingan Lake Lumber Co.. .69
Music Stores:
T. W. Fletcher 31
C. A. Lombard & Co 75
Newspapers:
The Colonist 67
The Times 67
Plumbers:
Watson & Geiger... 79
Painters
Joseph Sears 77
Printers:
T. Roarke 29
Railways:
Canadian Pacific Ry 105
Northern Pacific RR * 49
Real Estate:
Lowenberg, Harris & Co .27
Hy. Croft 47
Pemberton & Son 63
A. W. More & Co 115
Restaurant:
Poodle Dog  .-75 112
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Soda Water: page.
Phillips Bros 29
C. Morley 110
Sporting Goods
J. Barnsley & Co 86
Steamers
Canadian Pacific Navigation Co. 85
Taxidermist
Wm. Lindley 31
Tailors
J. C. Leask & Co 31
A. Gregg & Son 77
Typewriters page.
M. W. Waitt & Co 69
Undertakers
C. Hayward 31
Vinegar Works:
Falconer's 45
Wholesale Importers
R. Ward & Co 59
Wilson Bros 61
Hudson's Bay Co Cover
Turner, Beeton & Co 116
VANCOUVER.
Auctioneers page
A. Murray Beattie  79
Boat Builders
Hayden & Mylius 81
Booksellers & Stationers
S. T. Tilley & Son 55
Bailey Bros 77
Boots & Shoes
Mills & Bethune  75
G. L. Allan 71
J. A. Pyke 77
Commission Merchants
Baker Bros. & Co., Ltd 4
Major & Eldridge 53
Baker & Leeson 53
Clothing
D. J. McLean & Co 79
Crockery
Clark's Toronto Variety Hall. .101
Druggists
T. R. Morrow 55
Dry Goods
Gordon Drysdale :. 89
Financial Agents
J. M. Buxton & Co 53
Innes & Richards 15
Fish Dealers
A. Fader & Co 55
Furnished Rooms
The Secord House 98
Furniture
Shelton & Co 81
General Dealers
Anglo-Columbia Co 51
Hardware
Thos. Dunn & Co 41
Harness & Saddlery page
D.Wilson 50
B. F. Heney 77
Hotels
Hotel Vancouver  2
The Manor House 25
Secord House ,,.. .110
House Furnishings
F. W. Hart 29
Insurance
Innes & Richards 15
Japanese Goods
Sun Ban 55
Lumber Dealers
Geo. Cassidy & Co 55
Royal City Mills .65
Men's Furnishings
Dunlap, Cooke & Co 29
Nursing Institution
Miss Wilkinson's Home and
Nurse's Institute. A Home in
Sickness 91
Oils, Etc.
Julius Wilkinson ••••. .\.. 108
Real Estate
Innes & Richards 15
J. M. Buxtou & Co 53
Railways
Canadian Pacific Railway 103
Steamship Companies
Union S. S. Co 39
Soap Makers
Pacific Soap Works 43
Sheet Iron Works
H. Hatch 77 HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
US
Ships' Supplies                        page
John Leckie 75
Transfer Companies
Vancouver Gurney Cab and Delivery Co 45
Tobacconists
S. Gintzburger 79
Teaming                                   page
Thos. Veitch j 79
Watchmaker & Jeweller
Geo. E. Trovey 79
Wine Merchants
J. Colcutt & Co 71
J. C. Douglas 1 71
NANAIMO.
Boots & Shoes page
Whitfields 33
Orr & Rendell 71
R. Hilbert 71
Butchers
Hull Bros 69
Hemans & Wamsley 33
Booksellers and Stationers
Raper, Raper & Co 110
Carriage Works
R. Craig ...79
Chemists
Nanaimo Pharmacy 33
Candy Factory
Mason 110
Cigar Manufacturer
P. Gable     33
Dye Works page
Nanaimo Steam Dye Works 81
Dry Goods
Spencer & Perkins 39
. J. S. Stannard & Co 81
Financial Agents
W. K. Leighton 107
Chas. R. Hardy & Co 33
C. Dempster & Co 33
Marcus Wolfe 71
Furniture
J. Hilbert 27
Fish Dealers
Nanaimo Fishing Co 33
General Merchant
Geo. Bevilockway 71
page
& Co 67
Grocers
W. S. Santo
Hotels
Windsor Hotel 16
Summerset House, Wellington. .81
Crescent Hotel 71
Harness & Saddlery
T. F. Barrett 33
Hard-ware
VanHouten & Randle 71
Insurance
W. K. Leighton 107
A. E. Planta & Co 61
Marcus Wolfe 71
C. C. McKenzie 33
C. Dempster & Co 33
Lumber Mills
A. Haslam. Cover.
Machinists
R. J. Wenborne 31
Coal Companies
New Vancouver Coal Co Cover.
Real Estate
Nanaimo Realty Co 31
A. E. Planta & Co 61
C. C. McKenzie 33
Chas. R. Hardy & Co 33
C. Dempster & Co 33
W. K. Leighton 107
Hawthornthwaite & Co 27
Tailors
Morgan & Comerford 33
Transfer Companies
I.X.L. Transfer Co 33
!
JAMES VAIE,
Tinware.
Dealer in
Stoves, Ranges,   Manufacturer of
Plumbing.   Hardware, Paint, Oil and Glass.
House Furnishing Goods. 114
HAND-BOOK TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
NEW WESTMINSTER
Boots & Shoes page
Toronto Shoe Store. 81
Booksellers
H. Morey & Co. i . .86
D. Lyall& Co 73
Commission Merchants
Youdall '& Sinclair. 73
Carpets, & Rugs
P. Peebles 81
Dry Goods
J. W. Harvey 89
H. B. Shadwell & Co. 87
Druggists
D. S. Curtis & Co 73
R. G. Macpherson 73
Groceries and Provisions    page
Ohas. McDonough 73
Hardware
Thos. Dunn & Co 41
Hotels
Depot Hotel 75
The Queen's 69
Hotel Douglas 25
Central Hptel 79
Iron Works
Reid & Currie, Iron Works 43
Lumber Mills
Royal City Mills 65
Brunette Saw Mill Cover
KAMLOOPS.
Baker 6c Grocer                      page
J.S.Smith 105
Books & Stationery
W. P. Slavin 115
Carriage Works
Kamloops   Carriage   & Wagon
Works 115
Druggists
Clarke & Oo 114
Furniture
M. P. Gordon 106
Hotels* page
Dominion Hotel 108
Grand Pacific  Hotel I 108
Cosmopolitan Hotel 108
Colonial Hotel 105
Ashcroft Hotel, Ashcrojft 108
Shingle Mills
Greely Creek Shingle Mill Oo. 108
Stoves & Tinware
James Vair 113
Watch Specialist
W. H. Stephenson 115
MUNROE MILLER, o
Printer and Bookbinder,
77 Johnson Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
CLARKE & CO.
WHOLESALE & RETAIL DRUGGISTS
Kamloops, B. C.
I NANAIMO SAW MILL
ft 5%>!
H
1
A.ND-
SASH AND DOOR FACTORY,
A. HASLAM,       -       PROPRIETOR.
Office: Mill Street,   -   NANAIMO, B. C.
P. O. Box 35. Telephone'Call 1-9.
A COMPLETE STOCK OP
k M I      I '§1
t   ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER,
SHINGLES, LATHS AND PICKETS,
!.|S    DOORS, WINDOW'S, BLINDS, MOULDING, TURNING,
' 1;' SCROLL   SAWING,      § ||
AND ALL KINDS OF WOOD FINISHING,    If..
Cedar    White  Pine.    Redwood.
Harbor and Outside Towing done at Reasonable Kates. Brunette Saw Mill Co., Ld., New Westminster, B.C.
to
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Cable Address," Brunette."   Codes, A. B. C.   Watkinsand AppenJix,
Incorporated     167Q.
Huc^oh s|Bay Company
TRADE   DEPARTMENT.
The Company Have General Stores at
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LAND   DEPARTMENT.
The Company's Land Grant consists of about 7,000,000 acres in
Manitoba and North-west Territories, which are offered for
Sale at Moderate Prices and Easy Terms of Payment
without any Condition of Settlement
Town Lots For Sale in Winnipeg, Fort William, Rftt Port&p, E#j$
Qu'Appelle, Edmonton, Prince Albert, Portage la Prairie, Ro^motiiift,
Victoria. For full and accurate information about lands, a|ji>ly to the
Commissioner.
GOVERNOR,
SIR DONALD^A* SMITH, K.C.M.G., M.P.,
Montreal.
COMMISSIONER?'
I 61C. CHIPMAN, *
Winnipeg.
LONDON (ENG.) OFFICE, 1 Lime Street, E. C.
UTRR  ki   RFPP   BOOKSELLERS & STATIONERS,
I\Lnn 06 DLUVJ, 45 Government Street, VI
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VICTORIA, B.C.

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