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Bibliography of Wakashan languages Pilling, James Constantine, 1846-1895 1894

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Array SMITHSONIAN   INSTITUTION 
BUREAU OF ETHNOLOGY: J. W. POWELL, DIRECTOR
 BIBLIOGRAPHY
 OF THE 
WAKASHAN LANGUAGES
 BY
 JAMES CONSTANTINE PILLING WASHINGTON
 Government printing office 1894  
SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 
BUREAU OF ETHNOLOGY: J. W. POWELL, DIRECTOR 
BIBLIOGRAPHY
 OF THE 
WAKASHAN LANGUAGES BY 
JAMES CONSTANTINE PILLING WASHINGTON
 GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
1894  LINGUISTIC BIBLIOGRAPHIES ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF ETHNOLOGY.
Smithsonian institution—Bureau of ethnology. Catalogue of linguistic! manuscripts in the library of the Bureau of ethnology. By
James C. Pilling.
In Bureau of ethnology first annual report; half-title as above p. 553, text pp.
555-577, Washington, 1881, royal 8°.
Issued separately with cover title as follows:
Catalogue | of | linguistic manuscripts | in the | library of the Bureau
of ethnology | by | James C. Pilling | (Extracted from the first annual
report of the Bureau | of ethnology) | [Vignette] |
Washington | Government printing office | 1881
Cover title as above, no inside title, half-title as under entry next above p. 553,
text pp. 555-577, royal 8°.    One hundred copies issued.
Smithsonian institution—Bureau of ethnology | J. W. Powell director | Proof-sheets | of a | bibliography | of | the languages | of the
| North American Indians | by | James Constantine Pilling | (Distributed only to collaborators) |
Washington | Government printing office | 1885
Title verso blank 11. notice (signed J. W. Powell) p. iii, preface (November 4, 1884)
pp. v-viii, introduction pp. ix-x, list of authorities pp. xi-xxxvi, list of libraries referred to by initials pp. xxxvii-xxxviii, list of fac-similes pp. xxxix-xl, text pp.
1-839, additions and corrections pp. 841-1090, index of languages and dialects pp.
1091-1135, plates, 4°. Arranged alphabetically by name of author, translator, or
first word of title. One hundred and ten copies printed, ten of them on one side of
the sheet only.
Smithsonian institution | Bureau of ethnology: J. W. Powell, director | Bibliography | of the | Eskimo language | by | James Constantine Pilling | [Vignette] |
Washington | Government printing office | 1887
Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 11. preface (April 20,1887) pp.iii-v,
text pp. 1-109, chronologic index pp. 111-116, 8 fac-similes, 8°. An edition of 100
copies was issued in royal 8°.
Smithsonian institution | Bureau of ethnology: J. W. Powell, director | Bibliography | of the | Siouan languages | by | James Constantine Pilling | [Vignette] |
Washington | Government printing office | 1887
Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 1 1. preface (September 1, 1887)
pp. iii-v, text pp. 1-82, chronologic index pp. 83-87, 8°. An edition of 100 copies
was issued in royal 8°.
Ill IV     LINGUISTIC BIBLIOGRAPHIES BY THE BUREAU OF ETHNOLOGY.
Smithsonian institution | Bureau of ethnology: .I.W.Powell, director
| Bibliography | of the | Iroquoian languages | by | James Coustantine
Pilling | [Vignette] |
Washington | Government printing office | 1888
Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 1 1. preface (December 15,1888) pp.
iii-vi, text pp. 1-180, addenda pp. 181-189, chronologic index pp. 191-208, 9 fac-similes,
8°.   An edition of 100 copies was issued in royal 8°.
Smithsonian institution | Bureau of ethnology: J.W.Powell, director
| Bibliography | of the | Muskhogean languages | by | James Constantine Pilling | [Vignette] |
Washington | Government printing office | 1889
Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 1 1. preface (May 15,1889) pp. iii-v,
text pp. 1-103, chronologic index pp. 105-114,8°. An edition of 100 copies was issued
in royal 8°.
Bibliographic  notes | on | Eliot's Indian bible | and | on his other
translations and works in the | Indian language of Massachusetts |
Extract from a "Bibliography of the Algonquian languages" | [Vignette] |
Washington | Government printing office | 1890
Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 1 1. text pp. 1-58, 21 fac-similes,
royal 8°. Forms pp. 127-184 of the Bibliography of the Algonquian languages, title
of which follows.    Two hundred and fifty copies issued.
Smithsonian institution | Bureau of ethnology: J. W.Powell, director
| Bibliography [ of the | Algonquian languages | by | James Constantine Pilling | [Vignette] |
Washington | Government printing office | 1891
Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 1 1. preface (June 1,1891) pp. iii-iv,
introduction p. v, index of languages pp. vii-viii, list of facsimiles pp. ix-x, text
pp. 1-549, addenda pp. 551-575, chronologic index pp. 577-614, 82 facsimiles, 8°. An
edition of 100 copies was issued in royal 8°.
Smithsonian institution | Bureau of ethnology: J. W. Powell, director
| Bibliography | of the | Athapascan languages | by | James Constantine Pilling | [Vignette] |
Washington | Government printing office | 1892
Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 1 1. [list of] linguistic bibliographies issued by the Bureau of Ethnology pp. iii-iv, preface (June 15, 1892) pp.
v-vii, introduction p. ix, index of languages pp. xi-xii, list of facsimiles p.xiii, text
pp. 1-112, addenda pp. 113-115, chronologic index pp. 117-125, 4 facsimiles, 8°. An
edition of 100 copies was issued in royal 8°.
Smithsonian institution | Bureau of ethnology: J. W. Powell, director
| Bibliography | of the | Chinookan languages | (including the Chinook
Jargon) | by | James Constantine Pilling | [Vignette] |
Washington | Government printing office | 1893
Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 1 1. [list of] linguistic bibliographies issued by the Bureau of Ethnology pp. iii-iv, preface (March 10,1893) pp.
v-viii, introduction p. ix, index of languages p. xi, list of facsimiles p. xiii, text pp.
1-76, chronologic index pp. 77-81, 3 facsimiles, 8°, An edition of 100 copies was issued
in royal 8°. LINGUISTIC BIBLIOGRAPHIES BY THE BUREAU OF ETHNOLOGY.     V
Smithsonian institution | Bureau of ethnology: J. W. Powell, director
| Bibliography [ of the | Salishan languages | by | James Constantine
Pilling | [Vignette] |
Washington | Government printing office | 1893
Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 1 1. [list of] linguistic bibliographies issued by the Bureau of Ethnology pp. iii-iv, preface (June 24, 1893) pp.
v-vi, introduction pp. vii-viii, index of languages pp. ix-xi, list of facsimiles p. xiii,
text pp. 1-79, chronologic index pp. 81-86, 4 facsimiles, 8°. An edition of 100 copies
was issued in royal 8°.
Smithsonian institution | Bureau of ethnology:
| Bibliography | of the | Wakashan languages
tine Pilling | [Vignette] |
Washington | Government printing office | 1894
Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 1 1. [list of] linguistic bibliographies issued by the Bureau of Ethnology pp. iii-v, preface (March 15, 1894) pp.
vii-viii, introduction pp. ix-x, index of languages p. xi, list of facsimiles p. xi, text
pp. 1-65, chronologic index pp. 67-70, 2 facsimiles, 8'-;. An edition of 100 copies was
issued in royal 8°.
J. W. Powell, director
by | James Constan-  PREFACE.
The derivation of the term used to designate the family which
embraces the group of languages treated of in the present paper is
from the Nutka word waukash, meaning good, and when heard by
Captain Cook at Friendly Cove, Nootka Sound, was supposed to be the
tribal name.
As the name of a family it was first used by Gallatin, in his Synopsis
of the Indian Tribes, published in the Transactions of the American
Antiquarian Society in 1830, based upon a vocabulary taken from
Jewitt's Narrative of Adventures and Sufferings. In this article he
gives, from Galiano, a vocabulary of the Maka, one of the Wakaslian
dialects, as a family of itself, under the name of Straits of Fuca. In
his later article, Hale's Indians of Nortlmest America, published in the
Transactions of the American Ethnological Society in 1848, Mr. Gallatin
retains the name Wakash as a family designation, using a vocabulary
of the Niwiti as a basis; but two of its dialects, the Hailtsa and Haelt-
zuk, he includes under the Nass family. Indeed, until recently the
Maka, Hailtsuk, and Kwakiutl dialects have not been embraced in the
Wakashan family by any writer, the first one to do so being Dr. Franz
Boas, who has made extensive studies among these northwest peoples
and collected vocabularies of many of them. Intermediate writers
have used a number of names to designate this family, the principal
ones adopting Nootka and Nootka-Columbian.
The geographic distribution of the tribes forming this family, according to Major Powell, in his Indian Linguistic Families Worth of Mexico,
published in the seventh annual report of the Bureau of Ethnology, in
1891, is as follows:
The tribes of the Aht division of this family are confined chiefly to the west coast
of Vancouver Island. They range to the north as far as Cape Cook, the northern
side of that capo being occupied by Haeltzuk tribes, as was ascertained by Dr. Boas,
in 1886. On the south they reached to a little above Sooke Inlet, that inlet bejng
in possession of the Soke, a Salishan tribe.
The neighborhood of Cape Flattery, Washington, is occupied by the Makah, one
the Wakashan tribes, who probably wrested this outpost of the family from the
Salish (Clallam) who next adjoin them on Puget Sound.
The boundaries of the Haleltzuk division of this family are laid down nearly as
the}' appear on Tolmie and Dawson's linguistic map of 1884. The west side of King
Island and Cascade Inlet are said by Dr. Boas to be inhabited by Haeltzuk tribes,
and are colored accordingly.
VII VIII PREFACE.
The accompanying paper embodies 251 titular entries, of which 220
relate to printed books and articles and 31 to manuscripts. Of these,
238 have been seen and described by the compiler, 215 of the prints
and 23 of the manuscripts; leaving as derived from outside sources 5
of the prints and 8 of the manuscripts.
In addition to these, there are given in full a number of engraved
titles, etc., all of which have been seen and described by the compiler;
while in the notes mention is made of 25 printed and manuscript works,
of which 14 have been seen aud described by the writer.
So far as possible, in reading the proof of this paper comparison has
been made direct with the books and articles themselves. In this work
access was had to the public and private libraries of this city, and Mr.
Wilberforce Eames, librarian of the Lenox Library, New York, has
kindly performed the same labor respecting books in his own and the
Lenox Library.
In the course of the work every facility has been given by Major J.
W. Powell, Director of the Bureau; and, as is the case with all the
previous papers of the series, Mr. P. C. Warman has contributed his
valuable services.
rsvw^^^O.  V%A
JlSLv^
Washington, D. C, March 15, 1894. IN T K 0 D U C TIO N.
In the compilation of this series of catalogues the aim has been to
include in each bibliography everything, printed or in manuscript, relating to the family of languages to which it is devoted: books, pamphlets, articles in magazines, tracts, serials, etc., and such reviews and
announcements of publications as seemed worthy of notice.
The dictionary plan has been followed to its extreme limit, the subject and tribal indexes, references to libraries, etc., being included in
one alphabetic series. The primary arrangement is alphabetic by
authors, translators of works into the native languages being treated as
authors. Under each author the arrangement is, first, by printed works,
and second, by manuscripts, each, group being given chronologically;
and in the case of printed books each work is followed through its
various editions before the next in chronologic order is taken up.
Anonymously printed work s are entered under the name of the author,
when known, and under the first word of the title not an article or
preposition when not known. A cross-reference is given from the first
words of anonymous titles when entered under an author, and from the
first words of all titles in the Indian languages, whether anonymous or
not. Manuscripts are entered under the author when known, under
the dialect to which they refer when he is not known.
Each author's name, with his title, etc., is entered in full but once,
i. e., in its alphabetic order. Every other mention of him is by surname and initials only, except in those rare cases when two persons of
the same surname have also the same initials.
All titular matter, including cross-reference thereto, is in brevier; all
collations, descriptions, notes, and index matter in nonpareil.
In detailing contents and in adding notes respecting contents, the
spelling of proper names used in the particular work itself has been
followed, and so far as possible the language of the respective writers
is given. In the index entries of the tribal names the compiler has
adopted that spelling which seemed to him the best.
As a general rule initial capitals have been used in titular matter in
only two cases: first, for proper names; and second, when the word
IX X INTRODUCTION.
actually appears on the title page with an initial capital and with the
remainder in small capitals or lower-case letters. In giving titles in the
German language the capitals in the case of all substantives have been
respected.
When titles are given of works not seen by the compiler the fact is
stated or the entry is followed by an asterisk within curves, and in
either case the authority is usually given. INDEX OF LANGUAGES.
Page.
Aht.    See Tokoaat.
Bellabella.    See Hailtsuk.
Cape Flattery Indians.    See Maka.
Claoquat.   See Klaokwat.
Coquilth.    See Kwakintl.
Fuca Straits Indians.   See Maka.
Hailtsuk     27
Hancock Harbor Indians.    See Klaokwat.
Kagutl.    See Kwakiutl.
King George Sound Indians.    See Nutka.
Klaokwat     38
Kwakiool.    See Kwakiutl.
Kwakiutl     39
Lekwiltoq     42
Maka     45
Millbank Sound Indians.    See Hailtsuk.
Nitinat          45
Niwiti     45
Nutka     46
Qagutl.    See Kwakiutl.
Quoquols.    See Kwakiutl.
Sebasa     56
Seshat     57
Tahkaht.    See Tokoaat.
Tlaoquatch.    See Klaokwat.
Tokoaat     59
Ucalta.    See Ukwulta.
Ukwulta     61
Vancouver Island Indians.    See Nutka.
Wakashan      62
Wikenak     63
Yokultat.   See Ukwulta.
Yukulta.    See Ukwulta.
LIST OF FACSIMILES.
Vage.
Title-page of Hall's Qagutl translation of Matthew     30
Title-page of New York [1816?] edition of Jewitt's Narrative     35
i
_  BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE WAKASHAN LANGUAGES.
By James 0. Pilling-.
(An asterisk within parentheses indicates that the compiler lias seen no copy of the work referred to.)
A.
Adelung (JohannChristoph) [and Vater
(J. S.)]. Mithridates | oder | allge-
meine | Sprachenkund e | mit | dem Vater
Unser als Sprachprobe | in bey nahe |
f iinf hundort Sprachenund Mundarten,
| von | Joliann Cliristoph Adelung, |
Churf iirstl. Sachsischen Hofratb und
Ober-Bibliothekar. | [Two lines quotation.] | Erster[-Vierter] Theil. |
Berlin, !in der Vossischen Buehband-
lung, | 1806 [-1817].
4 vols. (vol. 3 in three parts), 8°.
Numerals 1-3 of the Nutka (from Cook,
Dixon, and Humboldt), vol. 3, part 3, p. 215.—
Vocabulary (16 words from Cook) of the
Nutka, vol. 3, part 3, p. 215.—Numerals 1-10 of
the language spoken at King George Sound
(from Portlock and Dixon), vol. 3, part 3, p. 215.
Copies seen: Astor, Bancroft, British Museum, Bureau of Ethnology, Congress, Eames,
Trumbull, Watkinsou.
Priced by Triibner (1856), no. 503, 11. 16s.
Sold at the Fischer sale, no. 17, for 11. • another
copy, no. 2042, for 16s. At the Field sale, no. 16
it brought $11.85; at the Squier sale, no. 9, $5'
Leclerc (1S78) prices it, no. 2042, 50 fr. At the
Piimrt sale, no. 1322. it sold for 25 fr. and at the
Murphy sale, no. 24, a half-calf, marble-edged
copy brought $4.
Ant.   See Tokoaat.
Alcala-Galiano (D. Dionisio). See
Graliano (D. Alcala).
Anderson (Alexander Caulfleld). Notes
on the Indian tribes of British North-
America, and the northwest coast.
Communicated to Geo. Gibbs, esq. By
Alex. C. Anderson, esq., lateof the Hon.
WAK 1
Anderson (A. C.) — Continued.
H. B. Co. And read before theNew York
Historical Society, November, 1862.
In Historical Magazine, first series, vol. 7, pp.
73-81, New York and London, 1863, sm. 4°.
(Eames.)
Includes a discussion of the Hailtins.ITcaltas,
Ilailtsa, and Coquilth.
A rough manuscript of this article, accom.
panied by a letter from Mr. Anderson to Dr.
Gibbs from Cathlamet, Wash. Ty., dated
November, 1857, is in the library of the Bureau
of Ethnology.
Anderson (William). [Vocabularies and
numerals of the language of Nootka or
King George Sound.]
In Cook (J.) and King (J.), Voyages to the
Pacific Ocean, vol. 2, pp. 335-336, and vol. 3, pp.
540-546, London, 1784, 4°.
Short vocabulary (5 words) of the Nootka,
vol. 2, p. 335.—Numerals 1-10, vol. 2, p. 336	
Vocabulary (250 words and phrases), vol. 3, pp.
540-546.
Reprinted in the various editions of Cook
(.1.) and King (J.); also in whole or in part in
Buschmann (J. C. E.), Die Volker und
Sprachen Neu-Mexico's.
Fleurieu (C. P. C), Voyage autourdu ntonde.
Fry (E.), Pantographia.
Kerr (R.), General history and collection of
voyages.
La Harpe (J. F. de), Abrege de l'hiatoire.
Armstrong (A.N.) Oregon: j comprising
a | brief history and full description |
of the territories of | Oregon and Washington, | embracing the | cities, towns,
rivers, bays, | harbors, coasts, mountains, valleys,  | prairies and   plains;
1 BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
Armstrong (A. N.) — Continued.
together with remarks | upon the social
position, productions, resources, and |
prospects of the country, a dissertation
upon | the climate, and a full description of | the Indian tribes of the Pacific
[ slope, their manners, etc. | Interspersed with | incidents of travel and
adventure. | By A. N. Armstrong, | for
three years a government surveyor in
Oregon. |
Chicago: | published by Chas. Scott
& co. | 1857.
Titleverso copyright 11. copy of correspond-
enoe pp. iii-iv, index pp. v-vi, text pp. 7-147,12°.
Vocabulary (44 words) of the Nootka language, pp. 146-147.
Armstrong (A. N.)—Continued.
Copies seen : Astor, Boston Athenamm, Con-
Astor: This word following a title or within parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of the
work referred to has been seen by the compiler
in the Astor Library, New York City.
Authorities:
See Dufosse (E.)
Field (T.W.)
Ludewig (H.E.)
M'Lean(J.)
Pilling (J. C.)
Pott (A. F.)
Sabin (.!-.)
Trumbull (J. H.)
Vater (J. S.)
B.
Bachiller y Morales (Antonio). Antig-
iiedades Amcricanas. | Noticias | que
tuvieron los Europeos de la America |
antes del descubrimiento | de Cristobal Colon, | recogidas | por A. Bachiller
y Morales. | Individuo corresponsal de
merito de la Academia Arqueologico-
Matriten- | se, de merito de la Beal
Sociedad Economica de la Habana, y
corresponsal | de la de Puerto-Rico &c.
| [Picture.] |
Habana. | Oficina   del   Earo   Industrial, jCalledel Obispo num. 9. | 1845.
Cover title 11. pp. 1-134, 1 1. map, sm. 4°.
Word for hierro (iron) in a number of Amer.
ican languages, among i hem the Nutka, p. 100.
Copies seen: Astor.
Balbi (Adrien). Atlas | ethnographique
du globe.': ou' classification des peuples
| anciens et modcrnes | d'apres leurs
langues, | prece'de' | d'un discours sur
l'ntilite- et l'importance de l'c'tude des
langues appliqude a plusieurs branches
des connaissances humaines; d'un
apercu | sur les moyens graphiques employes par les differens peuples de la
terre; d'un coup-d'ceil sur l'histoire | de
la langue slave, et sur la marche progressive de la civilisation | et de la lit-
terature en Russie, | avec environ sept
cents vocabulaires des principaux idi-
omes connus, |et suivi | du tableau physique, moral et politique [ des cinq parties du monde, | Dedie' | a S. M. l'Em-
pereur Alexandre; 'par Adrien Balbi, |
ancien   professeur de geographie,  de
Balbi (A.)—Continued,
physique et de rnathematiques, | mem-
toe correspondant de l'Athenee de Tre"-
vise, etc. etc. | [Design.] |
A   Paris, | Chez    Rey   et   Gravier,
libraires, Quai des Augustins, N" 55. |
M.DCCC.XXVI [1826]. | Imprime" chez
Paul Renouard, rue Garenciere, N° 5.
F.-S.-G.
Half-title 11. title verso blank 1 1. dedication
2 11. table synoptique 11. text plates i-xli (single
and double), table plates xlii-xlvi, additions
plates xlvii-xlix, errata 1 p. folio.
Langues de la cote occidentale de TAmer-
ique du Nord, plate xxxv, includes, under no.
846, the Wakash or Nootka, with a brief discussion upon that language.— Tableau poly-
glotte des langues americaines, rplate xli,
includes avocabularyof theNootkaor Wakash.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Congress, Eames, Powell, Watkinson.
Bancroft: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy
of the work referred to has been seen by the
compiler in the library of Mr. H. H. Bancroft,
San Francisco, Cal.
Bancroft (Hubert Howe).    The | native
races | of |  the   Pacific   states | of |
North   America. | By | Hubert    Howe
Bancroft. | Volume I. | Wild tribes [-V.
Primitive history]. |
New York: | D. Appleton and company. | 1874[-1876].
5 vols, maps and plates, 8°. Vol. I. Wild
tribes; II. Civilized nations; III. Myths and
languages; IV. Antiquities; V. Primitive history.
Some copies of vol. 1 are dated 1875. (Eamea,
Lenox.) WAKASHAN   LANGUAGES.
Bancroft, (H. H.)—Continued.
Personal pronouns of the Nass, Hailtsa, and
Sobasas, vol. 3, p. 606.—A few sentences (from
Dnnn), p. 607.—A few "words in common" of
the Hailtsa and Belacoola, p. 607.—The Nootka
language of Vancouver Island, a general discussion with examples, pp. 609-611.
Copies seen: As tor, Bancroft, Brin ton, British
Museum, Bureau of Ethnology, Congress,
Eames, Lenox, Powell.
 The | native races | of | the  Pacific
states | of | North America. | By | Hubert Howe Bancroft. | Volume I. | Wild
tribes[-V. Primitive history]. |
Author's Copy. | San Francisco. 1874
[-1876].
5 vols. 8°. Similar, except on title-page, to
edition titled above. One hundred copies
issued.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Bancroft, British Museum, Congress,
In addition to the above tbo work has been
issued with the imprintof Longmans,London;
Maisonneuve, Paris; and Brockhaus, Leipzig;
none of which have I seen.
Issued also with title-pages as follows :
 The works | of | Hubert Howe Bancroft. [ Volume I[~V]. | The native
races. | Vol. I. Wild tribes[-V. Primitive history]. |
San Francisco: | A. L. Bancroft &
company, publishers. | 1882.
5 vols. 8°. This series "will include the History of Central America, History of Mexico,
etc., each with its own system of numbering
and also numbered consecutively in the series.
Of these works there have been published
vols. 1-39. The opening paragraph of vol. 39
(1890) gives the following information: "Tin's
volume closes the narrative portion of my historical series; there yet remains to be completed the biographical section."
Copies seen: Bancroft, British Museum,
Bureau of Ethnology, Congress.
Bartlett (John Russell). Numerals of
the Makah language.
Manuscript, 1 page, folio; in the library of
the Bureau of Ethnology.
Includes the numerals 1-20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70,
80, 90, 100.
 Vocabulary of the Makah language.
Manuscript, 6 leaves, folio, written on one
side only; in the library of the Bureau of Ethnology.
Contains 180 words, recorded on one of the
forms issued by the Smithsonian Institution.
Equivalents of nearly all the words are given.
John Russell Bartlett, author, born in Providence, R. I., 23 Oct., 1805, died there 28 May,
1886. He was educated for a mercantile career,
entered the banking business at an early age,
Bartlett (J. R.)—Continued.
and was for six years cashier of the Globe bank
in Providence. His natural bent appeals to
have been in the direction of science and belles-
lettres, for he was prominent in founding the
Providence athenasum and was an active member of the Franklin society. In 1837 ho engaged
in business with a New York house, bilt was
not successful, and entered the book-importing
trade under the style of Bartlett & Welford.
He became amember and was for several years
corresponding secretary of the New York historical society, and was a member of the American ethnographical society. In 185o President
Taylor appointed him one of the commissioners
to fix the boundary between the United States
and Mexico under the treaty of Guadaloupo
Hidalgo. This service occupied him until 1853,
when he was obliged to leave the work incomplete, owing to the failure of the appropriation.
He became secretary of state for Rhode Island
in May, 1855, and held the office until 1872. -He
had charge of the John Carter Brown library in
Providence for several years, and prepared a
four-volume catalogue of it, of which one hundred copies were printed iu the highest style of
the art.—Appleton's Cyclop. of Am. Bioj.
Bates (Henry Walton). Stanford's | compendium of geography and travel |
based on Hellwald's' Die Erdo und iUre
Volkcr' | Central America the West Indies | and j South America | Edited and
extended | By H.W.Bates, | assistant-
secretary of the Royal geographical
society; | author of 'The naturalist on
the river Amazons' | With | ethnological appendix by A. H. Keane, B. A. |
Maps and illustrations |
London | Edward Stanford, 55, Charing cross, S. W. [ 1878
Half-title verso blank 11. title verso blank 1
1. preface pp. v-vi, contents pp. vii-xvi, list of
illustrations pp. xvii-xviii, list of maps p. xix,
text pp. 1-441, appendix pp. 443-561, index pp.
563-571, maps, 8°.
Keane (A. H.), Ethnography and Philology
of America, pp. 443-561.
Copies seen: British Museum, Congress,
Eames, Geological Survey, National Museum.
 Stanford's | compendium of geography and travel [ based on Hellwald's
'Die Erde und ihre Volker' | Central
America | theAVest Indies land | South
America | Edited and extended | By H.
W. Bates, | Author of [&c. two lines]
| With | ethnological appendix by A.
H. Keane, M. A. J. | Maps and illustrations | Second and revised edition. |
London | Edward Stanford, 55, Charing cross, S.W. | 1882.
Half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso blank 1 BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
Sates (H. W,) — Continued.
1. preface pp. v-vi, contents pp. vii-xvi, list of
illustrations pp. xvii-xviii, list of maps p. xix,
text pp. 1-141, appendix pp. 443-561, index pp.
563-571, maps, 8°.
Linguistic article as Under title next above.
Copies seen: British Museum, Harvard.
—— Stanford's | compendium of geography and travel | based on Hellwald's
'Die Erde und ihre Volker' | Central
America | the West Indies | and South
America | Edited and extended | ByH.
W. Bates,j assistant-secretary [&c.two
tines] | With | ethnological apjiendix by
A. H. Keane, M. A. I: | Maps and illustrations | Third edition |
London | Edward Stanford, 55, Charing cross, S. W. | 1885
Half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso blank 1
i. preface pp. v-vi, contents pp. vii-xvi, list of
iiiusttatioiis pp; xvii-xviii, list of maps p. six,
text pp. 1-441, appendix pp, 443-561, index pp.
563-571, maps, 8°.
linguistic article as under titles next above.
Copies seen: Geological Survey.
Beach (William Wallace). The | Indian
miscellany; j containing j Papers on the
History, Antiquities, Arts, Languages, |
Religions, Traditions and Superstitions
| of | the American aborigines; | with |
Descriptions of their Domestic Life,
Manners, Customs,j Traits,Amusements
and Exploits; | travels and adventures
in the Indian country; | Incidents of
Border Warfare; Missionary Relations.
etc. | Edited by W. W. Beach. |
Albany: | J. Munsell, 82 State street.
| 1877.
Title verso blank 11. dedication verso blank
11. advertisement verso blank 1 1. contents pp.
vii-viii, text pp. 9-477, orrata 1 p. index pp. 479-
490,8°.
Gatschet {A. S.), Indian languages of the
Pacific states and territories, pp. 416-447.
Copies seen: Astor, Brinton, British Museum,
Congress. Eames, Geological Survey, Massachusetts Historical Society, Pilling,Wisconsin
Historical Society.
Priced by Leclerc, 1878 catalogue, no. 2663, 20
fr.; the Murphy copy.no. 197, brought $1.25;  S
priced by Clarke &. co. 1886 catalogue, no. 6271,   i
$3.50, and by Littlefleld, Nov. 1887, no. 50, $4.
Bellabella.    See Hailtsuk.
.Berghaus (Dr. Heinrich).    Allgemeiner
| ethnographischer Atlas | oder | Atlas !
der Volker-Kunde. | Eine Sammlung |
von neiinzehn Karten, | auf deuen die, !
um die Mitte des neiinzehnten Jalirhun-
derts   statt    iindende ) geographische
Berghaus (H.) — Continued.
Verbreitung aller, nach ihrer Sprach-
Vefwandtschaft geord- | neten, Volker
des Erdballs, und ihre Vertheilung in
die Reiche und Staaten | der alten wie
derneiien Welt abgebildetuud versiun-
licht worden ist. | EinVersuch | von |
Dr Heinrich Berghaus. |
Verlag von Justus Perthes in Gotha.
| 1853.
Title of the series (Dr. Heinrich Berghaus'
physikalischer Atlas, etcjverso 1.1 rectoblank,
title as above verso blank 1 1. text pp. 1-68, 19
maps, folio.
Trausniontaine Gruppe treats of the habitat
and linguistic relations of the peoples of the
northwest coast, among them the Wakash and
its tribal divisions, p. 56. —Map no. 17 is entitled
"Ethnographische Karte von Nordamerika,"
Nach von Alb. Gallatin, A. von Humboldt,
Clavigero, Hervas, Hale, Isboster, etc.
Copies seen : Bureau of Ethnology.
Bergholtz (Gustaf Fredrik). The Lord's
Prayer | in the | Principal Languages,
Dialects and | Versions of the World, |
printed in | Type and Vernaculars of
the | Different Nations, | compiled and
published by | G. P. Bergholtz. |
Chicago, Illinois, | 1884.
Title verso copyright 1 1. contents pp. 3-7,
preface p. 9, text pp. 11-200, 12°.
The Lord's prayer in a number of American
languages, among them the Qagutl (from Hall),
p. 148.
Copies seen: Congress.
Bible:
Matthew       Kwakiutl       See Hall (A. J.)
John Kwakiutl Hall (A.J.)
Bible passages:
Kwakiutl See British.
Kwakiutl Gilbert (—) and Kivington (—).
Blenkinsop (George). See Dawson (G.
M.)
Boas: This word following a title or within parentheses after a note indicates that the compiler
has seen a copy of the work referred to belonging to the library of Br. Franz Boas.
Boas (Dr. Franz). On certain songs and
dances of the Kwakiutl of British
Columbia.    [Signed Franz Boas.]
In Journal of Am. Folk-lore, vol. 1, pp. 49-
64, Boston and New York, 1888, 8°.   (filling.)
Songs with music, verses with interlinear
English translation, proper names, mythic
terms, etc.
 Poetry  and music  of  some North
American tribes.
In the Swiss Cross, vol. 2, pp. 146-148, New
York, 1888, sin. 4°.    (Pilling.)
A song, with music, of the [Wakashan]
Indians of British Columbia, p. 148. WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES.
Boas (F.) — Continued.
 The   Indians of  British Columbia.
By Dr. Franz Boas.
In Popular Science Monthly, vol. 32, pp. 628-
636, New York, 1888, 8°.    (Pilling.)
A few Kwakiutl terms passim.
  Die Mythologieder nord-west-amer-
ikanischen Kustenvoiker.
In Globus, vol. 53, pp. 121-127, 153-157, 299-
302, 315-319; vol. 54, pp. 10-14, Braunschweig,
1888, 4°.    (Geological Survey.)
Terms of the native languages of the northwest coast of British America, including a few
of the Kwakiutl, with, meanings, passim.
 The houses of the Kwakiutl Indians,
British Columbia.    By Dr. Franz Boas.
In National Museum Proc. for 1888, pp. 197-
213, Washington, 1889, 8°.    (Pilling.)
Kwakiutl terms, with meanings, passim.
 The  Indians of   British  Columbia.
By Franz Boas, Ph.D. (Presented by
Dr. T. Sterry Hunt, May 30, 1888.)
In Royal Soc. of Canada, Trans, vol. 6, section 2, pp. 47-57, Montreal, 1889, 4°.    (Pilling.)
A short vocabulary (18 words) of the AVik'-
e nok, showing affinities with the Bilqula. p.
49.—Kwakiutl and AVik'e nok terms, pp. 53-55.
 Preliminary notes on the Indians of
British Columbia.
In British Ass. Adv. Sci. report of the fifty-
eighth meeting, pp. 233-242, London, 1889, 8°.
(Geological Survey.)
Kwakiutl and Heiltsuk terms, pp. 238-239.
Issued also as follows:
 Preliminary notes on the Indians of
British Columbia.
In British Ass. Adv. Sci. fourth report of the
committee . . . appointed for the purpose
of investigating and publishing reports on the
. . . northwestern tribes of the Dominion of
Canada, pp. 4-10 [London, 1889], 8°. (Eames,
Pilling.)
Linguistic contents as under title next above,
pp. 7-8.
 First General Report on the Indians
of British Columbia. By Dr. Franz
Boas.
In British Ass. Adv. Sci. report of the fifty-
ninth meeting, pp. 801-893, London, 1890, 8°.
(Geological Survey.)
The Kwakiutl, with a list of dialects, totems,
terms, and emblems, pp. 827-829.—Names, with
meanings, of the Kwakiutl groups, p. 849.
Issued also as follows :
 First General Report on the Indians
of British Columbia. By Dr. Franz
Boas.
In British Ass. Adv. Sci. fifth report of the
committee . . . appointed for the purpose
of investigating and publishing reports on the
Boas (F.) — Continued.
.   .   .   northwestern tribes of the Dominion of
Canada, pp. 5-97, London [1890], 8°.    (Pilling.)
Linguistic contents as under title nest above,
pp. 31-33, 53.
 Second    General     Report   on   the
Indians of British Columbia.    By Dr.
Franz Boas.
in British Ass. Adv. Sci. report of the sixtieth meeting, pp. 562-715, London, 1891, 8°.
(Geological Survey.)
The Nootka (pp. 582-604) includes the following: A list of the tribes and their habitat, p.
583.—Names, with meanings, of the septs of
the different Nootka tribes, p. 584.—Names of
the chiefs of the septs, pp. 585-587.—Songs set
to music, with translation, and many Nootka
terms passim, pp. 588-604.
The Kwakiutl (pp. 604-632) includes: Listof
tribes, their gentes, habitat, etc., pp. 604-607.—
Social organization, with many terms passim,
pp. 608-614.—Secret societies, with lists, songs
with interlinear translations, and many terms
passim, pp. 614-632.
Kwakiutl linguistics (Kwakiutl and Heiltsuk' dialects) includes: Comparative vocabularies, numerals, grannnatic notes on nouns,
adjectives, pronouns, verbs with conjugations,
formation of words, etc., pp. 668-678.—Comparison between the Kwakiutl and Nootka languages, pp. 678-679.
Comparative vocabulary of eighteen languages spoken in British Columbia, pp. 692-
715, includes three dialects of the Kwakiutl -
Nootka, viz, Heiltsuk, Kwakiutl, Nootka-
Ts'eciath.
Issued also as follows:
 Second   General    Report   on   the
Indians of British Columbia.    By Dr.
Franz Boas.
In British Ass. Adv. Sci. sixth report on the
northwestern tribes of Canada, pp. 10-163, Loudon [1891], 8°.    (Pilling.)
Linguistic contents as under title next above,
pp. 31, 32, 33, 35, 36-52,52-55, 56-62, 62-80,103-116,
117-127,140-163.
 Vocabulary   of  the   Kwakiutl   Indians.    By Dr. Franz Boas.
In American Philosoph. Soc. Proc. vol. 31, pp.
34-82, Philadelphia, 1893, 8°. (Geological Survey.)
General account of the Kwakiutl and their
language, pp. 34-35.—Vocabulary, alphabetically arranged, pp. 36-82.
 [Linguistic material relating to the
Kwakiutl language.] (*)
Manuscript, 227 pages, 4°, in possession of
its author, who writes me, December, 1893,
concerning it, as follows: Collected at Chicago
during the World's Columbian Exposition and
recorded in a blank book. The book contains
songs and legends, with lexical and grammatical explanations, vocabularies, and grammat- BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
Boas (F.) — Continued.
ieal notes.    The contents may be described as
follows:
1, Kwakiutl tribe:
Thirteen    old     songs    belonging    to   the
Tsetsaeka ceremonial.
Thirty-one songs of Tsetsaeka dances.
Fifteen songs belonging to Tsetsaeka masks.
Three Potlatsh songs.
Two songs from traditions.
Five shaman's songs.
Three Laola^a songs.
Two prayers to the sun.
Three love songs.
Two morning 3ongs.
Two children's sougs.
2. Ximkish tribe:
Five songs of Tsetsaeka dances.
3. Koskimo tribe:
One song of Tsetsaeka dance.
4. Newette tribe:
Four old songs belonging to the Tsetsaeka
ceremonial.
Eleven songs of Tsetsaeka dances.
Nine songs of Nonleow dances.
Three war songs.
5. Traditions:
Q'a'nigilak.
Mink and the wolves.
Mink and the sun.
Mink's burial.
Mink and otter.
Kuekuavfi'oe.
Lelayn.
OnTaxtalase.
Nomasenxelis.
Se'niac.
The deer and his son.
 Vocabulary of the Nootka dialect. (*)
Manuscript, 42 pages, folio, in possession
of its author, who informs me it consists of
about 1,400 words.
Franz Boas was born in Minden, Westphalia,
Germany, July 9,18.38. From 1877 to 1882 ho
attended the universities of Heidelberg, Bonn,
and Kiel. The year 1882 he spent in Berlin, preparing for an Arctic voyage, and sailed June,
1883, to Cumberland Sound, Baffin Land, traveling in that region until September, 1884, returning via St. Johns, Newfoundland, to New York.
The wiiuer of 1884-'85 he spent in Washington, preparing the results of his journey for
publication and in studying in the National
Museum. From 1885 to 1886 Dr. Boas was an
assistant in the Royal Ethnographical Museum
of Berlin and decent of geography at the University of Berlin. In the winter of 1885-'86 lie
journeyed to British Columbia, under the
auspices of the British Association for the
Advancement of Scieuce, for the purpose of
studying the Indians. During 1886-'88 Dr.
Boas was assistant editor of Science, in New
York, and from 1888 to 1892 docent of anthropology at Clark University, Worcester, Mass.
During these years he made repeated journeys
to the Pacific coast, with the object of con-
Boas (F.)—Continued.
tinuiug his researches among the Indians.   In
1881 Kiel gave him the degree of Ph. D.
Dr. Boas's principal writings are: Baffin
Land, Gotha, Justus Perthes, 1885; The Central
Eskimo (in tlu;6th Annual Report of the Bureau
of Ethnology); Reports to the British Association for the Advancement of Science on the
Indians of British Columbia, 1888-1892; A'olks-
sagen aus Britisch Columbien, Verb, der Ges.
fiir Anthropologic, Ethnoiogie und Urge-
schichte in Berlin, 1891.
Boston Athenreum : These words following a title
or within parentheses after a note indicate that
a copy of the work referred to lias been seen by
the compiler in the library of that institution,
Boston, Mass.
Boston Public: These words following a title or
within parentheses after a note indicate that a
copy of the work referred to has been seen by
the compiler in that library, Boston, Mass.
Boulet (Iter. Jean-Bap t is te), cdiior.    See
Youth's.
Bourgoing  (Jean Francois).    Relation
d'un voyage rCcent des Espagnols sur
les cotes nord-ouest de l'Amerique sep-
tcntrionale, 1792.
In Archives Litteraires de l'Europe, vol.2,
pp. 54-89, Paris, 1804, 8°.   (British Museum.)
Numerals 1-10 of the Eskelen, Nutka, and
Rums Leu (from Humboldt), pp.78, 79, 87.
Brabant (liev. A. J.) [Linguistic material in and relating to the Neskwiat or
Nutka language.]
Manuscript in possession of its author, who
writes me from the Nesquat mission, British
Columbia, under date of December 14, 1893, as
follows:
" I had spent about three months of the summer of 1874 with Right Rev. Bishop Segkers
among the natives of this coast, when the prelate concluded to establish a mission at Hes-
quiat, the entrance to Nootka Sound, and commissioned me to take charge of it in May, 1875.
You inquire about my work on the language. I
give you the information you ask for with much
•pleasure.
"As I had no books that I could consult, and
in fact I have up to this day seen nothing about
the language worth consulting, I selected two
Indians who kuewa fewwordsof Chinook,and
with the help of the Jargon began to collect a
number of familiar words and expressions.
After a while I noticed that these people when
speaking observed certain rules and forms, and
so I set to work and marked down anything iu
that line I could notice. Of eourso as time and
my knowledge of the language advanced the
task was rendered much more easy; and finally
I put my notes a little in shape, not with the
idea of having anything published, hut for ray
own satisfaction and for the use of any of our
priests   who,   being  stationed   among   these WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES.
Brabant (A. J.) — Continued.
Indians, may feel a desire to use my notes to
facilitate for themselves the study of the language. I have followed the order generally
adopted in the writing of a grammar, beginning
with the nouns, their gender, number, etc.;
then the adjectives, degrees of comparison,
diminutives, the numerals; next come the pronouns, followed by the verbs, with their different forms of conjugation. This part is proper
to the Hesquiats, Mowachats, and Makchelats,
the affix slightly differing in the language of
the other tribes. I have only a short chapter
about the adverbs; but I have collected several
hundred affixes and prefixes which play an
important role in the use of the language. These
are amply explained by examples.
"Whileteaching school I translated our class
book, Learning to spell, to ready to wrile, and to
compose, by J. A. Jacobs, A. M., principal of
the Kentucky Institution for the Education of
Deaf Mutes.
"Bishop Seghers in 1874 translated some of
the Catholic prayers, bttt under very unfavorable circumstances. A few years later I was
instructed by his successor to overhaul them
and put them in their present shape. I translated the small Chinook catechism of Bishop
Demers, afterwards selecting the principal
parts and putting it into a more succinct form
for the use of adults.
"En passant, I agree with you that the name
of the language of this coast ought to remain
the Nutka language; the term Aht, which has
been adopted lately by certain parties, being a
useless innovation, calculated to cause confusion, besides not conveying the sound or the
meaning which it is intended to convey.
" I may add that the word Nutka is the ire
qucntative of Nutkshitl, which means to go
round (French faire le tour de), i. e., Nutka
Island, a word that would likely have been used
by the natives upon the white men asking,
through signs, the name of Nutka Sound or
Island. The term used for over a century
ought to remain."
 The Lord's prayer in the Nesquiator
Nootka language.
* Manuscript in the library of the Bureau of
Ethnology. It is a copy written on the back- of
a letter dated September 19,1889, from the Rev.
J. B. Boulet, Sehome, Wash. In a subsequent
letter Father Boulet informs me that "it was
copied from a copy I have in my possession,
written by the Rev. A. J. Brabant, a missionary
on the west coast of Arancouver Island. In all
probability the reverend gentleman is himself
the translator, as he has been on that coast for
twenty years."
Brinley (George). See Trumbull (J. H.)
Brinton: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of
the work referred to has been seen by the compiler in the library of Dr. D. G. Brinton, Phila- j
delphia, Pa.
Brinton (Dr. Daniel Garrison). The
American Race: | A Linguistic Classification and Ethnographic | Description of the Native Tribes of | North
and South America. | By | Daniel G.
Brinton, A. M., M. D,, | Professor [&c.
ten lines.] |
NeAY York: | N. D. C. Hodges, Publisher, | 47 Lafayette Place. | 1891.
Title verso copyright notice 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. preface pp. ix-xii, contents pp. xiii-xvi, text pp. 17-332, linguistic
appendix pp. 333-364, additions and corrections
pp. 365-368, index of authors pp. 369-373, index
of subjects pp. 374-392, 8°.
Linguistic classification of the North Pacific
stocks (pp. 108-109) includes the Kwakiootl or
Haeltzukian (Heiltzuk, Kwakiutl, Quaisla),
and Nutka or Wakashan (Aht, Nootka,
Wakash), p. 108.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Eames,
Pilling.
Daniel Garrison Brinton, ethnologist, born in
Chester County, Pa., May 13, 1837. He was
graduated at Yale in 1858 and at the Jefferson
Medical College in 1.861, after which he spent a
year in Europe in study and in travel. On his
return he entered the army, in August, 1862, as
acting assistant surgeon. In February of the
following year he was commissioned surgeon
and served as surgeon in chief of the second
division, eleventh corps. He was present at the
battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and
other engagements, and was appointed medical
director of his corps in October, 1863. In eon-
sequence of a sunstroke received soon after the
battle of Gettysburg he was disqualified for
active service, and in the autumn of that year he
became superintendent of hospitals at Quincy
and Springfield, 111., until August, 1865, when,
the civil war having closed, he was brevetted
lieutenant-colonel and discharged. He then
settled in Philadelphia, where he became editor
of The Medical and Surgical Reporter, and
also of the quarterly Compendium of Medical
Science. Dr. Brinton has likewise been a
constant contributor to other medical journals,
chiefly on questions of public medicine ami
hygiene, and has edited several volumes on
therapeutics and diagnosis, especially the popular series known as Napheys's Modern Therapeutics, which has passed through many
editions. In the medical controversies of the
day, he has always taken the position that medical science should be based on the results of
clinical observation rather than on physiological
experiments. He has become prominent as a
student and a writer on American ethnology,
his work in this direction beginning while he
was a student in college. The winter of 1856-:57,
spent in Florida, supplied him with material
for his first published book on the subject. In
1884 he was appointed professor of ethnology
and archaeology in the Academy of Natural
Sciences, Philadelphia.   For some years he has 8
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF  THE
Brinton (D. G.) —Continued.
been president of the Numismatic and Antiquarian Society of Philadelphia, and in 1886 he
was elected vice-president of the American
Association for the Advancement of Science, to
preside over the section on anthropology. During the same year he was awarded the medal
of the Societe Americaine de France for his
"numerous and learned works on American
ethnology," being the first native of the United
States that has been so honored. In 1885 the
American publishers of the Iconographic Encyclopaedia requested him to edit the first volume, to contribute to it the articles on "Anthropology" and "Ethnology," and to revise that on
'' Ethnography,' 'by Professor Gerlaud, of Stras-
burg. He also contributed to the second volume of the same work an essay on the " Prehistoric Archaeology of both Hemispheres.'' Dr.
Brinton has established a library and publishing house of aboriginal American literature,
for the purpose of placing within the reach of
scholars authentic materials for the study of
the languages and culture of the native races of
America. Each work is the production of native
minds and is printed in the original. The
series, most of which were edited by Dr. Brinton
himself, include The Maya Chronicles (Philadelphia, 1882); The Iroquois Book of Rites
(1883); The Guegiience: A Comedy Ballet in
the Nahuatl Spanish Dialect of Nicaragua
(1883); A Migration Legend of the Creek Indians (1884); The Lenape and Their Legends
(1885); The Annals of the Cakchiquels (1885);
[Ancient Nahuatl Poetry (1887); Rig Veda
Americanus (1890)]. Besides publishing numerous papers he has contributed valuable reports
on his examinations of mounds, shell-heaps,
rock inscriptions, and other antiquities. He is
the author of The Floridian Peninsula: Its Lit
erary History, Indian Tribes, and Antiquities
(Philadelphia, 1859); The Myths of the New
World: A Treatise on the Symbolism and
Mythology of the Red Race of America (New
York, 1868); The Religious Sentiment: A Contribution to the Science and Philosophy of
Religion (1876); American Hero Myths: A
Study in the Native Religions of the Western
Continent (Philadelphia, 1882); Aboriginal
American Authors and their Productions,
Especially those in the Native Languages
(1883) and A Grammar of the Cakchiquel Language of Guatemala (1884) .-—Appleton's Cyclop,
of Am. Jiiog.
British and Foreign Bible Society: These words
following a title or within parentheses after a
note indicate that a copy of the work has been
seen by the compiler in the library of that institution, 146 Queen Victoria Street, London, Eng.
British and Foreign Bible Society.
EBanr. orb Ioanna, r.i. 3ft ct. 16. | 06pa3Ubi
^epeB040B^CBHmeHHa^o^^ca^ifI,| ir^anBbixi |
BejHKoOpniaHCKnMi h imocTpaHHbiM'b | uiiO.ic-
mckhmt. odmecTBOMt. I [Design and one line
quotation.] |
British and   Foreign   Bible    Society.—
Continued.
He^arano 4.1a CpnxaHCKaro n nnocrpannaro
BHCuencKaro | oOmeCTBa, | y rH.iboepia u Pn-
BHHrTOHa (Limited), 52, Ct. 4jkodci Cb'Bep-b,
Jotuo-b. I 1885.
Literal translation: The gospel by John, 3d
chapter, 16th verse. | Samples | of the translations of the holy scripture, | published j by the
British and foreign | bible society, j [Design.]
I " God's word endureth forever." |
Printed for the British and foreign bible |
society, j at Gilbert & Rivington's (Limited),
52, St. John's Square, London. | 1885.
Printed covers (title as above on front one
verso quotation and notes), contents pp. 5-7,
text pp. 9-68, 16°.
Matthew, xi, 28, in the Ka-gutl (Vancouver
Island), no. 107, p. 36.
Copies seen: Pilling.
The earlier issues of this work, titles of which
will be found in the Bibliography of the Algonquian Languages, contain no Wakashan material.
 Ev. St. Joh. iii. 16. | in den meisten
der j Sprachen und Dialecte in welchen
die I Britische und Auslandische Bibel-
gesellschaft | dieheilige Schrift druckt
und verbreitet. | [Design and one lino
quotation.] | Vermehrte Auflage. |
London: j Britische und Ausliindische
Bibelgesellschaft, | 146 Queen Victoria
Street, E.C. | 1885.
Title as above on cover reverse a quotation,
contents pp. 1-4, text pp. 5-67 (verso of p. 67
notes), remarks, officers, agencies, etc. 3 11.16°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above,
no. 98, p. 52.
Copies seen: Pilling,
In this edition and in those titled below the
languages are arranged alphabetically.
 St. Jean III. 16, &c. | Specimens | de
la traduction de ce passage dans la pin-
part I des langues et dialectes j dans
iesquels la | Societe Biblique Britan-
nique et Etrangere | a iinprime' ou mis
en circulation les saintes ecritnres. |
[Design and one line quotation.] |
Londres: | Socie"te biblique britan-
nique et etrangere, | 146, Queen Victoria Street, E. C. | 1885.
Title on cover as above reverse quotation,
contents pp. 1-4, text pp. 5-67 (verso of p. 67
observations), remarks etc. 3 11.16°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen : British and Foreign Bible Society, Pilling.
 St. John iii. 16, &c. | in most of the |
languages and dialects | in which the |
British and foreign bible society | has WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES.
British und Foreign Bible Society—C'td.
printed or circulated the holy scriptures. | [Design and one line quotation.] | Enlarged edition. |
London: | the British and foreign
bible society, | 146, Queen Victoria
Street, London, E. C. | 1885.
Title as above verso quotation and notes,
contents pp. 3-4, text pp. 5-67, remarks etc.
rerso p. 67 and two following 11.16°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above.
Copies seen: British and Foreign Bible Society, Eames, Tilling, Wellesley.
Some copies, otherwise unchanged, arc dated
1886.   (Pilling.)
 St. John iii. 16, &c. | in most of the |
languages and dialects | in which the |
British and foreign bible society | has
printed or circulated the holy scriptures.: [Design and one line quotation. J
| Enlarged edition. |
London: | the British and foreign
bible society, | 146, Queen Victoria
Street, London, E. C. | 1888.
Frontispiece (fac-siniile of the Queen's text)
1 1. title as above verso quotation and notes,
contents pp. 3-4, text pp. 5-67, remarks etc.
verso p. 67 and two following 11.10°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
 St. John iii. 16, &c. | in most of the |
languages and dialects | in which the |
British and foreign bible society | has
printed or circulated the holy scriptures. | [Design and one line quotation.]
| Enlarged edition. |
London: | the British and foreign
bible society, | 146 Queen Victoria
Street, London, E. C. | 1889.
Title as above verso notes etc. 1 I. contents
pp. 3-4, text pp. 5-83, historical sketch etc. 2 11.
10°.
Liuguiatic contents as under titles above,
no. 156, p. 48.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Wellesiey.
Some copies are dated 1890.    (Pilling.)
 St. John iii. 16, &c. | in most of the |
languages and dialects | in which the |
British and foreign bible society | has
printed or circulated the holy scriptures. | [Design and one line quotation.]
| With an appendix of new versions. |
London: | the British and foreign
bible society, | 146 Queen Victoria
Street, London, E. C. | 1893.
Cover title, title as above verso notes ete. 1
1. text pp. 5-83, list of additions p. 84, appendix
of new versions pp. 85-90, colophon verso
picture 11. sketch of the society 11.
British and Foreign Bible Society—C'td.
Linguistic contents as under title nextabove.
Copies seen: Eames, Pill ing.
British Museum: These words following a t i tie or
within parentheses after a note indicate that a
copy of the work referred to has been seen by
the compiler in the library of that institution,
Loudon, Eng.
Brown: This word following a title or within pa
rentheses after a note indicates that a copy of
the work referred to has been seen by the eom-
pib'r in the library of the late John Carter
Brown, Providence, K. I.
Bulmer(ZV.Tliomas Sanderson). Chinook
Jargon | grammar    and    dictionary |
compiled by | T. S. Buhner, M.D.,C.M.,
F. S. A., London, Surgeon-Accoucheur,
Eoyal College of Surgeons, England. |
Author of [&c. four lines.] (*)
Manuscript in possession of its author, Salt
Lake City, Utah, who furnished me the above
•transcript of the title-page, and who wrote me,
October, 1891, concerning it as follows: '' Ishall
issue it on Hall's typewriter, and tb en d uplicate
copies with another special machine, and use
various types on the machine, testing the uses
of each. . . . Fifty pages will be devoted
to the origin of the language from all sources.
Examples of hymns from various languages
will he given."
Contains many words of Wakashan origin,
some of which are so indicated.
 Chinook Jargon language. | Part II.
| [Two lines Chinook Jargon.] | To be
completed in IX parts. | Compiled by
| T. S. Buhner, M. D., C. M., F. S. A. Sc.
A., London. | Ably assisted by | Rev'd
M. Eells, D. D., and Rev'd Pi>re N. L.
St. Onge, (formerly missionary to the
| Yakama Indians).
Manuscript; title as above verso blank 1 1.
text 11.1-124, 4°. In possession of Dr. Buhner.
Comparison of languages (20 words and
phrases) in Tlaoquateh and Nootka, with the
Columbian and Chinook, 11. 63^-64.—Wakashan
words passim.
 The Chee-Chinook   language | or |
Chinook Jargon. | In | IX parts. | Part
III. | English-Chinook dictionary. |
First edition. | By T. S. Buhner, ably
assisted by | the Revd. M. Eells, D. D.,
& the Revd. Pore Saint Onge, both missionaries to the Indians in Washington
& Oregon states.
Manuscript; title verso blank 1 1. preface
verso blank 1 1. special note for readers verso
blank 11. "memos to guide the reader" 211. text
alphabetically arranged by English words 11.
1-189, written on one side only, folio. In posses-
siou of its author, who kindly loaned it to me 10
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF  THE
Bulmer (T. S.) — Continued.
for examination. In his "memos'1 the author
gives a list of letters used to indicate the origin
of the respective words C, 2f, I, E, F, Ch, Yak.,
Chinook, Nootka, Indian, English, French, Chi-
halis, and Takama; and a second list of persons from whom the words were obtained and
localities in which they were used.
"In my selection of the term Chee-Chinook
I merely intend to convey to students that it
has its principal origin in the Old or Original
Chinook language; and although it contains
many other Indian words as well as French and
English, yet it came forth from its mother as an
hybrid, andas suchhasbeenbredandnourished
asanurslingfrom the parent stem. I therefore
designate it as a chee or new Chinook—the word
chee being a Jargon word for lately, just now,
new "
[ ] Chinook Jargon dictionary.    Part
III. Chinook-English.
Manuscript; 121 leaves folio, written on one
side only, interspersed with 40 blank leaves
inserted for additions and corrections. In
possession of its author.
The dictionary occupies 106 leaves, and many
of the words are followed by their equivalents
in the languages from which they are derived,
and the authority therefor. Appended to the
dictionary are the following: Original Indian
names of town sites, rivers, mountains, etc., in
the western parts of the State of Washington :
Skokomish,2 11.; Chemakmn, Lower Chihalis,
Puwamish, 11.; Chinook, 2 11.; miscellaneous, 2
11.—Karnes of various places in the Klamath
and Modoc countries, 3 11.—Camping places
and other localities around the Upper Klamath
Lake, 5 11.
[ ] Appendix to Buhner's Chinook-
Jargon grammar and dictionary.
Manuscript; 11.1-70, 4°; in possession of its
author.
Contains a number of words of Wakashan
origin, some of which are so indicated.
[ ] Part II ] of | Buhner's Appendix |
to the Chee-Chinook | Grammar and
Dictionary.
Manuscript; 57 11. 4°; in possession of its
author.
Wakashan words passim.
[ ] The Christian   prayers | in Chinook [Jargon].
Manuscript; 01 11. 4°; in possession of its
author.
Prayers in Chinook Jargon, 11.1-5.—Lessons
l-17in Chinook Jargon, with English headings,
11. 0-23.—List of special words adopted by
Fathers Blanche! and Demers in connection
with the service of the mass, 11. 24-25.—Trans"
lation of the Chinook prayers into English, 11.
26-38.—Copy of a sermon preached by Rev. Dr.
Eells to the Indians at Wallawalla, with interlinear English translation, 11.39-46. '' Of the 97
words used, 46 are of Chinook origin, 17 Nootka,
3   Selish,   23   English,   2  Jargon,   and   6   in
Bulmer (T. S.) — Continued.
French.'—Articles of faith of the Congregational church at Skokomish, Washington, in
the Jargon with interlinear English translation, 11. 47-52.—Oration in Chinook Jargon with
interlinear English translation, 11. 53-54.—
Prayers to God in English blank verse, 11. 55-
56; the same in Jargon with interlinear English
translation, 11. 57-61.
In addition tothe abovepapers, Dr. Buhner is
also the author of a number of articles appearing in Father Le Jeune's Kamloops Wavia, q. v.
I am indebted to Dr. Bulmer for the notes
upon which is based the following account:
Thomas Sanderson Bulmer wasborn in 1834, in
Yorkshire, England. He was educated at Preston grammar school, Stokesley, and at Newton
under Brow, was advanced under Rev. C. Cator
and Lord Beresford's son at Stokesley, and afterwards was admitted a pupil of the York and
Ripon diocesan college. He was appointed principal of Doncaster union agricultural schools,
but soon after emigrated to New York. There
ho took charge, as head master, of General
Hamilton's free school; thence he went to
Upper Canada and was appointed one of the professors in L'Assoinption Jesuit College. From
there he went to Rush Medical Collegeand Lind
University, Chicago; thence to the Ecolo Nor-
male, Montreal; thence to Toronto University,
medical department. Later he continued his
studies in the Ecole de Medecine and McGill
University, Montreal, and graduated in medicine at Victoria University. In 1868 he crossed
to London, whence he proceeded to New Zealand, and was appointed superintendent of
quarantine at Wellington. In Tasmania and
Australia he held similar i»ositions. His health
failing, he went to Egypt, and later returned to
England. The English climate not agreeing
with him, he took a tour of the Mediterranean
ports. Returning to London, the Russian
grippe attacked him, and he was warned to seek
a new climate. He returned to Montreal, en
route for the Rocky Mountains, where besought
Indian society for a considerable time. Finding
winter disastrous to him, he proceeded to Utah
in search of health. For the last two years he
has been engaged in writing up bis Chinook
books, as well as completing his Egyptian Rites
and Ceremonies, in which ho lias been assisted
by English Egyptologists. Dr. Buhner is a
member of several societies in England and
America and the author of a number of works
on medical and scientific subjects.
Bureau of Ethnology: These words following a
title or within parentheses after a note indicate
that a copy of the work referred to lias been seen
by the compiler in the library of the Bureau of
Ethnology, Washington, D. C.
Buschmann (JohaimCarl Eduard). Die
Volker und Sprachen Neu-Mexico's
und der Westseite des britischen Nord-
amerika's, dargestellt von Hrn. Buschmann. WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES.
11
Buschmann (J. C. E.) — Continued.
In Konigliche Akad. der Wiss. zu Berlin,
Abhandlungcn, aus dem Jahre 1857, pp. 209-
414, Berlin, 1858, 4°.
Varias palabras del idioma que se habla en la
BocaS. del Canal de Fuca (from AlcalaGaliano)
includes a vocabulary of 27 words of Fuca
Strasse and 9 words of Nutka, p. 324.—Konig-
Georgs-Sund, Quadra- und Vancouver- Insel
(pp. 325-329) includes: Numerals 1-10 of King
George Sound, compared with those of Prince
William Sound and Norfolk [Sitka] Sound (all
from Dixon), p. 326.—Tribal divisions, references to authorities, etc., pp. 327-329.
Nutka, general discussion and references to
authorities, pp. 329-335.—Nootka Sound vocabulary (about 104 words, from Hale), pp. 336-
337.—Nootka vocabulary (about 250 words,
phrases, and numerals, from Anderson), pp. 337-
341.—Nootka vocabulary (120 words, phrases,
and numerals, from Jewett), pp. 341-343.—
Nootka vocabulary (400 words, from AlcalaGaliano), pp. 343-347.—Substantives, pronouns,
geographic names, etc., pp. 347-349.—Alphabet -
ische Verzeichnung der Nutka-Worter (from
Cook, Halo, Jewett, and Alcala-Galiano), pp.
350-354.—Substantives, adjectives, and verbs,
alphabetically arranged by English words (from
Hale, Cook, Jewett, and Alcala-Galiano), pp.
355-357.—General discussion on the foregoing,
with examples, pp. 357-363.—General discussion of the Nootka and Tlaoquatch, with examples, pp. 363-365.— Vocabulary (31 words) of the
Nootka (from Hale, Cook, and Alcala-Galiano,
and of the Tlaoquatch, pp. 305-360.—Comparison of Nootka words with those of the Haeltzuk, Hailtsa, Eskimo, Haidah, Cora, Cahita,
Tepeguana, and Aztek, pp. 366-371.—Vocabulary {70 words) of the Tlaoquatch (alphabetically arranged by English words) compared
with those of the Kawitchen, Noosdalnm,
Squallyaniish, and pseudo-Chinook (Cathlas-
con?), pp. 375-377.—Numerals 1-100, pronouns,
adjectives, and phrases of the above-named
languages, pp. 3W-378.—General discussion of
the same, p. 379.— Numerals 1-10 of the Hailtsa,
and of the Indians of Fitzhugh Sound, p. 381.—
General discussion of the Hailtsa, pp. 383-385.—
Comparative vocabulary of substantives,
adjectives, and adverbs (130 words, alphabetically arranged by English, words) of the
Hailtzuk (from Tolmie), Hailtsa (from Hale),
and Bellachoola, pp. 385-388.—Numerals 1-100
of the same, pp. 388-389.—Pronouns, adverbs,
and interjections of the same, p. 389.—General
discussion and analogies of the same, p. 390.
Issued separately with title-page as follows:
■ Die   Volker   und    Sprachen | Neu-
Mexico's | und | der Westseite | des |
britischen Nordamerika's | dargestellt
| von | Joh. Carl Ed. Buschmann. | Aus
den Abhandhmgen der Konigl. Akade-
mie der Wissenschaften | zu Berlin
1857. I
Buschmann (J. C.E.) — Continued.
Berlin | Gedruckt in der Buchdruck-
erei der Konigl. Akademie | der Wissenschaften | 1858. | In Commission bei F.
Diimmler's Verlags-Buchhandlung.
Cover title as above, title as above verso
note 1 1. text pp. 209-404, Inhalts-Ubersicht
pp. 405-413, Verbesserungen p. 414, 4°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Astor, Congress, Eames, Pilling,
Trumbull.
The copy at the Fischer sale, catalogue no.
270, brought 14s.; at the Field sale, catalogue
no. 235,75 cents; priced by Leclere, 1878, no.
3012, 12 fr. and by Trubner, 1882,15s.
 Die Spuren der aztekischen Sprache
im nordlichen Mexico und hoheren
amerikanischcn Norden. Zugleicheine
Musterung der Volker und Sprachen des
nordlichen Mexico's und der Westseite
Nordamerika's von Guadalaxara an
bis zum Eismeer. Von Joh. Carl Ed.
Buschmann.
In Konigliche Akad. der Wiss. zu Berlin,
Abhandlungen, aus dem Jahre 1854, Zweiter
Supp.-Band, pp. 1-819 (formsthe whole volume),
Berlin, 1859, 4°.
People and speech of Puget Sound, Fuca
Straits, etc., includes the Wakashan and its
divisions, p. 671.
Issued separately with title-page as follows:
 Die | SpivrenderaztekischenSprache
| im nordlichen Mexico | und hoheren
amerikanischcn Norden. | Zugleich |
eine Musterung der Volker und Sprachen | des nordlichen Mexico's [ und
der Westseite Nordamerika's | vonGua-
dalaxara an bis zum Eismeer. | Von |
Joh. Carl Ed. Buschmann. |
Berlin. | Gedruckt in der Bxichdruck-
erei der Konigl. Akademie ] der AVissen-
schaften. | 1859.
Half-title verso blank 1 1. general title of the
series verso blank 11. title as above verso blank
1 1. abgekurtzto Inhalts-Ubersicht pp. vii-xii,
text pp. 1-713, Einleitung in das geographische
Register pp. 714-718, geographische Register
pp. 718-815,vermischteNachweisungen pp. 816-
818, Verbesserungen p. 819,4°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Astor, Brinton, Eames, Maison-
neuve, Pilling, Quaritch, Smithsonian, Trumbull.
Published at 20 Marks. An uncut half-morocco copy was sold at the Fischer sale, catalogue no. 269, to Quaritch, for 21. lis.; the latter
prices two copies, catalogue no. 12552, one 21.2s.
the other 21.10s.; the Pinart copy, catalogue no.
178, brought 9 fr.; Koehler, catalogue no. 440,
prices it 13 M. 50 pf.; priced again by Quaritch,
no. 30037.21. 12
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
C.
Campbell (Rev, John). Origin of the
aborigines of Canada. A paper read
before the society, 17th December,
1880, by Prof. J. Campbell, M. A.
In Quebec Lit. and Hist. Soc. Trans, session
1880-1881, pp. 61-93, and appendix pp. i-xxxiv,
Quebec, 1882, 12°.    (Pilling.)
The first part of this paper is an attempt to
show resemblances between varions families
of the New World, and between these and
various peoples of the Old World.
Comparative vocabulary (70 words) of the
Hailtzukh and Malay-Polynesian families, pp.
xxvi-xxviii. Comparative vocabulary (70
words) of the Nootka and Malay-Polynesian
languages, pp. xxix-xxxi.
Issued separately with title-page as follows:
 Origin | of the | aborigines of Canada. | A paper read before the Literary
and historical society, | Quebec, | by |
prof. J. Campbell, M. A., | (of Montreal, ) | Del^gue" Gdneral de l'lnstitu-
tion Ethnographique de Paris. |
Quebec: | printed at the "Morning-
chronicle" office. | 1881.
Cover title as above, title as above verso
blank 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. text pp.
1-33, and appendix pp. i-xxxiv, 8°. Twenty-five
copies printed.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Wellesley.
Canadian Indian. Vol. I. October, 1890.
No. I [-Vol. I. September, 1891. No. 12].
| The | Canadian | Indian | Editors |
rev. E.F.Wilson | H. B. Small. | Published under the Auspices of | the Canadian Indian Iiesearchal [aio] | Society
[ Contents | [&c. double columns, each
eight lines.] | Single Copies, 20 cents.
Annual Subscription, $2.00. |
Printed and Published by Jno. Rutherford, Owen Sound,Ontario [Canada].
[1890-1891.]
12 numbers: cover title as above, text pp. 1-
356,8°. A continuation of Our Forest-Children,
title and collation of which will be found in the
Bibliography of the Algonquian languages.
The publication was suspended with the
twelfth number, with the intention of resuming
it in January, 1892. The word "Researchal"
on the cover of the first number was changed
to "Research" in the following numbers.
Wilson (E. F.), A comparative vocabulary,
vol. 1, pp. 104-107.
Copies seen : Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
Cape Flattery Indians.    See Maka.
Catechism:
Nutka See Brabant (A. J.)
Catlin (George). North and South American Indians. | Catalogue | descriptive
and instructive | of | Catlin's | Indian
Cartoons. | Portraits, types, and customs. | 600 paintings in oil, | with [
20,000 full length figures | illustrating
their various games, religious ceremonies, and | other customs, | and | 27
canvas paintings | of | Lasalle's discoveries. |
New York: | Baker & Godwin, Printers, | Printing-house square, | 1871.
Abridged title on cover, title as above verso
• blank I 1. remarks verso note 1 1. text pp. 5-92,
certificates pp. 93-99, 8°.
Proper names with English significations in
a number of American languages, among them
a few of the Klah-o-qiiaht, p. 30.
Copies seen: Astor, Congress, Eames, Wellesley, Wisconsin Historical Society.
George Catlin, painter, born in Wilkesbarre,
Pa., in 1796; died in Jersey City, N. J., December 23, 1872. He studied law at Litchfield, Conn.,
but after a few years' practice went to Philadelphia and turned his attention to drawing
and painting. As an artist lie was entirely self-
taught. In 1832 he went to the Far West and
spent eight years among the Indians of Yellowstone River, Indian Territory, Arkansas, and
Florida, painting a unique series of Indian portraits and pictures, which attracted much
attentiou, on their exhibition, both in this
country and in Europe. Among these were 470
full-length portraits of a large number of
pictures illustrative of Indian life and customs,
most of which are now preserved in the
National Museum, Washington. In 1852-1857
Mr. Catlin traveled in South and Central
America, after which he lived in Europe until
1871, when he returned to the United States.
One hundred and twenty-six of his drawings
illustrative of Indian life were at the Philadelphia exposition of 1876. He was the author of
Notes of Eight Years in Europe (New York,
1848); Manners, Customs, and Condition of the
North American Indians (London, 1857); The
Breath of Life, or Mai-Respiration (New York,
1861); and O-kee-pa: A Religious Ceremony,
and other Customs of the Mandans (London,
1867).—Appletoii's Cyclop, of Am. Biog.
Chamberlain (Alexander Francis). The
Eskimo race and language. Their
origin and relations. By A. F. Chamberlain, B. A.
In Canadian Inst. Proc. third series, vol. 6,
pp. 261-337, Toronto, 1889, 8°.
Comparative Indian vocabularies, pp. 318-
322, contain words in Kwakiool and Aht (from
Tolmie and Dawson, and Hale). WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES.
13
Chamberlain (A. F.) — Continued.
Alexander Francis Chamberlain was born at
Kenninghall, Norfolk, England, January 12,
1865, and came to New York with his parents
in 1870, removing with them to Canada in 1874.
He matriculated from the Collegiate Institute,
Peterboro, Ontario, into the University of
Toronto in 1882, from which institution he
graduated with honors in modern languages and
ethnology in 1886. From 1887 to 1890 he was
fellow in modern languages in University College, Toronto, and in 1889 received the degree
of M. A. from his alma mater. In 1890 he was
appointed fellow in anthropology in Clark University, Worcester, Mass., where he occupied
himself with studies in the Algonquian languages and the physical anthropology of America. In June, 1890, he went to British Columbia, where, until the following October, he was
engaged in studying the Kootcnay Indians
under the auspices of the British Association
for the Advancement of Science. A summary
of the results of these investigations appears
in the proceedings of the association for 1892.
A dictionary and grammar of the Kootenay
language, together with a collection of texts of
myths, are also being proceeded with. In 1892
Mr. Chamberlain received from Clark University the degree of Ph.D. in anthropology, his
thesisbeing: "The Language of the Mississagas
of Skugog: A contribution to the Linguistics
of the Algonkian Tribes of Canada," embodying the results of his investigations of these
Indians.
Mr. Chamberlain, whose attention was, early
in life, directed to philologic and ethnologic
studies, has contributed to the scientific journals of America, from time to time, articles on
subjects connected with linguistics and folklore, especially of the Algonquian tribes. He
has also been engaged in the study of the Low-
German and French Canadian dialects, the
results of which will shortly appear. Mr. Chamberlain is a member of several of the learned
societies of America and Canada and fellow of
the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
In 1892 he was appointed lecturer in anthropology at Clark University.
Claoquat.    See Klaokwat.
Claret de Fleurieu (C. P.) See Fleurieu
(C.P.C.)
Classical. The | classical journal; | for
| September and December | 1811. | Vol.
IV. | [Two lines quotation in Greek
and a monogrammatic device.] |
London : | printed by A. J. Valpy, |
Took's court, Chancery lane; | sold by
| Sherwood, Neely, | and Jones, Paternoster row; | and all other booksellers.
[1811.]
Title verso blank 1 1. contents {of no. vii) pp.
iii-iv, text pp. 1-526, index pp. 527-537, verso p.
537 colophon giving ilate 1811, 8°.
Classical — Continued.
A chart of ten numerals in two hundred
tongues (pp. 105-119), includes a number of
American languages, among them the Nutka
Sound (from Dixon), p. 241; Cook, vol. 2, p. 336;
and Humboldt's Travels, vol. 2, p. 346), p. 115.
Copies seen: Congress.
Congress: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy
of the work referred to has been seen by the
compiler in the Library of Congress, "Washing
ton, D. C.
Cook (Captain James) and King (J.) A
| voyage | to the | Pacific ocean. |
Undertaken, | by the command of his
majesty, | for making | Discoveries in
the Northern Hemisphere. | Performed
under the Direction of Captains Cook,
Clerke, and Gore, [ in His Majesty's
Ships the Resolution and Discovery;
in the Years 1776, 1777, 1778, 1779, and
1780. | In three volumes. | Vol. I. and
II. written by Captain James Cook,
P. E. S. | Vol! III. by Captain James
King LL. D. and F. B. S. | Published
by Order of the Lords Commissioners of
the Admiralty. | [Vignette.] | Vol. I
[-III]. |
London: | printed for G. Nicol, bookseller to his  majesty, in the | Strand;
and   T.    Cadell,    in     the    Strand. |
M.DCC.LXXXIV [1784].
3 vols. 4°, maps and plates, and atlas, folio.
Anderson (TV.), Vocabularies and numerals
of the Nootka language, vol. 2, pp. 335, 336; vol.
3, pp. 540-546.
Copies seen: Uritish Museum, Congress,
Geological Survey.
 A  | voyage | to   the | Pacific
ocean. | Undertaken, | by the command
of his majesty, | for making | Discoveries in the Northern Hemisphere. | To
determine | The Position and Extent of
the West Side of North America; | its
Distance from Asia; and the Practicability of a | Northern Passage to
Europe. | Performed under the direction of | Captains Cook, Clerke, and
Gore, | in his majesty's Ships the Eeso-
lution and Discovery. | In the Years
1776,1777,1778, 1779, and 1780. | In three
volumes. | Vol. I and II written by
Captain James Cook, E. E. S. | Vol. Ill
by Captain James King, LL. D. and F.
E. S. | Illustrated with Maps and
Charts from the Original Drawings
made by Lieut. Henry Eoberts, | under
the Direction of  Captain  Cook; and 14
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF   THE
Cook (J.) and King (J.) — Continued,
with a great Variety of Portraits of
Persons, Views | of Places, and Historical Bcpresentations of Eemarkable
Incidents, drawn by Mr. | Webber
during the Voyage, and engraved by
the most eminent Artists. | Published
by Order of the Lords Commissioners
of the Admiralty. | Vol. I [-III]. |
London: { printed by W. and A.
Strahan: for G. Nico], bookseller to his
majesty, in the Strand; | andT. Cadell,
in the Strand: | MDCCLXXX1V[1784].
3 vols, maps and plates, 4°, and atlas, folio.
Linguistic contents as under title next above,
vol. 2, pp. 335, 336, vol. 3, pp. 542-546.
Copies seen: Astor, Bancroft, British
Museum, Greely, Harvard, Lenox,yVutkinson.
 A  | voyage  |  to   the |   Pacific
ocean, j Undertaken, | by the command
of his majesty, for making | Discoveries in the Northern Hemisphere. | To
determine | The Position and Extent of
the West Side of North America; | its
Distance from Asia; and the Practicability of a | Northern Passage to
Europe. | Performed under the direction | of Captains Cook, Clerke, and
Gore, | In his majesty's Ships the Bes-
olution and Discovery. | In the Years
1776,1777.1778,1779, and 1780. | In three
volumes. | Vol. I and II written by
Captain James Cook, F. E. S. | Vol. Ill
by Captain James King, LL. D. and F.
E. S. | Illustrated with Maps and
Charts, from the Original Drawings
made by Lieut. | Henry Roberts, under
the Direction of Captain Cook. | Published by Order of the Lords Commissioners     of    the     Admiralty.   |  Vol.
i[-iirj. |
Dublin: Printed for H.Chaniberlnine,
W. Watson, Potts, Williams, | Cross,
[&c. six lines.] | M,DCC.LXXXIV
[1784].
3 vols, maps and plates, 8°.
Linguistic contents as undertitles above, vol.
2, pp. 335, 336, vol. 3, pp. 542-546.
Copies seen: Boston Athemeum, British
Museum, Congress, Harvard.
 A  |  voj-age  |  to  the |   Pacific
ocean; | Undertaken by Command of
his majesty, | for making | discoveries
| in the northern hemisphere: | Performed under the Direction of | Captains Cook, Clerke, and Gore, | In the
Years 1776, 1777, 1778,1779, and 1780. |
Cook (J.) and King (J.) — Continued.
Being a copious, comprehensive, and
satisfactory abridgment of the | voyage | written by | Captain James Cook,
E. R. S. | and | Captain James King,
LL. I), and E. R. S. | Illustrated with
Cuts. | In four volumes. | Vol. I[-IV].
| [Monogram.] |
London : printed for John Stockdale,
Scratchcrd, and Whitaker, John Fielding, and John Hardy. | MDCCLXXXIV
[1784].
4 vols, plates, 8°.
Brief remarks on the language of the Indians
of Nutka Sound, including a lew examples,
vol. 2, pp. 274-275.
Copies seen: Bancroft, British Museum, Harvard.
 A | voyage | to   the |  Pacific
ocean. | Undertaken, | by the command
of his majesty, | for making | Discoveries in the Northern Hemisphere. |
Performed under the Direction of
Captains Cook, Clerke, and Gore, | in
His Majesty's Ships the Resolution and
Discovery; in the Years 1776,1777,1778,
1779,andl780. | In three volumes. | Vol.
I. and II. written by Captain James
Cook, F. E. S. I Vol. III. by Captain
James King, LL. D. and F. B. S. | Published by the Order of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty. | The
second edition. | [Portrait of Cook.]
| Vol. I [-III].
London: | printed by H.Hughs, | for
G. Nicol bookseller to his majesty, in
the Strand; | and T. Cadell, in the
Strand. | M. DCC. LXXXV[1785].
3 vols, maps and plates, 4°, and atlas folio.
This edition contains "A defence of the
arguments advanced in the Introduction to
Captain Cook's last voyage," which does not
appear in the earlier editions.
Anderson ("W".), Vocabularies and numerals
of the Nootka language, vol. 2, pp. 335, 336. vol.
3, pp. 540-546.
Copies seen : British Museum, Lenox.
 Troisieme voyage | de Cook, |
ou | Voyage a l'ocean Pacifique, |
ordonne parle Boi d'Anglcterre, | Four
faire des Dccouvertes dans 1'Hemisphere
Nord, ] pour determiner la position &
l'e'tendue de la Cote-Ouest de | 1'Anie-
rique Septentrionale, sa distance l'Asie,
| &resoudre la question du passage an
Nord. | Execut6 sous la direction des
Capitahies Cook, Clerke & Gore, I sur WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES.
15
Cook (J.) and King (J.) — Continued,
les Vaisseaux la Eesolution & la
D<$converte, en 1776, 1777, 1778, 1779 &
1780. | Traduit de l'Anglois par M.
D[emennier]. | Ouvrage enrichi [&c.
five lines.] | Tome premier [-qua-
trieme]. | [Pictures.] |
A Paris, | Hotel de Thou,  rue  des
Portevins. | M. DCC.LXXXV[1785]. |
Avec approbation et privilege du roi.
4 vols. 4°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above,
vol. 3. pp. 103, 105, 157-158.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum.
 Troisieme  voyage | de  Cook |
on | voyage    a   l'ocoan      Pacifiqne, |
ordonn6 par le roi d'Angleterre, | pour
faire   [&c.   seven  lines.] | Traduit de
l'Anglois, par M. D[emeunier]. | Tome
premier [-quatrieme]. | [Scroll.] |
A  Taris, | Hotel de Thou, rue des
Portevins. |  M. DCC. LXXXV[1785]. |
Avec approbation et privilege du roi.
4 vols. 8°.
Linguisticcontentsas undertitlesnext above,
vol.3, pp.126, 129, 191-102.
Copies seen: British Museum.
 A | voyage to the Pacific ocean
| Undertaken | by command of his
majesty for making | discoveries in the
northern hemisphere | Performed |
• under the direction of captains Cook,
Clerke and Gore | Iu the Years 1776, 7,
8, 9 and 80. | In four volumes. Volume
1V[-IV?]. | [Design.] |
Perth. | Printed by E. Morrison, junr.
for E. Morrison & son. | 1785[-!].
4 (>) vols. 16°.   I have seen the first volume
only; see title next below.
Copies seen: British Museum.
■ A | voyage  |   to   the  |  Pacific
ocean; | Undertaken by command of
his majesty, | for making discoveries
in the | northern hemisphere. [ Performed under the direction of | captains
Cook, Clerke, and Gore, | In the Years,
1776, 7, 8, 9, and 80. | Compiled from
the various accounts of that | voyage
hitherto published. | In four volumes.
| The second edition. | Vol. [I?-]IV. |
Embellished with copper-plates. |
Perth. | Printed by E. Morrison,
junr, | for E. Morrison and son, J.
Lockington, Lon- | don; and J. Binns,
Leeds. | 1787.
4 (?) vols. 16°. I havo seen no copy of the
first volume.   It may be possible that it is a
Cook (J.) and King (J.) — Continued,
continuation of the set of which the title of
the first volume is given next above.
Brief remarks and a few examples in thelan-
guage of the Indians of Nootka Sound, vol. 2,
pp. 231-237.
Copies seen: British Museum.
 Dor Capitain   Jacob Cook's |
dritte | Entdeckunge-Eeise | welche
derselbe | aus Besche und Kosten der
Groskbrittanischen Begierung | in das
Stille Meer | und nach dem Nordpol
hinauf | unternommen | und mit den
Schifl'cn Eesolution und Discovery |
wahrend der Jahre 1776 bis 1780 | [&c.
five lines.] | Aus dem Englischen iiber-
setzt | von Georg Forster | [&c. five
lines.] [ Erster[-Zweiter Band]. |
Berlin | bei Haude und Spener. 1787
[-1788].
2 vols.: 4 p. 11. pp. i-xvi, 1-504, 2 11.; 7 p. 11.
1-532, maps and plates, 4°.
A brief discussion, with a few examples, of
the language of the Indians of Nootka Sound,
vol. 2, pp. 59, 60.
Copies seen: British Museum.
There is an edition: Captain Cook's three
voyages. Boston, 1795-1797, 2 vols., 16°, which
contains no linguistic material.
 HyTomecTBie    bi   cbaepnbiii   thxM
oKeani,, no noBe.iliHiio Kopo.ui Teopria III
UpejnpiHToc, .tin onpefli.ieiiia nojoiKeiila
3an,i^iiuxT> BeperoBi, CtBepHoii A.iiepiiKH,
paacToniiin onoB on Aiin, h BosMostaocra
ctBepiiaro npoxo^a n:rb Tiixaro St
AuaHTHiecKiii oiteaHb, noji HaiaJbCTBOMb
K uFHTaooBb h"yna, K.iepi;a ii ropa, Ha
cy,iax'bPe30.noniii a /iHCKOBepn, bi npo^o.iaieHie
1776, 77, 78, 79 it 1780 ixuOB'b. Cb Alio.
T. iornuiT) ro.ieniimL'B'b-Kj"ry30Bb.
r.aiiKTueTepoypn 1805 ii 1810. (*)
300, 209 pp. 4°.   10 charts,
Translation.—Voyage to the North Pacific
Ocean, undertaken by direction of King George
III, to determine the situation of the western
shores of North America, their distances from
Asia and the possibility of a northern passage
from the Pacific to the Atlantic ocean, under
the direction of captains Cook, Clerke, and Gore
in the ships Resolution and Discovery during
the years 1776. 77, 78, 79 and 1780. [Translated]
from the English by Mons. Loggin Golenit-
sholf-Kutuzoff.
St. Petersburg, 1805 and 1810.
Title from SokolofT's Bibliography in the
Journal of the Russian Navy Department, vol.
8, p. 411, St. Petersburg, 1850, 8°.
There is an edition iu English: Philadelphia,
De Silver, 1818, 2 vols, 8°, which contains no
linguistics.   (Bancroft, Lenox.) 16
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
Cock (J.) and King (J.) — Continued.
 A voyage to the Pacific ocean,
undertaken by the [ command of his
majesty, for making discoveries | in
the northern hemisphere; to determine
the | position and extent of the west
side of North | America, its distance
from Asia, and the prac- | ticability of
a northern passage to Europe. | Performed under direction of Captains |
Cook, Clerke, and Gore, in his majesty's
ships | the Resolution and Discovery,
in the years | 1776, 1777, .1778, 1779, &
1780.
In Kerr (B.), A general history and collection
of voyages, vol. 15, pp. 114-514, vol. 16, and vol.
17, pp. 1-311, Edinburgh, 1811-1816, 17 vols,
folio.    (Congress, Lenox.)
Anderson (W.), Vocabularies and numerals
of the Nootka language, vol. 16, pp. 255-257,
vol. 17, pp. 300-309.
Keprinted in the later edition of Kerr (11.),
General history and collection of voyages,
London, 1824, 18 vols. 8°, in the same volumes
and pages.
There is an edition of the "Voyages around
the world performed by Captain Cook," Boston,
Wliitaker, 1828, 2 vols. 8°, of which I have seen
but the first volume, and which may contain
the Wakashan linguistics.    (Congress.)
 The voyages j of | captain James
Cook. | Illustrated with | maps and
numerous engravings on wood. | With
An Appendix, | giving an account of
the present condition of the South sea
islands, &c. | In two volumes. | Vol.
I[-II]. | [Portrait of Capt. Cook.] |
London: | William Smith, 113, Fleet
street | MDCCCXLII[1842].
Engraved title: The j three voyages | of j
captain Janies Cook. [ [Picture of ship
Endeavour, with inscription.] |
Cook (J.) and King (J.) — Continued.
London: | William Smith, 113, Fleet street,
j 1842.
2 vols.: Portrait of Capt. Cook 1 1. engraved
title verso blank 11. title verso names of printers 1 1. contents pp. v-viii, list of illustrations
pp. ix-xii, life of Captain James Cook, pp. xiii-
xx, map, introduction pp. 1-2, text pp. 3-596;
map, title verso names of printers 1 1. contents pp.v-xi, map, half-title verso blank 1 1,
text pp. 3-556, appendix pp. 557-619, colophon
p. [620], royal 8°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above,
vol. 2, pp. 290, 551-553.
Copies seen: Eames.
 The voyages! of | captain James
Cook | round   the   world, | illustrated
with | maps and numerous engravings
| on wood  and  steel. | Vol. I[-II], |
[Portrait of Capt. Cook.] |
John Tallis & company, London and
New-York.    [1852?]
Engraved   title: The | three voyages ] of |
captain Cook, | round the world. | [Picture of
the ship Endeavour with inscription.] |
John Tallis & company, London & vew
York.
2 vols.: portrait of capt. Cook 1 1. engraved
title verso blank 1 1. portrait of Sir Joseph
Banks 1 1. seven double page mai>s, half-title
verso blank 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. contents
pp. v-viii, list of illustrations pp. ix-xii, life
of capt. Cook pp. xiii-xx, introduction pp. 1-2,
text pp. 3-506; three double page maps, two
engravings, two double page maps, half-title
verso blank 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. half-title
verso blank 1 1. contents pp. v-xi, text pp. 3-
556, royal 8°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above,
vol. 2. pp. 290, 551-553.
Copies seen : Astor, Lenox.
There is an edition of Cook's Voyages, Philadelphia, 1871,8°, which does not contain the
linguistic material.    (Astor.)
Coquilth,    See Kwakiutl.
D.
Daa (Ludwig Kristensen). On the affinities between the languages of the
northern tribes of the old and new continents. By Lewis Kr. Daa, Esq., of
Christiania, Norway. (Read December
the 20th.)
In Philological Soc. [of London] Trans. i856i
pp. 251-294, London [1857], 8°.    (Congress.)
Comparative tables showing affinities between Asiatic and American languages, pp. 264-
285, contain words from many North American
languages, the Wakashan being represented
by the Haeltzuk, Nootka, Tlaoquatch, and
Wakash.
Ball (William Healey).      Tribes of the
extreme northwest.    By W. H. Dall.
In Powell (J.W.), Contributions to North
American Ethnology, vol. 1, pp. 1-106, Appendix, linguistics, pp. 107-157, Washington, 1877,
4°.
G-ibbs (&.), Vocabulary of the Hailt'zukh, pp.
144-153,
 Aroeabulary of the Kwakiutl, pp. 144-4-53,
William Healey Dall, naturalist, was born in
Boston, Mass., Aug. 21, 1845. Was educated at
the Boston public schools, and then became u
special pupil in natural sciences under Louis
Agassi? and in anatomy and medicine under WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES.
17
Dall (W. H.) —Continued.
Jeffries Wyman and Daniel Brainard. In 1865 he
was appointed lieutenant in the international
telegraph expedition, and in this capacity visited Alaska in 1865-1868. From 1871 till 1880 he
was assistant to the U. S. Coast Survey and
under its direction spent the years 1871 to 1874
and 1884 in that district. His work, besides the
exploration and description of the geography,
included the anthropology, natural history, and
geology of the Alaskan and adjacent regions.
From the field work and collections have
resulted maps, memoirs, coast pilot, and papers
on these subjects or branches of them. [Since
1884 he has been] paleontologist to the U. S.
Geological Survey, and since 1869 he has been
honorary curator of the department of mollusks
in theU. S. National Museum. In tMa office he
has made studies of recent and fossil mollusks
of the world, and especially of North America,
from which new information has been derived
concerning the brachiopoda, patellidsc, chiton*
ida?, and the mollusk fauna of the deep sea.
These studies have grown out of those devoted
to the fauna of northwestern America and eastern Siberia. Mr. Dall has been honored with
elections to nearly all the scientific societies in
this country, and to many abroad. In 1882 and
in 1885 he was vice-president of the American
Association for the Advancement of Science,
and presided over the sections of biology and
anthropology. His scientific papers include
about two hundred titles. Among the separate
books are "Alaska and its Resources " (Boston,
1870): " Tribes of the Extreme. Northwest"
(Washington, 1877); "Coast Pilot of Alaska,
Appendix 1, Meteorology and Bibliograx>hy"
1879); "The Currents and Temperatures of
Bering Sea and the Adjacent Waters" (1882);
"Pacific CoastPilot and the Islands of Alaska,
Dixon Entrance to Yakutat Bay. with the
Inland Passage'1 (1883); "Prehistoric America," by the Marquis deNadaillac, edited (New
York, 1885); and "Report on the Mollusca,
Brachiopoda, and Pelecypoda" of the Blake
dredging expedition in the West Indies (Cambridge, 1886).—Appleton's Cyclop, of Am. Biog.
Dawson (George Mercer). Notes and
observations on the Kwakiool People
of the Northern Part of Vancouver
Island and Adjacent Coasts, made
during the Summer of 1885; with a
Vocabulary of about seven hundred
words. By George M. Dawson, D. S.,
F. G. S., Assistant-Director Geological
Survey of Canada.
In Royal Soc. of Canada Proc. and Trans.
vol.5, section 2, pp. 63-98, Montreal. 1888, 4°.
(Geological Survey.)
Notes on tribal subdivisions of the Kwakiool, and details respecting them (pp. 64-75),
contains astai istical tableof tribal subdivisions
for the year ending June 30,1885, by Geo. Blen-
kinsop,  p. 65; meaning of native terms pas-
WAK 2
Dawson (G. M.) — Continued.
sim.—Mode of life, arts and customs of the
Kwakiool includes a discussion of the numerals, mode of counting, measuring, etc., pp. 75-
79.—Custom of the Potlatch or donation feast,
including native terms passim, pp. 79-81 .—Traditions, folk-loreand religion, withmanynative
terms, names of legendary characters, etc ,
passim, pp. 81-87.—Vocabulary of about seven
hundred words of the Kwakiool language (from
Ya-a-kotle-a-katlos (Tom) of the K6m-o-yaw8, a
subdivision or sept of the Kwa'-ki-ool or Kwa-'
kutl tribe, now inhabiting the vicinity of Fort
Rupert, Beaver Harbour, Vancouver Island),
pp. 89-98.
In his introductory remarks the author
states: " The subjoined vocabulary is based on
the schedules of words given by Major J. W.
Powell in his 'Introduction to the Study of
Indian languages.' Having been obtained
from an educated Indian, with the additional
assistance of a good interpreter, it is much
more complete than those given for several
tribes of the Kwakiool people by Dr. Tolmie
and the writer in the ' Comparative Vocabularies of the Indian tribes of BritishColumbia.'"
See Tolmie (W. F.) and Dawson (G.M.)
Issued separately, with title-page as follows:
 Section IT, 1887.    Trans. Royal Soc,
Can. | Notes and observations | on
the | Kwakiool people of Vancouver
island | by | George M. Dawson, D. S.,
F. G. S., | Asst-Director of the Geological Survey of Canada j From the |
transactions of the Royal society | of
Canada | volume V, section II, 1887 |
Montreal | Dawson brothers, publishers | 1888
Cover title as above, no inside title, text pp.
1-36, plate, 4°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Geological Survey, Pilling,
AVellesley.
 See Tolmie (W.F.) and Dawson (G.
M.)
George Mercer Dawson was born at Pictou,
Nova Scotia, August 1,1849, and is the eldest son
of Sir William Dawson, principal of McGill
University, Montreal. He was educated at
McGill College and the Royal School of Mines;
held the Duke of Cornwall's scholarship, given
by the Prince of Wales; and took the Edward
Forbes medal in palaeontology and the Murch-
ison medal in geology. He was appointed geologist and naturalist to Her Majesty's North
American Boundary Commission in 1873, and at
the close of the commission's work, in 1875, he
published a report under the title of "Geology
and Resources of the Forty-ninth Parallel." In
July, 1875, he received an appointment on the
geological survey of Canada. From 1875 to 1879
he was occupied in the geological survey and
exploration of British Columbia, and subse- 18
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Dawson (G. M.) — Continued.
quently engaged in similar work, both in the
Northwest Territory and British Columbia. Dr.
Dawson is the author of numerous papers on
geology, natural history, and ethnology, published in the Canadian Naturalist, Quarterly
Journal of the Geological Society, Transactions
of the Royal Society of Canada, etc. He was
in 1887 selected to take charge of the Yukon
expedition.
Dictionary:
Tokoaat See Knipe (C.)
Dixon (Capt. George).  A | voyage round
the world; | but more particularly to
the | north-west coast of America: |
performed in 1785,1786,1787, and 1788, |
in | the King George and Queen Charlotte, | captains Portlock and Dixon. I
Dedicated,   by   permission,   to  |  Sir
Joseph Banks, Bart. | By captain George
Dixon. |
London: | published by Geo. Colliding, | Haydn's head, no. 6, James street,
Covent garden. | 1789.
Half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso blank 1
1. dedication pp. v-vi, introduction pp. vii-
xxiii, contents pp. xxv-xxix, errata p. [xxxij
directions to the hinder p. [xxxiij, text pp. 1-
352, appendix no. 1 pp. 353-360, appendix no. 2
pp. 1-47, map, plates, 4°.
Numerals 1-10 of Prince William Sound and
Cook River, Norfolk Sound, and King George
Sound, p. 241.
Copies seen: Astor, Bancroft, Boston Athenaeum, British Museum, Congress, Greely,
Harvard,Lenox,National Museum,Watkinson.
At the Fischer sale, catalogue no. 2312, acopy
brought Is. 6(7.; at the Brinley sale, no. 4678, a
tine copy, calf, gilt, $2.75. Priced by Quaritch,
nos. 28950 and 28951, 10!. and 12s.
 Voyage | autour du monde, | et prin-
cipalement | a la cote nord-ouest de
l'Aniexique, | Fait en 1785, 1786,1787 et
1788, | A bord du King-George et de la
Queen- | Charlotte, par les Capitaines
Portlock et Dixon. | DiSdie, parpermis-
sion, k Sir Joseph | Banks, Baronet; |
Par le Capitaine George Dixon. | Traduit de l'Anglois, par M.Lebas. | Tome
premier[-second]. |
A Paris, | Chez Maradan, Libraire,
Hotel de Chateau- | Vieux, rue Saint-
Andre-des-Arcs. | 1789.
2 vols.: half title verso blank 1 1. title verso
blank 1 1. dedication 1 1. introduction pp. 1-34,
text pp. 35-581; half-title verso blank 1 1. title
verso blank 1 1. text pp. 1-274, appendix 1 pp.
275-292, appendix 2 pp. 1-46, 8°.
Dixon (G.)—Continued.
Linguistic contents as under title next above,
vol. 2, pp. 16-17.
Copies seen: Bancroft, Boston Athenaeum,
Harvard.
 Der | Kapitaine Portlock's und Dixon's | Keise um die Welt | besonders
nach | der Nordwestlichen Kuste von
Amerika | wakrends der Jahre 1785 bis
1788 | in den Schiffen King George und
Queen Charlotte, Herausgegeben | von
dem | Kapitain Georg Dixon.; Aus dem
Englischen iibersetzt und mit Amner-
kungen erlautert | von | Johann Kein-
holdForster, | derRechte,Medicmund
WeltweisheitDoktor,ProfessorderNat-
urgeschichte und Mineralogie | auf der
Konigl. Preusz. Friedrichs-Universitat,
Mitglied der Konigl. Akademie der
hoheren | und schonen Wissenchaften
zu Berlin. | Hit vielen Kupfern und
einer Landkarte. |
Berlin, 1790. | Bei Christian Fried-
rich Bosz und Sohn.
4 p. 11. pp. i-xxii, 1-314, map, 4°.
Linguistic contents as undertitles above, pp.
216-218.
Copies seen: Brown.
 Eeis | naarde j nord-west kust | van
| Amerika. | Gedaan in de Jaren 1785,
1786,1787 en 1788. | Door | de Kapteins
| Nathaniel Portlock | en | George
Dixon. | Uit derzelver oorspronklijke
Eeisverhalen zamengesteld en ver-
taald. | Met platen. |
Te Amsterdam, bij | Matthijs Schale-
kanip. | 1795.
Title verso blank 1 1. inleiding pp. iii-xii,
inhalt 2 H. text pp. 1-265, de plaaten, etc., p.
[266], maps, plates, sm.4°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above, p.
209.
Copies seen: Brown, Congress.
Douglass (Sir James). Private papers |
of Sir James Douglass. | Second series.
Manuscript, pp. 1-36, folio; in the Bancroft
Library, San Francisco, Cal.
Contains lists of native tribes from Puget
Sound northward to Cross Sound, Alaska,
with traders and native tribal names, grouped
according to languages, pp. 7-33. Between pp.
33 and 34 are 14 blank pages.
This manuscript was copied from the original papers in Sir James's possession; in Indian
names the copyist has universally substituted
an initial Ii for the initial K. It may or may
not contain Wakashan names. WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES.
19
Drake (Samuel Gardiner). The | Aboriginal races | of | North America; | comprising | biographical sketches of eminent individuals, | and | an historical
account of the different tribes, | from |
the first discovery of the continent | to
| the present period | with a dissertation on their | Origin,Antiquities, Manners and Customs, | illustrative narratives and anecdotes, | and a | copious
analytical index | by Samuel G. Drake.
| Fifteenth edition, | revised, with valuable additions, | by Prof. H. L. Williams. | [Quotation, six lines.] |
New York. | Hurst & company, publishers. | 122 Nassau Street.    [1882.]
Title verso copyright 1 1. preface pp. 3-4,
contents pp. 5-8, Indian tribes and nations
pp. 9-16, half-title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 19-
767, index pp. 768-787, 8".
Gatschet (A. S.), Indian languages of the
Pacific states and territories, pp. 748-763.
Copies seen: Astor, Congress, Wisconsin Historical Society.
Clarke & co. 1886, no. 6377, price a copy $3.
Dufosse(E.) Americana | Catalogue de
livres | relatifs a l'Amerique | Europe,
Asie,Afrique | et Oce~anie | [&c. thirty-
four lines] |
Librairie ancienne et moderne de E.
Dufossc | 27, rue Guenegaud, 27 | pres
le Pont-neuf | Paris [1887]
Cover title ae above, no inside title, table
des divisions 11. text pp. 175-422, 8°.
Contains, passim, titles of works in various
American languages, among them a few relating
to the Wakashan.
Copies seen: Fames, Pilling.
This series of catalogues wras begun in 1876.
Duflot de Mofras (Eugene). Exploration
| du territoire | del'Oregon, desCalifor-
nies | etde lamerVermeille, | executed
pendant les annees 1840,1841 et 1842, |
| par | M. Duflot de Mofras, | Attache
a la Legation de France a Mexico; |
ouvrage public par ordre du roi, | sous
les auspices de M. le marechal Soult,
due de Dalmatic,! President du Conseil,
| et de M.   le   ministre   des   affaires
e'trangeres. | Tome premier [-second]. |
Paris, | Arthus Bertrand, editeur, |
libraire de la Soeicte de geographie, |
Rue Hnutefeuille, n" 23. | 1844.
Duflot de Mofras (E.) — Continued.
2 vols.: half-title verso names of printers 11.
title verso blank 1 1. dedication verso blank 1
1. avant-propos pp. vii-xii, avertissement verso
note 11. nota verso blank 11. text pp. 1-518, table
des ehapitres pp. 519-521, table des cartes pp.
523-524; half-title verso names of printers 1 1.
title verso Wank 1 1. text pp. 1-500, table des
ehapitres pp. 501-504, table des cartes pp. 505-
506, table analytique, etc. pp. 507-514, 8°.
Numerals 1-10 in a number of North American languages, among them the Noutka, p. 401.
Cojries seen: Astor, Bancroft, Boston Athenaeum, British Museum, Congress, Geological
Survey, Lenox.
Dunn (John). History | of | the Oregon
territory | and British North-American
| fur trade; | with | an account | of the
habits and customs of the principal
native | tribes on the northern continent. | By John Dunn, | late of the
Hudson's bay company; | eight years
a resident in the | country. |
London: | Edwards and Hughes, Ave
Maria lane. | 1844.
Title verso name of printer 1 1. preface pp.
iii-vi, contents pp. vii-viii, text pp. 1-359, maps,
8°.
A few specimens (30) of the Bellas or Mill-
bank Sound tribe, pp. 358-350.
Copies seen: British Museum, Congress.
There is an edition of this work: Philadelphia, Zeiber & Co., 1845, which does not contain the "specimens." (Boston Athenamm,
British Museum, Harvard.)
Reprinted, omitting the linguistics, in
Smith's Weekly Volume, vol. 1, pp. 382-416,
Philadelphia, 1845,4°.   (Mallet.)
A later edition with title-page as follows:
 History | of | the Oregon territory |
and British North-American ] fur trade;
| with | an account | of the habits and
customs of the principal native. | tribes
ou the northern continent. | By John
Dunn, | late of the Hudson's bay company, | eight years a resident in the
country. | Second edition. |
London: | EdwardsandHughes,Ave-
Maria lane. | 1846.
Title verso name of printer 1 1. preface pp.
iii-vi, contents pp. vii-viii, text pp. 1-359, map,
8°.
Linguistic contents asunder title next above.
Copies seen: Astor. 20
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
E.
Eames: Tbis word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of
the work referred to has been seen by the compiler in the library of Mr. Wilberforce Eames,
Brooklyn, N. Y.
Eells (Rev, Myron). The Indian languages of Puget Sound. [Signed M.
Eells.]
In the Seattle Weekly Post-Intelligencer,
vol.5, no.8. p.4, Seattle, Wash., November 26,
1885, folio.    (Pilling,Wellesley.)
Remarks upon the peculiarities ami gram-
matie forms of a number of languages of the
northwest coast, among them the Makah.
 Indians   of   Puget   Sound.    (Sixth
paper.)    Measuring and valuing.
In American Antiquarian, vol. 10, pp. 174-178,
Chicago, 1888, 8°.    {Bureau of Ethnology.)
Numerals, and remarks concerning the
numeral system, of quite a number of the languages of AVashington Territory, among them
the Bella-hella and Aht, pp. 174-176.
The preceding articles of the series, all of
which appeared in the American Antiquarian,
contain no linguisticmaterial. It was the intention of the editor of the Antiquarian, when the
series should be finished, to issue them in book
form. So far as they were printed in the magazine they were repaged and perhaps a number of signatures struck off. The sixth paper,
for instance, titled above, I have in my possession, paged 44-48.
 TheTwana, Chemakum7 and Klallara
Indians of Washington territory. By
Rev. Myroii Eells.
In Smithsonian Institution, annual report of
the Board of Regents for 1887, parti, pp. 605-
681, Washington, 1889, 8°.    (Pilling.)
Numerals 1-10 of a number of languages of
the northwest coast, among them the Makah,
p. 644.—Comments upon the affinities of the
numerals given, pp. 645-646.
This article was issued separately, without
change; and again as follows :
 The Twana, Chemakum, and Klallani
Indians of Washington territory. By
Rev. Myron Eells.
In Smithsonian Institution, Misc. Papers
relating to anthropology, from the Smithsonian
report for 1886-'87, pp. 605-681, Washington,
1889, 8°.    (Eames, Pilling.)
Linguistic contents as under titlenextabove.
 Aboriginal geographic names in the
state of Washington.   By Myron Eells.
In American Anthropologist, vol. 5, pp. 27-
35, Washington, 1892, 8°.    (Pilling.)
A few Makah names with meanings.
Eells (M.) —Continued.
 Copy of a sermon preached by Rev.
Dr. Eells to the Indians at Walla-walla.
In   Bulmer  (T.   S.),   Christian   prayers  in
Chinook, 11.39-46.
1 'Of the 97 words used. 46 are of Chinook origin, 17 Nootkan. 3 Salish. 23 English, 2 Jargon,
and 0 iu French."
The sermon is accompanied by an interlinear
English translation.
 See Bulmer (T.S.)
Rev. Myron Eells was born at Walker's
Prairie,Washington Territory, October .7, 1843.
He is the son of Rev. Cushing Eells. D. D., and
Mrs. M. F. Eells, who went to Oregon in 1838 as
missionaries to the Spokane Indians. He left
Walker's Prairie in 1848 on accountof the AVhit-
man massacre at Wallawalla and Cayuse war,
and went to Salem, Oreg., where he began to
go to school. In 1849 he moved to Forest Grove,
Oreg.; in 1851 to Hillsboro, Oreg., and in 1857
again to Forest Grove, at which places he continued his school life. In 1862 he removed to
Wallawalla, spending the time in farming and
the wood business until 1868, except the falls,
winters, and springs of 1863-'64, 1864-65, and
1865'66, when he wasatForestGrovein college,
graduating from Pacific University in 1866, in
the second class which ever graduated from
that institution. In 1868 be went to Hartford,
Conn., to study for the ministry, entering the
Hartford Theological Seminary that year, graduating from it in 1871. and being ordained at
Hartford, June 15, 1871, as a Congregational
minister. He went to Boise City in October.
1871, under the American Home Missionary
Society, organized the First Congregational
church of that place in 1872, and was pastor of
it until he left in 1874. Mr. Eells was also
superintendent of its Sunday school from 1872
to 1874 and president of the Idaho Bible Society
from 1872 to 1874. He went to Skokomisb,
Washington, in June, 1874, and has worked as
missionary of the American Missionary Association ever since among the Skokomisb or
Twanaand Klallani Indians, pastor of Congregational church at Skokomisb Reservation since
1876, and superintendent of Sunday school at
Skokomisb since 1882. He organized a Congregational church among the Klallams in 1882, of
which bo has since been pastor, and another
among the whites at Seabeck in 1880, of which
he was pastor until 1886. In 1887 he was chosen
trustee of the Pacific University, Oregon; in
1885 was elected assistant secretary and in 1889
secretary of its begird of trustees. Hedelivered
the address before the Gamma Sigma society
of that institution in 1876, before the alumni in
1830, and preached the baccalaureate sermon in
1886. In 1888 he was chosen trustee of Whitman College, Washington, delivered the conj- WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES
21
Eells (M.) — Continued.
mencement address there in 1888 and received
the degree of D.D. from that institution in
1890. In 1888 he -was elected i ts financial secretary and in 1891 was asked to become president
of the institution, but declined hoth.
He was elected an associate member of the
Victoria Institute of London in 1881, and a
corresponding member of tho Anthropological
Society at AYashington in 1885, to hoth of which
societies he has furnished papers which have
heen published by them. He was also elected
vice-president of the Whitman Historical Society at "Wallawalla in 1889. Prom 1874 to 1886
he was clerk of the Congregational Association
of Oregon and AVashington.
Mr. Eells during 1893 held the position of
Superintendent of the Department of Ethnology
for the State of Washington at the World's
Columbian Exposition.
Ellis (Robert).    Peruvia Scythica. | The
| Qnichua   language   of  Peru: | its |
derivation from central Asia with the
American | languages iu general, and
witJi the Turanian | and Iberian languages of the old world, | including |
the Basque, the Lycian, and the Pre-
Aryan | language  of   Etruria. | By |
Robert Ellis, B. D., | author of "The
Asiatic affinities of the old Italians",
and late fellow | of St. John's college,
Cambridge, j [Quotation, three lines.] |
London: ] Triibner &. co.,57 & 59, Lud-
gate hill. | 1875. | All rights reserved.
Title verso name of printer 1 1. preface pp.
iii-vii, contents pp. ix-xi, errata p. [xii], text
pp. 1-219,8°.
A few words in the Nootka language, pp.
118. 120, 124, 130.
Copies seen: British Museum, Eames, Wat-
kinson.
Ellis (W.) An authentic | narrative |
of a | voyage | performed by | Captain
Cook and Captain Clerke, | in his
majesty's ships [ Resolution and Discovery, | During the years 177C, 1777,
1778, 1779, and 1780; | in search of a
north-west passage | Between the Continents of Asia, and America. | Including | A faithful Account of all their
Discoveries, and the | unfortunate
Death of Captain Cook. | Illustrated
with | a chart and a Variety of cuts. |
By W.Ellis, | assistant surgeon to both
vessels. | Vol. I[-II]. |
Ellis (W.) —Continued.  .
London, | Printed for G. Robinson,
Pater-noster Row; J. Sewell, I Corn-
hill; and J. Debrett, Piccadilly. |
MDCCLXXXII[1782].
2 vols.: 6 p. 11. pp. 1-358, 1 1.; 4 p. 11. pp. 1-
347, 8°.
Vocabulary (about 100 words) alphabetically
arranged, of the language of King George's
Sound, vol. 1, pp. 224-229.
Copies seen: British Museum.
 An   authentic | narrative | of  a |
voyage | performed by | Captain Cook
and Captain Clerke, | in his majesty's
ships | Resolution and Discovery, |
During the Years 1776,1777,1778,1779,
and 1780; | in search of a [ north-west
passage | Between the Continents of
Asia and America. Including | A faithful Account of all their Discoveries,
and the | unfortunate Death of Captain
Cook. | Illustrated with | a chart and
a Variety of cuts. [ By W. Ellis, |
assistant surgeon to both vessels. | Tho
second edition. | Vol. I f—II].
London, | Printed for G. Robinson,
Pater-noster Row; J. Sewell, | Corn-
hill; and J. Debrett, Piccadilly. |
MDCCLXXXIII[i783].
2 vols.: half-title verso blank 11. title verso
blank 11. map, text pp. 1-358, contents pp. [359-
361], directions for placing cuts p. [371]; half-
title verso blank 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. contents 2 11. text pp. 1-347, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Astor.
 Zuverliissige   Xachricht    von   der
dritten und letzten Reise der Kap.
Cook und Clerke in den koniglichen
Sehiffen, die Resolution und Discovery,
in den Jahren 1776 bis 1780, besonders
in der Absicht, eine nordwestliche
Durchfarth [«jc] zwischen Asien und
Amerika ausfindig zu machen. Von
W. Ellis, Unterwundarzt auf beyden
Sehiffen. Aus dem Englischen iiher-
setzt, nebst einer Charte.
Fraukfnrt und Leipzig, auf Kosten
der Verlagskasse.    1783. (*)
324 pp. map, 8°. Title from Sabin's Dictionary, no. 22334.
Enssen (P.)    See Lemmens (T. N.)aud
Enssen (V.) 22
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
Featherman (A.)   Social history [ of the
| races of mankind. | First division : |
Nigritians[-Third   division: | Aoneo-
Maranouians]. | By | A. Featherman. [
[Two lines quotation.] |
London: | Triibner & co., Ludgate
Hill. | 1885[-1889J. | (All rights reserved.)
3 vols. 8°.
A general discussion of a number of North
American families occurs in vol. 3, among them
the Nootka, which includes a few words passim, and brief remarks upon the language and
its grammar, pp. 340-356.
Copies seen: Congress.
Field (Thomas Warren). An essay |
towards an | Indian bibliography. |
Being a | catalogue of books, | relating
to the | history, antiquities, languages,
customs, religion, !wars, literature, and
origin of the | American Indians, | in
the library of | Thomas W. Field. | With
bibliographical and historical notes,
and | synopses of the contents of some
of | the works least known. |
Now York: | Scribner, Armstrong,
and co. [ 1873.
Title verso names of printers 11. preface pp.
iii-iv, text pp. 1-430, 8°.
Titles and descriptions of books in or relating
to the Wakashan languages, passim.
Copies seen : Congress, Eames, Pilling.
At the Field sale, no. 688, a copy brought
$4.25; at the Menzies sale, no. 718, a "half-
crushed, red levant morocco, gilt top, uncut
copy," brought $5.50. Priced by Leclerc, 1878,
18 fr.; by Quaritch, no. 11996,15s.; at the Pinart
sale.no.368.it brought 17 fr.; at tho Murphy
sale, no. 949, $4.50. Priced by Quaritch, no.
30224, 11.
■ Catalogue | of the | library | belonging to | Mr. Thomas W. Field. | To be
sold at auction, | by | Bangs, Merwin
& co., | May 24th, 1875, | aud following
days. |
New York. ] 1875.
Cover title 22 lines, title as above verso blank
1 1. notice etc. pp. iii-viii, text pp. 1-376, list of
prices pp. 377-393, supplement pp. 1-59,8°. Com-
piled by Joseph Sabin, mainly from Mr. Field's
Essay, title of which is given above.
Contains titles of a number of works in antl
relating to the Wakashan languages, passim.
Copies seen : Bureau of Ethnology.Congress,
Eames.
At the Squier sale, catalogue no. 1178, an
uncut copy brought $1.25.
F.
Fillmore (John Comfort). A woman's
song of the Kwakiutl Indians.
In Journal of Am. Folk-lore, vol. 6, pp. 285-
290, Boston and New York, 1894.8°.   (Pilling.)
Song with music, pp. 285-286.
Fleurieu (Charles Pierre Claret, Comte
de).   Voyage | autour du monde, | pendant les annees 1790, 1791, et 1792, |
Par  Etienne   Marchand,  | pre'cedC |
d'une introduction historique; | anquel
ona joint | desrecherches surlesterres
australes de  Drake, | et | un examen
critique du voyage de  Roggeweeu; |
avec cartes et figures: | Par C. P. Claret
Fleurieu, | De 1'Institnt national  des
Sciences et des Arts, et du Bureau |
des Longitudes. | Tome I[-II. III. Qna-
trieme]. |
A Paris, klel'imprimorie de la Repub-
liquo. | An VI[-VIII] [1798-1800].
4 volumes, 4°.
Numerals 1-10, 20, 40, of the language of the
Indians of Nootka Sound, from Cook, compared with the same from Dixon, vol. 1, p. 284.
Copies seen: Astor, Bancroft, British
Museum, Congress, Harvard.
 Voyage | autour du monde, pendant
les annexes 1790, 1791 et 1792, | Par
Etienne Marchand, | precede" | d'une
introduction historique; | auqnel on a
joint | des recherches sur les terres
australes de Drake, | et | un examen
critique dn voyage de Roggeween; |
avec cartes et figures: | ParC.P. Claret
Fleurieu, | De 1'Institut national des
Sciences et des Arts, | etdu Bureau des
Longitudes. | Tome I[-V]. |
A Paris, |do l'imprimerie de la RCpub-
lique. | An VI[-VIII] [1798-1800].
5 vols. 8° and atlas 4°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above,
vol. 2, p. 107.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum.
 A | voyage | round the world, | performed | during the years  1790, 1791,
and   1792, | by | Etienne Marchand, |
preceded | by a historical introduction,
| and | Illustrated   by   Charts,  etc. |
Translated from the French | of | C. P.
Claret Fleurieu, | of the National institute of arts and sciences, and of the
Board of | longitude of France, j Vol.
I[-III]. |
London : | printed for r. N. Longman WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES.
23
Fleurieu (C. P. C.) — Continued.
and O. Rees, Paternoster-row; and T.
Cadell, jun. | and W. Davies, Strand.
| 1801.
3vols.4°.    "Vol.III.  Charts, &c."
Linguistic contents  as under titles above,
vol. 1, p. 255.
Copies seen: Congress.
 A | voyage | round the world, [ performed | during the years 1790, 1791,
and   1792, | by | Etienne  Marchand, |
preceded | by a historical introduction,
| and | Illustrated   by Charts,   etc. |
Translated from   the   French | of | C.
P." Claret Fleurieu, | of the National
institute of arts and sciences, [ and of
the Board of longitude of France. |
Vol. I [-II]. |
London: | printed for T. N. Longman
and O. Rees, Pater- | noster-row; and
T. Cadell, jun. and W. Davies, | in the
Strand. | 1801.
2 vols.: title verso note etc. 1 1. contents 5
pages, list of plates 2 pages, errata 1 page,
advertisement 3 11. introduction pp. i -cvi, text
pp. 1-536; title verso name of printer 1 1. contents pp. iii-xiii, errata p. [xiv], text pp. 1-663,
journal of the route pp. 1-105, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above, vol.
1, p. 380.
Copies seen: British Museum, Congress.
The Boban catalogue, no. 2425, gives title of
an edition : Paris, 1841, 4 vols. 4°.
Forster (Johann Georg Adam). Ge-
sehichte der Reisen, | die seit Cook | an
der | Nordwest- und Nordost-Kiiste |
von Amerika und in dem|nordlichsten
Amerika selbst | von | Meares, Dixon,
Portlock,Coxe,Longu. a. M.; unternom-
men worden sind. | Mit vielen Karten
und Kupfern. | Aus dem Englischen, |
mit   Zuziehung   aller   anderweitigen
Forster (J. G. A.) — Continued.
Hiilfsquellen, ausgearbeitet j von Georg
Forster. | Erster[-Dritter] Band. |
Berlin,1791. | InderVossischenBuch-
handlung.
3 vols.: pp. i-ix, 1 1. pp. 1-130, 1-302; 5 p. 11.
pp. i-xxii, 1-314; i-xv, i-iii, 1-74,1-380, 4°.
Comparative vocabulary and numerals of a
number of languages of the northwest coast,
among them the Indians of King George Sound
(from Portlock and Dixon), vol. 2, pp. 216-217.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Harvard.
Fouquet (Pere—).    See Petitot (E. F.
S..I.)
Fry (Edmund).  Pantographia;' containing j accurate copies of all the known |
alphabets in the world; | together with
| an English explanation of the peculiar | force or power of each letter: | to
which   are   added, | specimens of  all
well-authenticated | oral languages; |
forming | a comprehensive digest of |
phonology. | ByFdmundFry, | Letter-
Founder, Type-Street. |
London. | Printed by Cooper and Wilson, | For John and Arthur Arch, Grace
church-street; | John White, Fleet-
Street; John Edwards, Pail-Mall, and
John Debrett, Piccadilly.] MDCCXCIX
[1799].
Title verso blank 11. dedication verso errata
1 1. preface pp. i-xxiv, table of synonyms p.
xxv, authorities quoted pp. xxvi-xxix, list of
subscribers pp. xxx-xxxvi, half-title (Pantographia) p. 1, text pp. 2-307, appendix pp.308-
320, 8°.
Vocabulary of the language of the Indians of
NootkaSound (36 words, from Cook), p. 210.
Copies seen : Astor, Boston Athenaium, British Museum. Congress, Eames.
At the Squier sale a copy, catalogue no. 385,
brought $2.13.
Fuca Straits Indians.    See Maka.
G.
[Gaiiano (/). Dionisio Alcala).] Relacion
| del viage  hecho por   las   goletas |
So til y Mexicana | en el alio de 1792 j
para reconocer el estrecho de Fuca; |
con una introduccion | en que se da
noticia   de las expediciones execu- |
tadas anteriorinente por los Espanoles
en busca [ del paso del noroeste de la
America. | [Vignette.] |
De   orden   del   rey. | Madrid en la
imprenta real | alio de 1802.
Gaiiano (D.A.) — Continued.
Title verso blank ] 1. indice 3 11. verso of last
one blank, [contents] 4 11. introduccion pp. i-
clxvii, advertencia p. elxviii, text pp. 1-185, 8°;
atlas, folio; appendix, 1806, 20 pp.
Varias palabras [28] del idioma que se habla
en la Boca S. del Canal de Fuca [Maka] y
susequivalentes en castellano, p. 41.—Nombres
[11] que dan los naturales a varios puntos de
la entrada de Juan du Fuca [Maka], p. 42.—
Vocabulario [400words] del idioma de los habi-
tantes de Nutka, pp. 178-184. 24
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
Gaiiano (D, A.) — Continued.
Copies seen: Bancroft,Congress, Lenox, New
Tort Historical Society.
A French translation of this work, in manuscript, 113 pages, 4°, was sold at the Moore .sale
(no. 1878), in February, 1894.
Gallatin (Albert). A synopsis of the Indian tribes within the United States
east of the Rocky Mountains, and in
the British and Russian possessions in
North America. By the Hon. Albert
Gallatin.
In American Antiquarian Soc. Trans.
(Archseologia Americana),vol. 2, pp. l-422,Cam-
bridge, 1836,8°.
Vocabulary (40 words) of the language of
Nootka Sound (from Jewitt), p. 371.—Vocabulary (28 words) of the [Maka] language of the
Straits of Fuca (from Alcala-Galiano), p. 378.
 Hale's Indians of North-west America, and Yocabularies of North America;
with an introduction. By Albert Gallatin.
In American Eth.Soc. Trans, vol. 2, pp. xxiii-
clxxxviii, 1-130, New York, 1848, 8°.
Vocabulary of the Newittee (100 words), pp.
89-95.—Vocabulary of tho Hailtsa, and of the
Haeltzuk (45 words each), p. 103. These are
included under the Nass family, together with
theBillechoola and Chimme8yan.--Vocabularv
(00 words) of the language of Nootka Sound, p.
121.
 Table of generic Indian families of
languages.
In Schoolcraft (H. R.), Indian tribes, vol. 3,
pp. 397-402, Philadelphia, 1853, 4°.
Includes the Wakash and its subdivisions,
p.402.
Albert Gallatin was born in Geneva, Switzerland, January 29, 1761, and died in Astoria,
L. I., August 12, 1849. Young Albert had
been baptized by the name of Abraham Alfonse
Albert. In 1773 he was sent to a boarding
school and a year later entered the University
of Geneva, where he was graduated in 1779. He
sailed from L'Orient late in May, 1780, and
reached Boston on July 14. He entered Congress on December 7, 1795, and continued a
member of that body until his appointment as
Secretary of the Treasury in 1801, which office
he held continuously until 1813. His services
were rewarded with the appointment of minister to France in February, 1815; he entered
on the duties of this office in January, 1816. In
1826, at the solicitation of President Adams, he
accepted the appointment of envoy extraordinary to Great Britain. On his return to the
United States be settled in New York City,
where, from 1831 to 1839, he was president of the
National Bank of New York. In 1842 he was
associated in the establishment of the American
Ethnological Society, becoming its tirst presi-
•Gallatin (A.) — Continued.
dent, and in 1843 he was elected to hold a similar office in the New York Historical Society, an
honor which was annually conferred on him until
bis death.—Appleton's Cyclop, of Am. Biog.
Gatschet (Albert Samuel). Indian languages of the Pacific states and territories.
In Magazine of American History, vol. 9, pp.
145-171, New York, 1877, 4°.
Brief references to the Nootka language, its
dialects, and their territorial boundaries.
Issued separately, with half-title, as follows:
 Indian   languages | of  the | Pacific
states and territories | by | Albert S.
Gatschet | Reprinted from March [1877]
Number of The Magazine of American
History
[New York 1877]
Half-title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 145-171,
sin. 4°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Coxites seen: Astor, Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
Reprinted in the following works:
Beach (W."W.)i Indian Miscellany, pp. 416-
447, Albany, 1877,8°.
Drake (S. G.), Aboriginal races of North
America, pp. 748-763, New York, [1882], 8°.
A supplementary paper by the same author
and with the same title, which appeared in the
Magazine of American History, vol. 8, contains
no Wakashan material.
Albert Samuel Gatschet was born in St. Beat-
enberg, in the Bernese Oberlaud, Switzerland,
October 3,1832. His propaedeutic education was
acquired in the lyceums of Neuchatel (1843-
1845) and of Berne (1846-1852), after which he
followed courses in the universities of Berne
and Berlin (1852-1858). His studies had for
their object the ancient world in all its phases of
religion, history, language, and art, and thereby
bis attention was at an early day directed to
philologic researches. In 1865 he began the publication of a series of brief monographs on the
local etymology of bis country, entitled "Orts-
etymologische Forschungen aus der Schweiz"
(1865-1867). In 1S67 he spent several months
iu London pursuing antiquarian studies in the
British Museum. In 1868hesettledinNcw York
and became a contributor to various domestic
and foreign periodicals, mainly on scientific
subjects. Drifting into a more attentive study
of the American Indians, he published several
compositions upon their languages, the most
important of which is " Zwolf Spracben aus
dem Sudwesten Nordamerikas," Weimar, 1876.
This led to his appointment to the position
of ethnologist in the United States Geological
Survey, under Maj. John W.Powell, in March,
1877. when he removed to Washington, and first
employed himself in airanging the linguistic
manuscripts of the Smithsonian Institution,
now the property of the Bureau of Ethnology, WAKASHAN   LANGUAGES.
25
Gatschet (A. S.) — Continued.
which forms a part of the Smithsonian Institution. Mr. Gatschet has ever since been actively
connected with that bureau. To increase its
linguistic collections and to extend his own
studies of the Indian languages, he has made
extensive trips of linguistic and ethnologic
exploration among the Indians of North America. After returning from a six months'
sojourn among the Klamaths and Kalapuyas
of Oregon, settled on both sides of the Cascade
Range, he visited the Kataba in South Carolina
and the Cha'hta and Shetimasha of Louisiana
in 3881-,82, the Kayowc, Comanche, Apache,
Yattassee, Caddo, Naktche, Modoc, and other
tribes in the Indian Territory, the Tonkawe
and Lipans, in Texas, and the Atakapa Indians
of Louisiana in 1884-'85. In 1886 he .saw the
Tlaskaltecs at Saltillo, Mexico, a remnant of the
Nahua race, brought there about 1575 from
Anahuac, and was the first to discover the affinity of the Biloxi language with the Sionan family. He also committed to writing the Tuni^ka
or Touica language of Louisiana, never before
investigated, and forming a linguistic family of
itself. Excursions to other parts of the country
brought to his knowledge other Indian languages: the Tnskarora, Caughnawaga, Penobscot, and Karankawa.
Mr. Gatschet has written an extensive report
embodying his researches among the Klamath
Lake and Modoclndians of Oregon, which forms
Vol. II of ''Contributions to North American
Ethnology."' It is in two parts, which aggregate 1,528 pages: Among the tribes and languages discussed by him in separate publications are tho Timucua (Florida), Tonkawe
(Texas), Yuma (California. Arizona, Mexico),
Chumeto (California), Beothuk (Newfoundland), Creek, and Hitchiti (Alabama). His
numerous publications are scattered through
magazines and government reports, some being
contained in the Proceedings of the American
Philosophical Society, Philadelphia.
(3-eneral discussion:
Hailtsuk See Anderson (A. C.)
Hailtsuk Buschmann {J. C. E.)
Hailtsuk Gibbs (G.)
nailtsuk Latham (R. G.)
Hailtsuk Prichard (J. C.)
Klaokwat Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Klaokwat Gibbs (G.)
Klaokwat Latham (R. G.)
Kwakiutl Anderson (A. C.)
Kwakiutl Dawson (G. M.)
Maka Eells (M.)
Xitinat Knipe (C.)
Nutka Balbi (A.)
Nutka Bancroft (H. H.,
Nutka Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Nutka Gatschet (A.S.)
Nutk    • Gibbs (G.)
Nutka Jehan (L.F.)
Nutka Latham (R. G.)
Nutka Prichard (J. C.)
General discussion
Nutka
Ukwulta
Wakash
W'akash
Wakash
Wakash
AVakash
Gentes:
Kwakiutl
Nutka
— Continued.
Roquefeuil (C. de).
Anderson (A. C.)
Beach (W. W.)
Berghaus (H.)
Drake (S. G.)
Latham (R.G.
Treasury.
-.)
See Boas (F.)
Boas (F.)
Geographic names:
Maka
Maka
Geological Survey;
See Eells (M.)
Swan (J.G.)
These words following a title
or within parentheses after a note indicate that
a copy of the work referred to has been seen by
the compiler in the library of thcUnited States
Geological Survey, Washington, D. C-
Gibbs (Dr. George). Smithsonian miscellaneous collections. ■ 1611 A | dictionary
| of the [ Chinook Jargon, | or | trade
language of Oregon. | Prepared for the
Smithsonian institution. | By | George
Gibbs. | [Seal of the institution.] |
Washington: | Smithsonian institution: | March, 1863.
Title verso advertisement 11. contents p. iii,
preface pp. v-xi, bibliography pp. xiii-xiv, half-
title (Part I. Chinook-English) verso note 1 1.
text pp. 1-29, half-title (Part II. English-
Chinook) p. 31, text pp. 33-44, 8°.
A short comparative vocabulary (20 words
and phrases) of the Tlaoquatch, Nutka, and
Columbian (all from Scouler), p. ix.—Comparison of Chinook words with the Hailtzuk and
Belbella, and the Nootka, p. x.—The Chinook-
English and English-Chinook dictionary, pp.
1-43, contains 24 words of Nutka origin.
Copies seen: Astor. Bancroft, Dunbar, Eames,
Pilling, Trumbull,Wellesley.
"Some years ago the Smithsonian Institution
printed a small vocabulary of the Chinook Jargon, furnished by Dr. B. R. Mitchell, of the U.
S. Navy, and prepared, as I afterwards learned,
by Mr. Lionnet, a Catholic priest, for his own
use while studying the language at Chinook
Point. It was submitted by the Institution,
for revision and preparation for the press, to
the late Professor W. W. Turner. Although it
received the critical examination of that distinguished philologist, and was ot use iu directing
attention to the language, it was deficient in the
number of words in use, contained many which
did not properly belong to the Jargon, and did
not give the sources from which the words were
derived.
" Mr. Hale had previously given a vocabulary
and account of this Jargon in his Ethnography
of the United States Exploring Expedition,'
which was noticed by Mr. Gallatin in the Transactions of the American Ethnological Society,
vol. ii.   He however fell into some errors in his 26
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF  THE
Gibbs (G.) — Continued.
derivation of the words, chiefly from ignoring
the Cbehalis element of the Jargon, and the
number of words given by him amounted only
to about two hundred and fifty.
"A copy of Mr. Lionnet's vocabulary having
been sent to me with a request to make such
corrections as it might require, I concluded not
merely to collate the words contained in this
and other printed and manuscript vocabularies,
but to ascertain, so far as possible, the languages which had contributed to it, with the
original Indian words. This had become the
more important, as its extended use by different tribes had led to ethnological errors in the
classing together of essentially distinct families."—Preface.
Issued also with title-page as follows:
 A  |  dictionary  |  of the  |  Chinook
Jargon, [ or, | trade language of
Oregon. | By George Gibbs. |
New York: | Cramoisy press. | 1863.
Half-title (Shea's Library of American Linguistics. XII.) verso blank 11. title verso blank
11. preface pp. v-xi,bibliography of the Chinook
Jargon pp. xiii-xiv, half-title of part I verso
note 1 1. Chinook-English dictionary pp. 1-29,
half-title of part II verso blank 1 1. English-
Chinook dictionary pp. 33-4J, the Lord's prayer
in Jargon p. [44], 8°.
Copies seen: Astor, Boston Athenaeum, Congress, Dunbar, Eames, Harvard, Lenox, Sinith-
sonian, Trumbull, Wellesley.
Some copies (twenty-five, I believe) were
issued in large quarto form with no change of
title-page.    (Pilling, Smithsonian.)
See Hale (H.)
 Vocabulary of the Hail t'-zukh. (Bel-
bella of Millbank Sound, British
Columbia.) Obtained from an Indian
known as " Capt. Stewart," at Victoria,
Vancouver Island, in April, 1859, by
George Gibbs.
In Dall(W. H.), Tribes of the extreme northwest; in Powell (J. W.), Contributions to
North American Ethnology, vol. 1, pp. 144-153,
Washington, 1877,4°.
Contains about 150 words.
 Vocabulary of the Kwa'-kiutl.    (A
dialect of the Ha-ilt'zukh.) Obtained
from two women of the tribe, at Nan-
aimo, British Columbia, in September,
1857, by George Gibbs.
In Dall (W. H.), Tribes of the extreme northwest; in Powell (J.W.), Contributions to North
American Ethnology, vol. 1, pp. 144-153,Washington, 1877, 4°.
Contains about 160 words.
 Account of Indian tribes upon the
northwest coast of North America.
Manuscript, 8 leaves, folio, written on one
side only; in the library of the Bureau of Ethnology, Washington, D. C.
Gibbs (G.) — Continued.
General account of the Indians of the above,
named  region,   including  the   Nutka,   Tlaoquatch, and Heiltzuk,and a list of vocabularies
which have been printed in those languages.
 Numerals of the Makah.
Manuscript, 1 page, folio; in the library of
the Bureau of Ethnology.
Includes the numerals 1-20, 25, 30,40,50,60,
70, 80, 90,100.
 Vocabulary of the Makah language.
Manuscript, 6 leaves, folio, written on one
side only; in the library of the Bureau of Ethnology, Washington, D. C.   Collected in 1858.
Recorded on one of the forms containing 180
words issued by the Smithsonian Institution.
Equivalents of nearly all the words are given.
 Vocabularies.     AVashington   Territory.
Manuscript, 141 leaves, most of which are
written on both sides, and some of which are
blank, 12°; in the library of the Bureau of
Ethnology.   Recorded in a blank book.
Most of the vocabularies have been copied
by their authoron separate forms. Among them
is one of the Haeltzuk or Belbella, 7 pages.
  See Knipe (C.)
George Gibbs, the son of Col. George Gibbs,
was born on the 17th of July, 1815, at Sunswick,
Long Island, near the village of Halletts Cove,
now known as Astoria. At seventeen he was
taken to Europe, where he remained two years.
On bis return from Europe he commenced the
reading of law, and in 1838 took his degree of
bachelorof law at Harvard University. In 1848
Mr. Gibbs went overland from St. Louis to
Oregon and established himself at Columbia.
In 1854 he received the appointment of collector
of the port of Astoria, which be held during
Mr. Fillmore's administration. Later he removed from Oregon to Washington Territory,
and settled upon a ranch a few miles from Fort
Steilacoom. Here he had his headquarters for
several years, devoting himself to the study of
tho Indian languages and to the collection of
vocabularies and traditions of the northwestern tribes. During a great part of the time
he was attached to tho United States Government Commission in laying the boundary,
as the geologist or botanist of the expedition.
He was also attached as geologist to the survey
of a railroad route to the Pacific, under Major
Stevens. In 1857 he was appointed to the
northwest boundary stirvey under Mr. Archibald Campbell, as commissioner. In 1860 Mr.
Gibbs returned to New York, and in 1861 was
on duty in Washington in guarding the Capitol.
Later he resided in Washington, being mainly
employed in the Hudson Bay Claims Commission, to which ho was secretary. He was also
engaged in the arrangement of a large mass of
manuscript bearing upon the ethnology and
philologyofthe American Indians. His services
were availed of by the Smithsonian Institution
to superintend its labors in this field, and to his WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES.
27
Gibbs (G.) — Continued.
energy and complete knowledge of the subject
it greatly owes its success in this branch of the
service. The valuable and laborious service
which he rendered to the Institution was
entirely gratuitous, andin his death that establishment as well as the cause of science lost an
ardent friend and important contributor to
its advancement. In 1871 Mr. Gibbs married
his cousin, Miss Mary K. Gibbs, of Newport,
R. I., and removed to New Haven, where he
died on the 9th of April, 1873.
Gilbert (—) and Rivington (—). Specimens | of the | Languages of all Nations, | and the | oriental and foreign
types | now in use in | the printing
offices | of | Gilbert &■ Rivington, | limited. | [Eleven lines quotations.] |
London:   |  52,   St.   John's    square,
Clerkenwell, E.C. | 1886.
Cover title verso advertisement, no inside,
title, contents pp. 3-4, text pp. 5-66, 16°.
Matthew xi, 28, in the Qagutl language of
Vancouver Island (from Hall), no. 198, p. 52.
Copies seen : Eames, Pilling.
Gospel according to Saint John    .    .
Qa gutl language.    See Hall (A. J.)
Grammar:
Kwakiutl See Hall (A. J.)
Tokoaat Knipe (C.)
Grammatic treatise:
Hailtsuk
Hailtsuk
Hailtsuk
Klaokwat
Kwakiutl
Kwakiutl
Nutka
Nutka
Nutka
Sebasa
Tokoaat
Ukwulta
See Bancroft (H.H.)
Boas (F.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Boas (F.)
Dawson (G. M.)
Brabant (A.J.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Featherman (A.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Sproat (G.M.)
Petitot(E. F.S.J.)
Grant (Walter Colquhoun). Description
of Vancouver Island. By its first Colonist, W. Colquhoun Grant, Esq., F, R.
S. G., of the 2nd Dragoon Guards, and
late Lieut.-Col. of the Cavalry of the
Turkish Contingent.
In Royal Geog. Soc. Jour. vol. 27, pp. 268-320,
London [1858], 8°.   (Geological Survey.)
Brief discussion of the [Maka] language of
Vancouver Island, and numerals 1-10, 100, of
the Macaw or Niteenat, p. 295.
Greely: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy
of the work referred to has been seen by the
compiler in the library of Gen. A. W. Greely,
Washington, D. C.
H.
Hailtsuk:
General discussion See
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
Grammatic treatise
Grammatic treatise
Grammatic treatise
Lord's prayer
Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Sentences
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Yocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Words
Words
Words
.E.)
Anderson (A. C.)
Buschmann (J. C.
Gibbs (G.)
Prichard (J. C.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Boas (F.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Tate (CM.)
Boas (F.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Eells (M.)
Latham (R. G.)
Bancroft (H.H.)
Boas (F.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Campbell (J.)
Dall(W.H.)
Gallatin (A.)
Gibbs (G.)
Hale (H.)
Latham (R. G.)
Powell (J.W.)
Tolmie (W.F.)
Boas (F.)
Daa(L. K.)
Gibbs (G.)
Latham (R. G.)
Haines (Elijah. Middlebrook). The |
American Indian | (LTh-nish-in-na-ba).
| The Whole Subject Complete in One
Volume | Illustrated with Numerous
Appropriate Engravings. I By Elijah
M. Haines. | [Design.] |
Chicago: | tho Mas-sin-na-gan company, | 1888.
Title verso copyright notice etc. 1 1. preface pp. vii-viii, contents pp. 9-21, list of illustrations pp. 21-22, text pp. 23-821, large 8°.
Chapter vi, Indian tribes (pp. 121-171), gives
special lists and a general alphabetic list of the
tribes of North America, derivations of tribal
names being sometimes given. Among them
are the Millbank Sound Indians, p. 129; Indian
tribes of the Pacific coast, pp. 129-130; tribes of
Washington Territory west of the Cascade
Mountains, pp. 132-133.—Chapter xxxvi, Numerals and use of numbers (pp. 433-451), includes
the numerals 1-10 of the Nootka (from Jewitt),
p. 445.—Chapter lv, vocabularies (pp. 668-703),
contains a vocabulary (30 words) of the Nootka
(from Jewitt), p. 675.
Copies seen: Congress, Eames, Pilling. 28
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Haldeman (Samuel Stehman). Analytic j
orthography: | an | investigation of
the sounds of the voice, | and their |
alphabetic notation; | including | the
mechanism of speech, | and its bearing
upon etymology. | By | S. S. Haldeman,
A. M., | professor in Delaware college;
j member [&c. six lines.] |
Philadelphia: [ J. B. Lippincott & co.
| London: Triibner & co. Paris: Benjamin Duprat. | Berlin: Eerd. Diimm-
ler. | 1860.
Half-title " Trevelyan prize essay'' verso
blank 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. preface pp. v-vi,
contents pp. vii-viii, slip of additional corrections, text pp. 5-147, corrections and additions
p. 148, 4°.
Numerals 1-10 of the [Maka] language of the
Indians of Cape Flattery (from the dictation
of Dr. John L. LeConte), p. 146.
Copies seen.- Boston Athenaeum, British Museum, Bureau of Ethnology, Eames, Trumbull.
First printed in American Philosoph. Soc.
Trans, new series, vol. 11. (*)
Samuel Stehman Haldeman, naturalist, was
born in Locust Grove, Lancaster County, Pa.,
August 12,1812; died in Chickies, Pa., September
19,1880. He was educated at a classical school in
Harrisbnrg, and then spent two years in Dickinson College. In 1836 Henry D. Rogers, having
been appointed state geologist of New Jersey,
sent for Mr. Haldeman. who had been his pupil
at Dickinson, to assist him. A year later, on
the reorganization of the Pennsylvania geological survey, Haldeman was transferred to his
own state, and was actively engaged on the survey until 1842. He made extensive researches
among Indian dialects, and also in Pennsylvania Dutch, besides investigations in the
English, Chinese, and other languages. —Apple-
ton's Cyclop, of Am. Biog.
Hale (Horatio). United States | exploring expedition. | During the years |
1838, 1839, 1840, 1841,1842. | Under the
command of | Charles Wilkes, U. S. N.
| Vol. VI. | Ethnography and philology. | By | Horatio Hale, | philologist
of the expedition. |
Philadelphia: | printed by C. Sherman. | 1846.
Half-title (United States exploring expedi
tion, by authority of Congress) verso blank 1 1.
title verso blank 11. contents pp. v-vii, alphabet
pp. ix-xii, half-title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 3-
666, map, 4°.
No. 14, Vocabulary {104 words) of the Nootka
(Kwoneatshatka), line 14 on pp. 570-629.—
Vocabulary (69 words) of tho Hailtsa (from
Anderson), p. 634.—List of 17 words used in the
Chinook Jargon and derived from the Nootka,
pp. 636-637.
Hale (H.) — Continued.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Congress, Lenox, Trumbull.
At the Squier sale, no. 446, a copy brought
$13; at the Murphy sale, no. 1123, a half maroon
morocco copy, top edge gilt, brought $13.
Issued also with title-page as follows:
 United States | exploring expedition. | During the years | 1838, 1839,
1840,1841, 1842. | Under the command
of | Charles Wilkes, U.S.N. | Ethnography and philology. | By | Horatio
Hale, | philologistof the expedition. |
Philadelphia: | Lea and Blanchard.
| 1846.
Half-title (United States exploring expedition) verso blank 11. title verso blank 1 1. contents pp. v-vii, alphabet ]rp. ix-xii, half-title
verso blank 11. text pp. 3-666, map, 4°.
Linguisticcontentsas undertitlenext above.
Copies seen : Eames, Lenox.
These vocabularies are reprinted in Gallatin
(A.), Hale's Indians of northwest  America,
New York, 1848,8°.
 Was America peopled from Polynesia?
In Congres Int. des Ainericanistes, compte-
rendu, 7*'1 session, pp. 375-387, Berlin, 1890. 8°.
(Eames, Pilling.)
Table of the pronouns I, thou,ive (inc.), we
(exc.) and they in the languages of Polynesia
and of western America, including the Kwakiutl and Nootka, pp. 386-387.
Issued separately with title-page as follows:
 Was America peopled from Polyne
sia? | A study in comparative Philology. | By | Horatio Hale. | Prom the
Proceedings of the International Congress of Americanists | at Berlin, in
October 1888. |
Berlin 1890. | Printed by II. S. Hermann.
Title verso blank 1 l.text pp. 3-15, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above,
p.14.
Copies seen : Pilling, Wellesley.
 An international idiom. | A manual
of the | Oregon trade language, | or |
" Chinook Jargon/' | By Horatio Hale,
M. A., F. R. S. C, | member  [&c.  six
lines.] |
London: | Whittaker  &.  eo., White
Hart    Street, | Paternoster    square. |
1890.
Half-title verso blank 1 I. title verso names
of printers 1 1. prefatory note verso extract
from a work by Quatrefages 1 I. contents verse
blank 1 1. text pp. 1-63, 16°.
Trade language and English dictionary, pp.
39-52, and the English and Trade language, pp. WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES.
29
Hale (H")—Continued.
53-63, each contain a number of words derived
from the Nootka; in the Jargon-English portion these words are marked with an N.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
Horatio Hale, ethnologist, born in Newport,
N. H., May 3,1817, was graduated at Harvard in
1837 and was appointed in the same year philologist to the United States exploring expedition
under Capt. Charles Wilkes. In this capacity
he studied a large number of the languages of
the Pacific islands, as well as of North and
South America, Australia, and Africa, and also
investigated the history, traditions, and customs of the tribes speaking those languages.
The results of his inquiries are given in his
Ethnography and Philology (Philadelphia,
1846), which forms the seventh volume of the
expedition reports. He has published numeroos
memoirs on anthropology and ethnology, is a
member of many learned societies, both in
Europe and in America, and in 1886 was vice-
president of the American Association for the
Advancement of Science, presiding over the
section of anthropology.—Appleton's Cyclop, of
Am. Biog.
Hall (Rev. Alfred James).    The gospel |
according to | St. Matthew,'translated
into the | Qa-gutl  (or Quoquols   language). | By the | rev. A.J. Hull,   | C.  j
M. S. missionary at Fort Rupert, Van-  !
couver's island. |
London: [ printed for the British :
and foreign bible society, | Queen Vic- ■
toria street. | 1882.
Title verso "sounds of the letters" 11. text  !
entirely in the Qagutl language pp. 5-121.163.
See facsimile of the title-page, p. 30.
Copies seen: British and Foreign Bible
Society, Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
[ ] The | gospel  according  to | Saint
John. | Translated into the | Qa gutl
language. |
London: | printed for the British and
foreign bible society, | Queen Victoria
street. | 1884.
Title verso names of printers 11. test entirely
in the Qa gutl language pp. 5-101,16°.
Copies seen: British and Foreign Bible Society,
British Museum, Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
Noticed, and an extract (St. John iv, 7-8) given
in the American Antiquarian, vol. 8, p. 187,
Chicago, 1886.8°.
 A Grammar of the Kwagiutl Language. By Rev. Alfred J. Hall, Alert
Bay, British Columbia.
In Royal Soc. of Canada Trans, vol. 6, section
2, pp. 59-105, Montreal, 1888,4°.
Introductory, p. 59.—The Kwagiutl people,
with list of villages, pp. 59-60.— Phonology, pp.
60-61,—Parts oi speech (pp. 61-105) includes:
Hall (A. J.) — Continued.
Nouns, pp. 61-65; adjectives, pp. 65-72; pronouns, pp. 72-76; verb, pp. 77-101 * adverb, pp.
101-103; conjunction, pp. 103-104; interjection,
p.105.
Issued separately with title-page as follows:
 Section II, 1888.    Trans. Royal Soc,
Can. | A grammar | of the Kwagiutl
language, | by the [ rev. Alfred J. Hall,
| from the | transactions of the Royal
society of Canada | volume VI, section
II, 1888. |
Montreal [ Dawson brothers, publishers | 1889.
Cover title as above, title as above verso
blank 11. contents verso blank 1 1. text pp. 59-
105, 4C.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen : Eames,Geological Survey, Pilling, Wellesley.
[ ] x | Kwagutl version  of   portions
| of the | Book  of common prayer. |
[Seal of the S. P. C. K.] |
London: | Society for promoting
christian knowledge, | Northumberland avenue, Charing cross, W. C.
[1891.]
Title verso blank 1 1. contents verso blank I
1. text entirely in the Kwagutl language pp. 3-
62, colophon verso blank 11.16°.
Prayers, pp. 3-49.—Hymns, pp. 50-62.—Isaiah
Hi, 7. 9, p. 62.
Copies seen : Eames, Pilling.
Mr. Hall was born in 1853 in the village of
Thorpe, Surrey, England. In 1873 he was
accepted by the Church Missionary Society for
foreign work, and was sent to their college at
Islington for four years. In February, 1877, lie
was ordained, and in June of the same year he
left England for Mctlakatla, British Columbia,
arriving there August 6,1877, where he labored
with Mr. AVilliam Duncan till March 8, 1878.
At that date this village contained 638 Tsim-
shian Indians, and the Sunday congregations
numbered 600 or 700 souls. When Mr. Duncan
was absent Mr. Hall preached through an
interpreter. He taught daily in a schoolof 140
children, more especially instructing them to
sing; and he also had a large evening school of
young men. During his eight months' stay at
Metlakatla he acquired a fair knowledge of
Tsimshian, and left it with much regret. In
March, 1878, Mr. Hall was ordered to Fort
Rupert, northeast of Vancouver Island, to
work among the Kwakiutls, who speak a totally
different language. He found this tongue
more difficult to acquire than the Tsimshian,
the variety of pronouns being very puzzling.
Here he taught school for six months, and
afterward for two years inside the Hudson Bay
fort. There were difficulties in acquiring land
at Fort Rupert, and in 1881 Mr. Hall removed 30
I3IBLIOGKAPHY   OF   THE
THE   GOSPEL
ACCORDING  TO
ST. MATTHEW,
TRANSLATED  INTO  THE
QA-GUTL (OR QUOQUOLS LANGUAGE).
REV. A, J. HALL,
C.M.S.  MISSIONARY   AT   FOIIT   RLFEKT,   VANCOUVER S   ISI.ANW,
UonBon:
PRINTED POR TUB BRITISH AND FOREIGN BIBLE SOCIETT,
QUEEN VICTORIA STREET.
1882.
FACSIMILE  OF TITLE-PAGE OF HALL'S QA-GUTL TRANSLATION OF MATTHEW. WAKASHAN   LANGUAGES.
31
Hall (A. J.)—Continued.
to Alert Bay, about twenty miles south of
Fort Rupert, and here built a house and school.
There are eleven villages within a radius of
fifty miles from Alert Bay, and it has been
usual to make two itinerancies annually to
visit these tribes, numbering 1,978 souls.
Hancock Harbor Indians.    See Klaokwat.
Harvard: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy
of the work referred to has been seen by the
compiler in the library of Harvard University,
Cambridge, Mass.
Humboldt (Friedrieh Wilholm Heinrich
Alexander von). Versuch | iiber | den
politischen Zustand [ des Kiinigreichs
| Neu Spanien, | enthaltend | Unter-
suchungen [&c. ten lines], | von Fried-
rich Alexander von Humboldt. |
Erster[-Fiinfter] Band. |
Tiibingen, | in der J. G. Cotta'schen
Buehhandlung. | 1809 [-1813].
5 vols, maps, 8°.
Numerals 1-10 of the Mexican, Escelen,
Iiumsen, and Nootka (the last named from a
manuscript of Mozino) compared, vol. 2, p. 238.
Copies seen: British Museum, Harvard.
Sabin's Dictionary, no. 33717, gives a similar
title with the date 1809-1814, 5 vols. 8°.
 Essai  politique | sur le royaume |
de | la Nouvelle-Espagne; | par Alexandre de Humboldt. [ Avec an atlas |
physique et geographique, fonde sur
des observations astronomiques, des
mesures I trigonome'triques et des
nivcllemens baromeUriques. | Tome
premier [-deuxifeme]. |
A Paris, | chez F. Schoell, libraire,
rue des Fosse's- Saint-Germaine-l'Aux-
errois, n". 29. | 1811. | De l'imprimerie
de J. H. St6ne.
Series title: Voyage | de Humboldt et Bonp-
land. | Troisieme partie. j Essai politique sur
le royaume j de | la Nouvelle-Espagne. | Tome
premier [-deuxieme]. |
A Paris, | Chez F. Schoel], libraire, rue des
Fosses-Saint-Germain-rAuxerrois, n". 29.11811.
| De rimprimerie do J. H. Stone.
2 vols.: half-title of the series verso blank 1
1. titlo of the series verso blank 11. half-title of
tiie work verso blank 1 1. title of the work
verso blank 1 1. dedication 3 11. analyses rai-
sonnees etc. pp, i-xcii, half-title verso blank 1 1.
[preface] pp. i-iv, text pp. 3-350, table des
matieres 2 11. corrections 1 1.; half titles and
titles as in vol. 1, 411. text pp. 351-866, table des
matieres pp. 867-868, additions pp. 861 Ms-867
bis, table alphabetique pp. 869-904, corrections
p. [905], folio.
Linguistic contents as under title next above,
vol. 1, p. 322.
Humboldt (F. W. H. A.) — Continued.
Copies seen: Astor, Boston Athenaeum,
British Museum, Congress, Harvard.
There are two copies of this work in the
Astor Library, each slightly differing in the
order of the preliminary leaves from that
given above.
 Essai politique j sur le royaume | de
la | Nouvelle-Espagne. | Par Al. de
Humboldt. Tome      premier[-cin-
quieme]. |
A Paris, | Chez F. Schoell,Libraire,
rue des Fosse's- | Saint-Germain-l'Aux-
errois, n».29. | 1811.
5 vols, 8°.
A short vocabulary (6 words) of the Nootka,
showing resemblances to the Mexican, vol. 2,
p. 446.—Numerals 1-10 of the Mexican, Escelen,
Kumsen, and Nootka, vol. 2, p. 447.
Copies seen: Congress, Geological Survey,
Harvard, Lenox.
 Political Essay | on  the | kingdom
of New Spain. | Containing | Researches relative to the Geo- | graphy
of Mexico, the Extent [ of its Surface
and its political | Division into Intend-
ancies, the [ physical Aspect of the
Coun- | try, the Population, the State
| of Agriculture and Manufac- | tur-
ing and Commercial In- [ dustry, the
Canals projected | between the South
Sea  and | Atlantic  Ocean, the Crown
| Revenues,  the    Quantity   of   the |
precious   Metals which  have | flowed
from Mexico into En- | rope and Asia,
since the Dis- | covery of the New Continent, | and the Military Defence of
| New Spain. | By Alexander de
Humboldt. | With | physical sections
and maps, | founded on astronomical
observations, and | trigonometrical and
barometrical | measurements. | Translated from the original French | by
John Black. | Vol. I [-IV]. |
London: | printed for Longman,
Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown; and
| H. Colburn: and W. Blackwood, and
Brown and Crombie, | Edinburgh. |
1811.
4 vols. 8°. atlas, 4°.
Numerals 1-10 of the Mexican, Escelen,
Knmsen, and Nootka compared, vol. 2, p. 346.
Copies seen: Astor, Boston Athenseum,
British Museum, Congress, Lenox.
At the Murphy sale, catalogue no. 1289, a
copy brought $18.75.
 Political essay | on the | kingdom of
New   Spain. | Containing | Researches 32
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
Humboldt (F. W. H. A.) —Continued,
relative to tho Geo- | graphy of Mexico, the Extent | of its Surface and its
political | Division into Intendancies,
the | physical Aspect of the  Coun- |
try,   the   Population,   the   State | of
Agriculture and Manufac- | luring and
Commercial   Indus- | try,   the   Canals
projected   be- | tween   the  South Sea
and At- | lantic Ocean, the Crown Re-
| venues, the Quantity of the | precious
Metals which have | flowed from Mexico into En- | rope and Asia, since the
Dis- | covery of the New Continent, j
and   the   Military   Defence   of | New
Spain. | By Alexander de Humboldt. |
With | physical sections and mapB, |
founded on astronomical observations,
and | trigonometrical and barometrical
| measurements. | Translated from the
original  French, |  by  John   Black. |
Vol. I [-II]. |
New-York: | Printed and published
by I. Riley. | 1811.
2 vols.: title verso blank 1 1. preface by the
translator pp. iii-viii, dedication pp. ix-x, contents pp. xi-xii, geographical introduction pp.
i-cxv, text pp. 1-221; title verso blank 3 1. text
pp. 3-377, 8°.    (No more published.)
A few words (6) of the Nootka showing
resemblances to the Mexican, vol. 2, p. 238.—
Numerals 1-10 of the Nootka, vol. 2, p. 238.
Copies seen : Congress, Geological Survey.
Sabin's Dictionary, no. 33715. mentions " Second edition, London, 1814, 4 vols. 8°. atlas.
There is an edition: Minerva, Ensayo politico sobro de Nueva Espafia, Madrid, 1818, 2
vols. 8°.which contains no "Wakashan linguistic
material.   (Congress.)
 Ensayo politico | sobre el reino | de
| la    Nueva-Espafia,   |   Por   Alej.    de
Humboldt; | traducido  al   Espanol, |
Por Don Vicente Gonzales Arnao, | con
dosmapas. | Tomoprimcro [-cuarto]. |
Paris, | en casa do Rosa, gran patio
■ del palacio real, | y calle de Montpen-
sier, N» 5. j 1822.
4 vols, maps, 8°.
A few-words (6) of the Nootka language,vol.
2, p. 154.—Numerals 1-10 of the Nootka, vol. 2,
p. 155.
Copies seen: Astor, Geological Survey.
Sabin's Dictionary, no. 33718,  mentions an
• edition, with similar title, Paris, J. Eenouard
1827, 5 vols. 8°.
—— Political essay | on the [ kingdom of
New   Spain. | Containing | Researches
relative to the Geography of Mexico   |
The Extent of its Surface and itspolit-
Humboldt (F.W. H. A.) —Continued.
ical Division into Intendancies, | The
physical Aspect of the Country, | The
Population, the State of Agriculture
and Manufacturing | and Commercial
Industry; | The Canals projected between the South Sea and Atlantic
Ocean, | The Crown Revenues, | The
Quantity of the precious Metals which
have flowed from Mexico | into Europe
and Asia, since the Discoveiy of tho |
New Continent, | And the Military
Defence of New Spain. | By Alexander
de Humboldt. ] With physical sections
and maps, | founded on astronomical
observations, and trigonometrical j and
barometrical measurements. | Translated   from  the  original   French | by
John Black. | Vol. I[-1V]. | Third edition. |
London: | printed for | Longman,
Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, | Paternoster-row. | 1822.
4 vols. 8°.
Numerals 1-10 of the Mexican, Escelen,
Rumsen, and Nootka compared, vol. 2, p. 299.
Copies seen: Boston Public, Congress, Harvard.
 Essai politique | sur le royaume | de
la | Nouvelle-Espagne j par Alexandre de
Humboldt. | Deuxieme edition. | Tome
premier [-quatrieme]. | [Design.] |
A Paris, | chez Antoine-Augustin
Reuouard. | M DCCC XXV[-M DCCC
XXVII] [1825-1827]
4 vols. 8°.
Numerals 1-10 of the Mexican, Escelen,
Rumsen and Nootka compared, vol. 2. p. 280.
Copies seen : Harvard.
Sabin's Dictionary, no. 33713, mentions an
edition, Paris, 1825, 4 vols. 8°.
 Ensayo     politico   |   sobre   |   Nueva
Espana, | por | el B°". A. de Humboldt,
| traducido al Castellano | por Don
Vicente Gonzales Arnao. | Tercera
edicion, | corregida aumentada y ador-
nado | con mapas. | Tomo primero
[-quinto]. [
Paris, | libreriadeLeeointe, | 49qnai
des Augustins. [ Perpinan, | libreria de
Lassere. | 1836.
5 vols. 8°.
Numerals 1-10 of the Mexican, Escelen,
Rumsen, and Nootka, vol. 2, p. 130.
Copies seen : British Museum.
Hicrsemann's catalogue 30, no. 423, mentions
an edition: Essai politique, Paris, 1871 [1811?],
8°, atlas, folio, which he prices at 30 fr. WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES.
33
Humboldt (F. W. H. A.) —Continued.
 Vues [ des Cordilleres, 1 et monumens
| des peuples indigenes | de l'Amer-
ique. | Par Al. de Humboldt. |
A Paris, [ Chez F. Schoell, rue des
Fosses-Saint - Germain-l'Auxerrois, n".
29. | 1810.
Series title : Voyage 1 de | Humboldt et Bon-
pland. | Premiere partie, j Relation historique.
| Atlas pittoresque. |
A Paris, | Chez F. Schoell, rue des Fosses
Saint-Germain-1'Auxerrois, n". 29. | 1810.
Half-title of the series verso blank 1 1. title
of the series verso blank 1 1. half-title of the
work verso name of printer 1 1. title of the
work verso blank 1 1. dedication verso blank 1
1. introduction pp. i-xvi, text pp. 1-304, notes
pp. 305-321, table alphabetique des auteurs et
des ouvrages pp. 323-328, table alphabetique
des matieres pp. 329-347, table des matieres pp.
348-350, book of plates (69), atlas, folio.
Numerals 1-13 of the Aztequc and Noutka
(the latter from a manuscript of Mozino), pp.
140-141.
Copies seen: Astor, Congress.
Priced by Quaritch, cat. 362, no. 28958,61.10s.
 Vues | des Cordilleres, \et monumens
| des peuples indigenes | de PAiner-
ique. | Par Al. de Humboldt. |
A Paris, | Chez F. Schoell, rue des
Fosses-Montmartre, n°. 14. | 1813.
Series title: Voyage | de | Humboldt et Bon-
pland. | Primiero partie, [ Relation historique.
| Atlas pittoresque. j
A Taris, | Chez F. Schoell, rue des Fosses-
Montmartre, n". 14. | 1813.
Half-title of the series verso blank 1 1. title
of the series verso blank 1 1. half-title of the
work verso name of printer 1 1. title of the
work verso blank 1 1. dedication verso blank 1
1. introduction pp. i-xvi, text pp. 1-304, notes
pp. 305-321, table alphabetique des auteurs et
ouvrages pp. 323-328, table alphabetique des
matieres pp. 329-347, table des matieres pp. 348-
350, book of plates (69), atlas, folio.
Linguistic contents as under ti tie next above.
Copies seen : Harvard, Lenox.
Priced by Dufosse, no. 1619i, and 24143, 200 fr.
 Researches | Concerning | the institutions   and    monuments  |  of |  the
Ancient   Inhabitants | of | America, |
with Descriptions & Views | of some of
the most | Striking   Scenes | in the |
Humboldt (F. W. H. A.) —Continued.
Cordilleras.  | Written in French by |
Alexander   de' Humboldt, | &  Translated into   English by | Helen Maria
Williams. | Vol. I [-II]. | [Engraving.] |
London: | Published   by   Longman,
Hurst, Rees, Orme & Brown, J. Murray
& H. Colburn. | 1814.
2 vols.: title verso blank 1 1. advertisement
pp. iii-iv, text pp. 1-411; title verso blank 11.
text pp. 1-219, notes pp. 221-250, index to
authors pp. 257-272, general index pp. 273-322,
list of plates pp. 323-324,8°.
Numerals 1-13, Mexican and Nootka, vol. 2, p.
305.
Copies seen: Astor, Bancroft, Boston Athenaeum, Congress, Lenox.
 Vues des Cordilleres, et Monumens
des Peuples Indigenes de l'Aincrique.
Par Al. de Humboldt.
Paris: Maze. 1815. (*)
2 vols. pp. 392, 411, 1 1, 19 plates, 8°.
Title from Sabin's Dictionary, no. 33750.
 Vues des Cordillieres et monuments
des peuples de l'Amorique.
Paris, 1816. (*)
2 vols.: 19 black and colored plates, 8°.
Title   from  Dufosse's   1887 catalogue,   no.
24142, where it is priced 20 fr.   At the Murphy
sale, no. 1288, a copy brought $9.50.
 Vues | des | Cordilleres, [ et | monumens     des     peuples | indigenes | de
l'Amorique; | Par Al. de Humboldt. |
Avec    19   planches,    dont   plusieurs
coloriees. | Tome premier [-second]. |
Paris, ] Chez N. Maze, Libraire, Rue
Git-le-Cceur, n" 4.    [1824?]
2 vols.: half-title verso" Imp rimeriede Smith
(1816), Excepte les titres qui sont de l'lm-
primerie de Stahl (1824)'' 11. title verso blank t
1. dedication verso blank 11. avertisseinent pp.
5-6, introduction pp. 7-42, text pp. 43-392; half-
title verso as in first volume 1 1. title vers.)
blank 1 1. text pp. 1-354, notes pp. 355-394, table
des matieres pp. 395-399, table des auteurs pp.
400-401, table alphabetique des matieres pp.
402-411, errata p. [412], table des planches pp.
1-2, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above,
vol.1, p. 367.
Copies seen: Brinton.
WAK-
-;; 34
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF  THE
Jehan (Louis-Francois). Troisieme et
derniere | Encyclopedic theologique, |
[&c. twenty-four lines] | publie'e | par
M. l'abbe* Migne | [&c. six lines.] |
Tomo trent-quatrieme. | Dictionnaire
de linguistique. | Tome unique. | Prix:
7 francs. |
S'imprime et se vend chez J.-P.Migne,
e'diteur, | aux ateliers catboliques, Rue
d'Amboise, au Petit-Montrouge, | Bar-
riere d'enfer de Paris. | 1858.
Sceond title: Dictionnaire | de [ linguistique
| et | de philologio compar6e. | Histoire de
tontes les langues mortes et vivantes, [ ou [
traite complet d'idiomographie, | embrassant |
l'examen critique dea syatemea et de toutea les
queationa qui se rattachent [ a l'origine et a la
filiation dea langues, a leur essence organiquo
| et a, leurs rapports avec l'hiatoire des races
humaincs, de leurs migrationa, etc. \ Preced6
d'un | Essai sur le role dulangage dans l'evolu-
tionderintelligence humaine. |ParL.-F. Jekaii
(do Saint-CIavien), | Membre de la Societe geo-
logiquo de France, de l'Academie royale des
sciences de Turin, etc. | [Quotation, three
lines.] | Public j parM. 1'Abbe Migne, | editeur
dela Bibliotheque universello du clerge, | ou |
des cours complets sur chaque brancbe de la
science ecclesiastique. j Tomo unique. \ Prix:
7 francs. |
S'Iniprinie et se vend chez J.-P. Migne,
editeur, | aux ateliers catboliques, Rue d'Amboise, au Petit-Montrouge, j Barrier© d'enfer
de Paris. | 1858.
Outside title 1 1. titles as above 2 11. columns
(two to a page) 9-1448, large 8°.
Linguistic content a as under title next below.
Copies seen; British Museum, Georgetown.
A later edition with title-pages as follows:
 Troisieme et derniere | Encyclopedic
| theologique, j ou troisieme et derniere | serie de dictiounaires sur toutes
les parties de la seieuce religieuse, |
offrant en francais, et par ordre alphabetique, | la plus claire, la plus facile,
la plus commode, la. plus variee | et la
plus complete des theologies: J [&c. seventeen lines] | publiee | par M. l'abbe*
Migne | [&c. six Hues.] | Tometrente-
quatrieme. | Dictionnaire de linguistique. | Tome unique. | Prix: 8 francs. |
S'imprime et se vend cbez J.-P. Migne,
Cditeur, | aux ateliers catboliques, rue
d'Amboise. 20, au Petit-Montrouge, |
autrefois Barriere d'enfer de Paris,
maintenant dans Paris. I 1864
Jehan (L. F.) —Continued.
Second title: Dictionnaire ] de | linguistique
et j do philologie convparee. j Histoire de toutea
leslanguesmorteset vivantes, j ou | traitecom-
plet d'idiomographie, | embrassant | l'examen
critique dea systemesetde toutes les questions
qui se rattachent j a l'origine ct a la filiation
des langues, aleuressenceorgaiiique | etaleurs
rapports avec l'histoire des races humaines, de
leurs migrationa, etc. | Precede d'un | Essai sur
le r61e du langage dans Involution de l'intelli-
gence humaine. | Par L.-F. Jehan (do Saint-
Clavien), | Membre de la Societe geologique de
France, de l'Academie royale des sciences de
Turin, etc. | [Quotation, three lines.] | Publi6 |
par M. Pabbe Migne, j editeur < le la Bibliotkeque
universelle du clerge, | ou j des cours complets
sur chaquebranche de la science eccleaiastique.
| Tomo unique. | Prix: 7 francs. |
S'imprime et so vend chez J.-P. Migne, editeur, j aux ateliers catboliques, rue d'Amboise,
20, au Petit-Montrouge, J autrefois Uarriere
d'enfer de Paris, maintenant dans Paris, j 1864
First title verso " avis important" 1 1. second
title verso name of printer 1 1. introduction
numbered by columns 9-208, text in double columns 209-1250, notes additionnelles columns
1249-1434, table des matieres columns 1435-1448,
Tableau polyglotte dea languea de la cote
occidentale de l'Ameriquo du nord, columns
445-448, contains a vocabulary of about a dozen
worda iu Noutka ou "Wakash.—Wakash ou
Noutka, columns 1238-1239, contains general
remarks on the language.
Copies seen: Eames.
Jewitt (John Rogers). A Narrative of
the Adventures and Sufferings of John
R. Jewitt only survivor of the crew of
the Ship Boston during a captivity of
nearly three years among the Savages
of Nootka Sound with an account of
the Manners, Mode of living and Religious opinions of the natives. Illustrated with a plate representing the
ship in possession of tho Savages.
Middletown, priuted by Loomis &.
Richards, 1815. (*)
203 pp. 2 plates, 12°.
Vocabulary of the Nootka language, containing nearly one hundred words, p. 4.
Title from Field's Essay, no. 777, where it is
followed by this note:
The narrative of Jewitt's captivity, was
written by Roland Alsop, of Middletown,
Connecticut, author of several books of poems,
and translator of Molina's History of Chili.
The details of the adventures of Jewitt were
drawn from him by the indefatigable queries of WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES.
35
IABRATITE
OP   THE
ADVENTURES AND SUFFERINGS   .
JOHN 11. JEWITT|
fORfcT SURVIVOR  of  TliE  CREW  OP THE
SHIP BOSTON,
BCRI50 A CAfrmTT Or KFiRtt TBRSK MAM AW9KG 1MM
SAVAGES OF NOOTKA SOUND:
WITH AN ACCOOST OF THE
MANNERS, MODE OF LIVINO, AND REUG10US  .'
OPINIONS OF THE NATIVES.
KM»BM,ISH6B WI*H TM SjreRATOMH,
YORE:
PHE   FVBUSHMU
FACSIMILE OF THE TITLE-PAGE OF THE NEW YORK [1816?] EDITION OF JEWITT'S NARRATIVE. 36
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
Jewitt (J. R.) — Continued.
Alsop, who after some years declared that he
feared he had done Jewitt but littlo good, in
furnishing him with a yagabond mode of earning a livelihood, by hawking his book from a
wheelbarrow through the country.
 A | narrative | of the | adventures
and sufferings, | of | John R. Jewitt; |
only survivor of the crew of the | ship
Boston, | during a captivity of nearly
three years among the savages of |
Nootka sound: | with an account of the
| manners, mode of living, and religious | opinions of tho natives. | Embellished with a plate, representing
the ship in j possession of tho savages.
| [Two lines quotation.] |
Middletown: [Conn.] | printed by
Seth Richards. | 1815.
Colophon : End of the Second Edition.
Frontispiece 11. title verso copyright "thirty-
ninth year of the Independence of the U. S. A."
11. names of the crew of the ship Boston, verso
list of words in Nootka 1 1. text x>p. 5-201.16°.
"A list of words [77, and the numerals 1-10,
20, 100, 1000] in the Noofkian language, the
most iu use," p. [4].—War song of the Nootka
tribe (two verses with explanatory note), p. 204.
Copies seen: Boston Athenauvm, Congress,
Eames, Harvard. Trumbull, Wisconsin Historical Society'.
 A | narrative | of   the | adventures
and sufferings | of | John R. Jewitt; |
only survivor of the crew of the | ship
Boston, | during a captivity of nearly
three years | among the savages of |
Nootka sound: | with an account of |
the manners, mode of living, and religious | opinions of the natives. | Embellished with a plate representing the
ship in | the possession of the natives.
| [Two lines quotation.] |
New York: | printed by Daniel Fan-
shaw, | No. 241, Pearl street. | 1816.
Frontispiece 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. names
of the crew of the ship Boston verso list of
words in Nootka 11. text pp. 5-208, 16°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above,
pp. [4], 208.
Copies seen: Boston Athenaeum, British
Museum.
 Narrative | of the | adventures and
sufferings | of | John E. Jewitt; [ only
survivor of the crew of the | ship Boston, | during a captivity of nearly
three years among the | savages of
Nootka sound: | with an account of the
| manners, mode of living, andreligious
Jewitt (J. R.) — Continued.
| opinions of the natives. Embellished
with ten engravings. | [Design.] |
New York: | printed for the publisher.    [1816?]
Cover title as above, frontispiece 1 1. title as
above verso blank 1 1. names of the crew etc.
verso vocabulary 1 1. text pp. 7-166, 16°. See
fac-simile of the title-page, p. 35.
Linguistic contents as under title next above,
pp. [6], 166.
Copies seen: Congress, Pilling, Wellesley.
 A | narrative | of the | adventures
and sufferings | of | John R. Jewitt, |
only survivor of the crew of the | ship
Boston, | during a captivity of nearly
three years | among the | savages of
Nootka sound: | with an account of the
| manners, mode of living, and religious | opinions of the natives. Embellished [&c. three lines.] | [Two lines
quotation.] |
Middletown: | printed by Loomis
and Richards, | And Re-printed by
Rowland Hurst, Wakefield; | and published by Longman, Hurst [&c. three
lines.] | 1816.
Frontispieee 1 1. title verso copyright notice
1 1. To the English reader pp. iii-iv, picture 1
1. text pp. 5-208,16°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above, pp.
205, 206-208.
Copies seen : British Museum.
 A | narrative | of   the | adventures
and sufferings | of | John R. Jewitt, |
only survivor of the crew of the | ship
Boston, | during a captivity of nearly
three years | among the | savages of
Nootka Sound: | with an account of
the | manners, mode of living, and religious | opinions of the natives. | Embellished [&c. three lines.] | [Two
lines quotation.] |
Middletown: | printed by Loomis
and Richards, | and Re-printed by
Rowland Hurst,Wakefield; | and published by Thomas Tegg, Cheapside,
London; and | sold by all booksellers.
| 1820.
Frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyright (39th
year of the independence) 1 1. To the English
reader pp. iii-iv, picture 11. text pp. 5-208, 16°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above, pp.
205,206-208.
Copies seen: Lenox.
Sabin'sDictionary, no. 36123. mentions anedi-
tion: Middletown, 1820, 208 pages, 2 plates, 12°.
He probably referred to the above by mistake. WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES.
37
Jewitt (J. R.) — Continued.
 The | adventures | and | sufferings |
of | John R. Jewitt, | only survivor of
the crew of the ship Boston, | during a
captivity of nearly three years | among
the savages of Nootka sound; | witli an
account of the manners, mode of living,
| and religious opinions of the natives.
| [Two lines quotation.] |
America printed. | Edinburgh: | reprinted for Archd. Constable & co.
Edinburgh: | and Hurst, Robinson, &
co. London. | 1824.
Title verso copyright 1 1. To the English
reader pp. iii-iv, text pp. 1-237,16°.
Linguistic contents as undertitles above, pp.
234, 235-237.
Copies seen : British Museum.
Sabin's Dictionary, no. 36123, mentions an
edition in German as included in Hulsuit's
Tagenbueh, Minister, 1828; and one in English,
Ithaca, N. T., 1840, 8°.
 Narrative | of the | adventures and
sufferings | of [ John R. Jewitt; | only
survivor of the crew of tho ship | Boston, | during a captivity of nearly
three years among the | savages of
Nootka sound: | with an account of the
| manners, mode of living, and religious | opinions of the natives. | Embellished with engravings. |
Ithaca, N. Y.: | Mack, Andrus, &
co. | 1849.
Frontispiece 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. vocabulary verso names of the crew 1 1. text pp. 7-
166,16°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above, pp.
[5], 166.
Copies seen: Astor, Bancroft, Congress,
National Museum.
 Narrative | of the | adventures and
snffereigns[sicj | of | John R. Jewitt, |
only survivor of the crew of the | ship
Boston, | during a captivity of nearly
3 years among the | savages of Nootka
sound: | with an account of the | manners, mode of living, and religious |
opinions of the natives. |
Ithaca, N. Y.: | Andrus, Gauntlett &
co. | 1851.
Frontispiece 1 1. title verso blank 11. text pp.
7-160,16°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above, pp.
7,166.
Jewitt (J. R.) — Continued.
Copies seen: British Museum, Georgetown,
Lenox, Wisconsin Historical Society.
The linguistic material gathered by Jewitt
has been reprinted by many authors.
 The | captive of Nootka. | Or the |
adventures of John R. Jewett[sic]. |
[Picture.] |
Philadelphia: | J. B. Lippincott &
co. [ 1861.
Frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyright notice
(1835) 1 1. contents pp. v-xii, text pp. 13-259,
plates, sq. 16°. Compiled from Jewitt's Narrative, by Peter Parley.
A number of Nutka words, phrases, and
proper names passim.
Copies seen : John K. Gill, Portland.Oregon.
 The | captive of Nootka. | Or the |
adventures of John R. Jewett[sic]. |
[Woodcut.] |
Philadelphia: | Claxton,  Remsen &
Haffelfinger, | 819 & 821 Market street.
| 1869.
Frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyright notice
(1835) 1 1. contents pp. v-xii, text pp. 13-259,
plates, sq. 16°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Astor.
There is a work entitled "A journal kept at
Nootka Sound by John It. Jewitt, Boston, 1807,
48 pages, which contains no linguistics. (British Museum.) Sabin's Dictionary, no. 36122,
mentions an edition, New York, 1812.
John Rogers Jewitt was born in Boston, Lincolnshire, England, May 21,1783. He attended
school in his native town, and at twelve years
of age was sent to an academy at Donnington.
At fourteen it was the intention of his father
to apprentice him to a physician, but his own
disinclination "was so strong he was permitted
to become an apprentice to his father as blacksmith. When about fifteen y-ears of age his
family moved to Hull, when, after four years'
residence there, he was permitted to ship as
blacksmith on the ship Boston, of Boston,
Mass., Capt. Salter, bound for the northwest
coast of America, thence to China and thence
to Boston, Mass. In March, 1803, while at
Nootka Sound, the ship was captured by the
natives, and all on board with the exception of
Jewitt and a sailmaker named Thompson were
killed. They remained prisoners among the
Nootkas until July, 1805, when they were rescued by Captain Hill, of the brig Lyrdia, of Boston.
Jiilg (B.>    See Vater (J S.) 38
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
K.
Kagutl.    See Kwakiutl.
Kane (Paul). Wanderings of an artist |
among the | Indians of North America
| from Canada | to Vancouver's island
and Oregon | through the Hudson's bay
company's territory | and | back again.
j By Paul Kane. |
London | Longman, Brown, Green,
Longmans, and Roberts. | 1859.
Half-title verso name of printer 1 1. frontispiece 11. title verso blank 1 1. dedication verso
blank 1 1. preface pp. v-x, contents pp. xi-xvii,
list of illustrations p. [xviii], text pp. 1-455,
appendix 4 11.8°.
List of peoples in the northwest, including
the Wakashan tribes, 4 unnumbered leaves at
end.
Copies seen: Bancroft, Boston Athenaeum,
British Museum, Congress, Harvard.
The edition: Les Indiens de la Baie Hudson,
Paris, 1861, contains no linguistic material.
(British Museum.)
Paul Kane, Canadian artist, born in Toronto
in 1810, died there in 1871. He early evinced a
love of art,and after studying in Upper Canada
college he visited the United States in 1836 and
followed his profession there till 1840. when he
went to Europe. There he studied in Rome,
Genoa. Naples, Florence, Venice, and Bologna.
He finally returned to Toronto in the spring of
1845, and after a short rest went on a tour of
art exploration through the unsettled regions
of the northwest. He traveled many thousands
of miles in this country, from the confines of
old Canada to the Pacific Ocean, and was eminently successful in delineating the physical
peculiarities and appearance of the aborigines,
as well as the wild scenery of the far north. He
returned to Toronto in December, 1848, having
in his possession one of the largest collections
of Indian curiosities that was ever made on the
continent, together with nearly four hundred
sketches. From these he painted a series of
oil pictures, which are now in the possession of
George "W.Allen, of Toronto, and embrace views
of the country from Lake Superior to Vancouver's Island.—Appleton's Cyclop, of Am. Biog.
Keane (Augustus H.)  Ethnography and
philology of America.    By A. H. Keane.
In Bates (H. W.), Central America, the West
Indies, etc., pp. 443-561, London, 1878, 8°.
General scheme of American races and languages (pp. 460-497), includes a list of tho
Columbian races, among them the Nootkah and
Puget Sound groups, pp. 473-474.—Alphabetical
list of all known American tribes and languages, pp. 498-545.
Reprinted in the 1882 and 1885 editions of the
same work and on the same pages.
Keane (A. H.) — Continued.
 American Indians.
In Encyclopedia Britannica, ninth edition,
vol. 12, pp. 822-830, New York, 1881, royal 83.
Columbian Races, p. 826, includes the divisions of the Nootka.
Kerr (Robert). A | general history and
collection | of | voyages and travels, j
arranged in systematic order: | forming a complete history of the origin
and progress | of navigation, discovery, and commerce, | by sea and land,
J from the earliest ages to the present
time. | By | Robert Kerr, P. R. & & F.
A. S. Ed in. | Illustrated by maps and
charts. | Vol. I [-XVII]. |
Edinburgh: | Printed by George
Ramsay and Company, | for William
Blackwood, south Bridge-street; | J.
Murray, Fleet-street, R. Baldwin, Paternoster-row, | London; and J. Cuming,
Dublin. | 1811 [-1816].
17 vols. 8°.
Cook (J.) and King (J.), A voyage to the
Pacific Ocean, vol. 15, pp. 114-514; vol. 16, pp. 1-
503; vol. 17,pp.l-ail.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Congress, Lenox.
A later edition from the same plates, with an
added volume, as follows:
 A | general history and collection |
of | voyages and travels, | arranged in
systematic order: | forming a complete
history of the origin and progress | of
navigation, discovery, and commerce,
| by sea and land, | from the earliest
ages to the present time. | By | Robert
Kerr, F. R. S. & F. A. S. Edin. [ Illustrated by maps and charts. | Vol. I
[-XVIH]. |
William Blackwood, Edinburgh; and
T. Cadell, London. MDCCCXXIV
[1824].
18 vols. 8°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Congress.
King (Capt. James.)    See Cook (J.) and
King (J.)
King George Sound Indians.    See Nutka.
Klaokwat:
General discussion See Buschmann (J. C. E.)
General discussion        Gibbs (G.)
General discussion        Latham (K. G.)
Grammatic treatise       Buschmann (J. C. E.) WAKASHAN   LANGUAGES.
39
Klaokwat — Continued.
Numerals
Proper names
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Words
Words
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Catlin (G.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Gibbs (G.)
Latham (11. G.)
Lemmens (T.N.)
Scouler (J.)
Waters (A.)
Daa (L. K.)
Latham (R.G.)
Whymper (F.)
[Knipe (Rev. C.)]    Some account | of |
the Tahkaht language, | as spoken by
several tribes on the | western coast of
| Vancouver island. | [One line in
Greek.] |
London: | Hatchardand co.,187 Piccadilly. | 1868.
Half-title (The Tahkaht language) verso
blank 1 1. title verso names of printers 1 1.
introduction pp. 1-8, text pp. 9-80, sq. 16°.
Habitat of the Tahkaht or Nootka, p. 1.—
Numerals 1-10, 20, 30,40 of the Indians N. E.
of Vancouver Island, and two sets of numerals
1-10 of the Indians of Milbank Sound (all furnished by Gibbs), pp. 1-2.—'• Tahkaht proper"
pp. 2-8, includes the etymology of the name,
list of tribal divisions, etymologies, tribal
names used by other authors, etc.—Tahkaht
grammar (pp. 9-29) includes: The language,
pp. 9-12; Numerals, pp. 12-13; The formation of
words, pp. 14-16; Roots, pp. 16-20; Terminations, pp. 21-25; Reduplication, pp. 25-26; Comparison, p.26; Verbs, pp. 27-29. —Nitinaht (pp.
29-31) includes: General discussion, p. 29;
Some words in which the Nitinaht differs
partly or altogether from the other tribes, pp.
30-31; Nitinaht numerals, p. 31.—Part I. [Dictionary of the] Tahkabt-English (alphabetically
arranged),pp. 33-38.—PartII. English-Tahkaht
(alphabetically arranged), pp. 59-78.—Proper
names (pp. 79-80) includes: Seshaht men and
boys, p. 79; Opechisaht men and boys, p. 80:
Seshaht women and girls, p. 80.
Copies seen: Boas, Brinton, Eames.
Much of this material is reprinted in Sproat
(G. M.), Scenes and studies of savage life.
 Nootka or Tahkaht vocabulary.
Manuscript,  1 leaf, folio, written on both
sides; in the library of the Bureau of Ethnology-
Contains about 190 words, and the numerals
1-12,20, 30,100,1000.
Knipe (C.) — Continued.
In the same library is a copy of this vocabulary, 6 leaves folio, made b> Dr. Geo. Gibbs.
 Notes on the  Indian tribes of the
north-west coast of North America.
Manuscript, 14 leaves, 8°, 4°, and folio, in the
library of the Bureau of Ethnology. Composed
mainly of letters in answer to inquiries of Di.
Geo. Gibbs.
Comparative vocabulary, 25 words, Newittee
and Makah; one of 24 words of the Nitinaht,
six tribes of Barclay Sound, and of the Nootka;
one of 54 words Chinooic and Tahkaht.—
Numerous notes on affinities, sounds used in
the languages, etc.
Kwagutl version    .... book of common prayer.    See Hall (A. J.)
Kwakiool.    See Kwakiutl.
Kwakiutl.    Vocabulary of the Coquilth
(Kwahkiutl).
Manuscript, 6 leaves folio, written on one
side only; in tho library of the Bureau of Ethnology, Washington, D. C. It is a copy, made
by Dr. Geo. Gibbs from a manuscript (?) in the
Hudson Bay Company's post at Victoria, June,
1857. Contains 180 words.
Kwakiutl:
Bible, Matthew       See
Bible, John
Bible passages
Bible passages
General discussion
General discussion
Gentes
Grammar
Grammatic treatise
Grammatic treatise
Legends
Lord's prayer
Lord's prayer
Numerals
Prayer book
Songs
Songs
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Words
Hall (A.J.)
Hall (A.J.)
British.
Gilbert (—) and Rivington (—>.
Anderson (A.C.)
Dawson (G. M.)
Boas <F.)
Hall (A.J.)
Boas (F.)
Dawson (G.M.)
Boas (F.)
Bergholtz (G.F.)
Rost (R.)
Boas (F.)
Hall (A.J.)
Boas <F.)
Fillmore (J. C.)
Boas (F.)
Chamberlain (A. F.)
Dall (W.H.)
Dawson (G.M.)
Gibbs (G.)
Kwakiutl.
Powell (J. W.)
Wilson (E. F.)
Boas (F.)
Hale(H.) m
40
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF  THE
L.
Legends:
Kwakiutl See Boas (F.)
La Harpe (Jean Francois de).  Abre'ge' |
de | l'histoire   gdnerale | des voyages,
| contenant | Ce qu'il y a de pins remarquable, de plus utile & | do mieux
avere' dans les pays ou les Voyageurs |
ontpe'ne'tre; lesmceursdesHabitans,la
Religion, | les Usages, Arts & Sciences,
Commerce, | Manufactures; enrichiede
Cartes geographiques | & de figures. |
Par M. De La Harpe, de   l'Academie
Franeaise. | Tome    premier    [-trente-
deux]. | [Design.] |
A Paris, | Hotel de Thou, rue des
Poitevins. | M.DCC.LXXX[-An IX —
1801] [1780-1801]. | Avec Approbation,
& Privilege du Roi.
32 vols. 8°, and atlas, 1804, 4°.
Remarks on the Nootka language, with a
short vocabulary and numerals 1-10 (all from
Anderson, in Cook and King1), vol. 23. pp. 184-
187.   This volume is dated 1786.
Copies seen: Astor, Congress.
 Abrege" | de | l'histoire generale | des
voyages, | contenant | ce qu'il y a de
plus remarquable, de plus utile et de |
mieux avere" daus les pays oil les voy-
ageurs ont pe'ne'tre'; les moeurs des habitans, la religion, les | usages; arts et
sciences, commerce etmanufac- | tures.
| Par J. F. LaHarpe. | Tome premier
[-vingt-quatrieme]. |
A  Paris, | Chez   Ledoux   et   Tenre
libraires, | rue Pierre-Sarrozin, N° 8. |
1816.
24 vols. 12°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above,
vol. 23, pp. 286-290.
Copies seen : British Museum.
 Abre'ge' | de | l'histoire generale | des
voyages, | contenant | ce qu'il y a de
plus remarquable, de plus utile et de
mieux | avere dans les pays oil les voyageurs ont pen6tr<5; les | moeurs des
habitans, la religion, les usages, arts et
| sciences, commerce et manufactures;
| Par J. F. LaHarpe. | Nouvelle Edition, revue et corrigee avec le plus
grand soin, | et accompagneo d'un bel
atlas in-folio. | Tome premier [-vingt-
quatrieme]. |
La Harpe (J. F. de) — Continued.
A Paris, | chez Etienne Ledoux, libraire, | rue Guenegaud, N° 9. | 1820..
24 vols. 8°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above, vol.
23, pp. 286-290.
Copies seen: Congress.
According to Sabin's Dictionary, no. 38632,
there are editions: Paris, Achilla Jourdan, 1822,
30 vols. 8°; Paris, 1825, 30 vols. 8°; Lyon,
Rusand, 1829-30, 30 vols.8°.
Latham (Robert Gordon). Miscellaneous
contributions to the ethnography of
North America. By R. G. Latham, M. D.
In Philological Soc. fof London] Proc. vol. 2,
pp. 31-50 [London], 1846,8°.
Numerals 1-10 of the [Hailtsuk] language of
Fitzhugh Sound compared with the Blackfoot,
p. 38.
This article is reprinted in the same author's
Opuscula, pp. 275-297, for title of which see
below.
 On the languages of the Oregon territory.    By R. G. Latham, M. D.
In Ethnological Soc. of London Jour. vol. 1,
pp. 154-166, Edinburgh [1848], 8°.
Numerals 2-7,10 of the Fitz-Hugk Sound,
compared with the Haeltzuk and Billechoola,
p. 155.—Vocabulary (12 words) of the Nootka
(trom Cook) compared with the Tlaoquatch
(from Tolmie), p. 156.—Comparative vocabulary
(6 words) of Fuca (Maka, from Alcala Gaiiano),
Tlaoquatch (from Tolmie), and Wakash (from
Jewitt), p. 156.—List of words, showing affinities between the languages of Oregon and the
Eskimo, pp. 164-165, includes a few words of
Nootka, Tlaoquatch, and Haeltzuk.
This article is reprinted with added "notes"
in the same author's Opuscula, pp. 249-265, for
title of which see below.
 The | natural history | of | the varieties of man. | By | Robert Gordon
Latham, M. D., F. R. S., | late fellow
of King's college, Cambridge; | one of
the vice-presidents of tho Ethnological
society, London; | corresponding member to the Ethnological society, | New
York, etc. | [Monogram in shield.] |
London: | John Van Voorst, Paternoster row. | M. D. CCCL [1850].
Half-title verso blank 11. title verso names of
printers 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. preface
pp. vii-xi, bibliography pp. xiii-xv, explanation of plates verso blank 11. contents pp. xix-
xxviii, text pp. 1-566, index pp. 567-574, list of
works by Dr. Latham verso blank 11.8°. WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES.
41
Latham (R. G.) — Continued.
Division F, American Mongolidee (pp. 287-
400) includes a classification of the Haeltzuk
and Hailtsa, pp. 300-301; of the Nutkans, pp.
301-302.—Vocabulary (20 words) of the Chekeeli
and of the "Wakash (from Scouler), p. 315.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Congress, Eames.
-— The I ethnology | of | the British
colonies | and | dependencies, j By | R.
G. Latham, M. D., F. R. S., | corresponding member to the Ethnological
society, New York, | etc. etc. | [Monogram.] |
London: | John Van Voorst, Paternoster row. | M. DCCC. LI [1851].
Title verso names of printers 1 1. preface
verso blank 11. contents pp. v-vi, text pp. 1-264,
12".
Chapter vi. Dependencies in America (pp.
224-264), contains a linguistic classification of
the Indians, among thein the Nutka and the
Hailtsa, p. 247; of Fitz-Hugh Sound, p. 252.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Congress, Eames.
At the Squiersale, no. 635, a copy brought $1.
 On the languages of Northern, Western, and Central America. By R. G.
Latham, M. D.   (Read May the 9th.)
In Philological Soc. [of London] Trans. 1856,
pp. 57-115, London [1857], 8°.   (Congress.)
Numerals 2,3 in the language of Fitz-Hugh
Sound and of the Haeltzuk compared with the
Blackfeet, p. 65.—The Hailtsa; their habitat and
divisions, p. 72.—The Wakash, a brief account,
p. 73.
This article reprinted in the same author's
Opuscula, pp. 326-377, for title of which see
below.
■  Opuscula. | Essays | chiefly | philological and ethnographical | by | Robert Gordon Latham, | M. A., M. D.,F.
R, S., etc. | late fellow of Kings college,
Cambridge, late professor of English |
in University college, London, late
assistant physician | at the Middlesex
hospital. |
Williams & Norgate, | 14 Henrietta
street, Covent garden, London | and |
20 south Frederick street, Edinburgh.
| Leipzig, R. Hartmann. | 1860.
Title verso name of printer 1 1. preface pp.
iii-iv, contents pp. v-vi, text pp. 1-377, addenda
and corrigenda pp. 378-418,8°.
A reprint of a number of papers read before
the Ethnological and Philological societies of
London, among them some of those titled above,
as follows:
On the languages of the Oregon territory (pp.
249-265) contains tho linguistic material given
Latham (R. G.) —Continued.
under this title above on pp. 250-251,251-252,
252,260-262. The"notes" (pp. 263-265) contain
a comparative vocabulary of 20 words of the
Tlaoquatch and Nootka, with the Columbia
(from Scouler), p. 263.
Miscellaneous contributions to the ethnography of North America (pp. 275-297) contains
the numerals 1-10 of the [Hailtsuk] language of
Fitz-Hugh Sound, p. 283.
On the languages of Northern, "Western, and
Central America (pp. 326-377) contains the linguistic material given under this title above,
pp. 333, 339, 340.
Addenda and corrigenda, 1859 (pp. 378-418)
contains brief references to the linguistic place
of the Tlaoquatch, p. 378; to the Wakash,
Nutka, and Tlaoquatch. p. 388.
Copies seen: Astor, Boston Public, Brinton,
Bureau of Ethnology, Congress, Eames, Pilling,
Watfcinson.
At the Squier sale a presentation copy (no.
639 of the catalogue) brought $2.37. The Murphy copy, no. 1438, sold for $1.
—- Elements | of | comparative philology. | By | R. G. Latham, M. A., M. D.,
F. R. S., &c, | late fellow of King's college, Cambridge; and late professor of
English | in University college, London. |
London: Walton andMaberly,! Upper
Gower street, and Ivy lane, Paternoster
row; | Longman, Green, Longman,
Roberts, and Green, | Paternoster row.
| 1862. | The Right of Translation is
Reserved.
Half-title verso names of printers 1 1. title
verso blank 11. dedication verso blank 11. preface pp. vii-xi, contents pp. xiii-xx, tabular view
of languages and dialects pp. xxi-xxviii, chief
authorities pp. xxix-xxxii, errata verso blank 1
1. text pp. 1-752, addenda and corrigenda pp.
753-757, index pp. 758-774, list of works by Dr.
Latham verso blank 1 1.8°.
Chapter lv, Languages of America (pp. 384-
403) contains: A brief discussion of the Hailtsa,
with a vocabulary (14 words and numerals 1-
10), pp. 401-402; comparative vocabulary (50
words and numerals 1-10) of the Nsietskawus,
Watlala, and Nutka, pp. 402-403.
Copies seen.- Astor, British Museum, Bureau
of Ethnology, Congress, Eames, Watkinson.
Robert Gordon Latham, the eldest son of the
Rev. Thomas Latham, was born in the vicarage
of Billiugsborough, Lincolnshire, March 24,
1812. In 1819 he was entered at Eton. Twoyears
afterwards he was admitted on the foundation,
and in 1829 went to Kings, where he took his
fellowship and degrees. Ethnology was his
first passion and his last, though for botany
he had a very strong taste. He died March 9,
1888.—Theodore Watts,inThe AthenceumtMarch
17, 1888. 42
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OP   THE
Le  Conte  (Dr.   John Lawrence).    See
Haldemann (S. S.)
Lekwihoq:
Vocabulary See Boas (F.)
Lemmens(T. N.)and Enssen (F.) T.N.
Lemmens. 1888. [ A vocabulary | of |
the Clayoquot Sound | Language.    (*)
Manuscript, pp. 1-218, folio, in possession of
the Bishop of Alaska, Victoria, B. C.
English-Clayoquot vocabulary, pp. 1-211.—
The verb, pp. 212-218.
Title from Dr. Franz Boas, who informs me
that the rectos of pp. 3-43 are in the Kyoquot
dialect, and were written bv Mr. Enssen.
Lord's prayer:
Hailtsuk
Kwakiutl
Kwakiutl
Nutka
See Tate (C. M.)
Bergholtz (G.F.)
Eost (E.)
Brabant (A.J.)
Lubbock (Sir John). The | origin of
civilisation | and the | primitive condition of man. | Mental and social condition of savages. | By | sir John Lubbock, Bart., M. P., F. R. S. | author
[&c. two lines.] |
London: | Longmans, Green, and co.
| 1870.
Half-title verso names of printers 1 1. frontispiece 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. prefaco pp. v-
viii, contents p. ix, list of illustrations pp. xi-
xii, list of principal works quoted pp. xiii-xvi,
text pp. 1-323, appendix pp. 325-362, notes pp.
363-365, index pp. 367-380, four other plates, 8°.
A few words in the Nootka language, p. 288.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Congress, Eames, Harvard.
 The | origin of civilisation | and the
| primitive condition of man. | Mental
and social condition of savages. | By |
sir John Lubbock, Bart., M. P., F. R. S.
| author[&c. two lines.] |
New York: | D. Apploton and company, 190, 92 & 94 Grand street. 11870.
Half-title verso blank 11. frontispiece 11. title
verso blank 11. preface to the American edition
pp. iii-iv, preface pp. v-viii, contents p. ix,
illustrations pp. xi-xii, list of principal works
quoted pp. xiii-xvi, text pp. 1-323, appendix pp.
325-362, notes pp. 363-365, index pp. 367-380, four
other plates, 12°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Harvard, Pilling.
 The | origin of civilisation | and the
| primitive condition of man. | Mental
and social condition of savages. | By |
Sir John Lubbock, Bart., M. P., F. R. S.
| author   [&c.   two   lines.] |  Second
edition, with additions. |
Lubbock (J.) —Continued.
London: | Longmans, Green, and co.
| 1870.
Half-title verso names of printers 11. frontispiece 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. preface pp. v-
viii, contents pp. ix-xiii, illustrations pp. xv-
xvi, list of principal works quoted pp. xvii-xx,
text pp. 1-367, appendix 364J-409, notes pp. 411-
413, index pp. 415-426, list of books 11. five other
plates, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above, p.
327.
Copies seen: British Museum, Eames, Harvard.
 The | origin of civilisation | and the
| primitive condition of man. | Mental
and social condition of savages. | By |
sir John Lubbock, Bart., M. P., F. R.
S. | vice-chancellor [efce. three lines.]
| Third edition, with numerous additions. |
London: | Longmans, Green, and co.
| 1875.
Half-title verso name of printer 1 1. frontispiece 11. title verso blank 11. preface pp. v-viii,
contents pp. ix-xiii, illustrations pp. xv-xvi,
list of the principal works quoted pp. xvii-xx,
text pp. 1-463, appendix pp. 465-507, notes pp.
509-514, index pp. 515 -528, five other plates, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above, p.
417.
Copies seen: British Museum, Eames.
 The | origin of civilisation | and the
| rjrimitive condition of man. | Mental
and social condition of savages. | By |
Sir John Lubbock, Bart. M. P. F. R. S.
| D.C. L. LL. D. | president [&c. five
lines.] | Fourth edition, with numerous
additions. |
London: | Longmans, Green, and co.
| 1882.
Half-title verso list of works " by the same
author " 11. frontispiece 11. title verso names of
printers 1 1. preface pp. v-viii, contents pp. ix-
xiii, illustrations pp. xv-xvi, list of the principal works quoted pp. xvii-xx, text pp. 1-480,
appendix pp. 481-524, notes pp. 525-533, index
pp. 535 -548, five other plates, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above, p.
427.
Copies seen: Boston Athenaeum, Eames,
Harvard.
 The | origin of civilisation | and the
| primitive condition of man | Mental
and social condition of savages | By |
sir John Lubbock, bart. | M. P., F. R.
S., D. C. L., LL. D. | author [.fee. four
lines] | Fifth Edition, with numerous
Additions \ WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES.
43
Lubbock (J.) —Continued.
London | Longmans, Green, and co |
1889 | All rights reserved
Half-title verso names of printers 11. frontispiece 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. preface (dated
February, 1870) pp. vii-x, contents pp. xi-xvi,
illustrations pp. xvii-xviii, list of principal
works quoted pp. xix-xxiii, text pp. 1-486,
appendix pp. 487-529, notes pp. 531-539, index
pp. 541-554, list of works by the same author
verso blank 1 1. five other plates, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above, p.
432.
Copies seen : Eames.
Ludewig (Hermann Ernst). The | literature | of | American aboriginal languages. | By [ Hermann E. Ludewig. |
With additions and corrections | by
professor Wm. W. Turner. | Edited by
Nicolas Triibner. |
London:! Triibner and co., 60, Paternoster row. | MDCCCLVIII [1858].
Half-title "Triibner's bibliotheca glottica
I" verso blank 1 1. title as above verso name of
printer 1 1. preface pp. v-viii, contents verso
blank 1 1. editor's advertisement pp. ix-xii, biographical memoir pp. xiii-xiv, introductory
bibliographical notices pp. xv-xxiv, text pp. 1-
209, addenda, pp. 210-246, index pp. 247-256,
errata pp. 257-258,8°. Arranged alphabetically
by languages. Addenda by Wm.'W, Turnerand
Nicolas Triibner, pp. 210-246.
Contains a listof grammars and vocabularies
of American languages and among them those
of the following peoples:
American languages generally, pp. xv-xxiv;
Fuca Strait, p. 74; Haeeltzuk, Hailtsa, p. 80;
Naas (including some "Wakashan), p. 130;
Nutka, Wakash, pp. 135-136, 233; Tlaoquatch,
p.188.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Congress,
Eames, Pilling.
At the Fischer sale, no. 990, a copy brought 5s.
6d.; at the Field sale, no. 1403, $2.63; at the
Squiersale, no. 699, $2.62; another copy, no. 1906,
$2.38. Priced by Leclerc, 1878, no. 2075, 15 fr.
The Pinart copy, no. 565, sold for 25 fr., and
the Murphy copy, no. 1540, for $2.50.
"Dr. Ludewig has himself so fully detailed
the plan and purport of this work that little
more remains for me to add beyond the mere
statement of tho origin of my connection with
the publication and the mention of such additions for which I alone am responsible, and
which, during its progress through the press,
have gradually accumulated to about one-sixth
of the whole. This is but an act of justice to the
memory of Dr. Ludewig, because at the time of
his death, in December, 1856, no more than 172
pages were printed off, and these constitute the
only portion of the work which had the benefit
of his valuable personal and final revision.
"Similarityof pursuits led,during my stay
Ludewig (H. E.) — Continued.
in New York in 1855, to an intimacy with Dr.
Ludewig, during which he mentioned that he,
like myself, had been making bibliographical
memoranda for years of all books which serve
to illustrate the history of spoken language.
As a first section of a more extended work on
the literary history of language generally, he
had prepared a bibliographical memoir of the
remains of the aboriginal languages of America.
The manuscript had been deposited by him in
the library of the Ethnological Society at New
York, but at my request he at once most kindly
placed it at my disposal, stipulating only that
it should be printed in Europe, under my personal superintendence.
" Upon my return to England, I lost no time
in carrying out the trust thus confided to me,
intending then to confine myself simply to producing acorrectcopy of my friend's manuscript.
But it soon became obvious that the transcript
had been hastily made, and but for the valuable
assistance of literary friends, both in this
country and in America, the work would probably have been abandoned. My thanks aremore
particularly doe to Mr. E. G. Sqnier, and to
Prof. William W. Turner, of Washington, by
whose considerate and valuable cooperation
many difficulties were cleared away and my editorial labors greatly lightened. This encouraged
me to spare neither personal labor nor expense
in the attempt to render the work as perfect as
possible, with what success must be left to
the judgmentof those who can fairly appreciate
the labors of a pioneer in any new field of literary research."—Editor's advertisement.
"Dr. Ludewig, though but little known in
this country [England], was held in consider-
ableesteem as a jurist, both in Germany and the
United States of America. Born at Dresden in
1809, with but little exception ho continued to
reside in his native city until 1844, when he emigrated to America; but, though in both countries he practiced law as a profession, his bent
was the study of literary history, which was
evidenced by his ' Livre des Ana, Essai de Catalogue Manuel,' published at his own cost in 1837,
and by his ' Bibliothekonomie,' which appeared
a few years later.
'' But even whilst thus engaged he delighted
in investigating the rise and progress of the land
of his subsequent adoption, and his researches
into the vexed question of tho origin of the peopling of America gained him the highest consideration, on both sides of the Atlantic, as a man
of original and inquiring mind. He was a
contributor to Naumann's 'Serapasuui;' and
amongst the chief of his contributions to that
journal may be mentioned those on 'American
Libraries,' on the 'Aids to American Bibliography,' and on the 'Book Trade of the United
States of America.' In 1846 appeared his 'Literature of American Local History,' a work of
much importance and which required no small
amount of labor and perseverance, owing to the
necessity of consulting the many and widely 44
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
Ludewig (H. E.) — Continued.
scattered materials, which had to be sought out
from Apparently the most unlikely channels.
" These studies formed a natural induction
to the present work on 'The Literature of
American Aboriginal Languages,' which occupied his leisure concurrently with the others,
and the printing of which was commenced in
August, 1856, but which he did not live to see
launched upon the world; for at the date of his
death, on the 12th of December following, only
172 pages were in type. It had been a labor of
love with him for years; and, if ever author
were mindful of the nonum prematurin annum,
he was when he deposited his manuscript in the
library of the American Ethnological Society,
diffident himself as to its merits and value on a
subject of such paramount interest. He had
satisfied himself that in due time the reward of
his patient industry might be the production of
some more extended national work on the subject, and with this he was contented; for it was
a distinguishing feature in his character, notwithstanding his great and varied knowledge
and brilliant acquirements, to disregard his
own toil, even amounting to drudgery if need-
Ludewig(H. E.) — Continued.
ful, if he could in any way assist in the promulgation of literature and science.
" Dr. Ludewig was a corresponding member
of many of the most distinguished European
and American literary societies, and few men
were held in greater consideration by scholars
both in America and Germany, as will readily be
' acknowledged should his voluminous correspondence ever see the light. In private life lie
was distinguished by the best qualities which
endear a man's memory to those who survive
him; he was a kind and affectionate husband
and a sincere friend. Always accessible and
ever ready to aid and counsel those who applied
to him for advice upon matters appertaining to
literature, his loss will long be felt by a most
extended circle of friends, and in him Germany
mourns one of the best representatives of her
learned men in America, a genuine type of a class
in which, with singular felicity, to genius
of the highest order is combined a painstaking
and plodding perseverance but seldom met with
beyond the confines of' the Fatherland.' "—Bio-
graphic memoir.
M.
Maclean (Rev. John). Indian languages
and literature in Manitoba, North-west
Territories and British Columbia.
In Canadian Institute, Proc. third series, vol.
5, pp. 215-218, Toronto, 1888, 8°.    (Pilling.)
Contains (1) list of languages in Manitoba,
Keewatin, and North-west Territories; (2) languages in British Columbia; and (3) the languages of which vocabularies and grammars
have been published, the authors and place of
publication.
 The Indians | their manners and customs. | By | John McLean,M. A.,Ph.D.
| (Robin Rustler.) | With Eighteen
full-page Illustrations. |
Toronto: | William Briggs, 78 & 80
King street east. | C. W. Coates, Montreal.    S.F.Huestis, Halifax. | 1889.
Frontispiece 1 1.title verso copyright notice
1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. preface pp. vii-
viii, contents pp. ix-x, list of illustrations verso
blank 1 1. text pp. 13-351,12°.
Indian languages and literature, pp. 235-258.
Copies seen.- Eames, Pilling, Powell.
Rev. John Maclean was born in Kilmarnoch,
Ayrshire, Scotland, Oct. 30,1852; came to Canada in 1873. and was graduated B. A. from Victoria University,Cobourg,Ontario. Some years
afterward his alma mater conferred on him tlie
degree of M. A. In 1874 lie entered the ministry
of the Methodist church. In 1880, at Hamilton,
Ontario, he was ordained for special work among
Maclean (J.) — Continued,
the Blackfoot Indians, leaving in June of the
same year for Fort McLeod, Northwest Territory, accompanied by his wife. At this point
were gathered about 700 Blood Indians, which
number was subsequently increased by the
arrival of Bloods and Blackfeet from Montana
to 3,500. Mr. Maclean settled upon the reserve
set apart for these Indians and diligently set to
work to master their language, history, etc
and on these, subjects he has published a mini
her of articles in the magazines and society
publications. At the request of the anthropo-
logical committee of the British Association for
the Advancement of Science, Dr. Maclean has
for several years prepared notes on the language,
customs, and traditions of the Blackfoot Confederacy, and the results of this labor are partly
given in one of the reports of the committee.
Although burdened with the labors of a missionary, he found time to prepare a post-graduate coursein history and took the degree of Pb.
D. at the Wesleyan University, Bloomington,
111., in 1888. Besides the articles which have
appeared under his own name, Dr. Maclean has
written extensively £or the press under the nom
de plume of Kobin Hustler. He is now (February, 1894) stationed at Port Arthur, Ontario,
Canada, having left the Indian work in July,
1889. He was for several years inspector of
schools, and a member of the hoard of education and of the board of examiners for the
Northwest Territory.
Mr. Maclean is engaged in the preparation of WAKASHAN   LANGUAGES.
45
Maclean (J.) — Continued.
a series of letters, to be published under the
title "Canadian Savage Folk," which will
include chapters on the languages and literature
of these people.
Maisonneuve: This word following a title or
within parentheses after a note indicates that a
copy of the work referred to has been seen by
the compiler in the bookstore of Maisonneuve
ct Cie, Paris, France.
Maka. Vocabulary of 200 words of the
Makah Indians of Oregon; from a chief
at San Francisco.
Manuscript, 3 pages folio; formerly in the library of the late Dr. J. G. Shea, Elizabeth, N. J.
Maka:
General discussion See Eells (M.)
Geographic names Eells (M.)
Geographic names Swan (J. G.)
Numerals Bartlett (J. E.)
Numerals Eells (M.)
Numerals Gibbs (G.)
Maka —Continued.
Numerals See
Numerals
Proper names
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Marchand (Etienne).
P.C. de).
Massachusetts Historical Society: These words
following a title or within parentheses after a
note indicate that a copy of the work referred
to has been seen by the compiler in the library
of that society, Boston, Mass.
Millbank Sound Indians,    See Hailtsuk.
Grant (W. C.)
Haldemann(S. S,)
Swan (J. G.)
Bartlett (J. E.)
Buschmann (J. C. E./
Gaiiano (D. A.)
Gallatin (A.)
Gibbs (G.)
Knipe (C.)
Latham (E.G.)
Maka.
Pinart(A.L.)
Swan (J. G.)
See Fleurieu (C.
.N.
National Museum : These words following a title
or within parentheses after a note indicate that
a copy of the work referred to has been seen
by the compiler in the library of that institution, Washington, D. C.
New York Historical Society: These words following a title or within parentheses after a note
indicate that a copy of the work referred to has
been seen by the compiler in the library of that
society, New York City.
Nitinat:
General discussion See Knipe (C.)
Numerals
Numerals
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Niwiti:
Vocabulary
ATocabulary
.Words
Grant (W.C.)
Knipe (C.)
Knipe (C.)
Pinart(A.L.)
Sproat (G.M.)
See Gallatin (A.)
Knipe (C.)
Pott (A. F.)
Norris (Philetus W.) The | calumet of
theCoteau, and other : poetical legends
of the border. | Also, | a glossary of
Indian names, words, and western pro.
vincialisms. | Together with | a guidebook | of the | Yellowstone national
park. By P. W. Norris,| five years superintendent of the Yellowstone national
park. | All rights reserved. |
Philadelphia: | J. B. Lippincott &
co. 1 1883.
Frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyright notice 1
1. dedication verso blank 1 1. poem verso blank
Norris (P. W.) — Continued.
1 1. introduction pp. 9-12, contents pp. 13-14,
illustrations verso blank 1 1. text pp. 17-170,
notes pp. 171-221. glossary pp. 223-233, guide
book pp. 235-275, map, sm. 8°.
Glossary of Indians words and provincialisms, pp. 223-233, contains a number of terms in
the Nootka language.
Copies seen: National Museum, Pilling,
Powell.
Numerals:
Hailtsuk
Sec Boas (F.)
Hailtsuk
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Hailtsuk
Eells (M.)
Hailtsuk
Latham (E. G.)
Klaokwat
Buschmann (J. 0. E.)
Kwakiutl
Boas (F.)
Maka
Bartlett (J. R.)
Maka
Eells (M.)
Maka
Gibbs (G.)
Maka
Grant (W.C.)
Maka
naldemann (S. S.)
Nitinat
Grant (W.C.)
Nitinat
Knipe (C.)
Nutka
Adelung (J. C.)
Nutka
Anderson (W.)
Nutka
Bourgoing (J. F.)
Nutka
Classical.
Nutka
Cook (J.)
Nutka
Dixon (G.)
Nutka
Duflot de Mofras (E.)
Nutka
Fleurieu (C.P.C.de).
Nutka
Haines (E. M.)
Nutka
Humboldt (F. von).
Nutka
Kerr (E.)
Nutka
Knipe (C.)
Nutka
LaHarpe (J. F. de). 46
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
imerals — Contii
med.
Nutka —Cont
nned.
Nutka                  See Pott (A. F.)
Vocabulary
See Balbi (A.)
Nutka
Roquefeuil (C. de).
Vocabulary
Boas (F.)
Tokoaat
Eells (M.)
Vocabulary
Brabant (A.J.)
Tokoaat
Knipe (C.)
Vocabulary
Bulmer (T. S.)
Tokoaat
ka:
Sproat (G.M.)
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Buschmann (J. C- E.)
Campbell (J.)
Cook (J.) aud King (J.)
Catechism             Se
B Brabant (A.J.)
Vocabulary
Ellis (W.)
General discussion
Balbi (A.)
Vocabulary
Forster (J.G. A.)
General discussion
Bancroft (H. H.)
Vocabulary
Fry (E.)
General discussion
Buschmann (J. C. B.)
Vocabulary
Gaiiano (D. A.)
<*
General discussion
Gatschet (A. S.)
Vocabulary
Gallatin (A.)
General discussion
Gibbs (G).
Vocabulary
Gibbs (G.)
General discussion
Jehan (L. F.)
Vocabulary
Haines (E.M.)
General discussion
Latham (R.G.)
Vocabulary
Hale (H.)
General discussion
Prichard (J. C.)
Vocabulary
Humboldt (F.von).
General discussion
Roquefeuil (C. de).
Vocabulary
Jehan (L.F.)
Gentes
Boas (F.)
Vocabulary
Jewitt (J. R.)
Grammatic treatise
Brabant (A.J.)
Vocabulary
Kerr (R.)
Grammatic treatise
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Vocabulary
Kuipe (C.)
Grammatic treatise
Featherman (A.)
Vocabulary
La Harpe (J. F. de).
Lord's prayer
Brabant (A.J.)
Vocabulary
Latham (R.G.)
Numerals
Adelung (J.C-)
Vocabulary
Pablo (J. E. S.)
Numerals
Anderson (W.)
Vocabulary
Quimper (M.)
Numerals
Bourgoing (J. F.)
Vocabulary
Scouler (J.)
Numerals
Classical.
Vocabulary
Sproat (M.)
Numerals
Cook (J.) and King (J.)
Vocabulary
Swan (J. G.)
Numerals
Dixon (G.)
Vocabulary
Yankiewitch (F.)
Numerals
Duflot de Mofras (E.)
Words
Bachiller y Morales (A.)
Numerals
Fleurieu (C. P. C.de).
Words
Bancroft (H.H.)
Numerals
Haines (K.J.)
Words
Boas (F.)
Numerals
Humboldt (F. von).
Words
Bulmer (T.S.)
Numerals
Kerr <R.)
Words
Daa (L. K.)
•
Numerals
Knipe (C)
Words
Eells (M.)
Numerals
La Harpe (J. F. de).
Words
Ellis (R.)
Numerals
Pott (A. F.)
Words
Featherman (A.)
Numerals
Roquefeuil (C.de).
Words
Gibbs (G.)
Prayers
Brabant (A.J.)
Words
Hale (H.)
Prayers
Seghers (C.J.)
Words
Jewitt (J. R.)
Proper names
Quimper (M.)
Words
Latham (R. G.)
Songs
Boas (F.)
Words
Lubbock (J.)
Songs
Jewitt (J. R.)
Words
Norris (P.W.)
Text
Brabant (A.J.)
Words
Pott (A. F.)
Vocabulary
Adelung (J. C.)
Words
Prichard (J.C.)
Vocabulary
Anderson (W.)
Words
Swan (J.G.)
Vocabulary
Armstrong (A.N.)
Words
Uniery (J.) WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES.
47
Pablo (Juan Eugenio Santelizes). [Vocabularies of the Nutka language.] (*)
Manuscript, 11.1-53, folio, in the library of
the British Museum (additional MS. 17631).
The following description ha* been furnished
me by Mr. R, Nisbet Bain of the above-named
library:
The vocabularies in the above volume were
compiled by Juan Eugenio Santelizes Pablo,
at the request of Don Josef de Espinoza, to
whom he addresses an introductory letter (f. 1),
dated Mexico, 16 March, 1791, in which he
states there is no connection between the dialects of the Sandwich Islands, Nutka, and
Mexico.
The first five vocabularies are headed as
follows:
1. Vocab.   Castellano - Nutketio - Mexicano.
Contains about 100 words, f. 4.
2. Vocab.   Castellano-Nutkcfio-Sandwich -
Mexicano. Contains about 80 words, f. 6.
3. Vocab. Castellano - Sandwich-Mexicano.
Contains about 250 words, f. 8.
4. Vocab.    .    .   .   de los Indias de Nootka.
Contains about 350 words, f. 12.
5. Vocab. del Idioma de los Naturales del
Principe Guillermo cituado   .   .   .   &c.
Contains about 80 words, f. 15.
Those described above are all copies of the
originals.
6. Another copy of No. 4, the Spanish words
being placed before the Nutka, f. 17.
7. A copy of part of No. 5, f. 21.
8. Vocab.    Castellano - Nutka - Sandwich   y
Mexicano; apparently contains all the
words in Nos. 1 to 4 in alphabetic order,
f.22.
9-14. [Vocabularies which do not relate to
North America], ff. 30-53.
I am inclined to thinkthe vocabularies of the
northwest coast are taken from Cook and King.
Petitot (Pf)re I^mile Fortune" Stanislas
Joseph). Monographic | des | Dene-
Diudjie* | par | le r. p. E. Petitot | Mis-
sionnaire-Oblat de Marie-Immaculee,
Officier d'Aeadeuiie, | Membre corre-
spondant de l'Acade'mie de Nancy, | de
la Soci6t6d?Anthropologie | et Membre
honoraire de la Socie'te' de Philologie
et d'Ethnographie de Paris. |
Paris | Ernest Leroux, Editeur | libraire de la socie'te' Asiatique de Paris,
| de l'e'cole des langues orientales vivantes etdes societe's Asiatiques de Calcutta, | deNew-Haven (l5tats-ITnis),de
Shanghai (Chine) | 28, rue Bonaparte,
28 | 1876
Cover title as above, half-title verso name of
printer 1 1. title as above verso blank 1 l.tcxt
pp.l-109,list of publications 11. 8°.
P.
Petitot (£. F. S.J.) —Continued.
Verbal conjugations of the Yukulta (to eat
and to drink), p. 104.—Vocabulary (8 words) of
the Yukulta, p. 105. Material furnished by
Pere Fouquet.
Copies seen: Astor, Brinton, Eames, Pilling.
 De la formation du langage;  mots
forme's par le redoublement de racines
he'te'rogenes, quoique de signification
synonyrne, e'est-a-dire par reiteration
copulative.
In Association frangaise pour l'avancoment
des sciences, compte-rendu,12thsession (Rouen,
1883), pp. 697-701, Paris, 1884, 8°. (Geological
Survey, Pilling.)
Contains examples in a number of North
American languages, among them the Vokultat.
Emile Fortune Stanislas Joseph Petitot was
born December 3,1838, at Grancey-le-Chateau,
department of Cote-d'Or, Burgundy, France.
His studies were pursued at Marseilles, first at
the Institution St. Louis and later at the higher
seminary of Marseilles, which he entered in 1857.
He was made deacon at Grenoble, and priest at
Marseilles March 15,186i. A few days thereafter
hewenttoEnglandand sailed for America. At
Montreal he found MonseigneurTachc, bishop
of St. Boniface, with whom he set out for the
Northwest, where he was continuously engaged
in missionary work among the Indians and
Eskimos until 1874, when he returned to France
to supervise the publication of some of his
works on linguistics and geography. In 1876
he returned to the missions and spent another
period of nearly six years in the Northwest.
In 1882 he once more returned to his native
country, where he has siuce remained. In 1886
he was appointed to the curacy of Mareuil
les Meaux, which he still retains. The many
years he spent in the inhospitable Northwest
were busy and eventful ones, and afforded an
opportunity for geographic, linguistic, and ethnologic observations and studies such as few
have enjoyed. He was the first missionary
to visit Great Bear Lake, which he did for the
first time in 1866. He went on foot from Good
Hope to Providence twice, and made many
tours in winter of forty or fifty days' length on
snowshoes. He was the first missionary to the
Eskimos of the Northwest, having visited them
in 1865, at the mouth of the Anderson, again in
1868 at the mouth of the Mackenzie, and in 1870
and again in 1877 at Fort McPherson on Peel
River. In 1870 his travels extended into
Alaska. In 1878 illness cansed him to return
south. He went on foot to Athabasca, whence
he passed to the Saskatchewan in a bark. In
1879 he established the mission of St. Raphael,
at Angling Lake, for the Chippewyans of that
region; there he remained until his final departure for France in January, 1882.
Father  Petitot  has  done much linguistic 48
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
Petitot (£. F. S. J.) —Continued.
work among the Eskimauan, Algonquian. and
Athapascan peoples, for an account of which see
the bibliographies of those families of speech.
Pilling: This word following a title or within parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of
the work referred to is in the possession of the
compiler of this bibliography.
Pilling (James Constantine).   Smithsonian institution—Bureau of ethnology |
J.W. Powell director | Proof-sheets | of
a | bibliography | of | the  languages |
of the | North American Indians \ by |
James  Constantine  Pilling | (Distributed only to collaborators) |
Washington | Government printing
office | 1885
Title verso blank 1 1. notice signed J. W.
Powell p. iii, preface pp.v-viii, introduction pp.
ix-x, list of authorities pp. xi-xxxvi, list of
libraries referred to by initials pp. xxxvii-
xxxviii, list of facsimiles pp. xxxix-xl, text pp.
1-839, additions and corrections pp. 841-1090,
index of languages and dialects pp. 1091-1135,
plates, 4°.
Arranged alphabetically by name of author,
translator, or first word of title. One hundred
and ten copies printed, ten of them on one side
of the sheet only.
Pinart (Alphonse L.) [Linguistic material relating to the Wakashan languages.] (*)
Some years ago, in response to a request of
mine for a list of the manuscript linguistic
material collected by him, Mr. Pinart wrote me
as follows:
"I have collected, during my fifteen years of
traveling, vocabularies, texts, songs, etc., general linguistic materials, in the following languages or dialects. It is impossible at present
to give you the number of pages, etc., as most
of it is to bo found among my note-books, and
has not been put in shape as yet."
Among the languages mentioned by Mr.
Pinart were the Nitinaht, Makah, and the tribes
of Vancouver Island.
Pott (August Friedrich). Die j quinare
und vigesimale | Zahlmethode | bei
Volkern aller Welttheile. | Nebst aus-
fiihrlichereii Bermerkungen | liber die
Zahlworter Indogermanischen Stainmes
| und oinem Anhange iiber Fingcrna-
nien. Aron | Dr. August Friedrich Pott,
| ord. Prof. [~&c. four lines.] |
Halle, | C. A. Schwetschke und Sohn,
| 1847.
Cover title nearly as above, title as above
verso blank 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. dedicatory notice 1 1. preface pp. vii-viii, text pp.
1-304,8°.
Pott (A. F.) — Continued.
Many North American languages are represented by numerals, finger names, etc., among
them the Indians of Nootka Sound, p. 304.
Copies seen: Astor, Boston Public, British
Museum, Eames, Watkinson.
—— Doppelung | (Reduplikatiou, Gemination) |als | eines der wichtigsten Bil-
dnngsmittel der Sprache, j beleuchtet |
aus Sprachen aller AVelttheile | durch |
Aug. Friedr. Pott, Dr. | Prof, der Allge-
meinen Sprachwiss. an der Univ. zu
Halle [&c. two lines.] |
Lemgo & Detmold, | im Verlage der
Meyer'schen Hof buchhandluug 1862.
Cover title as above, title as above verso quotation 1 1. preface pp. iii-iv, contents pp. v-vi,
text pp. 1-304, list of books on verso of back
cover, 8°.
Contains examples of reduplication in many
North American languages, among thoin the
Newitee, pp. 36, 90; Noutka or Wakash, p. 36;
Nootka Sound, pp. 43, 58.
Copiesseen : Astor, British Museum, Eames.
 Einleitungin die allgemeine Sprach-
wissenschaft.
In Internationale Zeitschrift fur allgemeine
Sprachwissenschaft, vol. 1. pp. 1-68, 329-354,vol.
2, pp. 54-115, 209-251; vol. 3, pp. 110-126, 249-275;
Supp., pp. 1-193; vol. 4, pp. 67-96; vol. 5, pp. 3-18,
Leipzig, 1884-1887, and Heilbronn, 1889, large 8Q.
(Bureau of Ethnology.)
The literature of American linguistics, vol. 4,
pp. 67-96. This portion was published after Mr,
Pott's death, which occurred July 5,1887. Tho
genera] editor of the Zeitschrift, Mr. Techmer,
states in a note that Pott's paper is continued
from the manuscripts which be left, and that it
is to close with the languages of Australia. In
the section of American linguistics publications in all the more important stocks of North
America are mentioned, with brief characterization.
Powell: This word following a title or within parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of
the work referred to has been seen by the compiler in the library of Major J. W. Powell,
Washington, D. C.
Powell (Maj. John AVesley). Indian
linguistic families of America north of
Mexico.
In Bureau of Ethnology, Seventh Annual
Report, pp. 1-142, Washington, 1891, royal 8°.
The Wakashan family, with a list of synonyms and principal tribes, derivation of the
name, habitat, etc., pp. 128-131.
Issued separately with title-page as follows:
 Indian linguistic families of America
| north of Mexico | by | J.W.Powell |
Extract from the seventh annual report
of the Bureau of ethnology  [Vignette] | WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES.
49
Powell (J. W.) —Continued.
Washington | Government printing
office | 1891
Cover title aa above, no inside title, half-title
p. 1, contents etc. pp. 3-6. text pp. 7-142, map,
royal 8°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Eames,
Pilling, Powell.
 Department of the interior. | U. S.
geographical and geological survey of
the Rocky mountain region. | J. AV.
Powell, Geologist in Charge. | Contributions | to | North American ethnology. | Volume I[-VII], | [Seal of the
department.] |
Washington: | Government printing
office. | 1877[-1890].
7 vols. (vol. 2 in two parts), 4°.
Dall (W. H.), Tribes of the extreme northwest, vol. 1, pp. 1-157.
Copies seen: Astor, Bureau of Ethnology,
Eames, Harvard, Pilling, Powell, Trumbull.
Prayer book :
Kwakiutl See Hall (A. J.)
Prayers:
Nutka See Brabant (A. J.)
Nutka Seghers (C. J.)
Prichard (James Cowles).   Researches |
into the | physical   history | of | Mankind. | By | James Co wles Prichard, M.
D. | Second edition. | In two volumes.
| Vol. I[-II]. |
London: | printed for John and Arthur Arch, | Cornhill. j 1826.
2 vols.: frontispiece 1 1. title verso name of
printer 11. dedication verso blank 1 1. preface
pp. v-viii, contents of both volumes pp. ix-xxx,
explanation of plates pp. xxxi-xxxii, text pp.
1-523, notes pp. 525-529, index of nations pp.
531-544, nine other plates; title verso name of
printer 1 1. text pp. 1-613, note pp. 614-G23,
plate, 8°.
General discussion of the Yucuatl or Nootka
(vol. 2, pp. 375-379) contains remarks on their
language, and a few words of Mexican and
Nootka compared, p. 379.
Copies seen; British Museum, Eames,
Geological Survey, Harvard.
The first edition, London, 1813,8°, contains
no linguistics.    (British Museum.)
 Researches | into the | physical history | of | mankind. | By | James Cowles
Prichard, M. D. F. R. S. M. R. I. A. | corresponding member [&c. three lines.]
| Third edition. | Vol. I[-V]. |
London: |  Sherwood,   Gilbert,   and
Piper, | Paternoster row; | and J. and
A. Arch, | Cornhill. | 1836[-1847].
WAK 4
Prichard (J. C.) —Continued.
5 vols. 8°. The words " Third edition," which
are included on the titles of vols. 1-4 (dated
respectively 1836,1837,1841,1844), are not on the
title of vol. 5. Vol. 3 was originally issued with a
title numbered "Vol. III.—Part I." This title
was afterward canceled Smd a new one (numbered "Vol. III.") substituted in its place. Vol.
I was reissued with a new title containing the
words "Fourth edition" and bearing the imprint," London: | Sherwood, Gilbert, and Piper,
| Paternoster row. | 1841." (Astor); and again
"Fourthedition. | Vol.1, j London: | Houlston
and Stoneman, | 65, Paternoster row. | 1851."
(Congress, Eames.) Volume 2 also appeared
in a "Fourth edition," with the latter imprint
and date (Eames). These several issues differ
only in the insertion of new titles in tho places
of the original titles.
On tho languages of the nations inhabiting
the western coast of North America (vol. 5, pp.
435-441) includes a brief discussion of the
Nootka-Columbians, pp. 435-437, with a few (5)
examples of the Nootka compared with the
Mexican, pp. 438-439.
Copies seen: Bancroft, Boston Athenaeum,
Congress, Eames, Lenox.
 Naturgeschichte  |  des | Menschen-
geschlechts; von | James Cowles Prichard, | Med. D. f&c. three lines."] | Nach
der [&c. three lines.] | von | Dr. Rudolph Wagner, | [&c. one line.] jErster
[-Vierter] Band. \
Leipzig, | verlag von Leopold Bosk.
| 1840[-1848].
4 vols.; vol. 4 in two parts, 12°. A translation
of the 5 vol. edition of the Physical History.
Discussion of American languages, vol. 4, pp.
311-341,357-363,458.
Copies seen.- British Museum.
 The | natural   history | of | man; |
comprising | inquiries into the modifying influence of | physical and moral
agencies | on the different tribes of the
human family. | By | James Cowles
Prichard, M.D. F. R. S. M.R. LA. |
corresponding member [&c. five lines.]
| With | Thirty-six Coloured and Four
Plain Illustrations | engraved on steel,
| and ninety engravings on wood. |
London: ] H. Bailliere, 219 Regent
street; | foreign bookseller [&c. two
lines.] | Paris: J. B. Bailliere,libraire,
rne de FEcole de Medecine. | Leipsic:
T.O.Weigel. | 1843.
Half-title verso note 1 1. frontispiece 11. title
verso names of printers 11. dedication pp. v-vi,
advertisement pp. vii-viii, explanation of
engravings on steel p. ix, index to engravings
on wood p. x, contents pp. xi-xvi, text pp. 1=
546, index pp. 547-556, 8°. 50
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
Prichard (J. C.) — Continued.
Brief references to tho Nootka-Columbian
and Haeltzuk peoples, pp. 413-415.
Copies seen: Boston Athenaeum, British
Museum, Eames, Harvard.
■ The | natural history | of |   man; |
comprising | inquiries into the modifying influence of | physical and moral
agencies | on the different tribes of the
human family. | By | James Cowles
Prichard, M.D., F. R. S., M.R.I. A. |
corresponding member [&.c. seven
lines.] | Second edition, enlarged, | with
| Forty-four Coloured and Five Plain
Illustrations | engraved on steel, | and
ninety-seven engravings on wood. |
London: | Hippolyte Bailliere, publisher, 219 Regent street; 1 foreign hook-
seller to the Royal college of surgeons,
| and to the Royal medico-chirnrgical
society. | Paris: J. B. Bailliere, libraire
do l'Academie royale de medecine. |
Leipsic: T. O. Weigel. | 1845.
Half-title verso note 11. frontispiece 1 1. title
verso "blank 1 1. dedication pp. v-vi, advertisement pp. vii-viii, explanations to the engravings on steel p. ix, index to the engravings on
"wood p. x, contents pp. xi-xvi, appendix p. xvii,
text pp. 1-586, index pp. 587-596,8°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above,
pp. 413-415.
Copies seen: Britisb Museum, Eames.
■ The | natural   history | of |  man; |
comprising | inquiries into the modifying influence of | physical and moral
agencies | on the different tribes of the
human family. ] By | James Cowles
Prichard, M.D., F. R. S., M.R.I.A. |
corresponding member [&c. six lines. ]
| Third edition, enlarged, | with | Fifty
Coloured and Five Plain Illustrations
| engraved on steel, | and ninety-seven
engravings on wood. |
London: | Hippolyte Bailliere, publisher, 219 Regent street; | foreign hook-
seller to the Royal college of surgeons,
| and to the Royal medico-chirnrgical
society. | Paris: J. B. Bailliere,libraire
de l'Academie royale de medecine. |
Leipsic: T. O. Weigel. | 1848.
Frontispiece 11. title verso names of printers
1 1. dedication pp. v-vi, advertisement pp. vii-
viii, explanation of illustrations pp. ix-x, contents pp. xi-xvii, text pp. 1-546, appendix pp.
547-666, index pp. 667-677, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above, pp.
413-415.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Congress, Harvard.
Prichard (J.C.) — Continued.
 The | natural history | of |  man; |
comprising | inquiries iuto the modifying influence of | physical and moral
agencies | on the different trihes of the
human family. | By | James Cowles
Prichard, M. D F. R. S. M. R.A. I. |
president[&c. four lines.] | FourthEdi-
tion, Edited and Enlarged by Edwin
Norris, | of the royal Asiatic society of
Great Britain and Ireland. | Illustrated with sixty-two coloured plates
engraved on steel, | and one hundred
engravings on wood. | In two volumes.
| Vol. I [-II]. |
London: • H. Bailliere, publisher, 219,
Regent street, | and 290, Broadway,
New York, U. S. | Paris: J. B. Bailliere,
libraire, rue Hautefeuille. | Madrid:
Bailly Bailliere, calle del principe. |
1855.
2 vols.: half-title verso notice 1 1. plate 11.
title verso names of printers 1 1. contents pp.
v-viii, explanation to the engravings on steel
p. ix, index to the engravings on wood p. x, editor's preface pp. xi-xiii, introductory note pp.
xv-xx, short biographical notice of the author
pp. xxi-xxiv, text pp. 1-343, sixteen other
plates; half-title verso notice 11. plate 11. title
verso names of printers 1 1. contents pp. v-vii,
text pp. 343-714, index pp. 715-720, forty-four
other plates, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above,
vol. 2, pp. 571-573.
Copies seen: Eames, Harvard, Lenox.
Priest (Josiah). American antiquities,
| and | discoveries in the west: | being
| anexhibitionoftheevidence | thatan
ancient population of'partially civilized
nations, | differing entirely from those
of the present In-1 dians, peopled America, many centuries hefore I its discovery by Col uinhus. | And | inquiries into
their origin,; with a 1 copious description
| Of many of their stupendous Works,
now in ruins. | With | conjectures concerning what may have | hecome of
them, j Compiled j from travels, authentic sources, and the researches | of |
Antiquarian Societies. | By Josiah
Priest. | Third Edition Revised. |
Alhany: | printed hy Hoffman and
White, I No. 71, State-Street. | 1833.
Eolded frontispiece, title verso copyright
notice 11. preface pp. iii-iv, contents pp. v- viii,
text pp. 9-400, map and plate, 8°.
Rafinesque (C. S.), Tabular view of the
American generic languages, pp. 309-312. WAKASHAN   LANGUAGES.
51
Priest (J.)—Continued.
Copiesseen: BostonPuhlic,Congress, Eames,
Harvard,Massachusetts Historical Society.
The Brinley copy, no. 5435, sold for $1.50.
This article is omitted in the earlier and
later editions of Priest's work.
Proper names:
Klaokwat
Maka
Nutka
Seshat
Tokoaat
Tokoaat
See Catlin {Or.)
Swan (J. G.)
Quimper (M.)
Knipe (C.)
Knipe (C.)
Sproat (G.M.)
Q.
Qagutl.    See Kwakiutl.
Quimper (D. Manuel). Segundo recono-
cimiento de la entrada de Fuca y costa |
comprendida entro ella y la de Nootka,
hecho | el afio de 1790 con la balandra
"Prin- J cesa Real" mandade por el
alferez de | navio D. Manuel Quimper.
Manuscript, in the Bancroft Library, San
Francisco.   Forms pp. 385-445 of:
Viages | en la | costa al Norte | do las j Oali-
Quimper (M.) —Continued.
fornias. | 1774-1790. j Copia Sacada | de los
Archivos de EspagQa. | Bancroft Library |
1874.
Short vocabulary of the inhabitants of the
coast between lat. 48° and 50°, pp. 21-23 (405-
407.)—Nootka vocabulary, collected with the
assistance of Ingraham, pp. 34-45 (418-429).—
Names of villages and chiefs, p. 46 (430).
Quoquols.    Seo Kwakiutl.
R.
Rafinesque (Constantino Samuel). Atlantic journal, | and | friend of knowledge. | In eight numbers. | Containing
about 160 original articles and tracts on
Natural and | Historical Sciences, the
Description of about 150 New Plants, |
and lOo JSew Animals or Fossils. Many
Vocabularies of Laugua- | ges, Historical and Geological Facts, &c. &c. &c.
| By C. S. Rafinesque, A. M. . , Ph. D.
| Professor of Historical and Natural
Sciences, Member of seve- | ral learned
societies in Europe and America, &c. |
[Quotation aud list of figures, six
lines.] |
Philadelphia: | 1832-1833. | (Two
dollars.)
Tabular view recto blank 11. title verso index
1 1. iconography and illustrations etc. 1 1. text
pp. 1-202, 205-212, 8°. Originally issued in numbers (1-8, and extra of no. 3),from the " spring
of 1832" to the "winter of 1833."
4. American history. Tabular view of the
American Generic languages [including the
"Wacash], and Original Nations, pp. 6-8.
Copies seen: Boston Athenseum, British
Museum, Congress, Eames.
This article is reprinted in:
Priest (J.), American Antiquities, pp. 309-
312, Albany, 1833, 8°.
Constantino Samuel Rafinesque, botanist,
horn in Galatz, a suburb of Constantinople,
Tnrkey. in 1784, died in Philadelphia, Pa., September 18,1842-   He was of French parentage,
Rafinesque (C. S.)—Continued.
and his father, a merchant, died in Philadelphia
about 1791. The son came to Philadelphia with
his brother in 1802, and, after traveling through
Pennsylvania and Delaware, returned with a
collection of botanical specimens in 1805 aud
went to Sicily, where he spent ten years as a
merchant and in the study of botany. In 1815
he sailed for New York, but was shipwrecked
on the Long Island coast, and lost his valuable
books, collections, manuscripts, and drawings.
In 1818 lie went to the west and became pro
m feasor of botany in Transylvania University,
Lexington, Ky. Subsequently he traveled and
lectured in various places, endeavored to establish a magazine and botanic garden, hut without success, and finally settled in Philadelphia,
where he resided until his death, and where he
published The Atlantic Journal and Friend of
Knowledge; a Cyclopaedic Journal and Review,
of which only eightnumbers appeared (1832-'33>.
The number of genera and species that heintro-
duced into his works produced great confusion.
A gradual deterioration is found in Rafinesque's
botanical writings from 1819 till 1830, when the
passion for establishing new genera and species
seems to have become a monomania with him.
He assumed thirty to one hundred years as the
average time required for the production of a
new species and five hundred to a thousand
years for a new genus. It is said that he wrote
a paper describing "twelve new species of
thunder and lightning." In addition to translations and unfinished botanical and ?oological
works, he was the author of numerous books
and pamphlets.—Apple ton's Cyclop, of Arn,
Biog. 52
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF  THE
Relacion   del   viage    .    .     .     Sutil    y
Mexicana.    See G-aliano (D. Alcala).
Rivington (—).    See Gilbert (—) and
Rivington (—).
Roquefeuil (Camille de). Journal | d'un
voyage | autour du monde, | pendant
les'amides 1816,1817,1818 et 1819, | par
M. Camillo de Roquefeuil, | lieutenant
de vaisseau, chevalier de Saint-Louis |
et de la legion-d'honncur, | Commandant de navire le Bordelais, armc par
M. Balguerie junior, \ de Bordeaux. |
Tonic prcmier[-secoud]. |
Paris, | Ponthieu,   libraire, Palacio-
royal,   Galerie    de   boies,   no.   252. |
Lesage, libraire, rue du Paon, no. 8. |
Gide tils, libraire, rue Saint-Marc-fey-
deau, no. 20. | 1823.
2 vols.: half-title verso name'of printer 1 1.
title verso blank 1 1. preface pp. v-xi, introduction pp. xiii-xlix, errata p. [l],text pp. 1-336,
contents pp. 337-344; titlo verso blank 1 1. text
pp. 1-384, vocabulary of marine terms used in
the work pp. 385-396, contents pp. 397-407, map,
8°.
Remarks on the Noutka and other languages
of the northwest coast, and on their system of
numeration, vol. 2, pp. 216-219.
""We have observed four different dialects in
the parts of the northwest coast which we have
explored: That of Noutka, which with somo
variations is common at Nitinat, and I believe
in all the Quadra and Vancouver isle; that of
Queen Charlotte, which, modified, is spoken
also in the Prince of "Wales island; another
used at Sitka, in Chatham Strait, and in Christian and Frederick Sounds, affluents to the
south; the fourth in Lynn Canal."
Copies seen: Congress.
 A | voyage | round     the    world, |
between the years 1816-1819. | By M.
Roquefeuil (C. de) —Continued.
Camille de Roquefeuil | in the ship le
Bordelais. |
London : j printed for sir Richard
Phillips and Co. | Bride-court, Bridge-
street. | 1823.
Title verso name of printer 1 1. text pp. 3-112,
8°.
Brief remarks upon, and a few words in, the
Nootka language, p. 100.
Copies seen: Congress.
Rost (Reinhold;. The | lord's prayer | Iu
Three Hundred Languages j comprising
the | leading languages and their principal dialects | throughout the world |
with tho places where spoken | Willi a
preface by Reinhold Rost, | C. I. E.,
LL. D., PH. D. |
London | Gilbert and Rivington |
Limited j St. John's house, Clerkenwell,
E. C. | 1891 | (All rights reserved) |
Title verso quotations 1 1. preface 2 11. contents 11. text pp. 1-88, 4°.
Tho Lord's prayer in a number of American
languages, among them the Kwagutl, p. 42.
Copies seen: Eames.
 The | lord's prayer | Iu Three Hundred Languages | comprising the |
leading languages aud their principal
dialects [ throughout the world | with
tho places where spokeu | With a preface by Reinhold Rost, | C. I. E., LL. D.,
PH. D. | Second edition |
London | Gilbert and Rivington |
Limited | St. John's house, Clerkenwell,
E.C. | 1891 | (All rights reserved) |
Title verso quotations 1 1. preface 2 11. contents 11. text pp. 1-88,4°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Pilling. WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES.
53
S.
Sabin   (Joseph).    A  | dictionary | of |
Books relating to America, j from its
discovery  to   the   present   time. | By
Joseph  Sabin.   |   Volume I [-XIX], |
[Three lines quotation.] [
New-York: | Joseph Sabin, 84 Nassau
street. | 1868[-1891],
19 vols. 8°. Still in course of publication.
Parts cxv-cxvi, commencing vol. 20 and reaching the entry "Smith,1' were published in
March, 1892. Now edited by Mr. Wilberforce
Eames.
Contains, passim, titles of a number of books
relating to the "Wakashan languages.
Copies seen: Congress, Eames. Geological
Survey, Lenox.
 See Field (T.W.)
St. Onge (Pere Louis Napoleon).     See
Bulmer (T.S.)
"The subject of this sketch, the Rev, Louis
N. St. Onge, of St. Alphonse de Liguori parish,
was born [in the village of St. Cesaire] a few
miles south of Montreal, Canada, April 14, 1842.
He finished his classical course when yet very
young, after which he studied law for two years.
Feeling called to another field, he gave up this
career in order to prepare himself to work for
God's glory as an Indian missionary in the
diocese of Nesqually, Washington Territory.
"A year and a half hefore his ordination,
Right Rev. A. M. Blanchet, his bishop, ordered
him to Vancouver,"W.T., where he was occupied
as a professor of natural philosophy, astronomy, and other branches in tho Holy Angel's
College. All his spare time was consecrated to
the study of the Indian languages, in which he
is to-day one of the most expert, so that lie was
ready to go on active missionary work as soon
as ordained.
" The first years of his missionary life were
occupied in visiting different tribes of Indians
and doing other missionary work in the Territories of "Washington, Idaho, Montana, and other
Rocky Mountain districts, among Indians and
miners. After such labors he was then appointed
to take charge of the Yakamas, Klikitats,
"Winatchas, Wishrams, Pshwanwapams, Nar-
chcz, and other Indian tribes inhabiting the
central part of Washington Territory. Having
no means of support in his new mission, Bishop
Blanchet, in his self-sacrificing charity for the
Indians of Ms extensive diocese, furnished him
with the necessary outfit • and with a number
of willing though unskilled Indians as apprentice carpenters, the young missionary set to
work to rebuild the St. Joseph's mission,
destroyed in 1856 by a party of vandals called
the Oregon Volunteers, who had been sent to
fight, the Yakamas.
St. Onge (L. N.) — Continued.
"After four years of labor, he and his devoted
companion, Mr. J. B. Boulet (now ordained and
stationed among the Tulalip Indians) had tho
satisfaction to see not only a comfortable residence, but also a neat church, erected, and a fine
tract of land planted with fruit trees, and iu a
profitable state of cultivation, where formerly
only ruin and desolation reigned.
"His health breaking down entirely, he was
forced to leave his present and daily increasing
congregation of neophytes. Wishing to givehiiu
the best medical treatment. Bishop Blanchetscnt
Eather St. Onge to his native land with a leave
of absence until his health would be restored.
During his eighteen months' stay in a hospital
he, however, utilized his time by composing and
printing two small Indian books, containing
rules of grammar, catechism, hymns, and Christian prayers in Takama and Chinook languages—the former for children, tho latter for
the use of missionaries on the Pacific coast.
'' By the advice of bis physician he then undertook a voyage to Europe, where he spentnearly
a year in search of health. Back again to this
country, lie had charge of a congregation for a
couple of years in Vermont; and now he is the
pastor of the two French churches of Glens
Falls and Sandy Hill, in the diocese of Albany,
N. Y.
'' Father St. Onge, though a man of uncommon
physical appearance, stoutly built, and six feet
and four inches in height, has not yet entirely
recovered his health and strength. The French
population of Glens Falls have good cause for
feeling very much gratified with the presentcon-
dition of the affairs of the parish of St. Alphonso
de Liguori, and should receive the hearty congratulations of the entire community. Father
St. Onge, a man of great erudition, a devoted
servant to the church, and possessing a personality whose geniality and courtesy have won
him a place in the hearts of his people, has by
his faithful application to his parish developed
it and brought out all that was to inure to its
benefit and further advance its interests."—
Glens Falls (2T. T.) Republican, March 28, 1889.
Father St. Onge remained at Glens Falls until
October, 1891, when increasing infirmities compelled him to retire permanently from the ministry. He is now living with his brother, the
rector of St. Jean Baptiste church, in Troy, N.
Y. Since his retirement he has compiled an
English-Chinook Jargon dictionary of about six
thousand words, and this he intends to supplement with a corresponding Jargon-English part,
lie has also begun the preparation of a Takama
dictionary, which he hopes to make much mora
complete than that of Father Paudosy, published in Dr. Shea's Library of American linguistics.
I have adopted the spelling of his name as it r
54
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF  THti
St. Onge (L.N.) —Continued.
appears on the title-page of Bishop Demers's
Chinook Jargon dictionary, though the true
spelling, and the one he uses now, is Saint
onge—that of a French province in which his
ancestors lived and from which four or five families came in 1696, all adopting the name. His
family name is Payant.
Sayce (Archibald Henry). Introduction
to the | science of language. | By | A.
H. Sayce, | deputy professor of comparative philology in the university of
Oxford. | In two volumes. | Vol.I[-II].
| [Design.] |
London: | C. Kegan Paul & co., 1,
Paternoster square. | 1880.
2 vols.: half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso
quotation and notice 11. preface pp.v-viii, table
of contents verso blank 11. text pp. 1-441, colophon verso blank 11.; half-title verso blank 11.
title verso quotation and notice 1 1. table of contents verso blank 11. text pp. 1-352, selected list
of works pp. 353-363. index pp. 365-121,12°.
A classification of American languages (vol.
2, pp. 57-64) includes the Nutka or Tucuatl.p.
61.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology. Fames.
 Introduction to the | science of language. | By | A. H. Sayce, | deputy-
professor of comparative philology,
Oxford, | Hon. LL. D. Dublin. | In two
volumes. | Vol. I[-II], | [Design.] |
Second edition. |
London: | Kegan Paul, Trench, &
co., 1, Paternoster square. | 1883.
2 vols.: half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso
quotation and notice 11. table of contents verso
blank 1 1. preface to the second edition pp. v-xv
verso blank, preface pp. xvii-xx, text pp. 1-441,
colophon verso blank 1 1.; half-title verso blank
1 1. title verso quotation and notice 1 1. table of
contents verso blank 1 1. text pp. 1-352, selected
list of works pp. 353-363 verso blank, index pp.
365-421,12°.
Linguistics as in the first edition, vol.2, pp.
57-64.
Copies seen: Eames.
Schoolcraft (Henry Rowe). "Historical |
and | statistical information, | respecting the | history, condition and prospects | of the | Indian tribes of the
United States: | collected and prepared
under the direction | of the [ bureau
of Indian affairs, | per act of Congress
of March 3d, 1847, j by Henry R. Schoolcraft, LL.D. Illustrated by S. Eastman,
capt. U. S. A. | Published by Authority
of Congress. | Part I [-VI]. |
Philadelphia: | Lippincott,   Grambo
Schoolcraft (H. R.) — Continued.
&,   company, | (successors   to   Grigg,
Elliot & co.) | 1851[-1857].
Engraved title: [Engraving.] | Historical |
and | statistical information | respecting the j
history, condition and prospects | of the ] Indian
tribes of the United States: | Collected and prepared under the ( direction of the bureau of
Indian affairs per act of Congress | of March
3"' 1847,1 by HenryR. Schoolcraft L.L.D. | Illustrated by j S. Eastman, capt. U. S. army. | [Coat
of arms.] | Published by authority of Congress. | Part I[-VI]. |
Philadelphia: | Lippincott, Grambo & oo.
6 vols. 4°. Beginning with vol. 2 the words
"Historical and statistical" are left off the
title-pages, both engraved and printed. Subsequently (1853) vol. 1 was also issued with the
abridged title beginning "Information respecting the history, condition, and prospects of the
Indian tribes," making it uniform with the
other parts.
Two editions with these title-pages were published by the same house, one on thinner and
somewhat smaller paper, of which but vols. 1-5
were issued.
Part I, 1851. Half-title (Ethnological researches, i respecting j the red man of America)
verso blank 1 1. engraved title as above verso
blank 1 1. printed title as above verso blank 11.
introductory documents pp. iii-vi, preface pp.
vii-x, list of plates pp. xi-xii, contents pp. xiii-
xviii, text pp. 13-524, appendix pp. 525-568,
plates, colored lithographs and maps numbered
1-76.
Part II, 1852. Half-title (as in part I) verso
blank 11. engraved title (Information respecting
the history, condition and prospects, etc.) verso
blank 1 1. printed title (Information respecting
thehistory, condition and prospects, etc.) verso
printers 11. dedication verso blankl 1. introductory document pp.vii-xiv, contents pp. xv-xxii,
list of plates pp. xxiii-xxiv, text pp. 17-608,
plates and maps numbered 1-29, 31-78, and 2
plates exhibiting the Cherokee alphabet and its
application.
Part in, 1853. Half-title (as in part i) verso
blank 11 .engraved title (as in part n) verso blank
1 1. printed title (as in part n) verso printers 11.
third report pp. v-viii, list of divisions p. ix,
contents pp. xi-xv, list of plates pp. xvii-xviii,
text pp. 39-635, plates and maps numbered
1-21,25-45.
'Part iv, 1854. Half-title (as in part I) verso
blan fell, engraved title (as in part 11) verso blank
1 1. printed title (as in part n) verso blank 1 1.
dedication pp. v-vi, fourth report pp. vii-x, list
of divisions p. xi. contents pp. xiii-xxiii, list of
plates pp. xxv-xxvi, text pp. 19-668, plates and
maps numbered 1-42.
Part v, 1855. Half-title (as in part i) verso
blankl 1. engraved title (as in part n) verso blank
1 1. printed title (as in part n) verso blank 11.
dedication pp. vii-viii. fifth report pp. ix-xii, list
of divisions p. xiii. synopsis of general contents WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES.
55
Schoolcraft (H. R.)—Continued.
of vols. i-V pp. xv-xvi, contents pp. xvii-xxii
list of plates pp. xxiii-xxiv, text pp. 25-625, appendix pp. 627-712, plates and maps numbered
1-8,10-36.
Part vi, 1857. Half-title (General history | of
the i North American Indians) verso blank 11.
portrait 11. printed title (History ] of the i Indian
tribes of the United States: | their | present
condition and prospects, | and a sketch of their
| ancient status. | Published by order of Congress, i under the direction of the Department of
the interior—Indiau bureau. | By | Henry Rowe
Schoolcraft, LL. D. I Member [&c. six lines.] [
With Illustrations by Eminent Artists. | In one
volume. | Part VI. of the series. ] Philadelphia:
| J. B. Lippincott & co. | 1857.) verso blank 11.
inscription verso blank 11. letter to the President pp. vii-viii, report pp. ix-x, preface pp. xi-
xvi, contents pp. xvii-xx vi, list of plates pp.
xxvii-xxviii, text pp. 25-744, index pp. 745-756,
fifty-seven plates, partly selected from the other
volumes, and three tables.
Gallatin (A.), Table of generic Indian families of languages, vol. 3, pp. 397-402.
Copies seen: Astor, Bancroft, Boston Athenaeum, British Museum, Congress, Eames,
National Museum, Powell, Shea, Trumbull.
At the Fischer sale, no. 1581, Quaritch bought
a copy for U. 10s. The Field copy, no. 2075, sold
for$72;theMenzieseopy, no. 1765, for $132; the
Squier copy, no. 121.4, $120; no. 2032, $60; the
Ramirez copy, no. 773 (5 vols.), 51.5s.; tho Pinart
copy, no. 828 (5 vols, in 4), 208 fr.; tho Murphy
copy, no. 2228, $69. Priced by Quaritch, no. 30017,
10L10.S.; by Clarke & co. 1886, $65; by Quaritch,
in 1888,152.
Reissued with title-pages as follows:
— Archives of; Aboriginal Knowledge.
| Containing all the | Original Papers
laid befoi*e Congress | respecting the |
History, Antiquities, Language, Ethnology, Pictography, | Rites, Superstitions, and Mythology, | of the | Indian
Tribes of the United States | by | Henry
R. Schoolcraft, LL. D. | With Illustrations. | Omen-dun ih ieu muzzinyegun
un.—Algonquin. | In six volumes. |
Volume I[-VI]. |
Philadelphia.: | J. B. Lippincott &
Co. | 1860.
Engraved title .- Information | respecting the
[ History, Condition and Prospects | of the |
Indian Tribes of the United States: | Collected
and prepared under the [ Bureau of Indian
Affairs | By Henry R. Schoolcraft L. L. D. |
Mem: Royal Geo. Society, London. Royal Antiquarian Society. Copenhagen. Ethnological
Society, Paris, &c. &c. | Illustrated by | Cap.1
S. Eastman, U. S. A. and other eminent artists. |
[Vignette.] j Published by authority of Congress. }
Philadelphia: | J. B. Lippincott & Co.
Schoolcraft (H. R.) — Continued.
6 vols, maps and plates, 4°.
This edition agrees in the text page for page
with the original titled above, and contains in
addition an index to each volume.
Copies seen: Congress.
Partially reprinted with title as follows:
[ ] The | Indian tribes j of the. United
States: | their [history, antiquities, customs, religion, arts, language, | traditions, oral legends, and myths, j Edited
by Francis S.Drake. | Illustrated with
one hundred fine engravings on steel.
| Iu two volumes, j Vol. I[-II]. |
Philadelphia: | J. B. Lippincott &
co. | London: 16 Southampton street,
Covent Garden. | 1884.
2 vols.: portrait I 1. title verso copyright
11. preface pp. 3-5, contents pp. 7-8, list of plates
pp. 9-10, introduction pp. 11-24, text pp. 25-458;
frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyright 11. contents pp. 3-6, list of plates p. 7, text pp. 9^45,
index pp. 447-455, plates, 4°.
"In the following pages the attempt has been
made to place before the public iu a convenient
and accessible form the results of the life-long
labors in the Held of aboriginal research of the
late Henry R. Schoolcraft."
Chapter n, Language, literature, and pictography, vol. 1, pp. 47-63, contains general
remarks on the Indian languages.
Copies seen: Congress.
Priced by Clarke &, co. 1886, no. 6376, $25.
Henry Rowe Schoolcraft, ethnologist, born in
[Watervliet] Albany County, X. T., March 2t*,
1793, died in Washington, D. C, December 10,
1864. Was educated at Middlebury College,
Vermont, and at Union, where he pursued the
studies of chemistry and mineralogy. In 1817-18
lie traveled in Missouri ami Arkansas, and
returned with a large collection of geological
and mineral ogical specimens. Iu 1820 he was
appointed geologist to Gen. Lewis Cass's exjdor-
ing expedition to Lake Superior aud the headwaters of Mississippi River. He was secretary of a commission to treat with the Indians
at Chicago, and, after a journey through Illinois and along Wabash and Miami rivers, was
in 1822 appoint..! uidii"! agent for the tribes
of tho lake region, establishing himself at
Sault Sainte Marie, and afterward at Mackinaw, where, in 1823, he married Jane Johnston,
granddaughter of Waboojeeg, a noted Ojibway
chief, who had received hereducationin Europe.
In 1828 he founded the Michigan historical society and in 18:J1 the Algic society. From 1828 till
1832 he was a member of the territorial legislature of Michigan. In 1832 lie led a government
expedition, which followed tho Mississippi
River up to its source in Itasca Lake. Iu 1836
he negotiated a treaty with the Indians on the
upper lakes for the cession to the United States
of 16,000,000 acres of their lands.   He was then 56
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
Schoolcraft (H. R.)— Continued.
appointed acting superintendent of Indian
affairs, and in 1839 chief disbursing agent for
the northern department. On bis return from
Europe in 1842 he made a tour through western
Virginia, Ohio, and Canada. He was appointed
by the Kew Tork legislature in 1845 a commissioner to take the census of the Indians in the
State and collect information concerning the
Six Nations. After the performance of this
task, Congress authorized him, on March 3,1847,
to obtain through the Indian bureau reports
relating to all the Indian tribes of the country
and to collate and edit the information. In this
work ho spent the remaining years of his life.
Through his influence many laws were enacted
for the protection and benefit of the Indians.
Numerous scientific societies in the United
States and Europe elected him to membership,
and the University of Geneva gave him the
degree of LL.D. in 1846. He was tho author of
numerous poems, lectures, and reports or.
Indian subjects, besides thirty-one larger
works. Two of bis lectures before the Algic
society at Detroit on the "Grammatical Construction of the Indian Languages" were translated into French by Peter S.Duponceau and
gained for their author a gold medal from the j
French institute. . . . To the five volumes
of Indian researches compiled under the direction of the war department he added a sixth,
containing the post-Columbian history of the j
Indians and of their relations with Europeans
(Philadelphia, 1857). He had collected material
for two additional volumes, but the government suddenly suspended the publication of
the work.—Appleton's Cyclop, of Am. Biog.
Scouler (Dr. John). Observations on the j
indigenous tribes of the N. W. coast of i
America.    By John  Scouler, M. D., F.
L. S., &c.
In Royal Geog. Soc. of London, Jour. vol. 11,
pp. 215-251. London, 1841,8°. (Geological Survey.)
Vocabulary of the Tlaoquatch (southwest
extremity Vancouver Island), about 100 words
(obtained from Dr. Tolmie), pp. 242-247.
 On the Indian tribes inhabiting the
north-west coast of America. By John
Scouler, M. I)., F. L. S. Communicated
by the Ethnological Society.
In Edinburgh New Philosoph. Jour. vol. 41,
pp. 168-192, Edinburgh, 1846, 8°.
Vocabulary (19 words) of the Chikeelis
[Chinook Jargon], showing affinities with the
Tlaoquatch (from Tolmie) and with the Nootka
(from Mozino and Jewitt), p. 176.
Reprinted in Ethnological Soc. of London,
Jour. vol. 1, pp. 228-252, London [1848], 8°. (Congress.)
Linguistic; contents as above, p. 236.
Sebasa:
Grammatic treatise   See Bancroft (II. II.)
Seghers (A rchbiskop Charles John).
[Roman Catholic prayers in the Nes-
quiat or Nutka language.] (*)
Manuscript; compiled in 1874. See note to
Brabant {A.J.)
Charles John Seghers, second and fourth
Bishop of Vancouver's Island and second Archbishop of Oregon City, was born in the ancient
city of Ghent, in Belgium, December 26, 1839.
While a mere lad he began to feel that he was
called to the priesthood, and, after going
through tho ordinary course at the theological
seminary of Ghent, be entered the American
College in the University of Louvain, and was
ordained, in the cathedral of Mechlin, in 1863,
for the American mission, choosing Victoria,
Vancouver's Island, at the instance of Bishop
Demers, who was then on a visit to his native
country. For eight years he was attached to
St. Andrew's Cathedral, Victoria, as assistant,
as rector, and vicar-general, being appointed
administrator of the diocese in 1871, on the death
of Bishop Demers. In 1873 he was consecrated
bishop of the see, the youngest prelate of the
American episcopacy at thattime. . . . But
he had always a strong predilection for the
primitive native Americans. No Catholic
missionaries had as yet attempted the conversion of the Indians of Alaska, for the reason
that while it was under the Russian dominions
access had been denied to them. ... In
1878 Bishop Seghers made his first visit to
Alaska in order to judge what could be done
there, aud began to study the native language
In the meantime Archbishop Blanchet, of
Oregon City, having grown old and feeble,
Bishop Seghers was made bis coadjutor, with
right of succession, while the see of Vancouver
was assumed by Bishop Brondel. No sooner
was he installed as coadjutor of Oregon City
than Bishop Seghers devoted a year to acquiring
practical knowledge of the vast region belonging to his province. ... On the resignation of Archbishop Blanchet, in 1881, Arch,
bishop Seghers became the metropolitan in
name as well as in fact. But for some time his
mind had been set on the conversion of Alaska,
and in 1883 he went to Rome to beg that he
might be allowed to take up that work. The see
of Vancouver was again vacant, Bishop Brondel
havingbeentranslated tothenewseeof Helena.
At his urgent request, therefore, the Propaganda authorized Archbishop Seghers to resign
the important see of Oregon City for tho
humbler and more laborious one of Vancouver. . . . By the opening of 1885 he was
back once more at Victoria. . . . Archbishop Seghers, accompanied by two Jesuit
fathers, Tosi and Rabaut, and a servant named
Frank Fuller, an American, arrived at Chilkat,
on the lower coast, and disembarked. Thence
they traveled northwesterly along the foothills of the coast range until they reached the
station of the Alaska Trading Company at the
headwaters of Stewart's River. Here the Jesuit WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES.
57
Seghers (C.J.) — Continued.
fathers remained to establish amission for the
Stekin Indians, while Archbishop Seghers,
accompanied by his servant and some Indian
guides, pushed on for the trading-post at Mukla-
kayet, near the mouth of the Tanaanah River,
reaching that point late in October. . . . The
journey was resumed with tho intention of
striking the Yukon River at Nulata. After
seven days with the sleds, during which they
had accomplished about 170 miles, they came to
a deserted village 30 miles from Nulata, and on
the advice of the Indians Archbishop Seghers
determined to halt here for the night, but to go
on the next day a fewmiles to an Indian settlement, and there to establish a mission. Fuller,
however, who seems to have been of a morose
disposition, was averse to pursuing the journey
any further, and gave way to a fit of anger when
lie found that the Indians' advice prevailed
against his own with tho archbishop. Theparty
entered an abandoned hut and lay down in a
line before the fire and slept. In spite of the
archbishop's soothing words, Fuller's anger at
the prospect of having to go further into this
desolate region must have rankled in the man's
heart. A t daylight the next morning, Sunday,
November 28, Fuller went out and brought
some sticks for the fire, and then sat down opposite the sleeping prelate. Picking up his rifle,
he leveled it at the prelate's head, at the same
time calling out. ;1 Archbishop,get up!" The
archbishop raised his head. As he did so
Fuller pulled the trigger, and the holy missionary received the bullet between the eyes and
fell back dead without a sound. . . . The
body, which the Indians had covered up and
left behind them in the hut, was sent for at once
and forwarded to the seaport of St. Michael's.
There it was encoffined, and at tho request of
the Russian priest was deposited in the Russian
church until it could be taken to'Victoria for
interment. The murderer, on being brought
to St. Michael's, acknowledged his guilt and
professed great sorrow. The lamentation over
the death of this devoted missionary, refined
scholar, adventurous explorer, and at the same
time humble and amiable Christian, was particularly great throughout theNorthern Pacific
coast, where his personality had become
endeared to all sorts of people during his fifteen
years of active Christian work in that region.—
T. F. Galwey in the Catholic Family Annual for
1888.
Sentences:
Hailtsuk See Bancroft (H. H.)
Seshat:
Proper names See Knipe (C.)
Smithsonian Institution : These words following
a title or included within parentheses after a
note indicate that a copy of the work referred
to lias been seen by tho compiler in the library
of that institution, Washington, D. C.
Some account of the Tahkaht language.
See Knipe (C.)
Songs:
Kwakiutl
Kwakiutl
Nutka
Nutka
Wakash
See Boas (F.)
Fillmore (J. C.)
Boas (F.)
Jewitt (J. R.)
Boas (F.)
Sproat (Gilbert Malcolm). Scenes and
studies | of savage life. [ By Gilbert
Malcolm Sproat. | [Two lines quotation.] |
London: Smith,Elder and co. | 1868.
Frontispiece 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. dedication vorso blank 1 I. contents pp. v-x, preface
pp. xi-xii, text pp. 1-310, appendix pp. 311-317,
colophon p. [318], 12°.
Chapter xv. Intellectual capacity and language [of the Ahts], contains a discussion on
the numeral system; divisions of the year;
grammatical analysis; the Nitinaht dialect [of
the Aht]; Cook's list of Nootkah words; affinity
of the Indian languages of the northwest coast;
a table showing affinities between the Chinook
Jargon and Aht, and tribal names, pp. 119-143.—
Vocabulary of tho Aht language, with a list of
the numerals 1-200; an alphabetical list of
words obtained at Nitinaht (or Barclay) Sound,
but fairly representing the language of all the
Aht tribes on the west coast of Vancouver
Island, including words invented since their
contact with white men, pp. 295-307.—List of
Aht tribes on the outside coast of Vancouver
Island in 1860, p. 308.—Aht names of men and
women, pp. 308-309; of places, p. 310; of berries,
p.310.
Much of this material is extracted from
Knipe (C), Some account of the Tahkaht language.
Copies seen: Bancroft. Boston Public, British
Museum, Congress, Eames, Georgetown.
Stewart (Capt.—).    See Gibbs (G.)
Swan   (James   Gilchrist).    The | northwest   coast;   | or, [ three   years'   residence  in Washington | territory. | By
James G. Swan. | [Territorial seal.] |
With numerous illustrations. J
New York: | Harper & brothers,
publishers, | Franklin square. | 1857.
Frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyright notice
1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. introduction pp.
v-vii, contents pp. ix-xiv, list of illustrations
p. [xv], map, text pp. 17-409, appendix pp. 411-
429, index pp. 431-135,12°.
Chapter xviii, Language of the Indians (pp.
306-326), includesavocabulary(12 words) of the
Nootka compared with the Chinook, p. 307.—
List of [80] words iu theNootkan language, the
most in use, from John R. Jewitfs Narrative of
the massacre of the crew of the ship Boston by
the savages of Queen Charlotte Sound, 1803, pp.
421-422.—Comparative words (12) intbeNootka
and Chenook or Jargon, pp. 422.—Many Nootka
words passim. 58
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF  THE
Swan (J. G.) — Continued.
Copies seen: Astor, Bancroft, Boston Athenaeum, British Museum, Eames, Geological
Survey, Harvard, Mallet, Pilling.
Issued also with title-page as follows:
 The | northwest   coast; | or, | three
years' residence in Washington | territory. | By | James G. Swan. | With
numerous illustrations. |
London: | Sampson Low, Son &. co.,
47 Ludgate hill. | New York: Harper
& brothers. |1857.
Frontispiece 1 1. title 1 1. dedication verso
blankl 1. introduction pp. v-vii, contents pp.
ix-xiv, list of illustrations p. xv, map, text
pp. 17-409, appendix pp. 411-429, index pp. 431-
435,12°.
Linguistic contents as undertitlenext above.
Copies seen.- Charles L. Woodward, New
York City.
 Smithsonian contributions to knowledge. ]220 | The j Iudiausof cape Flattery, | at the entrance to the strait of
Fuca, | Washington' territory. | By |
James G. Swan. | (Accepted for publication, June, 1868.)
Title verso names of commission etc. 1 1. advertisement signed by Joseph Henry, secretary
S. I. p. iii, prefatory note signed by George
Gibbs p. v, contents p. vii, list of illustrations
j). ix, text pp. 1-106, index pp, 107-108, plates, 4°.
Forms article viii, of vol. xvi, Smithsonian
Institution Contributions to Knowledge, Washington, 1870, 4°.
The Makah Indians and tho names by which
they are known to other Indians, p, 1.—Animal
names, p. 7.—Species of whales, p. 19.—The
harpoon and its parts, p. 21.—The canoe and its
parts, p. 21.—Porpoises, seals, otters, etc., p.
30.—Personal names, p. 58.— Mythology, pp. 61-
76, includes many native terms, names of gods,
etc.—Names of the months, elements, etc., pp.
91-92. — Makah vocabulary, alphabetically
arranged by English words, pp. 93-105.—Local
nomenclature of the Makahs, pp. 105-106.
Copiesseen: Geological Survey, Smithsonian.
Issued separately with title-page as follows:
 Smithsonian Contributions to Knowledge. | 220 | The | Iudiausof cape Flattery, | at the entrance to the strait of
Fuca, | Washington    territory. | By |
James G. Swan. I
Swan (J.G.) — Continued.
Washington city: | published by the
Smithsonian institution. | 1869.
Cover title as above, title as above (except
the imprint, which reads "Accepted for publication, June, 1868") verso names of the commission and of the printer 11. advertisementsigued
by Joseph Henry p. iii, prefatory note signed
by George Gibbs p. v; contents p. vii. list of
illustrations p. ix, text pp. 1-106, index pp. 107-
108, plates, 4°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen : Fames, Pilling, Smithsonian,
Trumbull, Wellesley.
 Vocabulary of the Makah
Manuscript, 10 leaves, 4°, written on one side
only; in the library of the Bureau of Ethnology.
Recorded, March, 1865. on one of the forms (no.
170) issued for collectors by the Smithsonian
Institution. Equivalents of all the 211 words
called for are given.
A copy of this vocabulary, 7 leaves, folio,
madebyDr.George Gibbs, is in thesaraelibrary.
 Vocabulary of the Makah.
Manuscript, 21 leaves, folio, written ou one
side only; in the library of the Bureau of Ethnology.
Contains about 1,000 words alphabetically
arranged by English words.
Mr. James Gilchrist Swan was born in Med-
ford, Mass., January 11,1818, and was educated
at an academy in that place. In 1833 he went to
Boston to reside, and remained there until 1849,
when he left for San Francisco, where he arrived
iu 1850. In 1852 he went to Shoalwater Bay,
where he remained until 1856, when he returned
east. In 1859 be returned to Puget Sound; since
then Port Townsend has been bis headquarters.
In 1860 Mr. Swan went to Neah Bay. In June,
1862, he Was appointed teacher of the Makah
Indian Reservation, where he remained till 1866.
In 1869 he went to Alaska, and in May, 1875, he
went a second time to Alaska, this time under
the direction of the Smithsonian Institution, as
a commissioner to purchase articles of Indian
manufacture for the Philadelphia Centennial
Exposition. This fine collection is now in the
H. S. National Museum at Washington. July
31, 1878, Mr. Swan was appointed an inspector
of customs at Neah Bay, Cape Flattery, and
remained there until August, 1888, addingmuch
to our knowledge of the Makah Indians, which
was reported to Prof. Baird and published in a
bulletin of the V. S. National Museum. In 1883
he went to Queen Charlotte Islands for the
Smithsonian Institution and made another collection for the U. S. National Museum.
V< WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES.
59
T.
Tate (Rev. Charles Montgomery). The
lord's prayer [in the Hailtsuk language].
1 leaf, verso blank, 8°.
Copies semi: Pilling.
Mr. Tate came to British Columbia from
Northumberland, England, in 1870. He engaged
in mission work among the Flathead Indians
at Nanaimo, Vancouver Island, in 1871, where
he learned the Aukamenum language spoken
by the Indian tribes on the east coast of Vancouver Island, lower Fraser River, and Puget
Sound. Here he spent three years, when he
removed to Port Simpson, on the borders of
Alaska, among the Tsimpsheans. He next
moved to the Fraser River and spent seven
years amongst the Flathead tribes between
Yale and Westminster, frequently visiting the
Indians on the Nootsahk River in Washington
Territory. Mr. Tate spent four years, 1880 to
1884, among the Bella-Bellas, returning in the
latter year to the mission on Fraser River.
Tahkaht. See Tokoaat.
Text:
Nutka See Brabant (A. J.)
Tlaoquatch.    See Klaokwat.
Tokoaat:
Dictionary See Knipe (C.)
Grammar Knipo (C.)
Grammatic treatise Sproat (G. M.)
Numerals Eells (M.)
Numerals Knipe (C.)
Numerals Sproat (G.M.)
Proper names Knipe (C.)
Proper names Sproat (G, M.)
Tribal names Knipe (C.)
Tribal names Sproat (G. M.)
Vocabulary Chamberlain (A. F.)
Vocabulary Sproat (G.M.)
Vocabulary Tolmie (W. F.) and
Dawson (G.M.)
Tolmie (Dr. William Fraser). [Vocabularies of the northwest coast of North
America.]
In Royal Geog. Soc. of London, Jour. vol. 11,
pp. 230-246, London, 1841,8°. (Geological Survey.)
Vocabulary of the Tlaoquatch (about 100
words), pp. 242-247.
This vocabulary and others by the same
author are included in an article by Scouler
(J.), Observations on the indigenous tribes of
the northwest coast, pp. 215-251.
 and Dawson (G.M.)  Geological and
natural  history survey of   Canada. |
Alfred  R. C. SelwymF. R. S., F. G. S.,
Director. | Comparative    vocabularies
| of the | Indian   tribes | of | British
Tolmie (W. F.) and Dawson (G. M.) —
Continued.
Columbia, | with a map illustrating distribution. | By | W. Fraser Tolmie, |
Licentiate of the Faculty of Physicians
and Surgeons, Glasgow. | And | George
M. Dawson, D. S., A. S. R. M., F. G. S.,
&c | [Coat of arms.] | Published by
authority of Parliament. |
Montreal: | Dawson brothers. | 1884.
Cover title nearly as above, title as above verso
blank 11. letter of transmittal signed by G. M.
Dawson verso blank 11. preface signed by G. M.
Dawson pp. 5b-7b, introductory note signed by
W. F. Tolmie pp. 9B-12B, text pp. 14b-131b, map,
8°.
Comparative vocabulary (225 words) of five
languages, among them theAht(Kaiookwahk),
pp. 50b-60b.—" Comparative table of a few of
the words [68] in the foregoing vocabularies,"
including the Aht, p. 127b.—Comparison of 4
words in various Indian languages of North
America (from various sources), among them
the Aht, pp. 128b-129b.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
William Fraser Tolmie was born at Inverness,
Scotland, February 3,1812, and died December
8,1886, after an illness of only three days, at his
residence, Clovcrdale, Victoria, B. C. He was
educated at Glasgow University, where he
graduated in August, 1832. On September 12 of
the same year he accepted a position as surgeon
and clerk with the Hudson's Bay Company, and
left home for the Columbia River, arriving at
Vancouver in the spring of 1833. Vancouver
was then the chief post of the Hudson's Bay
Company on this coast. In 1841 he visited his
native land, but returned in 1842 overland via
the plains and the Columbia, and was placed in
charge of the Hudson's Bay posts on Puget
Sound. He here took a prominent part, during
the Indian war of 1855-'56, in pacifying the
Indians. Being an excellent linguist, be had
acquired a knowledge of the native tongues,
and was instrumental in bringing about peace
between the whites and the Indians. He was
appointed chief factor of the Hudson's Bay
Company in 1855, removed to Vancouver Island
in 1859, when he went into stockraising, being
the first to introduce thoroughbred stock into
British Columbia; was a member of the local
legislature two terms, until 1878; was ainember
of the first board of education for several years,
exercising a great influence in educational matters ; held many offices of trust, and was always
a valued and respected citizen.
Mr. Tolmie was known to ethnologists for his
contributions to the history and linguistics of
thenative races of the West Coast, and dated his
interest in ethnological matters from his contact 60
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
Tolmie (W. F.) and Dawson (G. M.) —
Continued,
with Mr. Horatio Hale, who visited the West
Coast as an ethnologist to the Wilkes exploring
expedition. He afterwards transmitted vocabularies of a number of the tribes to Dr. Scouler
and to Mr. George Gibbs, some of which were
published in Contributions to North American
Ethnology. In 1884 ho published, in conjunction
with Dr. G. M. Dawson, a nearly complete series
of short vocabularies of the principal languages
met with in British Columbia, and his name is
to be found frequently quoted as an authority
on the history of the Northwest Coast and its
ethnology. He frequently contributed to the
press upon public questions and events now
historical.
Treasury.   The Treasury of Languages.
| A | rudimentary  dictionary | of |
universal  philology. | Daniel  iii.  4. |
[One line in Hebrew.] |
HallandCo.,25, Paternosterrow,Lon-
don. | (All rights reserved.)   [1873?]
Colophon: London: | printed by Grant and
co., 72-78, Turumill street, E. C.
Title verso blank 1 1. advertisement (dated i
February 7th, 1873) verso blank 11. introduction j
(signed J.B. and dated October 31st, 1873) pp. i
i-iv, dictionary of languages (in alphabetical j
order) pp. 1-301, list of contributors p. [302],
errata verso colophon 11.12°.
Edited by James Bonwick, Esq., F. R. G. S.,
assisted by about twenty-two contributors,
whose initials are signed to the most important
of their respective articles. In the compilation of the work free use was made of Bagster's
Bible of Every Land and Dr.Latham's Elements
of Comparative Philology. There are also
references to an appendix, concerning which
there is the following note on p. 301: '' Notice. —
Owing to the unexpected enlargement of this
Book in course of printing, the Appendix is
necessarily postponed; and the more especially
as additional matter has been received sufficient
to make a second volume. And it will be proceeded with so soon as an adequate list of Subscribers shall be obtained." Under the name of
each language is a brief statement of the family
or stock to which it belongs, and the country
where it is or was spoken, together with references, in many cases, to the principal authorities on the grammar and vocabulary. An
addenda is given at tho end of each letter.
Scattered references to the dialects of the
Wakashan.
Copies seen: Eames.
Tribal names:
Nutka See Keane (A. H.)
Tokoaat Knipe (C.)
Tokoaat Sproat (G. M.)
Wakash Kane (I1.)
Triibner (Nicolas). SecLudewig(H. K.)
Trumbull: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of
the work referred to has been seen by the compiler iu the library of Dr. J. Hammond Trumbull, Hartford, Conn.
[Trumbull (Dr. James Hammond).] Catalogue [ of the | American Library | of
the late | mr. George Brinley, | of Hartford, Conn. | Part I. | America in general | New France Canada etc. | the
British colonies to 1776 | New England
| [-Part V. | General and miscellaneous. | [&c. eight lines.] |
Hartford | Press of the Case Lock-
wood & Brainard Company [ 1878
[-1893]
5 parts, 8o. Compiled by Dr. J. H. Trumbull.
There is an Index to the catalogue, etc., compiled by Wm. J. Fletcher, Hartford, 1893, 8°.
(Pilling.)
Indian languages: general treatises and collections, part 3, pp. 123-124; Northwest coast,
p. 141.
Copies seen : Eames, Pilling.
James Hammond Trumbull, philologist,
born in Stonington, Conn., December 20, 1821.
He entered Vale in 1838, and though, owing to
ill health, ho was not graduated with his class,
his name was enrolled among its members in
1850 and he was given the degree of A. M. Ho
settled iu Hartford in 1847, and was assistant
secretary of state in 1847-'52 and 1858-'61,
and secretary in 1861-'64, also state, librarian in
1854. Soon after going to Hartford he joined the
Connecticut Historical Society, was its corresponding secretary in 1849-63, and was elected
its president in 1863. He has been a trustee of
the Watkinson free library of Hartford and its
librarian since 1863, and has been an officer of
theWadsworth athenaeum since 1864. Dr.Trumbull was an original member of the American
Philological Association in 1869 and its president in 1874-'75, He has been a memberof tho
American Oriental Society since 1860, and the
American Ethnological Society since 1867, and
honorary member of many State historical societies. In 1872 he was elected to the National
Academy of Sciences. Since 1858 he has devoted
special attention to the subject of the Indian
languages of North America. He has prepared
a dictionary and vocabulary to John Eliot's
Indian bible and is probably the only American scholar that is now able to read that work.
In 1873 ho was chosen lecturer on Indian languages of North America at Yale, but loss of
health and other labors soon compelled his
resignation. The degree of LL. D. was conferred on him by Yale in 1871 and by Harvard
in 1887, while Columbia gave him an L. H. D.
in 1887.—Appleton's Cyclo}). of Am. Biog.
Turner (William Wadden). See Lude^
wig(H.E.) WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES.
61
U.
TJcalta.    Seo Ukwulta.
Ukwulta:
General discussion
Grammatic treatise
Vocabulary
Words
i Anderson (A. C.)
Petitot (E.)
Petitot (E.)
Petitot (E.)
Umery (J.) Sur Pidentite* du mot mere
dans les idiomes de tons les peuples.
In Revue Orientale et Americaine. vol. 8, pp.
335-338, Paris, 1863,8°.
Among the languages mentioned is the
Noutka.
V.
Vancouver Island Indians. See Nutka.
Vater (Dr. Johann Severin). Untersu-
chungen | iiber j Amerika's Bevolkerung
| aus dem | alten Kontinente | dem |
Herrn Kammerherrn | Alexander von
Humboldt | gewidmet | von | Johann
Severin Vater I Professor und Biblio-
thekar. |
Leipzig, | hei Friedrich Christian
Wilhelm Vogel. | 1810.
Colophon: Halle, gedruckt bei Johann Jacob
Gebauer.
Title verso blank 11. dedication verso blank 1
I. verehrungswurdiger Herr Kammerherr 2 11.
inhalts-anzeige pp. ix-xii, half-title verso blank
II. textpp. 3-211, errata and colophon p. [212],8°.
A few words in the Nutka language, pp. 164.
196.—Vergleichungen Amerikanischer Sprach-
en (pp. 195-203) also contains a fewwords in the
same languages, p. 201.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Congress, Eames, Harvard, Watkinson.
At the Fischer sale, catalogue no. 2879, a copy
was bought by Quaritch for 1*. Gd.
 Linguarum   totius  orbis \  Index |
alphabeticus, j quarum | Grammaticae,
Lexica, | collection es    vocabulorum |
recenseutur, | patria signiticatur, his-
toria aduinbratur | a | Joanne Severino
Vatero, | Theol. Doct. et Profess. Bib-
liothecario Reg., Ord. | S. Wladimiri
equite. |
Berolini | In officina libraria Fr.
Nicolai. | MDCCCXV[1815].
Second title: Litteratur | der [ Grammatikon,
Lexica | und | Wortersaminlungen j aller
Sprachen der Erde | nach | alphabetischerOrd-
nung der Sprachen, | mit einor [ gedrangten
TTebersicht | des Vaterlandes, der Schicksale |
und Verwandtschaft dersolhen ] von [ Dr.
Johann Severin Vater, | Professor und Biblio-
thekar zu Konigsberg des S. Wladimir- | Or-
dens Ritter. |
Berlin | in der Nicolaisohen Buchhandlung.
i1815.
Vater (J. S.) —Continued.
Latin title verso 1.1 recto blank, German titlo
recto 1.2 verso blank, dedication verso blank 1
1. address to the king 1 1. preface pp. i-ii, to
the reader pp. iii-iv, half title verso blankl I.
text pp. 3-259, 8°. Alphabetically arranged by
names of languages, double columns, German
and Latin.
List of works containing material relating to
the language of Nutka Sound, p. 171.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Eames,
Pilling.
A later edition in German with ti'tle-page as
follows:
 Litteratur | der| Grammatiken, Lex-
ika | und | Wortersammlungen | aller
Sprachen der Erde [ von | Johann Severin Vater. | Zweite, vollig umgear-
beitete Ausgabe | von | B. Jiilg. |
Berlin, 1847. | In der Nicolaischen
Buchhandlung.
Title verso blank 11. dedication verso blank 1
1. preface (signed B.Julg and dated 1. December 1846) pp. v-x, titles of general works on the
subjectpp. xi-xii, text (alphabeticallyarranged
by names of languages) pp. 1-450, additions
and corrections pp. 451-541, subject index pp.
542-563, author index pp. 564-592, errata 2 11. 8°.
List of works containing material relating
to tho language of Nutka Sound, pp. 267-268,
528.
Copies seen: Congress, Eames, Harvard.
At the Fischer sale, no. 1710, a copy sold for Is.
 See Adelung (J. C.) and Vater (J. S.)
Vocabularies:
Hailtsuk See Boas (F.)
Hailtsuk Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Hailtsuk Campbell (J.)
Hailtsuk Dall(W.H.)
Hailtsuk Gallatin (A.)
Hailtsuk Gibbs (G.)
Hailtsuk Hale (H.)
Hailtsuk Latham (R. G.)
Hailtsuk Powell (J. W.)
Hailtsuk Tolmie (W. F.)
Klaokwat Bulmer (T. S.)
Klaokwat Buschmann (J. C. B.) 62
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF  THE
Vocabularies -
-Continued.
Vocabularies -
-Continued.
Klaokwat
See Gibbs (G.)
Nutka
See Boas (F.)
Klaokwat
Latham (R. G.)
Nutka
Brabant (A.J.)
Klaokwat
Lemmens (T. N.)
Nutka
Bulmer (T. S.)
Klaokwat
Scouler (J.)
Nutka
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Klaokwat
Waters (A.)
Nutka
Campbell (J.)
Kwakiutl
Boas (F.)
Nutka
Cook (J.)
Kwakiutl
Canadian.
Nutka
Ellis (W.)
Kwakiutl
Chamberlain (A. F.)
Nutka
Fry (E.)
Kwakiutl
Dall (W. H.)
Nutka
Forster (J.G.)
Kwakiutl
Dawson (G.M.)
Nutka
Gaiiano (D. A.)
Gallatin (A.)
Kwakiutl
Gibbs (G.)
Nutka
Kwakiutl
Kwakiutl.
Nutka
Gibbs (G.)
Kwakiutl
Powell (J. W.)
Nutka
Haines (E. M.)
Kwakiutl
Wilson (E. F.)
Nutka
Hale (H.)
Lekwiltoq
Boas (F.)
Nutka
Humboldt (F. von).
Maka
Bartlett (J. R.)
Nutka
Jehan (L. F.)
Maka
Buschmann (J. C. 3.)
Nutka
Jewitt (J.R.)
Maka
Gaiiano (D. A.)
Nutka
Kerr (R.)
Maka
Gallatin (A.)
Nutka
Knipe (C.)
Maka
Gibbs (G.)
Nutka
La Harpe (J. F. de).
Maka
Knipe (C.)
Nutka
Latham (R. G.)
Maka
Latham (R. G.)
Nutka
Pablo(J.E.S-)
Maka
Maka.
Nutka
Quimper (M.)
Maka
Pinart (A. L.)
Nutka
Scouler (J.)
Maka
Swan (J. G.)
Nutka
Sproat (G.M.)
Niwiti
Gallatin (A.)
Nutka
Swan (J.G.)
Niwiti
Knipe (C.)
Nutka
Yankiewitch (F.)
Nitinat
Knipe (C.)
Tokoaat
Chamberlain (A. F.)
Nitinat
Pinart (A. L.)
Tokoaat
Sproat (G.M.)
Nitinat
Sproat (G.M.)
Tokoaat
Tolmie (W.F.)
Nutka
Adelung (J. C.)
Ukwulta
Petitot (E. F.S.J.)
Nutka
Anderson (W.)
Wakash
Latham (R. G.)
Nutka
Armstrong (A.N.)
Wakash
Pinart (A. L.)
Nutka
Balbi (A.
w.
Wakashan:
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
See Bates (H. W.)
Beach (W.W.)
Berghaus (H.)
Boas (F.)
Brinton (D.G.)
Buschmann (J. 0. E.)
Dawson (G.M.)
Douglass (J.)
Drake (S. G.)
Gallatin (A.)
Haines (E.M.)
Kane (P.)
Keane (A.H.)
Latham (R. G.)
Powell (J. ^Y.)
Priest (J.)
Rafinesque (C. S.)
Sayce (A.H.)
Schoolcraft (H. R.)
Swan (J.G.)
Beach (W.W.)
Berghaus (H.)
Drake (S. G.)
Latham (R. G.)
Wakashan — Continued.
General discussion        Treasury.
Songs Boas (F.)
Vocabulary Latham (R. G.)
Vocabulary Pinart (A. L.)
AVords Bulmer (T. S.)
Words Daa(L.K.)
Waters (Abraham). A | vocabulary of |
Words in Hancock's Harbor | Language, | On the North West Coast of N.
America. | Taken by Abraham Waters,
who | sailed to that plac° with Capt.
Gray of [ Boston (about 20 years ago)
whose widow | presented the Original,
from which this is j transcribed, to
Elbridge G. Howe. [ Paxton Dec. 13.
1828.
Manuscript, 14 pages. 8°; in the library of the
American Antiquarian Society, Worcester,
Mass. " Hancock's Harbor, lat. 49° 9', long.
125°."
Contains 110 words in the Klaokwat language. WAKASHAN   LANGUAGES.
63
Watkinson: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of
the work referred to has been seen by the compiler in the Watkinson library, Hartford, Conn.
Wellesley : This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that ft copy of
the work referred to has been seen by the compiler belonging to the library of Wellesley
college, Wellesley, Mass.
Whymper (Frederick).    Travel aud adventure | in the | territory of Alaska, |
formerly Russian America—now ceded
to the | United States—and in various
other  |   parts of the north Pacific.   |
By Frederick Whymper. | [Design.] |
With map and illustrations. |
London: | John Murray, Albemarle
street. | 1868. [The right of Translation
is reserved.
Half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso names of
printers 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. preface
pp. vii-ix, contents pp. xi-xix, list of illustra-
tious p. [xx], text pp. 1-306, appendix pp. 307-
331, map, plates, 8°.
A few Claoq uaht phrases, pp. 30,31.
Copiesseen : Boston Public, British Museum,
Congress.
At the Field sale, catalogue no. 2539, a copy
brought $2.75.
 Travel    and    adventure | in   the |
territory of Alaska, | formerly Russian
America—now ceded to the | United
States—and in various other | parts
of the north Pacific. | By Frederick
Whymper. | [Design.] | With map and
illustrations. |
New York: | Harper &, brothers,publishers, [ Franklin square. [ 1869.
Frontispiece 11. title verso blank 1 1. dedication verso blank 11. preface pp. xi-xii concents
pp. xiii-xviii, list of illustrations p. xix, text
pp. 21-332, appendix pp. 333-353, map and
plates, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above,
pp. 49, 50.
Copies seen: Bancroft, Boston Athenseum,
Powell.
Reprinted, 1871, pp. xix, 21-353, 8°.
A French edition with title as follows :
 Frederick   Whymper | Voyages    et
aventures | dans | PAlaska | (anciennc
Ame"rique russe) | Ouvrage traduit de
l'Anglais | avec l'autorisation dc
Fauteur | par £mile Jonveaux | Illus-
tre de 37 gravures sur bois | et accom-
pagne d'une carte |
Paris | librairie Hachette et Ci(i |
boulevard Saint-Germain, 79 | 1871 |
Tqus droits reserve's
Whymper (F.)— Continued.
Cover title as above, half-title verso name of
printer 11, title verso blank 11. preface pp. i—ii,
half-title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 3-405, table
des ehapitres pp. 407-412, map, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above, p.
41.
Copiesseen: Pilling.
Wikenak:
Vocabulary See Boas (F.)
Wilson (Rev. Edward Francis).   A comparative vocabulary.
In the Canadian Indian, vol. 1, no. 4, pp. 104-
107, Owen Sound, Ontario, January, 1891, 8°.
(Pilling.)
A vocabulary of ten words in about 56 languages, mostly North American, among them
the Kwakiool.
Rev. Edward Francis Wilson, son of the late.
Rev. Daniel Wilson. Islington, prebendary of
St. Paul's cathedral, and grandson of Daniel
Wilson, bishop of Calcutta, was born in London
December 7,1844, and at the age of 17 left school
and emigrated to Canada for the purposeof leading an agricultural life; soon after his arrival
he was led to take an interest in the Indians
and resolved tobecomeamissionary. After two
years of preparation, much of which time was
spent among the Indians, ho returned to
England, and in December, 1867, was ordained
deacon. Shortly thereafter it was arranged
that he should return to Canada as a missionary
to the Ojibway Indians, under the auspices of
the Church Missionary Society, which hedid iu
July, 1868. He has labored among the Indians
eversince, buildiug two homes—the Shingwauk
Home, at Sault Ste. Marie, aud the Wawanosh
Home, two miles from tho former—and pre-
Xiaring linguistic works.
Wisconsin Historical Society: These words following a title or within parentheses after a note
indicate that a copy of the work referred to has
been seen by the compiler in the lihrary of that
institution, Madison, Wis.
Words:
Hailtsuk
See Boas (F.)
Hailtsuk
Daa (L. K.)
Hailtsuk
Gibbs (G.)
Hailtsuk
Latham (R. G.)
Klaokwat
Baa (L. K.)
Klaokwat
Latham (K. G.)
Klaokwat
Whymper <F.)
Kwakiutl
Boas (F.)
Kwakiutl
Hale (H.)
Kwakiutl
Pott (A.F.)
Nutka
Bachiller y Morales
Nutka
Bancroft (H. H.)
Nutka
Boas (F.)
Nutka
Bulmer (T. S.)
Nutka
Daa (L. K.)
Nutka
Eells (M.)
Nutka
Ellis (W.)
Nutka
Featherman (A.)
Nutka
Gibbs (G.)
Nutka
Hale (H.) 64
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
Words — Continued.
Words — Continued.
Nutka
See Jewitt (J. E.)
Nutka
See Umery (J.)
Nutka
Latham (B. G.)
Nutka
Vater (J. S.)
Nutka
Luhhock (J.)
Nutka
Youth's.
Nutka
Norris (P. W.)
Ukwulta
Petitot (E.F.S.J.)
Nutka
Pott (A. F.)
Wakash
Bulmer (T. S.)
Nutka
Prichard (J. C.)
Wakash
Daa(L.K.)
Nutka
Swan (J. G.)
Wikenok
Boas (F.)
Yale: This word following a title or within parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of the
work referred to has been seen by the compiler
in the library of Yale College, New Haven, Conn.
s [Yankiewitch (Feodor) de Miriewo. ]
CpaBHure.ii.nhiii | uoitapb | Bc/ftxi. | H3Mi>0B'b n
uapViiii, j no a36yiH0My nopjuity | pacno.10-
senHbiii. I (IacTb HepBaaC-seTBepTaa] | A-^
[C-0]. I
B'b CaiiKiunemepOyprfe, 1790[-1791].
Translation: Comparative | dictionary | of all
I languages and dialects | in alphabetical order
I arranged. | Part first [-fourth] A-D[S-Th]. |
At St. Petersburg, 1790[-1791]
4 vols.: title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 1-454;
title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 1-499; title verso
blank 1 1. text pp. 1-518; title verso blank 1 1.
text pp. 1-618,4°.
About two hundred and seventy-four languages and dialects are here represented, of
which twenty-five are American. Among the
latter is ono
Bb oUiacimi By mica Bb cBBCpo-3ana,nio ii AvepBKt
[In the region Nutka, in northwestern America.]
Each page is divided into three columns, the
first containing in alphabetical order the words
of various languages, the second showing the
Russian equivalents, and the third giving the
names of the languages represented in the first
column. This edition was edited by Feodor Yankiewitch.   One thousand copies were printed.
The work of which the above is a re arrangement was begun by the empress Catharine II
of Russia in the summer or autumn of 1784.
After laboring on it personally for about nine
months, she called Prof. Peter Simon Pallas to
her aid, and ordered him to digest the material
and prepare it for the press. On the22d of May,
1785, a circular or prospectus of the work was
issued; and in 1786 a Modelc du vocabulaire, qui
doit servir a la comparaison de toutes les langues,
411. 4°, was printed, and sent out for the purpose
of obtaining additional information.
One copy or more of this specimen was forwarded to General Washington, through the
Marquis do Lafayette, with a request for some
authentic vocabularies of the North American
Indians. The receipt of this application was
acknowledged on May 10th, 1786, by General
Yankiewitch (F.) — Continued.
Washington, who wrote on the 20th of the following August to Capt. Thomas Hutchins, enclosing the printed specimen, andasking for vocabularies of tho Ohio Indians. A few months later,
November 27th, 1786, hearing that Richard Butler had been appointed superintendent of Indian
affairs, General "Washington wrote to him,
requesting him to obtain the printed form from
Capt. Hutchins, and to collect the desired
information. A little more than a year passed
before the material was ready. On the 20th of
January, 1788, Washington transmitted to
Lafayette a vocabulary of the Sbawanese and
Delaware languages, collected by Mr. Butler,
together with a shorter specimen of the language of the southern Indians by Mr. Benjamin
Hawkins.
In the meantime, by order of the empress,
work on the great comparative vocabulary had
been rapidly hurried on. Tins first section was
completed and published, with Latin titles prefixed, Linguarum totius orbis vocabularia com-
parativa; augustisbimaecura collecta,VetTQi>oli,
1786-1789, 2 vols. 4°. (Eames.) It comprised
words in 51 European, 137 Asiatic, and 12 Polynesian languages, with the numerals at the end
in 225 languages, all in Russian characters; 285
selected words were treated separately, 130 in
the first volume and 155 in the second. The
Russian word was placed at the head of each list,
and followed in numerical order by the names
of the 200 languages, each witn its equivalent
word in one line.
The second section, which was intended to
comprise the American and African words, in
one volume, was never printed. This was due to
a change of plan. The empress, it seems, was
not satisfied with the result. She now wished
to have all the words arranged in one general
alphabet, irrespective of language. As Prof.
Pallas was busily engaged in other scientific
labors which had been assigned to him, the services of Feodor Yankiewitch de Miriewo, director
of the normal school at St. Petersburg, were
immediateiycallcd into requisition. Hnderhis
direction all the material in print and manuscript was recast, the American and African
words included, and the whole published in four
volumes, as described above.
Copies seen: .British Museum, Eames.
Yokultat.   See Ukwulta, WAKASHAN  LANGUAGES.
65
Youth's.    The   youth's | companion: | a
| monthly   magazine | published    for
the benefit | of the | Puget sound,W. T.
Indian missions. | Volume first [-fifth?]
| [Vignette.] |
Tulalip Indian Reservation, | 1882
[-1886?].
5 vols. 16°. I have seen but two volumes (tho
first and second) with cover title and inside
title both as above, those belonging to myself;
the remaining portion I have seen only in numbers, the last of which is beaded Vol. V. May,
1886. No. 60. These numbers are each headed
as follows:
The youth's companion: a juvenile monthly
magazine published for the benefit of the Puget
Sound Catholic Indian Missions; and set to
type, printed and in part written by the pupils
of the Tulalip, Wash. Ty. Industrial Boarding
Youth's —Continued.
Schools, under the control of the Sisters of
Charity. Approved by the Rt. Rev. Bishop.
Vol.1. May, 1881. No. 1 [-Vol.V.May, 1886. No.
60.]
It was edited by Rev. J. B. Boulet, and
instead of being paged continuously, continued
articles haveaseparate pagination dividing the
regular numbering. Por instance, in no. 1, pp.
11-14 {Lives of the saints) are numbered 1-4,
and tho article is continued in no. 2 on pp. 5-8,
taking the place of 41-44 of the regular numbering. The publication was discontinued after
May, 1886. on account of the protracted illness
of the editor.
A few words in the Nootsack language, vol.
2, p. 156.
Copies seen: Congress,Georgetown, Pilling,
Wellesley.
Yukulta.    See Ukwulta.
Vi  CHRONOLOGIC INDEX.
1782
Nutka
Vocabulary
1783
Nutka
Vocabulary
1783
Nutka
Vocabulary
178*
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
1784
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
1784
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
1784
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
1784
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
1785
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
1785
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
1785
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
1785
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
1785
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
1786
Nutka
Vocabulary
1787
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
1787-'88
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
1789
Nutka
Numerals
1790
Nutka
Numerals
1790
Nutka
Vocabulary, etc.
1790-'91
Nutka
Vocabulary
1791
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
1791
Nutka
Vocabulary
1792
Nutka
Numerals
1795
Nutka
Numerals
1798-1800
Nutka
Numerals
1798-1800
Nutka
Numerals
1799
Nutka
Vocabulary
1801
Nutka
Numerals
1801
Nutka
Numerals
1802
Maka, Nutka
Vocabularies
1866-'10
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
1806-'17
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
1809-'13
Nutka
Numerals
1810
Nutka
Numerals
1810
Nutka
Words
1811
Nutka
Numerals
1811
Nutka
Numerals
1811
Nutka
Numerals
1811
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
1811
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
1811-'16
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
1811-'16
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
1813
Nutka
Numerals
1814
Nutka
Numerals
1815
Nutka
Bibliography
1815
Nutka
Numerals
1815
Nutka
Vocabulary, song
1815
Nutka
Vocabulary, song
1810
Nutka
Numerals
1816
Nutka
Vocabulary, song
1816
Nutka
Vocabulary, song
1816?
Nutka
Vocabulary, song
1816
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
1820
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
1820
Nutka
Vocabulary, song
1822
Nutka
Numerals
Ellis (W.)
Ellis (W.)
Ellis (W.)
Anderson (W.)
Cook (J.)
Cook (J.)
Cook (J.)
Cook (J.)
Cook (J.)
Cook (J.)
Cook (J.)
Cook (J.)
Cook (J.)
La Harpe (J. F.)
Cook (J.)
Cook (J.)
Dixon (G.)
Dixon (G.)
Quimper (M.)
Yankiewitch (F.)
Forster (J. G. A.)
Pablo (J.E.G.)
Bourgoing (J. F.)
Dixon (G.)
Fleurieu (C.P. C.)
Fleurieu (C. P. C.)
Fry (E.)
Fleurieu (C.P. C.)
Fleurieu (C.P. C.)
Galiauo (D. A.)
Cook (J.)
Adelung (J. C.)
Humboldt (F. von).
Humboldt (F. von).
Vater (J.S.)
Classical.
Humboldt (F. von).
Humboldt (F. von).
Humboldt (F. von).
Humboldt (F. von).
Cook (J.)
Kerr (F.)
Humboldt (F. von).
Humboldt (F. von).
Vater (J. S.)
Humboldt (F. von).
Jewitt (J. E.)
Jewitt (J. E.)
Humboldt (F. von).
Jewitt (J. E.)
Jewitt (J. E.)
Jewitt (J. E.)
La Harpe (J. F.)
La Harpe (J. F.)
Jewitt (J. E.)
Humboldt (F. von).
67 68
CHRONOLOGIC   INDEX.
1822
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
Humboldt (F. von).
1822
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
La Harpe (J. F.), note.
1823
Nutka
Numerals
Boquefeuil (C.J.)
1823
Nutka
Words
Eoquefeuil (C. J.)
1824
Nutka
Numerals
Humboldt (F. von).
1824
Nutka
Vocabulary, song
Jewitt (J.E.)
1824
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
Kerr (E.)
1825
Nutka
Vocabulary
La Harpe (J. F.),note.
1825-1827
Nutka
Numerals
Humboldt (F.von).
1826
Nutka
General discussion
Prichard (J. C.)
1826
Nutka
Vocabulary
Balbi (A.)
1828
?
?
Cook (J.)
1828
Klaokwat
Vocabulary
Waters (A.)
lS29-'30
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
La Harpe (J.F.)
1832'83
Wakash
General discussion
Bafinesque (C. S.)
1833
Wakash
Classification
Priest (J.)
1836
Nutka
Numerals
Humboldt (F. von).
1836
Maka, Nutka
Vocabularies
Gallatin (A.)
18IS6-47
Nutka
General discussion
Prichard (J. C.)
1840-'48
Nutka
General discussion
Prichard (J. C.)
1841
Klaokwat
Vocabulary
Scouler (J.)
1841
Klaokwat
Vocabulary
Tolmie (W.F.)
1841
Nutka
Numerals
Fleurieu (C.P.C.)
1842
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
Cook (J.)
1843
Hailtsuk
General discussion
Prichard (J. C.)
1844
Hailtsuk
Voeabulary
Dunn (J.)
1844
Nutka
Numerals
Duflot de Mofras (E.)
1845
Nutka
Words
Bachiller y Morales (A.)
1846
Hailtsuk
Vocabulary
Dunn (J.)
1846
Hailtsuk
Numerals
Latham (E. G.)
1846
Klaokwat, Nutka
Vocabularies
Scouler (J.)
1846
Hailtsuk, Nutka
Vocabularies
Hale (H.)
1846
Hailtsuk, Nutka
Vocabularies
Halo (H.)
1847
Nutka
Bibliography
Vater (J. S.)
1847
Nutka
Numerals
Pott (A.F.)
1848
Hailtsuk, Nutka
Vocabularies
Gallatin (A.)
1848
Hailtsuk, Nutka
General discussion
Prichard (J. C.)
1848
Klaokwat, Nutka
Vocabularies
Scoulor (J.), note.
1848
Various
Various
Latham (E. G.)
1849
Nutka
Vocabulary, song
Jewitt (J.E.)
1850
Various
Various
Latham (E. G-.)
1851
Nutka
Vocabulary, song
Jewitt (J.E.)
1851
Hailtsuk, Nut ka
Classification
Latham (E.G.)
1851-'57
Wakashan
Classification
Schoolcraft (H. E.)
1862?
Nutka
Vocabulary, numerals
Cook (J.)
1852
Wakash
General discussion
Berghaus (H.)
1853
Wakash
Classification
Gallatin (A.)
1855
Hailtsuk, Nutka
General discussion
Prichard (J. C.)
1857
Kwakiutl
Vocabulary
Kwakiutl.
1857
Maka, Nutka
Vocabulary
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
1857
Maka, Nutka
Vocabulary
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
1857
Nutka
Vocabulary
Armstrong (A. M.)
1857
Nutka
Vocabulary, etc.
Swan (J.G.)
1857
Nutka
Vocabulary, etc.
Swan (J.G.)
1857
Various
General discussion
Anderson (A. C), note.
1857
Various
Numerals, etc.
Latham (E.G.)
1857
Various
Words
Daa (L. K.)
1858
Maka
Numerals
Grant (W. C.)
1858
Nutka
Vocabulary
Jehan (L. F.)
1858
Wakashan
Classification
Kane (1>.)
1859
Wakashan
Classification
Ludewig <H. E.)
1859
Wakashan
Classification
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
1859
Wakashan
Classification
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
1860
Maka
Numerals
Haines (E.M.)
1860
Various
Various
Latham (E. G.)
I860
Wakashan
Classification
Schoolcraft (H. E.)
1861
Nutka
Words
Jewitt (J. E.) CHRONOLOGIC   INDEX.
69
1802
Various
Vocabularies
1862
Various
Words
1863
Various
General discussion
1863
Various
Vocabularies
1863
Various
Vocabularies
1864
Nutka
Vocabulary
18G5
Maka
Vocabulary
1865
Maka
Vocabulary
1868
Aht, etc.
Various
1868
Klaokwat
Phrases
1868
Maka
Vocabulary, etc.
1868
Various
Various
1868-'91
Wakashan
Bibliography
1869
Klaokwat
Phrases
1869
Maka
Vocabulary, etc.
1869
Nutka
Words
1870
Nutka
Words
1870
Nutka
Words
1870
Nutka
Words
1871
Klaokwat
Phrases
1871
Klaokwat
Proper names
1873
Wakashan
Bibliography
1873?
Wakashan
Words
1874-'75
Nutka
Grammar, etc.
1874-76
Various
Various                    ,
1874-76
Various
Various
1875
Nutka
Words
1875
Nutka
Words
1875
Wakashan
Bibliography
1876
Ukwulta
Vocabulary
1877
Hailtsuk
Vocabulary
1877
Hailtsuk
Vocabulary
1877
Kwakiutl
Vocabulary
1877
Nutka
General discussion
1877
Nutka
General discussion
1877
Nutka
General discussion
1877-'90
Hailtsuk
Vocabulary
1878
Wakashan
Classification
1878
Wakashan
Classification
1881
Nutka
Tribal names
1881-'86
Nutka
Words
1882
Kwakiutl
Gospel of Matthew
1882
Nutka
Words
1882
Nutka, Hailtsuk
Vocabulary
1882
Nutka, Hailtsuk
Vocabulary
1882
Various
Various
1882
Wakashan
Classification
1882
Wakashan
Classification
1882
Wakashan
Classification
1883
Nutka
Words
1884
Tokoaat
Vocabulary
1884
Kwakiutl
Gospel of John
1884
Ukwulta
Words
1884
Wakashan
Classification
1884~'89
Wakashan
Bibliography
1885
Kwakiutl
Bible passage
1885
Kwakiutl
Bible passage
1885
Kwakiutl
Bible passage
1885
Kwakiutl
Bible passage
1885
Maka
Grammatic treatise
1885
Wakashan
Bibliography
1885
Wakashan
Classification
1885
Wakashan
Classification
1885-'89
Nutka
Words
1880
Kwakiutl
Lord's prayer
1887
Wakashan
Bibliography
1888
Tokoaat, Hailtsuk
Numerals
Latham (E. G.)
Pott (A. F.)
Anderson (A. C.)
Gibbs (G.)
Gibbs (G.)
Jehan (L.F.)
Swan (J. G.)
Swan (J. G.)
Sproat (G.M.)
Whymper (F.)
Swan (J.G.)
Knipe (C.)
Sabin (J.)
Whymper (F.)
Swan (J.G.)
Jewitt (J. E.)
Lubbock (J.)
Lubbock (J.)
Lubbock (J.)
Whymper (F.)
Catlin (G.)
Field (X. W.)
Treasury.
Brabant (A.J.)
Bancroft (H. II.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Ellis (K.)
Lubbock (J.)
Field (T.W.)
Petitot (E. F.S.J.)
Dall(W.H.)
Gibbs (G.)
Gibbs (G.)
Beach (W. W.)
Gatschet (A. S.)
Gatschet (A, S.)
Powell (J. W.)
Bates (H. W.)
Keane (A. H.)
Keane (A.H.)
Youth's.
Hall (A.J.)
Lubbock (J.)
Campbell (J.)
Campbell (J.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Bates (H. W.)
Drake (S.G.)
Keane (A. H.), note.
Norris (P. W.)
Tolmie (W. F.)
Hall (A.J.)
Petitot (E. F.S.J.)
Schoolcraft (n. Ii.)
Pott (A. F.)
British.
British.
British.
British.
Eells (M.)
Pilling (J. C.)
Bates (II. W.)
Keane (A. H.), note.
Featherman (A.)
Gilbert (—).
Dufosse (E.)
Eells (M.) 70
CHRONOLOGIC  INDEX.
1888
Kwakiutl
Bible passage
British.
1888
Kwakiutl
Grammar
Hall (A.J.)
1888
Kwakiutl
Grammar
Hall (A.J.)
1888
Kwakiutl
Songs
Boas (F.)
1888
Kwakiutl
Various
Dawson (G.M.)
1888
Kwakiutl
Various
Dawson (G.M.)
1888
Kwakiutl
Words
Boas (F.)
1888
Kwakiutl
Words
Boas (F.)
1888
Kwakiutl
Words
Boas (F.)
1888
Nutka, Hailtsuk
Vocabulary, numerals
Haines (E. M.)
1888
Wakashan
Bibliographic
Maclean (J.)
1888
Wakashan
Songs
Boas (F.)
1889
Kwakiutl, Tokoaat
Vocabulary
Chamberlain (A. F.)
1889
Kwakintl
Bible passage
British.
1889
Kwakiutl
Vocabulary
Boas (F.)
1889
Kwakiutl, Hailtsuk
Words
Boas (F.)
1889
Kwakiutl, Hailtsuk
Words
Boas (F.)
1889
Maka
Numerals
Eells (M.)
1889
Maka
Numerals
Eells (M.)
1889
Maka
Numerals
Eells (M.), note.
1889
Nutka
Lord's prayer
Brabant (A.J.)
1889
Nutka
Words
Lubbock (J.)
1889
Wakashan
Bibliographic
Maclean (J.)
1890
Kwakiutl
Bible passage
British, note.
1890
Kwakiutl
Various
Boas (F.)
1890
Kwakiutl
Various
Boas (F.)
1890
Kwakiutl, Nutka
Words
Hale (H.)
1890
Kwakiutl, Nutka
Words
Hale (H.)
1890
Nutka
Words
Hale (H.)
1890-'91
Kwakiutl
Vocabulary
Canadian.
1891
Kwakiutl
Lord's prayer
Eost (E.)
1891
Kwakiutl
Lord's prayer
Eost (E.)
1891
Kwakiutl
Vocabulary
Wilson (E. F.)
1891
Kwakiutl
Prayer book
Hall (A. J.)
1891
Nutka
Vocabulary
Eells (M.)
1891
Nutka
Words
Bulmer (T. S.)
1891
Nutka
Words
Bulmer (T. S.)
1891
Nu tka, Klaokwat
Words
Bulmer (T. S.)
1891
Various
Vocabularies
Boas (F.)
1891
Various
Vocabularies
Boas (F.)
1891
Wakashan
Classification
Brinton (D. G.)
1891
Wakashan
Classification
Powell (J. W.)
1891
Wakashan
Classification
Powell (J. W.)
1891
Wakashan
Geographic names
Buhner (T. S.)
1891
Wakashan
Words
Bulmer (T. S.)
1891
Wakashan
Words
Bulmer (T. S.)
1891
Wakashan
Words
Bulmer (T. S.)
1892
Maka
Words
Eells (M.)
1893
Kwakiutl
Bible passage
British.
1893
Kwakiutl
Grammar, etc.
Boas (F.)
1893
Kwakiutl
Vocabulary, etc.
Boas (F.)
N.d.
Hailtsuk
Lord's prayer
Tate (C. M.)
N.d.
Klaokwat
Vocabulary
Lemmens (T. N.)
N.d.
Maka
Numerals
Bartlett (J. E.)
N.d.
Maka
Vocabulary
Bartlett (J. E.)
N.d.
Maka
Vocabulary
Gibbs (G.)
N.d.
Maka
Vocabulary
Gibbs (G.)
N.d.
Maka
Vocabulary
Maka.
N.d.
Nutka
Prayers
Seghers (C.J.)
N.d.
Nutka
Vocabulary
Boas (F.)
N.d.
Nutka
Vocabulary
Knipe (C.)
N.d.
Nutka, Maka
Vocabularies
Gaiiano (D. A.), note
N.d.
Various
Bibliography
Gibbs (G.)
N.d.
Various
Vocabularies
Knipe (C.)
N.d.
Various
Vocabularies
Pinart (A. L.)
N.d.
I
?
Douglass (J.)    

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