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BC Historical Books

BC Historical Books

The Wawa shorthand instructor Le Jeune, J. M. R., 1855-1930 1896

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 50 CENTS 
THE WAWA 
Shorthand Instructor
 OR THE DUPLOYAN STENOGRAPHY 
ADAPTED TO ENGLISH
 By the Editor of the KAMLOOPS WAWA. "
THE simplest system of Shorthand in the world. The easiest to
learn.    A hundred times easier than the old writing.
Two million people (2,000,000) throughout the world already
practising this system of phonography. It is adapted to over twenty
different languages.
Can be learned without teacher in one to three hours.
If you are a stranger to Shorthand, take this paper and become
acquainted with this useful art.
If you have failed to learn Shorthand owing to the complication
of the system you adopted, or from want of time, do not give up, but
try this system, and wonder at its simplicity.
Time is precious. You will save time as soon as you are
acquainted with this phonography.
FIRST   EDITION.
i
KAMLOOPS, B.C.
1896. THE PHONETIC ALPHABET.
Vowels:
an    en^tn    tn    un
\
Consonants:
**  vy      J     C
npt/stlitis     n   m,
b   d   V- a    -fc   fch zjts   na
\
a    h   c    d    e. f Q h,   l  J
o /*rvy -       C      y, v**—N    -       •»
fa I m:  H   o p  a   t s
KS    —
fc   \   V<|
^«#»c ^»y
/    2    3    4     r     6    7    %   J     0
X    c     ^    ^    £j     o
\    / The system of Shorthand explained in these pages is the
Duployan Shorthand, as pure as it has been possible to retain it
for expressing the sounds of the English language. As has been
said in a former issue of the "Kamloops Wawa," "an effort is
here made to make our phonography read the same way exactly
in English as in French, and so also for all other languages."
Our Indians in British Columbia, as soon as they can read
the Chinook and their own language in shorthand, are also able
to read English, Latin, or any other language figured in shorthand.
In the same manner, as soon as one is able to read and write
English in this style of shorthand, he will find himself at once
able to read and pronounce correctly French, German, or any
other language, by which it can be seen that this shorthand is
a most powerful means for learning languages. This needs only
be tried to be proved to evidence.
Another object of this shorthand, which ought to make the
primary one, is to assist in acquiring every kind of knowledge,
even that of Grammar and Orthography, a hundred times quicker
than through the common way. This question has been discussed at full length in the French Duployan Stenographic Press.
It is sufficient to state that a pupil in this style of shorthand who
does not know how to read, will learn to read English or any 2 INTRODUCTION
other language in shorthand in a few lessons, and will at once be
able to store up in his mind all kinds of information, and will
with the greatest ease, learn that most difficult, most trying, and
most queer science, that of the current English Orthography.
But for many, the principal object in undertaking the study of
shorthand is to acquire speed in writing, and most pupils in
shorthand do hardly master the principles of the art, when they
rush for the reporting style, in which the words and phrases
are abbreviated as much as it is possible, and often more than is
necessary.
Now, do not be too anxious for abbreviations in this style of
shorthand; instead of looking up too early for a reporting style,
see rather that you master well the phonography in full. Mind,
this system of shorthand in full is at least five times shorter to
write than the common long hand, so that when you acquire the
same natural ease in writing this shorthand as you have now in
writing long hand, you can put down five times more words in
the same space of time. If you can now with ease write twenty
words a minute, you will write one hundred words with the same
facility, when you have become accustomed to the turn of the
shorthand, and if you can by rushing a little, write-thirty or even
thirty-five words a minute, you will just as well write 150 to 175
words a minute, and that in full style, without a single abbreviation, and what is more still, you will be able to read what you
have thus written, at any time, as easily as typography, or read
any other one's notes providing the writing is correct, what cannot be so easily done when abbreviations are used.
_n__M_| THE  WAWA  SHORTHAND
3
DUPLOYAN  PHONOGRAPHY-ENGLISH  METHOD.
ELEMENTS  OF  PHONOGRAPHY.
FIRST LESSON.
The first lesson  comprises five phonographic
elements and exercises.
1. Write a small circle, the smallest you can :
that is the sound | ah," or " a " as in " fat."
2. Write now a circle much larger than the first;
that will answer for "oh," and will figure "o" as
in "not."
3. The same size circle, "radiated," will stand
for "oo,"as in "foot."
4. The fourth sign is a short perpendicular, about
one-eighth of an inch long, drawn " straight downwards" ; it is the consonant " p."
5. A perpendicular two or three times longer is
the sign used for the consonant "b."
With these five elements we can figure a number
of words.
Draw the sign used for "p," ending it in a small
circle as used for "ah" : you have the word "pa."
Nota.—It would be wrong to make an angle
between the "p" and the "a," by placing the circle
straight under the perpendicular, thus making an
angle : that would make two strokes of the pen
instead of one. The angle is avoided by turning
the circle either side of the perpendicular.
Our great rule is to "avoid angles," whenever
it is possible.
CL in fat :    o
0 vn. not:   O
OOtnj-oot:  O
o-
,-b
oo
mm b
H i.  b b
eov THE  WAWA  SHORTHAND
a
Now, draw the "p" as before, and terminate by
a large circle, as for "o" : you have "po."
Draw again the same as for "po," radiating the
circle, as in the accompanying figures: you have
"poo."
Write now, first the letter " ah," commencing at
the bottom, so as to connect it without making an
angle, with the following letter "p." You have
"ap." In the same manner you can write "op,"
"oop."
Write now the long perpendicular "b," terminating it into a small circle : you have " ba." In the
same manner "bo," "boo." Write also: "ab,"
"ob," "oob."
Write again the monogram "pa," but, before
lifting the pen from the paper, draw another p
short perpendicular " straight downwards " : that
makes " pap." In the same manner "pop," "poop."
If to the monogram "pap," you add another " ah,"
YOU will have "papa."
<.
0 0 ^
00- Q
»n
■<mj:    ?   <p   <y
HyAt:
<\ q Q
pa  bo wo
1  b b
ab ob oob
Not a.—It will be very useful to study this lesson
two or three times over, carefully writing down
all the signs and monograms, before passing to the
next lesson. See that you take not the habit of
making the "a" too large, or the "o" too small.
Beginners are also liable to make the " p" too long,
or the "b" too Bhort, so as to confound the one
letter with the other.
p PaP i
/
papa.: j THE  WAWA   SHORTHAND
SECOND LESSON.
The second lesson adds only two more elements
to the ones already given. Like "p" and "b," the
sounds "t" and "d" are similar, the one being
sharp and short, and the-other, soft and long. The
letter "t" will be represented by an.horizontal line,
very short, always written "from left to right."
The letter "d" in the same manner, but much
longer.
Now write an horizontal line, very short, terminating without angle, into a very small circle
turned above or below the line : that makes " ta."
In the same manner, "to," "too."
Then, write first the vowel, followed by the consonant, without making an angle : "at," "ot,"
"oot."
Write again "ta," and before lifting the pen,
draw another "t" : "tat" ; also, " tot," "toot."
A number of other words can be written with
the help of the two consonants learned in the first
lesson: "tap," "top," "toop." Here the circle is
turned above the line, so as to connect without
angle with the following consonant without the
pen running the same course twice.
II.
THIRD LESSON.
Two more signs are added to the one already
known : the similar sounds " f'' and " v,'' are represented by slanting lines, or lines drawn "obliquely
from left to right/' the "v" being much longer
than the "f." ^
&M
-O-JD
£3
<x.
ex
Q.
O.
.Q.
&- J- d- d-
jfc<j J-    eJ-
-P_p Jp.
\>\X^
3!' rv . , ■
FOURTH LESSON.
. Two more signs. "K" is short and sharp, and
" G" is soft and long. An oblique line, very short,
written downwards, "from right to left," will represent "k" ; the same, much longer, "g."
Nota.—When "g" sounds like "j," as in age, it is
written like "j," in phonograph}'.
<r or <¥ y-<yot-
-r-y>-p>>/> THE  WAWA   SHORTHAND
FIFTH LESSON.
" L" and " R" are called'' liquids." Oblique lines
drawn "upwards, from left to right," will represent these letters, a short one for "1," and a
long one for "r."
At first sight, these two letters resemble the
preceding ones, "k" and "g." But they are perfectly distinct, and no confusion can be made ; for
"1" and "r" are written "upwards," "k" and "g,"
" downwards." When written from the same line,
"1" and "r" will "ascend, above," while " k" and
"g" will "descend, below" the line.
SIXTH LESSON.
"Sh," and " j or ch." A large semicircle, curved
''upside" the line, and written "from left to
right," will represent " sh"; the same with a dot
inside, will figure "j or ch," a smaller one for "j,''
and a larger one for " ch."
SEVENTH LESSON.
"S"and"z." A large semicircle, curved "beneath the line," written "from left to right," will
stand for the letter "s" ; a dot inside will distinguish the letter "z, or ts."
EIGHTH LESSON.
Two more signs : "n" and "ng." A large semicircle, curved "to the right,'' and written "downwards," will be the letter "n" ; a dot inside will
make it "ng."
/
MP
n.
x,
ex
xx/y^yy
sy
S.^.Z   ^y
vyv^5y9<>_y^y
-e, &c y^<^
VIII.
n
) ■ W )
!)X<?^-
«i Only one consonant left: | m." It will be figured
by a large semicircle, curved "to the left" and
written "downwards."
TENTH LESSON.
The sounds i ow" and " wa." A circle, same size
as "o," with a dot inside, will figure the sound
of "ow," as in "cow," or "ou" in "out."
Write the vowel "o," but before lifting the pen,
write a small circle inside, same as "ah": you
have the diphthong " wa," as in " water."
ELEVENTH LESSON.
The sounds "a" as in "age," "e,"asin "here,"
"e" as in "sell," "i" as in "mill," and all like
sounds are represented by a small semicircle,
which may take four different positions.
The position of the semicircle is not to be selected at random, but the one that will connect
without angle is to be chosen.
"I" short may be precised by a dot above the
semicircle. |^
IE" long, by a dash above.
" E" short, by a dot under.
" A" long, by a dash under.
These dots and dashes are omitted generally,
unless it be necessary in certain cases to determine
precisely the word used. In ordinary cases, the
context is sufficient to fix the meaning of the word
employed.
The semicircle may be turned "up" or "forward," to represent "i " short or "e" long; and it
may be turned " down," or "backwards," to figure
" e" short or " a" long.
This rule applies only when the hook is final,
and in a few cases, as illustrated in the exercises.
X.
XI.
Cmherc: Z ~? z z
£, in Sell < a 1 ~
Ct^maae' < 2. c f
pea j1. tea I %
pay: j  toy • % •
fee: \>. Jfey: I.
fay ^-Ctfay. tA
.q <_ c_ c-^7 y - 8
THE  WAWA   SHORTHAND
TWELFTH LESSON.
The sound of "u," as in "use," and "u," as in
" us J' will be figured by a quadrant of a large
circle, so placed as to make no angle with the preceding consonant in all cases, and with the following one, whenever possible.
As "u" in "use" is the regular sound of "u," it
is natural that it should be written without another mark when figuring that sound. Whenever
a distinctive mark for "u" as in " us" is required,
a dot may be placed inside the curvature of the
quadrant.   . ________
THIRTEENTH LESSON.
A quadrant of a small circle has been adopted in
thfe system, to represent in abbreviated form the
nasal sounds as below. .The quadrant can be
written in four different positions, numbered 1, 2,
3, 4,. in, the accompanying exercises. The first
when alone will represent "an" ; the second, "in,"
the third, "on," and the fourth, "un." The same,
without any other distinction, will represent the
same sounds in the body of words, whenever they
can be written in the same positions, and connected without angles. In other cases, they should
always be connected without angles, which can
always be done by selecting the one that answers
the requirement: then the sound represented may
be precised by accents as follows :
An acute accent above to designate " an."
A grave accent above to designate "en, in."
An acute accent'belBw to designate "on."
A grave accent below^to designate " un."
The accent may safely be omitted whenever the
context is sufficient to determinate the sound
written.
The same quadrants may be adopted as well to
represent; "am,'' "em," "im," "om," "um" ;
and even the following ones in ordinary cases :
"ang," "eng," "ing," "ong," "ung."
When thp nasal sounds are long as in " been,"
"loan," etc., it is better to write them in the unabbreviated way.    ^^^^^^^
FOURTEENTH LESSON.
"H" aspirate.   A heavy dot in front of a word
will point out " h" aspirate.
XII.
v
Uin use   s- ^\J^
«y
I;
_y
V.
m m
XIII
an. |  enjn \ >
y       n      v    n
an,
am
ana
en, em i
in ,(rn >
on, ont 7 y    >   j-   v.
ona.    J
ctnar,      J v    »•     *    *
£<$"
XIV
h
asp.
9     9  *<?^ THE  WAWA   SHORTHAND
FIFTEENTH LESSON.
A small circle and a small semicircle combined
will figure " i" as in p time," " mile," etc., or "y''
in ''by," "my," etc.
The diphthong of " oi" may be written the same
way, but the circle should be larger. In every case
see that angles are avoided whenever possible.
SIXTEENTH LESSON.
I Th'j is represented by a " t" or "d" marked on
one side or crossed by a dash.
A few samples of compound vowels are given
here, to serve as a key for the writing of those and
similar sounds, whenever they occur.
SEVENTEENTH LESSON.
NUMERALS.
The numerals 1, 2, 3, i, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, are represented, respectively, by P. T. F. K. R. M. N. Sh.
S. O., only the M. N. Sh. and S. are reduced to a
size corresponding with that of the P. T. F. K.
When 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 are represented, as in 11, 22,
33, etc., a small circle as used for a in far, is used
to separate them.   See the example.
Round numbers may be abbreviated as in the
accompanying example.
*£_.   ^S
XV.
lm we :
|||ljfi
p   Q   k
Ot. a 0oi,
xvl
th sharp: ^
/A soft	
the: -
Wa: yy W0:(p
Woo- @ Wtou.g?
We:& Way:Q
Ul*y-ee:($My:0k
Wee-ak ! ® tom-jff
XVII.
1   iH^>
6    7   %   3   0
<        y     r\     **    O
10   ft   30, H 41
b 1 — In
100.1000-   10000
b   ®    ®
?oo ooo. laooooo REMARKS.
The following tables are intended
to show the correct manner of connecting the elements of shorthand
with each other, and the pupil who
follows exactly the turns which are
indicated in these tables cannot fail
to acquire correctness in writing
shorthand. A strict rule is followed
of writing the syllables always in the
shortest possible way.
In the study of shorthand all depends on the habits taken in the beginning. If a habit of writing a
syllable wrong is contracted from the
beginning, it will be difficult to correct it afterwards. Another remark
is that a wrong turn in shorthand is
always detrimental to speed, and to
legibility. So take great care to
write exactly as you see indicated in
the following tables : in most cases
there is only one correct way of
writing a word in shorthand, and to
make sure of having the correct way,
there is no shorter method than to
follow exactly the models given in
the following pages.
The great object in these tables is
to show how to avoid angles,
the first table, page 12. You have
"a" and "p," make "ap." Remember that "a" has uniformly the
sound of "a" in "fat" in all these
syllables. Now the table shows the
shortest way to write down "ap," and
with  "p"  without
the "p" without making an angle.
Write in the same manner "at" "af,"
"ak,"   "al,"   "ash,"   "as,"
"an,"
a
am." Notice that the pen or pencil
is first placed in position for writing
the consonant in the proper direction,
but before writing the same, the circle vowel is traced to one side. The
same rule is observed in the lower
half of the table for writing "pa,"
"ta," etc. ; the consonant is first
written, ending without angle into a
small circle turned to one side. The
consonants "b," "d," "v," "g," "r,"
n g," follow exactly
J, Kjllf Lt
the same rules as their correspondents
in the above tables ; they are omitted
for the sake of simplicity.
The second table, left column of
page 13, works on the vowel "o," in
the same way as letter "ah," in the
first table, so that when the first
table has been well understood, the
second one offers no difficulty ; only
be careful to make the "o" large
enough, as well as to make the "ah"
as small as you possibly can.
Coming to the third table, right
column of page 13,—on "oop,"
"oot," etc. It is again the same
principle "to avoid angles" ; observe
how the "radius" or tail inside the
circle is situated. In the upper part
of the table "oop," "oot," etc., the
phonographic sign must begin with
the radius, and end into the proper
consonant without angle.
The second or lower half of the
table is much simpler, because the
direction of the pen is indicated by Iv
REMARKS
11
the consonant, and the vowel circle
has only to be turned to one side,
and radiated.
The fourth table, first column of
page 14, "wa" and "p" make "wap,"
etc., requires a careful study. The
shortest way must always be preferred in shorthand, and the table
shows the shortest way to write down
the double loop, and the shortest way
to connect it without angle with the
consonant that follows or precedes.
Fifth table, second column of page
14, short "i" and "p" make "ip,"
etc. -We have four different ways of
writing the hook for "i"; one that
will connect without angle must be
chosen in every case. See how the
rule is applied throughout the table.
A great number of mistakes made by
beginners come from disregarding this
rule. "Avoid Angles." With an
angle between "i" and "p," you
write only 100 syllables in the same
time that you write 150 words or
more, by avoiding the angle. To
write "ip" without angle, only one
stroke of the pen is required, while it
takes two to write the same with all
angle between the "i" and the "p."
Nota.—The half circle or hook of
this table is used also to represent
"e" long as in "here," "a" as in
"age," and "e" short as in "met."
To precise either sound, when necessary, follow the rule given in the
eleventh lesson, page 9.
The key to these tables will be
found in the February, March and
April issues of the "Wawa." But
they are so simple that, after seeing
the first one, the following ones can
be followed at first glance.
The exercises on page fifteen are
complete, that is they give the way
to connect any initial vowel with any
following consonant, and how to connect any terminal vowel with any
preceding consonant.
Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, are nothing else
than the tables of pages 12, 13, and
14 condensed, Nos. 6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 13 and 14, take the place of
similar tables which it would be too
long to reproduce in this little booklet.
The key to these exercises is found in
"Wawa," Nos. 137 and 138.
In Exercise No. 6, see how the "e"
hook is connected without angle with
any consonant: Beginners are very
apt to take the wrong turn in this
point, and retard their progress by it.
There must be no perceptible transition between the vowel and the consonant, in the syllables of these
tables : the pen or pencil must run
from the one into the other without
a single mark where the connection
is made. The object of these tables
and exercises is precisely to enable the*
pupil to follow this rule in all cases.
In exercise No. 12 is found a short
way to represent "wip," "wit,"
"wif," etc., by using a large quarter
circle to represent "w" in connection
with the "i" or "e," which, can be
done without engendering confusion.
Exercise No. 13 shows how to connect "wipe," "wite," "wife," etc.,
and Exercise No. 14, "pwi," "twi,"
etc.
No. 15 gives two ways of writing
"we," "way," and then a very short
way to write "wan," "win," "won,'
("wun" or "one"). a
and
P
a
a
t
a
a
f
a
<<
k
a
<<
1
a
t<
sh
a
a.
s
a
<(
n
a
<<
m
•   mctk^     <|
ash     °
make
pa
j    and
ta
—      «.
fa
\
ka
/
la
y
"'up        >f
o   mctke.      [> It
THE WAWA  SHORTHAND
13
The sound "o" before or after
a*ny consonant.
O
O
o
O
O
o
o
o
o
om<
arid
\
/
y
^P
)
(
)
c
make    Q
9
'    (°
O
o
o
o
o
o
make     L
y>
■      6
The sound'
any
'oo" before or
consonant.
after
yf^Yatrto.
|    make    Q
jjJV ;•
_          u
m
©    ••
\          "
I
Q    ,
/
P
Q   ■/•
yjup    ••
6>^
o  !
y-^
_y~~N
c •■•  •
w   '■
e^
©     "
.9   •■
)      1
1
a* A        Q moLke     K
«i
y
/,
W
c
o
~TD
O
NQ
J
II
o
,.      yf>
o:
• ^
o
..     sj?
o
I 1
o
^  (c>  k
SYLLABIC  EXERCISES  COMPLETE
15
cx.eAtAses.
<\ °- <\, ?~<S6^Zy°) C
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biD\y(j^'~z>^><$&
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l -,
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2^d
Way
0   "    ^
W«/r,      W4|V     ty/0K/      WMK/
»s
y   -\ A table showing how to connect the vowel "ah" with any preceding
or following consonant.
This table is very important. In most cases there is
only one way to connect the vowel witfhout angle with the
two consonants, and that is the way which is marked down
in the table. Only nine consonants appear in these tables,
the sharp or short consonants; the other consonants corresponding one by one with those in the table, follow the
same rule; "b" same as "p," "d" same as "t," "v" same as
i      g  same as  k,     r  same as   l,     j,    ch  same as  sh,
a    " a     J>     a 'J a      >>
z   same as   s,      ng   same as   n.
i
|
k >
y
-f
-~-
-^ s
v
r
V
\   >
V
1
y-
< r
y
A
m
y\ y
y
Is V
THE  WAWA  SHORTHAND
1*7
A table showing how to connect the vowel "o" with any preceding
or following consonant.
It is exactly the same as the preceding table, only the
circle between the two consonants is much larger. Remember that beginners are liable to create confusion by
making the "o" too small or the "a" too large. Endeavor
from the beginning to give each letter its proper size.
The key to this table is to be found in "Wawa" No.
*39> page 76.
I.&§£ mm <h^<y. k
-P -**- p y> -6   -6^-^y -R  -f>
o( c/~ cycy ycf-^ °0^ 1
I 1 1 y°cy <y^^\ X
**> y.
1
1 A table showing how to connect the sound "oo" with any preceding
or following consonant.
This table follows the same rules as the preceding ones,
only a break is made in the circle to make it figure the
sound of "oo" as in "foot," "good," etc.
Key in "Wawa," No. 139, page y/.
No table for the vowel "ow." It is the same exactly as
for the vowel "o," with a dot inside.
ef    d-  <*   >   ^   «h GLy<$    k>
^  ^-  ^   y   ^^p ^^  ^>
<y <y- <K ¥ cyc/~^ <K^cy a
<j> <y~ y\f <y y^%s^ f
^ ^~ ^X v-^-v^f?^ vJ^ v^ v_y> THE WAWA  SHORTHAND
19
A table showing how to connect the sound "wa" with any preceding
' or following consonant.
This is a very important table, as it shows the correct
way to make a double loop between any two consonants
without always completing two circles. The table studies
to follow the shortest way in every case.
The key to this table is on page 78, "Wawa," No. 139.
i b- flfi|||i IrH^^
np -^-^-7?
y> __5^
4 yy- <i <? # y^^^) f'
yf /*- yi yp f/*^ As/5 <f
-~^ ^O- \_y^ s-^> vj/v^ "~*Ls "^5 ^~f
} 2 i'y >yy^ f A table showing how to connect "e" long or "1" short with any
preceding or following consonant.
The monograms of this table are intended to represent
"pip," "pit," "pif," etc. They may be made to represent
as well "pep," "pet," "pef," etc., by placing a dot under the
vowel hook, or "peep," "peet," "peef," etc., by placing a
short dash above the hook ; or also "pape," "pate," "pafe,"
etc., if the da&h is placed under the hook. rIn current
shorthand all these dots and dashes are dispensed with,
unless it be necessary to precise the sound. In ordinary
cases, the context will be sufficient to make out the meaning of the word written.
Key to this table on page 79, " Wawa," No. 139.
X  > THE  WAWA  SHORTHAND
21
A table showing how to connect the sound "u" with any preceding
or following consonant.
1
I
This table is a delicate one, and if the greatest care is
not taken from the beginning to acquire a correct writing
of these syllables, one will be liable to confusion afterwards.
S
|
j
yi
L   ^   y     1/    U^   O
~y
S   >   Vy   V^ "Vy
y yy
y\ y?
y
"> Wm.
^-s\
<y^\
y t
I % i
■
1 1
>
I y
2
I
1
I
c
f A table showing how to connect the sound "i" as in "pipe" with any
preceding or following consonant.
This table will be found very useful, because the words
figured in this table are of frequent occurrence. Beginners
are apt to make more angles than is necessary, especially
in words similar to those in this table. The table shows
the way to avoid angles whenever possible. See then that
you write all the monograms of this table exactly as they
are printed.
cCy       ay^    </\^y    <^       «^
J/     JZr*s    >X-y    X      ^ V
SHORTHAND  EXERCISES
I.—Grace's Servants.
23
V 1^>   y*y*—/*Ky>   ^Ls
til <^ ^ (VA=0  '^ jp'       §1 /^v^- B -TD i ^  -
•~  ^y^s   <rs    V^^y^^      tjy   3*7 ^jf  -*0  x-T>~/>
'O 'O ° **— id ->—-^   I— <Xcr*/^<yyA/c><*
O«—*-|  .    . * ycr     Ly   ^ .   /^ -j  ■
-— /TV    V   i? «^ «^ "X       jj|  ty "& 7 Syr^'Of*
N_y,-— - yf—-yy) _)^.^N-y^y. 2-4 SHORTHAND   EXERCISES
II.—The Plays of Animals.
^^ </~&r     °   *^c\vSvl/    <P/*^~~ °S I // C\ -*^y
•/4-y/i '7V/ 1 ^z_- */°  -^C^ <x •" »^- * -** >^/^>
'—dLA^y '    V/°  BB    ^"^'       ^    f
©v-y?>  \fy/<N       ^^^ \y> '        *
»\yy<\ -S-y^i o ^\?~^
^ \y~>(p—sY9 SHORTHAND   VS.   LONGHAND
*si
1  V
1
sCayn,    fc? /&.   <* M 3, .
yvuM&n = 2,o.  L^-£ .
4rvu     ~ ft.   Q ^r z »
dystOjCOsz ft.   /y\^ = 3 .
-ttyyisoL   - /J. <— ^ / .
^Z^- |§      %•    ^ =? &  ■•
yfe-
-^Z^    =r       ?.     C = ty>
(y ■=" £ %        r\   =- *&  .
/k?vu |f   ft. v^r *.
ToU(:     i*7.
miyi,
—    /• -o~ *^
sC*€rUy4<4fc&l.
<OsWtoyiy=/Z
/rLaJ' - /#.
^y     ^   :T
WlyOyU-   St.
fa   j /.
4fr I   ,>:
€^Uy p   /^.
4kr   -    /.
WOAyt- //.
'^£ - f.
Wsrvu- /4>.
Jbntrzr /3.
<k%yn - /&.
41.     TiUCl _*«.
0 - 3  \
*e-y-$  •
* yr / .
^_- 2 «
<S^ X   .
•^   ■•§§    *v    •
9 -- -* |
a-3 •
s =/ i
&> = -< •
#- 3 .
of - Z .
1 - / .
1 THE WAWA SHORTHAND EXERCISE BOOK
Same size as the Instructor,—will be ready
within a month.
Price, only Fifteen cents.
THE KAMLOOPS WAWA!
SHORTHAND AMONG INDIANS.
A   Newspaper   in   Shorthand   Circulating   among
the  Natives.
Two Thousand Indians reading and writing Phonography.
The Plainest Proof of the Simplicity of the System
A NOVEL IDEA TO TEACH THE INDIANS SHORTHAND.
HOW CAN INDIANS LEARN SHORTHAND ?
Because Shorthand is a hundred, nay a thousand times simpler than
the old writing. Any one can learn it in a few hours, and become
expert in it in a few days. Many of our Indians learned it in two or
three days.
If you are a lover of curious specimens, you must have this
paper, it is sfJ|
" The Queerest Newspaper in the World/'
Subscribe for this paper, and help to civilize our Indians, to
enlighten those who were sitting "in darkness and the shadow of
death. \' 	
At least ten pages of English reading and English shorthand lessons,
exercises, abbreviations, etc., every issue.
Subscription, One Dollar per annum.        To pupils in Shorthand classes, only Fifty cents.
Address: Editor "WAWA," KAMLOOPS, B.C.

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