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Chinook and shorthand rudiments, with which the Chinook jargon and the wawa shorthand can be mastered… Le Jeune, J. M. R., 1855-1930 1898

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Array CHINOOK AND SHORTHAND 
RUDIMENTS, 
WITH WHICH THE CHINOOK JARGON AND THE WAWA
SHORTHAND CAN BE MASTERED WITHOUT A
TEACHER IN A FEW HOURS.
BY THE EDITOR OF THE "KAMLOOPS   WAWA."
"The shortest way to learn the Chinook
is through the Shorthand, and the shortest
way to learn the Shorthand is through the
Chinook."
KAMLOOPS, B.C.
1898. PHONEMIC ALPHABET.
tlnpoet.,
tihirm, -^
(iktm KlootUw.
J<<ikih*l', f
Kopshpwalu, «
Huafuui,      y
J-ila-tutL.        /.
tolo, /■
wuxXie., tg
vnaJ«wk, £
vwxkwocU, ^
wia-wwok, C
., i'SSiI-p,     ..->.
. .■ aa/v»(>(.e,., c
.. kl*«U, .
.. Know, „ ,
_ k\Moolt,„£l
., koc/nSin,„e/
., UvJCX-Sh, ,._
.. kuwlax, .,.,
., kiskti, „ 4.
., toiy.Tta.vtoa.z
. P&poL, " L
.. pail. "■*-
»yva»v»eoK poo, „
„ ba.ha.ll, ,.^
,. -mcmilooS,.i<
■■ ruwfi*>. ■< -j
.. olo, .. £
.. ktah<~wua/m,
_ klafip^-, t.^a
., kol, _ .. >-
i.:'Hoo4, -PS
.. nwtp, i. .<p
_ ti/a.-m, •• f?
.. bfoow,  „j^
.. piw'vitj   .■ 1q
"■»
VKXnpd'l,   ^i}s
OOL.
A
ptf
Marp>
Tia'.utnko^Ttt
doob wamUi'
attai/, cr;
pailcxxk, kJ
pelt,       u
pla^, v
5olL«X,i    O"
*>ont no.,   v_f
Phonetic   AlpWbet.
t*   SiwpU , -for  Chinook,
O
CD
O    C?
K
tf.      <T     ^      d^W   ^»
/
A- Complete, j-or   £r\cjli$h..
o   o  o   o   <y„ -if
<£    <?■    <#r   <?#/    #^   -€
A ^   £ ^   3   3   C   -
Sh   j*ch    5   2*tS    n    *<3     m    th_
/■»
c
dtf
e
J
V.
an*
^/k
3" -Vwwerals.
/>
v ^
^
M 1
3
Untrobuction,
The following clipping from the Montreal Gazette
of Nov. 29th, 1894, will make a convenient introduction to this little pamphlet:—
"The 'Chinook Jargon,' or Oregon Trade language, is a curiously composite form of speech, being
partly Chinook, partly Nootka, partly French, partly
English, and partly the result of onomatopoeia. During the early intercourse of Europeans with the West
coast, Nootka was the emporium'of the traffic, and
the Indians gradually picked up from the sailors
some English words. Later on, when traders began to frequent the Columbia River, they used the
words learned at Nootka, and in this way the Chi-
nooks, always quick in catching sounds, added
Nootka and English words to their own vocabulary.
As early as 1804 a lingua franca had thus come into
use on the coast. The Nor'-West, Astor and Hudson's Bay Companies servants, and the French voy-
ageurs, all contributed their share to the jargon.
When Mr. Horatio Hale, whose manual is a work of
authority, first visited the coast, it consisted of about
250 words. Of these 18 were of Nootka origin, 41 of
English source, while 34 were French and 111 formed
the Chinook substratum. That was more than fifty
years ago. In 1863, when the Smithsonian Institution published its dictionary of the language, the
number of words had grown to 500. Of these 221
were considered Chinook, 94 French, 67 English,
while the Salish or Flathead Indians are credited
with 39. The nationalities of their civilized visitors
were designated respectively Pasai (Francais); Kint-
chossh (King George, whose medals are known all
through the North-West, being the type of an Englishman), and Boston (from the French-Canadian
Bastounais.) A man named Pel ton, going insane,
furnished | term for fool or madman. The term ot
salutation— clak-oh-ali-yah—used to be traced to the
visit of Clark, and his friends' enquiries after his
health, and their origin satisfied Sir D. Wilson. Mr.
Hale, however, prefers to assign it to a Chinook
origin. Tum-txim is a sound word for heart (from
the pulsation), and is used for will, purpose, desire.
Lip-lip (to boil) is another such word, imitating
boiling water.' Kole-sick-icaum-sick is the expressive jargon for fever and ague. Stik is used for tree
or anything made of wood.   Hee hee clearly denotes
'fliirfii^iihtfiii'titW' '",&
«aa.w>eoK Poo,,.
.. 5a.Ka.te, ,, yj
• • iw\tw>,' ,-, -,
- oto, I I
.. kla'iixwaaw
.. k<3l,
.. tluoi,
.. Wip, „ .©
., W«.w, „ £>
.i bioovn, „ f>
.. pa^'vibj ,, u
watapt, £v^
•v/fooSSoom, (sit
MaW'fp pepa,,
THolWcK kopop w
iloos YKWVuJl
^tliot/,       cr-c
p£.Lf-, t^
pa.it, <t_
Salix, ok
6opc via.,    v_0
tans-,      -j
laughter, and is used for any kind of diversion.  One!
of the commonest words is mamook (to make), and
can be used with any noun to indicate every kind of
operation or proceeding.   Ilia hee (ground) is also
used in all sorts of ways, as Boston illahee  (thel
United States), mimaloose illahee (death ground,
cemetery),   sagali illahee  (mountain, highlands).
All strong liquors are called lum (rum).  Ship, prayj
tea, sick, stone, sing, nose, soap, mama, papa,
other words, are good Chinook as well as good English.   The French words adopted have mostly undergone some change, as m,ahsie (merci), malich (mar-
ier), pe (puis) used for ' and,' lamestin (la medicine,;
etc.   The Nootka word hyas (great) is used withi
other words to indicate a larger animal, etc., resem-^
bling a smaller one, as puss-puss, or pish-pish (a
cat), hyas puss-puss (a panther).   The Nootka pot-,
latch (gift) is also largely used both as noun and
verb.'
The following Chinook vocabulary is as complete
as it is necessary to have it for the rapid learning of
the Chinook Jargon. A few words are omitted because they are of very rare occurrence, and would
make an unnecessary burden for the memory. The
more one confines himself to the words in this
vocabulary for expressing his ideas, the purer his
Chinook will be. Whenever the Chinook vocabulary is not sufficient to express one idea, an English
word must be used—the simplest and most common
that can be found. A short way to master this
vocabulary is to read it over, and repeat every word
of it once a day for a week or so, or, better still, read
it over every evening before retiring, and again the
first thing in the morning, until Well mastered. If
that reading is made with proper attention, three or
four days will be sufficient for most people.
The apostrophe in each word of the following vocabulary denotes the accented syllable. The pronunciation is the Latin pronunciytion, in which the
consonants sound the same as in English. Whenever the " j" or " ch " occur they are sounded as m
English, but the vowels must be sounded uniform^
asfollows: "a," as in "fat";   "e," as in "met"
"fill"'       " y.   "      «<->    *■*>     "T-.iT.".       '<
"V
as
UK
The vowel "u" is to be   sounded as in
The consonat "h" has a stronply guttural
sound wherever it appears, except in connection with
"u«."
e w ^nd " s " in " ch " and " sh-. /   O    /^   (-00
3 O cl   yui0
( O (q ™°° l  3_&sT
V
CHINOOK VOCABULARY.
7
J\Yke.   &'£   bya/wl by.
aXxCL   cy~°    novo
cxnkotU ^)l~> -formerly
a7Voik ? opo   j-ast
OL'jas,   oxj are at
ix.'yoo ,   «^    many
Cha'ko, rr^i coyrx.
cm
iTMW?
chikmvy*^).^ metal
dreb, _A  |||lj|
vht ,   v.«    to laudh
£Vv*pooi   «rL     shut
.eHehe, Id    earth
-elcLLCev> /}   slave
<clo      y°     riont
tncLioa, <w across
cskom  'km)   tofcak-e.
hciHak  >(,4   opt¥\*
kmm, H   smell
iWt,     <,_    one
All  Lw. .      yl_ «vr!U.i, ,
%
ik'tas
'-©
,<~P
floods
A
j.
IPS
ad ale
ts'SiK  ^?    p
i'HooiAh ^& ^lesh
3%ah      ^.     where
5 ik'shet |H |p|
««v
*  7   J
kaUkala  j^j^o  birds
kal'tash   j,^   useless
JHawooks  /^?   do a
JWhaw*  ^^ all
kanamwd ^^tdqttkir
ka/n'sin      o<vy   hon/wany
toshwala <v//-^/° to sbeal
y
6
m
t
Xa'ia
khell
|1
ki'kooU
ki'lapai
kirrftOL
'T3
hovtf
hard
^o reach
below
rtiurn.
ajktr
needle
y-L
horse
M
Ma'howe ^-p]>  outdoors
KlaHowyam /«£)*>  poor
klafota!,^  Uol
Kla'ska   ^^    they
kltxlwa.  ao-t>   qa
W.iSH£5   /v^  Knots
jJttfioirdimin^^M     Woman/
jktaonas' /o«L   perhaps
memm'    J        canot
ear
know
to, in, at
j-tntshed
rinor
I. ~>        -     «y  c/ t    J
i .KVVav.eS£m^v£ aluaays
jikwash   gs-\    afraid   .
iko'ia^' yA
komhax'y^
kefpa,    y 8
CHINOOK VOCABULARY.
efie, J
thpoop,
eskow, ^
tikam WooiIyw
ipSOOl, 1,
ftuapui, />
kla.tu'tt.. /
koTnto-"! vtf>
iolo, I
vnaj-ie, <^
VMakfok, <i
ywa.UwK.U, (i
wux&n, <£
wnx-wiook,    C
„ i'4s?k,
., know, „ -
„ kikooit,„jt
., k(X/vlSLn,11o|
.,  kvpttXSil,    »j
.. kowila-X, „.
., kisk'ts, „ t
., tcuv\na.v\oa:
i pep a.,  " i
., pa-H, "J
fYVaimfioK pOO, ,
.. Sa-lrxU, „v
.. •mcnuooS,..
,. rtvifi*.,' n -
.. olo, .1 (
.. kl(x!ia.wua/w
.. Mafwm. if/.
„ko[,  ...^
.. Hm>4, " -'
■. T*u/ip,     n .6
„ W*w, .. £
., bioowi., „ ^
.. pcu'vit) n I
wiiUa.pt, Cr-
nnitoDwj £-<.
■r/iwsw**". &.
natfu'^n pep'
Xa/wtln Kopop
fliylM/, C
paitaxk, j,
pe it,
p«-it,
pU«j,
Salix,     v
tha/nte,
SODC MO.,     -
How       ^
<Kwa?hfo   ^_,
kw/e'na/m ^a)
la'kel
Me
lep'lep
lo'lo
maika
I .
bouna
belly
-five
-j-our
'along hW
boil
carry
thou
m
AA
m
ma'hook   jgjjgj   to buy
mak1mak ,££   to eat
ma'mook  'C6?   to work
mash        y-^    throw away' ;
masa!ehl G^rx bad
merrploos   <#-"   dead
mit'lait       C~f to slay
mit'ooit    C-^c to standup
moos'moos ($^<^y cattle •
mcu)'ich  (j>0^ deer
msa'ika C^j,/    youA>Wal)
na'ika    Dy       I, me
na'mch   j ^n    S€€>
laa'wifcka ^7   yes
nsa'ika £^
CPihat    <>.<*-    road
pa.lL j_/ -J-ull
pa'tlach  ^J^ aive
pel [/    red.
pel'pel |/|/   blood
pelh'ten y-\  crcay
pi ^      and.
poo Jk      e^plosiftn
poos ( Qty      if
poola'kle tj/^  night
poo'lale k//1  dust
sa'haU. ^j.o? above
sa'\Ja.    o1'^   far
SaV.a'looks'-^ pants
5a'Ux     ^-^ anary
Saplel
vj»jy oread
we, us
excha/ntf*.
ernes
b
hunary
J'
O'ihoi
o'lali
o'lo       Q
oo'kook ($8/  this
oo'poots q^j  hind pari:
OVO 0     tfoiiiiitftr brother
pa'ia.      ^ro     j-ire
potpoos'   i oLf  child
past'si    jis^r blanket
'tf
Sevle     ^»^    Soul
Semmoxt ^fe. Seven
sioc'boos ♦^.•Cy' tWfate
sit1 sew w^   to male
sit'Kom  w^   half
sUoo%om ^p strong
i snaz      ^^   rain
Sta'lo   ^ro^ rivtr
stiwilh v^n«/ pray
ta'ham  -^   six
takmoonak 7"^?P ^n< hundred
tawarioVz. -t>6^oW(Mr«c
tonf^a^,    -o^ small
tanke-6oA -3^ vS^ vc^lerday
toCiiloim   -o-*y   ten,
ta'ye       -„^    chief
te'ke      -,/       to like
tekop"*   -jqJ    white $&w
CHINOOK VOCABULARY.
9
h ploct
h pot
It pre tre.
les an yes -
les iApotrcs,
les demh
hi tvtaues
tncdit
rfia.ru
mulct
pa.ta.te
pourrc
/y> dish
M pot
//>- priest
/y^/ apostle
/•_,, teeth
/^N, bishop
Qy medal
Qy married
(of mule
\>y potatoes
i* bccia
k/* rotten
English words
basket J^,
u tf
bone Jn
broom f/7
Coat ^^z.
cold a-
cup ^
dollar |||
dry _y^
tight e_
fight ^
^ish v^
ily v*
(jit wp </q
a old Z
arease
K
amwer
y
<rvy
kip
house
ice
islcvnd eA
kettle __/
H <_
knife £
lake. /?
toLSV /W
lowu /^
leaves
n
light f
mavi Ctf
mcca <^a
mountain £>-v
musket Q^
I
na/me
necktie 21
nine      P
nose    o^>
old   • cy
papa      ^
pin/ U
B*   <h
play ^
quarter J-^
rope       /P
snake  ^0
snow    ^
spoon.    ^
stea/mboat'-Tj
Stick      s_jf
Sugar    /->&,
SUA/ s_y)
♦Sunday <-yS
swim    kJI
tea        g
to-mornm/_£W?
v/arn^
^y\ Wash
watch
wheat
whip
•wild
wivul
The above vocabulary is
about as complete as is ner
cessar^ for avuckly learning
the chin oo k. J\ qnod weeny
other enojUsh ~woro\s are used,
which it lA/ould be too long
to emuwerate here. Tke apove
<wc the commonest amd. the.
best u/noWsttfod by 'nearly
all the Indians.
(of 	
C .. kol, .
.. tlooi,
\. 4lM/ip,     i. •<
„ W/CCVYi,   .1 ;
., bloow, „ j
.. pOUTltj     I.
W itLcLU, 6-
mr^toBpt', £-_
"r/ioossoow, &
ti«W<>> pep
.it
ovnoi,,      <
pete.,
§0}
SctUX,      «*
c(^cp<yite,
6ope MO.,
fans,
VOords from rremch.
UaFck
three.
qoo d
wrf-frnqf
mistaken
sweet
i
tsikhik ^«^ carnaae4
tsilhu viVvy/ stars
utl       v_7   atad
ul'-kat   */j_    long
Wan      £?.    poor out
y?<?   speak
(C)—  aaa/irv
y     he, she, it
»vi> kair
her*.
/a louche yl    mouth
la louleillt y\-   bottle
la. carroltt sy2' carrot
la. Cassette y^_ W
la. clef     /)p    key
la. crotx    yy  cross
la hacht /fo    ccxe.
la lamyut SA    ton que
la ir,eaeclh<yc^ druas
la messi    s^j M.as:>
la yyimtayrht /°(ye mounts
waVa
weht
wek
ya'ka
yak'so
yaSkwa >»i
ya'wa M
Co%
lapelh      Sy   shovel
la. peTiitemct /^ ptna/ACi.
la pCoch-L    S\£\   pick
laplancJitySf-^ tuml
Al porlt      />J~   door
7a /<zo/d     Aj>     table
/a ///e      /»__.    heal
la vUtlle   yQc,   ola Wiwa-.,
I? Saptimi. /!     3aptiSYn
7<f ccwemt yj>f lent
/<? chapeld />v , beads
/<; £eW      y^r,   -niul
It loUD f/Q
It marcouft. /£>5-> marrias'.
UiVll
woox
le fnoufon. S(y~ Sj
It papi
le pe'chi
le Died
^4
T
pOM.
r^rr---—y-r-'-.u"""' jajfef5. Anlcate
8. T.
ma'mook
sa'hale
e'lehe
pi
ook'ook
elehe.
KopeV
eh ok
pi
l^oola^kle
mitla'it
ko'pa
ookook
elehe.
Pi
mm
wahva :
Tloos
chcfko
light {lait).
A'yak
chako
light
kopec
elehe.
K).   J- .
mamook
Jca'hwa
kopa
iht
son.
. Kopa
moxt
son
JS. ■
mamook
ookook
sky (skai)
nsaVka
ncCnich
kopa Z
sahale.
Kopa
tloon
son
on
this
earth.
And
God
said:
let
come
. light.
At once
came
light
on
earth.
God
made
thus
on
the first
day.
On
the second
day
God
made
that
sky
we
see
in the
above.
On
the third
a you (a-u
heloi-ma
stick
pi
kanaive
tloos
flowers.
Kopa
laket
son,
S.T.
mamook
son
moon.
pi
tsiVtsil
grass
and
)  many
different
trees
and
all
(the) fine
flowers.
On
the fourth
day.
God
made
the sun
the moon
and
the stars 12      FIRST LESSON IN CHINOOK.
e
dnaMo tloos, y
the.,
Chpoou,
eskow, ^
f jl-iovn kloooiwi
vpsoot, ■)
kixkikat, «
kotpshi/uttxlu, .
Wilcpptup, /
hlaivHx.,        J
koYftlQ-<i
lolo,
maiit, c
vncckwk-, <
wia-kwock, (
wuxsh, <
vHflfwiook,
., K5ijlj     ,.
- .1 qixjmhle.,,,
.. UkeU,    ..
., Khovu,   „
., Ml«<w/e,„
...   kotMSLn,,,
j, kwu.sk,  J
,,  kowilaX, rj
., kislus, „■
•i VCV/Y\(X.ViOa{
-' P«-P«-)     "
.,  pail,     ■•
g^\Oj/Y\Dok POO,
., 5a.ka.le, „
.. -me/wucoS,.
•> rw>lv»,' „
„, do, I
.. klahawu'a
.. kitting ..
.. kol$£$j
.. H**, f
.. nvp/tp,    11 .
.. Waw, ..
., blcowi 11
.. ptu'nt, n
WiLHapt, C
w>itot)<i,   C
■VAOOiiotr/r,, 6
v>a.nitKi, ^
na-wak pe/-
7\a/v\uk Hop
£t,nfl-L.,
pa.Hoa.h,
pe/ie.,
pa.it,
j0$
S«.U>>,
cha/nte,
6op« via.,
fans,
kopa
in the
iaka
he (be)
sahale.
above.
ta'ye
chief
Kopa
On
kopa
over
kwe-nam
the fifth
kanaive
every
son,
day
ikta
thing
Iaka
He
mitlait
(that) is
mamook
made
kopa
on
kanaive
all
elehe
earth.
heloima
{ (the)
Ia'wa
There
I     different
cy    rn
KS.   1 .
God
fish
fish (es)
es'kom
took
kopa
in
tanas1
a little
chok
the water
elehe
earth
pi
and
pi
and
ka'nawe
all
tanas
a little
ookook
those
chok
water.
kaVakala
birds
Iaka
He
klas'ka
which
mamook
made
fly
%
klas'ka
them
kopa
in the
kanamokst
together
wind.
wind.
pi
and
Kopa
On the
iaka
He
tamam
sixth
eskom
took
son
day
ookook
that
8. T.
God
elehe
earth
mamook
made
poos
to
mowHch
the deer
'mamook
make
pi
and
iht
one
kanaive
every
man
man
ikta
thing
iaka
his
koo'li
that runs
i'tlooilh
body
kopa
on
kopa
into
elehe
the earth
ookook
this
kakiva
like
elehe
earth (en)
mowieh
deer.
man
man.
kim ta
After
Iaka
He
S. T.
God
mamook
made
luaxva
said,
klatwa
go
tloos
let
iht
one
nsaHka
us
se'le
soul
mamook
make
ookook
this
man
man
sele
soul
poos
that (he be)
wek lean'si?
l never
ka'kwa
like
alke
in the future
nsaHka
our
memloos
dead.
tsem
figure
io.  1 .
God
vi
and
mamook
made
\» >>        * ■«■
KST LESfc
>UJN
y-icxmc
he (be)
ookook
this
chi
new
man
man
Adam
Adam,
kakiva
as
poos
if
wawa
to say
elehe
earth
iaka.
he (is)
jS. t.
God
Notes and Explanations.
iS. T.,   abbreviation for Sahale Taye—the above
chief, God.
The Verb 'mamook.
PRESENT.
Naika mamook—I work, or I make.
Maika mamook—Thou workest.
Iaka mamook—He works.
Nsaika mamook—We work.
Msaika mamook—You work.
Klaska mamook—They work.
PAST.
A nkate naika mamook—I did work, I mad
A nkate maika mamook—Thou didst work.
A knate iaka mamook—He did work.
Ankate nsaika mamook—We did work.
Ankate msaika mamook—You did work.
Ankate klaska mamook—They did work.
FUTURE.
A Ike naika mamook—I shall work.
Alke maika mamook—Thou wilt work.
Alke iaka mamook—He will work.
A Ike nsaika mamook—We shall work.
Alke msaika mamook—You will work.
Alke klaska mamook—They will work.
Other Verb—wawa.
present.
Naika wawa—I speak, etc.
Maika wawa, Nsaika wawa,
Iaka wawa, Msaika wawa,
Klaska wawa.
!Past—Ankate naika wawa, etc.
Future—A Ike niaka wawa, etc. *v\OLw\Ook poo,
„ 5a.ka.le, .,
.. vne/wlooS,'
• • tVniTwi," i,
., olo,
.. klahawua.
.. Klatum, „
., kpJl,
h tlooi,
„ u"*/vvij »
.1 btoowi, „
.. pou'nt
WLtla.pt,  C
jrvtttojiii,   C
■rAooiioirm, C
via/men,   c
Mairutn pet
7\a.'v\tCr\ kopp
tloos Yva/Yi-
pottlopjck,
pcie.,
pa.it.
And so on, in the same manner, for all verbs.
Poos naika mamook, etc.—If I work.
Naika kopet mamook—I have done working.
1. The word tloos is used as an imperative form;
tloos naika klatwa—let me go; tloos maika cfiako—
tloos iaka mitlait—let him stay, etc.
Saliale elehe—the above land, heaven; cold
elehe—winter, when the earth is cold; tanas warm
elehe^—spring, when the earth begins to get warm;
warm elehe—the summer, when the earth is warm;
tanas cold elelie—autumn, when the earth begins to
cool. Naika elelie means my garden or my country,
as the case may be, or also my place, when in a room
or in a specified place. Ex.—Stay in your place—I
tloos maika mitlait kopa maika ele?ie.
3. Kopa, Hep.—Ilcp means the first, ahead of.
Kopa Hep—at first.
4. Kopet means, in first instance, done, finished.
Naika kopet 'mamook—I have  finished my work.1
Naika kopet makmak—I have done eating.   As it is
here it means, only, nothing else but; kopet chok pi
poolakle—only water, etc.
5. Chako is a wonderful word in Chinook. It
helps to give a hundred different meanings to
other words. Chako alone means come; iaka chako
sun—day comes: iaka chako warm—it gets warm;
chako tanas or chako man or chako kopa elehe—to
be born; chako tanas aias, chako aias, chako dret
aias—to grow a little, or to grow big, or to grow
very big; chako elo—to vanish, to disappear; chako
tloos—to become good; chako kaltash—to turn bad,
etc., etc.
6. Iht sun—one day, the first day.
7. Iht, iht, or iht, pi iht, pi iht, means a few.
8. Memloos means dead. There is no word in
Chinook to signify "death."    When speaking of
death," the sentence must always be turned in
such a way as to bring in the participle " dead." At
the hour of death—| When will come the day to be
dead."
9. Some of the words have a curious origin.   For
an instance,   the word   masli—to throw away—is
nothing else than the French word marchef va-t-en
—ugo your way"—very  extensively used for dis&
missing people in the old Hudson's Bay times. 10. The wordpehlten—insane, crazy—comes from
1 Filion" the name of an employee of the Hudson's
Bay, who became insane. Between the French and
English pronunciation of that name, the Indians
made it pilio, pilian, and at last pehlten, and adopted the name to mean insane in general.
*>^SEND    FOR   THE
WAWA SHORTHAND INSTRUCTOR
With which Shorthand may be learned without a teacher.   Onlv 15 cents.
The Wawa Shorthand First Reading Book 15 cents.
English, Chinook and Latin Manual, a
very  curious and  interesting Prayer
Book, 192 pages, paper cover  50 cents.
The same, cloth binding  $1.00
Skwamish, Seshel and Slayamen Manuals, in one, or the Prayers, Hymns and
Catechism in the said languages, 160
pages  50 cents.
Shushwap Manual, 64 pages  SO cents.
Stalo Manual, 32 pa-ges  25 cents.
Thompson Manual, 86 pages  25 cents.
Lillooet Manual, 32 pages  25 cents.
Okanagan Manual, 32 pages  25 cents.
Polyglot Manual, or all the above manuals bound in one, 560 pages, cloth cover £2.00
Same, calf binding  . 2.50
Kamloops Wawa, 1892  1.50
1      1893   1.50
1894  1.50
|       1895  1.00
1       1896  1.00
1895-96, bound in one .. 2.00
Address-- |EDITOR   WAWA,
KAMLOOPS,   B.C. TITLE PAGE OF THE "WAWA."
KAMLOOPS WAWA.
January, 1898.
THE WAWA SHORTHAND!
The simplest system of Shorthand in the world. The easiest to
learn. A hiindred times easier
than the old writing.
Two million people (2,000,000)
throughout the world already
using the same shorthand. It is
adapted to over twenty different
languages.
Can be learned without a teacher in one to three hours.
If you are a stranger to Shorthand, take this paper and become
acquainted with this useful art.
If you have failed to learn
Shorthand owing to the complication of the system you adopted,
or from want of time, do not give
up, but try this system, and wonder at its simplicity.
.' Time is precious.' You will save
time as soon as you are acquainted with this phonography. \
THE  KAMLOOPS WAWA!
SHORTHAND AMONG INDIANS
A  Newspaper in   Shorthand  Circulating
Among (he Natives.
Two Thousand Indians reading and
writing Phonography,   .   .  .
The Plainest Proof of the Simplicity of the System. .   .
A NOVEL IDEA TO TEACH THE
INDIANS SHORTHAND
HOW CAN iND!A VS LEARN SHORTHAND 7
Because Shorthand is a hundred, nay &
thousand times simpler than tne old writing. Any one can learn it in a few hours,
and become expert in it in a few days.
Many of our Indians learned it la two or
three days.
If you are a !over of curious specimen's,
you must have this paper.   It is
The Queerest Newspaper in the WorW"
Subscribe for this paper, and help to
civilize our Indians, to enlighten those
who were "sltUng "in darkness and the;
shadow of death."
Your Subscription Solicited.
Only One Dollar per Annum,
Address: "EDITOR WAWA,  KAMLOOPS, B.C."

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