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BC Historical Books

Bibliography of the Athapascan languages Pilling, James Constantine, 1846-1895 1892

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Array           LINGUISTIC BIBLIOGRAPHIES ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF ETHNOLOGY.
Smithsonian institution—Bureau of ethnology. Catalogue of linguistic manuscripts in the library of the Bureau of ethnology. By
James G. Pilling.
In Bureau of ethnology first annual report; half-title as above p. 553, text pp.
555-577, Washington, 1881, royal 8°.
Issued separately ■with cover title as follows:
Catalogue | of | linguistic manuscripts | in the | library of the Bureau
of ethnology | by | James C. Pilling | (Extracted from the first annual
report of the Bureau | of ethnology) | [Vignette | |
Washington | Government printing office | 1881
Cover title as ahove, no inside title, half-title as under entry next ahove p. 553,
text pp. 555-577, royal 8°.    One hundred copies issued.
Smithsonian institution—Bureau of ethnology | J. W. Powell director | Proof-sheets | of a | bibliography | of | the languages | of the
| Jforth American Indians | by | James Constantino Pilling | (Distributed only to collaborators) |
Washington | Government printing office | 1885
Title verso blank 11. notice (signed J. W. Powell) p. iii, preface (November 4,1884)
pp. v-viii, introduction pp. ix-x, list of authorities pp. xi-xxxvi, list of libraries rer
ferred to by initials pp. xxxvii-xxxviii, list of fac-similes pp. xxxix-xl, text pp.
1-839, additions and corrections pp. 841-1090, index of languages and dialects pp.
1091-1135, plates, 4°. Arranged alphabetically by name of author, translator, or
first word of title. One hundred and ten copies printed, ten of them on one side of
the sheet only.
Smithsonian institution | Bureau of ethnology: J. W. Powell, director | Bibliography | of the | Eskimo language | by | James Constan-
tine Pilling | [Vignette] |
Washington | Government printing office | 1887
Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 11. preface (April 20,1887) pp. iii-v,
text pp. 1-109, chronologic index pp. 111-116, 8 fac-similes, 8C. An edition of 100
copies was issued in royal 8°.
Smithsonian institution | Bureau of ethnology: J. W. Powell, director | Bibliography | of the | Siouan languages | by | James Constan-
tine Pilling | [Vignette] |
Washington | Government printing office | 1887
Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 11. preface (September 1, 1887)
pp. iii-v, text pp. 1-82, chronologic index pp. 83-87, 8°.    An edition of 100 copies
was issued in royal 8°.
in IV        LINGUISTIC  BIBLIOGRAPHIES,   BUREAU  OF  ETHNOLOGY.
Smithsonian institution | Bureau of ethnology: J. W. Powell, director | Bibliography | of the | Iroquoian languages | by | James Con-
stantine Pilling | [Vignette] |
Washington | Government printing office | 1888
■Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 11. preface (December 15, 1888)
pp. iii-vi, text pp. 1-180, addenda pp. 181-189, chronologic index pp. 191-208, 9 facsimiles, 8°.    An edition of 100 copies issued in royal 8°.
Smithsonian institution | Bureau of ethnology: J. W. Powell, director | Bibliography | of the | Muskhogeau languages | by | James
Constantine Pilling | [Vignette] |
Washington | Government printing office | 1889
Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 1 1. preface (May 15, 1889) pp.
iii-v, text pp. 1-103, chronologic index pp. 105-114, 8°. An edition of 100 copies
issued in royal 8°.
Bibliographic notes | on | Eliot's Indian bible | and | on  his other
translations and works in the | Indian language of Massachusetts |
Extract from   a  | Bibliography  of the  Algonquian   languages"!
[Vignette] |
Washington | Government printing office | 1890
Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 11. text pp. 1-58, 21 fac similes,
royal 8°. Forms pp. 127-184 of the Bibliography of the Algonquian languages, Title
of which follows.    Two hundred and fifty copies issued.
Smithsonian institution | Bureau of ethnology: J. W. Powell, director | Bibliography | of the | Algonquian languages | by | James
Constantine Pilling | [Vignette] |
Washington | Government printing office | 1891
Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 1 1. preface (June 1, 1891) pp.
iii-iv, introduction p. v, index of languages pp. vii-viii. list of fac-similes pp. ix-x,
text pp. 1-549, addenda pp. 551-575, chronologic index pp. 577-614, 82 fac-similes, 8°.
An edition of 100 copies issued in royal 8°. PREFACE.
The series of bibliographies of which this forms the sixth number
was started in 1887 with, -the Eskimauan as the first issue. They are
all based upon the | Proof Sheets of a Bibliography of the North American Languages," by the same author, printed in 1885, in an edition of
110 copies. Titles and collations of these works will be found on a
previous page.
The next in order of publication are to be the Chinookan (including
the Chinook jargon), the Salishan, and the Wakashan, all of which are
well under way.
The name adopted by the Bureau of Ethnology for this family of
languages (Athapascan) is that used by Gallatin in the American Antiquarian Society's Transactions, vol. n, 183(i. It has been objected to
by a number of missionaries—students of various dialects of this family
in the Northwest—but priority demanded that Gallatin's name should
be retained. It is derived from the lake of the same name, which, according to Father Lacoinbe, signifies "place of hay and reeds."
The following account of the distribution of the Athapascan people
is taken from Powell's 1Indian Linguistic Families," in the Seventh
Annual .Report of the Bureau of Ethnology:
The boundaries of the Athapascan family, as now understood, are best given under
three primary groups: Northern, Pacific, and Southern.
Xorthern group.—This includes all the Athapascan tribes of British North America
and Alaska, in the former region the Athapascans occupy most of the western
interior, being bounded on the north by the Arctic Eskimo, who inhabit a narrow
strip of coast; on the east by the Eskimo of Hudson's Bay as far south as Churchill
Eiver, south of which river the country is occupied by Algonquian tribes. On the
south the Athapascan tribes extended to the main ridge between the Athapasca and
Saskatchewan rivers, where they met Algonquian tribes; west of this area they
were bounded on the south by Salishan tribes, the limits of whose territory on Fra-
ser River and its tributaries appear on Tolmie and Dawson's map of 1884. On the
west, in British Columbia, the Athapascan tribes nowhere reach the coast, being cut
oif by the Wakashan, Salishan, and Chimmesyan families.
The interior of Alaska is chiefly occupied by tribes of this family. Eskimo tribes
have encroached somewhat upon the interior along the Yukon, Kuskokwim, Kowak,
and Noatak rivers, reaching on the Yukon to somewhat below Shageluk Island and
on the Kuskokwim nearly or quite to Kolmakoff Redoubt. Upon the two latter
they reach quite to their heads. A few Kutchin tribes are (or have been) north of
the Porcupine and Yukon rivers, but until recently it has not been known that they
extended north beyond the Yukon and Romanzoff mountains.   Explorations of VI
PREFACE.
Lieut. Stoney, in 1885, establish the fact that the region to the north of those mountains is occupied by Athapascan tribes, and the map is colored accordingly. Only
in two places in Alaska do the Athapascan tribes reach the coast: the K'naia-kho-
tana, on Cook's Inlet, and the Ahthena, of Cooper River.
Pacific group.— Unlike the tribes of the Northern group, most of those of the Pacific
group have removed from their priscan habitats since the advent of the white race.
The Pacific group embraces the following: Kwalhioqua, formerly on Willopah River,
Washington, near the lower Chinook; Owilapsh, formerly between Shoal water Bay
and the heads of the Chehalis River, Washington, the territory of these two tribes
beiug practically continuous; Tlatscanai, formerly on a small stream on the northwest side of Wapatoo Island. Gibbs was informed by an old Indian that this tribe
"formerly owned the prairies on the Tsihalis at the mouth of the Skukurnchuck, but,
on the failure of game, left the country, crossed the Columbia River, and occupied
the mountains to the south," a statement of too uneertaiu character to be depended
upon; the Athapascan tribes now on the Grande Rondo and Siletz Reservations,
Oregon, whose villages on and near the coast extended-from Coquille River southward to the California line, including, among others, the Upper Coquille, Sixes,
Euchre, Creek, Joshua, Tutu tunue, and other "Rogue River" or "Tou-touten
bands," Chasta Costa, Galice Creek, Naltunne tunnS, and Chetco villages; the Athapascan villages formerly on Smith River and tributaries, California; those villages
extending southward from Smith River along the California coast to the mouth of
Klamath River; the Hupfi villages or "clans" formerly on Lower Trinity River,
California; the Kenesti or Wailakki (2), located as follows: "They live along the
western slope of the Shasta Mountains, from North Eel River, above Round Valley,
to Hay Fork; along Eel aud Mad rivers, extending down the latter about to Low
Gap; also on Dobbins and Larrabie creeks;" and Saiaz, who "formerly occupied
the tongue of land jutting down between Eel River and Van Dusen's Fork."
Southern group.—Includes the Navajo, Apache, and Lipan. Eugineer Jose' Cortez,
one of the earliest authorities on these tribes, writing in 1799, defines the boundaries
of the Lipan and Apache as extending north apd south from 29° N. to 36° N., and
east and west from 99° W. to 114° W.; in other words, from central Texas nearly
to the Colorado River in Arizona, where they met tribes of the Yuma stock. The
Lipan occupied the eastern part of the above territory, extending in Texas from the
Comanche country (about Red River) south to the Rio Grande. More recently both
Lipan and Apache have gradually moved southward into Mexico, where they extend
as far as Durango.
The Navajo, since first known to history, have occupied the country on and south
of the San Juan River in northern New Mexico and Arizona and extending into
Colorado and Utah. They were surrounded on all sides by the cognate Apache
except upon the north, where they meet Shoshonean tribes.
The present volume embraces 544 titular entries, of which 428 relate
to printed books and articles and 116 to manuscripts. Of these, 517
have been seen and described by the compiler, 422 of the prints and
95 of the manuscripts, leaving 27 as derived from outside sources, 16 of
the prints and 21 manuscripts. Of those uuseen by the writer, titles
and descriptions have been received in most cases from persons who
have actually seen the works and described them for him.
So far as possible, during the proof-reading, direct comparison has
been made with the works themselves. For this purpose, besides his
own books, the writer has had access to those in the libraries of Congress, the Bureau of Ethnology, the Smithsonian Institution, and to
several private collections in the city of Washington.   Mr. Wilberforce   INTRODUCTION
In the compilation of this catalogue the aim has been to include
everything, printed or in manuscript, relating to the Athapascan languages: books, pamphlets, articles in magazines, tracts, serials, etc.,
and such reviews and announcements of publications as seemed worthy
of notice.
The dictionary plan has been followed to its extreme limit, the subject and tribal indexes, references to libraries, etc., being included in
one alphabetic series. The primary arrangement is alphabetic by
authors, translators of works into the native languages being treated as
authors. Under each author the arrangement is, first, by printed works,
and second, by manuscripts, each group being given chronologically;
and in the case of printed books each work is followed through its
various editions before the next in chronologic order is taken up.
Anonymously printed works are entered under the name of the author,
when known, and under the first word of the title, not an article or
preposition, when not known. A cross-reference is given from the first
words of anonymous titles when entered under an author and from the
first words of all titles in the Indian languages, whether anonymous or
not. Manuscripts are entered under the author when known, under
the dialect to which they refer when he is not known.
Each author's name, with his title, etc., is entered in full but once,
i. e., in its alphabetic order. Every other mention of him is by surname and initials only, except in those rare cases when two persons of
the same surname have also the same initials.
All titular matter, including cross-references thereto, is in brevier, all
collations, descriptions, notes, and index matter in nonpareil.
In detailing contents and in adding notes respecting contents, the
spelling of proper names used in the particular work itself has been
followed, and so far as possible the language of the respective writers
is given. In the index entries of the tribal names the compiler has
adopted that spelling which seemed to him the best.
As a general rule initial capitals have been used in titular matter in
only two cases: first, for proper names, and second, when the word
actually appears on the title-page with an initial capital and Avith the
remainder in small capitals or lower-case letters.   In giving titles in the
:German language the capitals in the case of all substantives have been
iiespected.
When titles are given of works not seen by the compiler the fact is
stated or the entry is followed by an asterisk within curves, and in
either case the authority is usually given.
IX ".      BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
By James 0. Pilling.
[An asterisk within parentheses indicates that the compiler has seen no copy of the work referred to.]
Abbott (G. H.) Vocabulary of the
Coquille language.
Manuscript, 6 pages, folio, in the library of
the Bureau of Ethnology, Washington, D. C.
Taken down in 1858 at the Siletz Indian Agency,
Oregon, with the assistance of the interpreter
at that agency, and recorded on one of the blanks
of 180 words issued by Mr. Geo. Gibbs. The
blanks are all filled and about 20 words added.
A partial copy, made by Mr. Gibbs, consisting of the 180 words of the standard vocabulary,
with some changes in the alphabetic notation,
is in the same library.
Adam (Lucien). Examen grammatical
compar6 de seize langues americaines.
In Congres Int. des Americanistes, Compte
rendu, second session, vol. 2, pp. 161-244, and
six folded sheets, Luxembourg & Paris, 1878,
8°.   (Bureau of Ethnology, Congress.)
This work is subdivided under twenty-two
headings, "Des differentes classes denoms et
du genre," "Dupluriel des noms," etc., under each of which occur remarks on all the sixteen languages, among which is the Monta-
gnais. The six folded sheets at the end contain
a comparative vocabulary (135 words and the
numerals 1-100) of fifteen languages, among
them the Montagnais.
Issued separately as follows:
 Examen grammatical compare" | de |
seize langues americaines | par | Lucien
Adam | Conseiller a la Cour de Nancy. |
Paris | Maisonneuve et Cie, Editeurs,
| 25, Quai Voltaire, 25 | 1878
Half-title verso "extrait du" etc. 11. title as
above verso blank 1 1. text pp. 5-88, six folding
tables, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Astor, Boston Public, Congress,
Gatschet, Welleslcy.
Trlibner, 1882 catalogue, p. 3, prices a copy
6*.; Leclerc, 1887, p. 3, 15 fr,; Maisonneuve,
1888, p. 42, 15 fr.
Adeltmg (Johann Christoph) [and Vater
(J. S.)] Mithridates | oder | allgemeine
|  Sprachenkunde | mit | dem Vater
• Unser als Sprachprobe | in bey nahe |
f iinf hundert Sprachen und Mundarten,
| von | Johann Christoph Adelung, |
Churfiirstl. Siichsischen Hofrath und
Ober-Bibliothekar. |   [Two lines quotation.] | Erster[-Vierter] Theil. |
Berlin, | inderVossischenBuchhand-
lung, | 1806 [-1817].
4 vols. (vol. 3 in three parts), 8°.
Vol. 3, part 3, is devoted-to American linguistics; the Athapascan contents are as follows : General remarks on the Apache, pp. 177-
179; of the Nabajoa, pp. 179-180.—Short discussion of the Kinai, pp. 228-229.—Comparative
vocabulary of the TJgaljachmutzi (from Resan-
off), with four Kinai vocabularies respectively
from Dawidoff, Besanoff, Lisiansky, and "TJn-
genannten," pp. 230-231.—A few words in
Sussee (from Umfreville), p. 254.—General discussion of the Chepewyan, with examples
from Mackenzie and Dobbs, pp. 419-424.—Vocabulary of the Chepewyan and Nagailer (both
from Mackenzie) and the Hudson Bay Indians
(from Dobbs), p. 424.
Copies seen: Astor, Bancroft, British Museum, Bureau of Ethnology, Congress, Eames,
Trumbull, Watkinson.
Priced by Triibner (1856), no. 503,11.16s. Sold
at the Eischer sale. no. 17, for II.; another copy,
no. 2042, for 16*. At the Field sale, no. 16, it
brought $11.85; at the Squier sale, no. 9, $5.
Leclerc (1878) prices it, no. 2042, 50 fr. At the
Pinart sale, no. 1322, it sold for 25 fr. and at the
Murphy sale, no. 24, a half-calf, marble-edged
copy brought $4.
Ahtena. See Ahtinne'.
Ahtinne':
General discussion See Buschmann (J. C E.)
Numerals Allen (H. T.)
Numerals Dall(W.H.)
I 1
ATH-
-1 BIBLIOGEAPHY  OF  THE
Ahtinne—Continued.
Numerals
Sentences
Tribal names
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
"Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Ellis (B.)
Allen (H. T.)
Latham (B. G.)
Allen (H. T.)
Baer (K.E.von).
Bancroft (H. H.)
Buscimann (J. C. E.)
DaU(W.H)
Gallatin (A.)
Jehan (L. E.)
Latham (R. G.)
Pinart(A.L.)
Wrangell(F.von).
Daa (L. K.)
Ellis (R.)
Petitot (E. E. S. J.)
Pott (A. E.)
Schomburgk (R. H.)
Allen (Lieut. Henry T.)    49th Congress,
| 2d Session. | Senate. | Ex. Doc. | No.
125. | Eeport | of | an expedition | to |
the   Copper,   Tananfi,   and   Kdyukuk
rivers, | in the | Territory of Alaska, |
in | the year 1885, | "for the purpose
of obtaining all information which will
| be valuable and important, especially
to the | military branch of the government." | Made Tinder the direction of |
General Nelson A. Miles, Commanding
the Department of the Columbia, | by
| lieut.     Henry   T.    Allen, | Second
United States Cavalry. [
Washington: | Government printing
office. | 1887.
Title verso blank 1 1. contents pp. 3-8, correspondence pp. 9-14, introduction p. 15, half-
title p. 17, text pp. 19-172, 5 maps and 29 plates,
8°.
Sentences in the Midnoosky language, p. 51.—
Natives of Copper River (pp. 125-136) contains
some general remarks on their language, a
vocabulary of 53 words English-Midnoosky, p.
134, and the numerals 1-10 of the Midnoosky
and Apache (the latter from Lieut. T. B.
Dugan, V. S. A.) compared, p. 135.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Eames,
Pilling.
Some copies are issued without the documentary heading of five lines at the beginning of
the title-page.   (Bureau of Ethnology, Pilling.)
Partly reprinted as follows:
 Atnatanas; natives of Copper river,
Alaska.   By Lieut. Henry T. Allen, U.
S. Army.
In Smithsonian Inst. Annual Report for
1886, part 1, pp. 258-266, Washington, 1889, 8°.
(Pilling.)
Vocabulary and numerals as under title next
above, p. 265.
Reprinted as follows:
Allen (H. T.) — Continued.
 Atuatanas, or natives of Copper river.
In Quebec Soc. de Geog. Bull. 1886-87-88-89,
pp. 79-90, Quebec, 1889, 8°.
Linguistics as under titles above, pp. 87-88.
American Bible Society: These words following
a title or within parentheses after a note indicate that a copy of the work referred to has been
seen by the compiler in the library of that institution, New York City.
American Bible Society. 1776.   Centennial exhibition. 1876. | Specimen verses
| from versions in different | languages
and    dialects | in   which    the | holy
scriptures | have been printed and circulated by the | American bible society
| and the | British and foreign bible
society. | [Picture and one line quotation.] |
New York: | American bible society,
| instituted in the year MDCCCXVI. |
1876.
Title verso picture etc 1 1. text pp.3-47, advertisement p. 48, 16°.
St. John, iii, 16, in the Tinne language (syllabic charaeters), p. 36.
Copies seen: American Bible Society, Pilling,
Trumbull.
Editions, similar except in date, appeared in
1879 (Wellesley) and in 1884 (Pilling).
 Specimen verses | from versions in
^different | languages and dialects | in
which the | Holy Scriptures ] have been
printed and circulated by the | American bible society | and the | British and
foreign bible society. | [Picture of bible
and one line quotation.] | Second edition, enlarged. |
New York: | American bible society,
1 instituted in the year MDCCCXVI. |
1885.
Title verso note 1 1. text pp. 3-60, index pp.
61-63, advertisement p. 64, 16°.
St. John, iii, 16, in the Tinne or Chippewyan
(roman and syllabic) and Tukudh (roman), p.
47.
Copies seen: Wellesley.
There is an edition, otherwise(as above, dated
1888 (Pilling).
Issued also with title as above and, in addition, the following, which encircles the border
of the title-page: Souvenir of the World's industrial and cotton j centennial exposition. |
Bureau of education: Department of the interior. | New Orleans, 1885.   (Pilling.)
 Muestras de versiculos | tornados de
las versiones en diferentes | lenguas y
dialectos | en que las | sagradas escri-
turas | ban sido impresas y puestas en
circulacion por lab.|-§ociedad biblica ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
American Bible Society — Continued,
americana | y la | Sociedad biblica in-
glesa y extranjera. | [Design and one
line quotation.]
Nueva York: | Sociedad biblica americana. | Fundada en el Aflo de 1816. |
1889.
Title as above verso picture etc. 1 1. text pp.
3-50, historical and other observations pp. 51-
60, index pp. 61-63, picture and description p.
64, 16°.
St. John iii, 16, in the Tinne (syllabic characters), Chippewyan (roman), and Tukudh
(roman), p. 47.
Copies seen: Pilling, Wellesley.
American Tract Society: These words following
a title or within parentheses after a note indicate that a copy of the work referred to has
been seen by the compiler in the library of that
institution, New York City.
Anderson (Alexander C aulfield). Vocabulary of the Tahkali or Carrier.
In Hale (H.), Ethnography and philology of
the TJ. S. exploring expedition, pp. 570-629, line j
A, Philadelphia, 1846, 4°.
Reprinted in G-allatin (A.). Hale's Indians of
northwest America, in American Eth. Soc.
Trans, vol. 2. pp. 78-82, New York, 1848, 8°.
 Notes on the Indian tribes of British
North America, and the northwest
coast. Communicated to Geo. Gibbs,
esq. By Alex. C. Anderson, esq., late
of the hon. H. B. co., and read before
the New York Historical Society, November, 1862.
In Historical Mag. first series, vol. 7, pp.
73-81, New York <fe London, 1863, sm. 4°.
Includes a short account of the Tahcullys,
with a few proper names with English signification.
■ Notes | on | north-western America.
| By | Alexander Caulfield Anderson,
J. P. | (Formerly of the Hudson's Bay
Company.) |
Montreal: | Mitchell & Wilson, Printers, 192 St. Peter Street. | 1876.
Cover title as above, no inside title; text pp.
1-22 12°.
Under the heading of " Indians,"-pp. 20-22, is
given a short account of the natives of that
region, including the'' Chipewyan race,'' which
includes a few tribal names with English significations.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology.
I Concordance of the Athabascan languages.
Manuscript, 8 unnumbered leaves, folio, in
the library of the Bureau of Ethnology, Washington, D. C. Recorded at Cathlamut, Washington Ty., 24th February, 1858,
Anderson (A. C.) — Continued.
The first four leaves, written on one side
only, contain a comparative vocabulary of 108
words of the following languages: English,
Chipwyan, Tacully, Klatskauai, Willopah,
Upper Umpqua, Tootooten, Applegate Creek,
Hopah, and Haynarger. The remaining four
leaves, written on both sides and headed Appendix, contain notes and memoranda connected with the vooabularies collated in the
accompanying abstract.
Apache:
General discussion Sec
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
Gentes
Grammatic comments
Grammatic comments
Grammatic comments
Grammatic treatise
Grammatic treatise
Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Proper names
Proper names
Proper names
Relationships
Relationships
Sentences
Sentences
Text
Tribal names
Tribal names
Tribal names
■ Tribal :namos
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Yocabularv
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Adelung (J. C.) and
Vater (J. S.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Berghaus(H)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Cremony (J. C.)
Jehan (L. E.)
Orozco y.Berra (M.)
Pimentel (P.)
Smart (C.)
White (J. B.)
Bourke (J. G.)
Featherman (A.)
Muller (E.)
White (J. B.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Cremony (J. C.)
Allen (H. T.)
Bancroft (H.H.)
Cremony (J. C.)
Dugan (T. B.)
Gatschet (A. S.)
Haines (E. M.)
Haldeman (S. S.)
Pimentel (F.)
Tolmie (W. F.) and Dawson (G. M.)
Catlin (G.)
Cremony (J. C.)
White (J. B.)
Morgan (L. H.)
White (J.B.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
White (J.B.)
Bancroft (H.H.)
Balbi (A.)
Higgins (N. S.)
Jehan (L. F.)
White (J.B.)
Allen (H. T.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Bartlett (J.R.)
Bourko (J. G.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Chapin (G.)
Cremony (J. C.)
Froebel (J.)
Gatschet (A. S.)
Gilbert (G.K.)
Henry (C. C.)
Higgins (N. S.)
Hoffman (W.J.)
Loew (O.)
McElroy(P.D.) BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Apache — Continued.
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocahulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
See
Palmer (E.)
Pimentel (F.)
Ruby(C)
Schoolcraft (H. R.)
Sherwood (W. L.)
Simpson (J. H.)
Smart (C-)
Ten Kate (H. F. C.)
Turner (W.W.)
Whipple (A. W.)
White (J.B.)
Wilson (E. F.)
Yarrow (H. C.)
Bourke (J. G.)
Daa(L.K.)
Ellis (R.)
Gatschet (A. S.)
Latham (R. G.)
Tolmie (W. F.) and Dawson (G. M.)
Wilson (E. F.)
Gatschet (A. S.)
Words
Apache John.
Apostolides (S.) L'oraison dominicale
| en | Cent Langues Differentes; |
publiee et vendue au profit des | mal-
heureux r6fugies Cre'tois, [ actuelle-
inent en Grece. | Cornpilee par S. Apostolides. | [Scripture text, two lines.] |
Londres: | imprhn6 et publi6 par W.
M. Watts, | 80, Gray's-inn road. | (Entered at stationers'hall).    [1869.]    (*)
Second title:   Our lord's prayer | in | One
Hundred Different Languages; [ published for
the benefit of the | poor Cretan refugees, | now
in  Greece. |  Compiled by S. Apostolides. |
[Scripture text, two lines.] |
London: | printed and published by W. M.
Watts, | 80, Gray's-inn road.
First title verso blank 1 1. second title verso
blank 11. dedication in French verso blank 1 1.
dedication in English verso blank 1 1. preface
(French) pp. ix-x, preface (English) pp. xi-xii,
index pp. xiii-xiv, half-title verso blank 1 1.
text (printed on one side only) 11.17-116,12°.
The Lord's prayer in Chepewyan, 1.32.
Title from Mr. Wilberforce Eames, from copy
belonging to Mr. E. P.Vining, Brookline, Mass.
For title of the second edition see in the Addenda, p. 113.
Applegate Creek.   See Nabiltse.
Arivaipa Apache.   See Apache.
Amy (Gov. W. F. M.)   Vocabulary of
the Navajo language.
Manuscript, 10 unnumbered leaves, 4°, in the
library of the Bureau of Ethnology. Collected
on the Navajo reservation in New Mexico,
November, 1874, with the assistance of Prof.
Valentine Friese and Rev. \Y. 1?. Truax.
Recorded on one of the forms (no. 170) of the
Smithsonian Institution, containing 211 words,
equivalents of all of which are given in Navajo.
Arny (W. F. M.) — Continued.
This manuscript was referred, Dec. 26, 1874,
to Dr. Trumbull for inspection, and was
returned by him with the recommendation that,
after certain changes in the phonetic notation,
it be published by the Institution.
Astor: This word following a title or within parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of the
work referred to has been seen by the compiler
in the Astor Library, New York City.
Athapascan. Vocabulary of the language spoken by the Indians of Cook's
Inlet Bay.
Manuscript, 1 leaf, folio, written on both
sides, in the library of the Bureau of Ethnology.
Contains 60 words.
Athapascan:
General discussion See
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
Geographic names
Grammatic comments
Grammatic comments
Grammatic comments
Proper names
Proper names
Relationships
Sentences
Syllabary
Tribal names
Tribal names
Tribal names
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
See also Ohippewyan
Atna.   See Ahtinne.
Bastian(P.W.A.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Campbell (J.)
Gabelentz (H. G. C.)
Keane (A. H.)
Scouler (J.)
Trumbull (J. H.)
Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
Dorsey (J. O.)
Gallatin (A.)
Grasserie (R. de la).
Catlin (G.)
Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
Dorsey (J. O.)
Petitot (E.F.-S. J.)
Morice (A. G.)
Gallatin (A.)
Latham (R. G.)
Petitot (E. F.S.J.)
Athapascan.
Bancroft (H. H.)
Brinton (D. G.)
Daa (L. K.)
Ellis (R.)
Hearne (S.)
Kovar (E.)
Lubbock (J.)
Pott (A. F;)
; Montagnais; Tinne1
Authorities:
See Dufoss6 (E.)
Field (T.W.)
Latham (R. G.)
Leclerc (C.)
Ludewig (H. E.)
McLean (J.)
Pilling (J. C.)
Pott (A. F.j
Quaritch (B.)
Sabin (J.)
Steiger (E.)
Triibner &. Co.
Trumbull (J. H.)
Vater (J. S.) ATHAPASCAN -LANGUAGES.
Azpell (Dr. Thomas F.)   Vocabulary of I
the Hoopa language.
Manuscript, 10 unnumbered leaves, 4°, in the1
library of the Bureau of Ethnology, Washington, D. C. Recorded at Camp Gaston, California, Aug. 14, 1870, on Smithsonian form no. 170.  |
The printed form contains blanks for 211
words, all of which are given, and in addition a
few other words and about 25 phrases and sen-*
tences. In transmitting the manuscript Dr.
Azpell writes as follows:
Camp Gaston, Hoopa Valley, Cal.,
Aug. Uth, 1870.
Secretary of Smithsonian Institution,
Washington, D. C:
SIR: I have the honor to enclose herewith the
vocabularies of the Noh-tin-oah (or Hoopa) and
Sa-ag-its (or Klamath) tribes of Indians.
I have adhered as closely as possible to the
orthography given in the Smithsonian instructions, with the single exception of substituting
the Greek \ for "kk" in representing the
Azpell (T. F.) —Continued.
guttural aspirate, which letter I think represents the sound better.
The syllabic sounds have been carefully compared in the pronunciation of several Indians
of each tribe, and I am able to hold communication with them by reading off the words as I
have written them, which seems to prove their
accuracy.
The Indian languages in this vicinity are
rapidly becoming corrupted by contact with
the white man, the younger Indians speaking
in a different dialect from the elder ones, and
probably in a generation or two will be no
longer recognizable. Knowing this to be the
case, I have endeavored to get the most correct pronunciation from the older Indians, and
this, being very tedious, must be my apology
for seeming delay and also for writing the two
tribes on one form, as I have spoiled one by
pencil marks.
Very respectfully, your ob't serv't,
T. F. Azpell,
Asst.Surg. U.S.A.
B.
Baer (Karl Ernst von). Statistische und
ethnographische Nachrichten | fiber |
die Eussischen Besitzungen | an der |
Nordwestkuste von Amerika. | Gesam-
melt | von dem ehemaligen Oberver-
walter dieser Besitzungen, | Contre-
Admiral v. Wrangell. | Auf Kosten der
Kaiserl. Akademie der Wissenschaften |
herausgegeben | und mit den Berech-
nungen aus Wrangell's Witterungs-
beobachtungen | und andern Zusatzen
vermehrt | von | K. E. v. Baer. )
St. Petersburg, 1839. | Buchdruckerei
der Kaiserlichen Akademie der Wissenschaften,
Forms vol. 1 of Baer (K. E. von) and Helmer-
sen (G. von), Beitriige zur Kenntniss des Russ-
ischen Reiohes, St. Petersburg, 1839, 8°.
Short comparative vocabulary of the Atna,
Ugalenzen, and Koloschen, p. 99.—Comparative
vocabulary of the Aleut, Kadjack, Tschugut-
schen, Ugalenzen, Kenaier, Atnaer of Copper
River, Koltschanen of Copper River, and
Koloschen of Sitka, p. 259 (folding sheet).
Balbi (Adrien). Atlas | ethnographique
du globe, | ou | classification des peu-
ples | anciens et modernes | d'apres leurs
langues, | precSde' | d'un discours sur
l'utilite' et l'importance de l'e'tude des
langues appliquee a plusieurs branches
des connaissances- humaines* d'un
apereu | sur les moyens graphiques em-
Balbi (A.) — Continued,
ployes par les diU'ereus peuples de la
terre; d'un coup-d'ceil sur l'histoire |
de la langue slave, et sur la marche progressive de la civilisation | et de la lit-
terature en Russie, | avec environ sept
cents vocabulaixes des principaux idi-
omes   connus, | et  suivi | du   tableau
physique, moral et politique | des cinq
parties du monde, | D6di6 a S. M. l'Em-
pereur Alexandre; j par Adrien Balbi, |
ancien  professeur   de geographic, de
physique et de mathematiques, | mem-
bre correspondant de l'Athenee de Tre'-
vise, etc. etc. | [Design.] |
A Paris, | Chez  Key et Gravier, li-
braires, Quai des Augustins, N° 55. |
M.DCCC.XXVI [1826]. | Imprint chez
Paul Eenouard, Rue Garenciere, N° 5.
F.-S.-G.
Half-title 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. dedication
211. table synoptique 11. text plates i-xli (single
and double), table plates xlii-xlvi, additions
plates xlvii-xlix, errata 1 p. folio.
Plate xxxii, Langues du plateau central de
l'Amerique du Nord, embraces the Apaches,
with a list of the principal divisions.—Plate
xxxiii, Region Missouri-Columbienne, embraces the Sussee.—Plate xxxiv, Langues de la
region Alleghanique et des lacs, embraces the
Tacoullies.—Plate xxxv, Langues de la cdte
occidentale de l'Amferique du Nord, includes
the Kinaitze.—Plate xli, Tableau polyglotte des
langues americaines, includes a vocabulary of a
BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE
Balbi (A.) — Continued.
26 words of the Sussee, Cheppewyan, Tacoullies |
or Carriers, and Kinai.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Congress, Watkinson, Wellesley.
Bancroft: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy
of the work referred to has been seen by the
compiler in the library of Mr. H. H. Bancroft,
San Francisco, Cal.
Bancroft (Hubert Howe).   The | native
races | of | the Pacific states | of |
North America. | By | Hubert Howe
Bancroft. | Volume I. | Wild tribes[-V.
Primitive history]. |
New York: | D. Appleton and company. | 1874[-1876].
5 vols, maps and plates, 8°. Vol. I. Wild
tribes; II. Civilized nations; LTI. Myths and
languages; IV. Antiquities; V. Primitive history.
Some copies of vol. 1 are dated 1875,
Chapter 2 of vol. 3 (pp. 574-603) includes a
general discussion of the Tinneh family, with
examples, pp. 583-585. — Chepewyan declensions, pp. 585-586.—Partial conjugation of the
verb yaws' thee, to speak, p. 586.—General discussion of the Kutchin and Kenai, with examples, pp. 586-588; of the Atnah, with a short
Vocabulary, pp. 589-590; of the Kenai, with
examples, pp. 590-591; of the Tacullies, with
examples, pp. 591-593.—Numerals 1-10 of the
Tolewah, Hoopah, and Wi-lackee, p. 593.—
General discussion of the Apache and Navajo,
with examples (from Cremony), pp. 593-597.—
Conjugation of the Apache verbs to be, to do, to
eat, to sleep, to love, and numerals 1-2000, pp.
597-600.—Apache sentences, p. 600.—Speech of
Gen. Carleton in Apache, with interlinear English translation, pp. 600-602.—Lord's prayer in
Lipan (from Phnentel), p. 602.—Comparative
vocabulary of 11 words of the Apache, Apache
Coppermine, Atnah, Beaver, Chepewyan, Dog-
rib, Hoopah, Inkilik, Inkalit, Kenai, Kolt-
shane, Kutchin, Kwalhioqua, Loucheux, Navajo, Northern Indian, Apache Pinalefio, Sursee, I
Tacully, Tenan Kutchin, Tlatskanai, Ugalenze,
Umpqua, Unakatana, Xicarilla, Apache Mes-
calero, p. 603.
Copies seen: Astor, Bancroft, Brinton, British Museum, Bureau of Ethnology, Congress,
Panics, Powell.
 The | native races | of | the Pacific
states | of J North America. | By I Hubert Howe Bancroft | Volume 1.1 Wild
tribes[-V. Primitive history]. |
Author's Copy, | San Francisco. 1874
[-1876].
5 vols. 8°. Similar, except on title-page, to
previous editions.   One hundred copies issued.
Copies seen: Bancroft,British Museum, Congress.
Bancroft (H. H.) — Continued.
In addition to the above the work ha^ been
issued with the imprint of Longmans, London;
Maisonneuve, Paris; and Brockhans, Leipzig;
none of which have I seen.
 The works | of | Hubert Howe Bancroft. | Volume I[-V]. | The native
races. | Vol. I. Wild tribes [-V. Primitive history]. |
San Francisco: | A. L. Bancroft &
company, publishers. | 1882.
5 vols. 8°. This series includes the History of
Central America, History of Mexico, etc., each
with its own system of numbering and also
numbered consecutively in the series.
Of these works there have been published
vols. 1-39. The opening paragraph of vol. 39
gives the following information: "This volume
closes the narrative portion of my historical
series; there yet remains to be completed the
biographical section."
Copies  seen:   Bancroft,   British   Museum,
Bureau of Ethnology, Congress.
Baptismal card:
Chippewyan See Church.
Barnhardt(W. H.) Comparative vocabulary of the languages spoken by the
"Uinpqua," "Lower Rogue River,"
and Calapooia tribes of Indians.
Manuscript, 4 unnumbered leaves (recto of
the first and verso of the last blank), folio, in
the library of the Bureau of Ethnology. Recorded in May, 1859.
\Each vocabulary (of which only the Umpqua
is Athapascan) contains 180 words, those constituting the standard vocabulary compiled by
the Smithsonian Institution. The vocabulary
is followed by the "rules adopted in spelling."
There is a copy of this manuscript, 4 11. folio,
made by its compiler, in the same library, and
also a copy of the Umpqua (6 11. folio), according to the original spelling in one column and a
revised spelling in a second. The latter copy
was made by Dr. Geo. Gibbs.
Barreiro (Antonio). Ojeada | sobre
Nuevo-Mexico, | que da una idea | de
sus producciones naturales, y de algu-
nas  otras | cosas   que   se  consideran
■ oportunas para mejorar | su estado, 6 ir
proporcionando su futura felicidad. |
Formada | por el lie. Antonio Barreiro,
| asesor de dicho territorio. | A peti-
cion | del escmo. senor ministro que fu6
dejusticiadon | Jos6 Ignacio Espinosa.
| Y dedicada | al escmo. senor vice-pres-
idente de los Estados Uni- | dos Mexi-
canos don Anastacio Bustamente. |
Puebla: 1832. | Imprenta del ciuda-
dano Jose' Maria Campos, esquina | de
la Carniceria niiniero 13. ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
Barreiro (A.) — Continued.
Title verso blank 1 1. dedication 1 1. text pp.
5-42, statistics 2 11. apendice half-title and pp.
2-10 of text, sin. 4°.
Ten Nabajoe words and expressions, p. 10 of
apendice.
Copies seen: Congress.
Bartlett (John Russell).   Vocabulary of
the Apache language.
In Whipple (A. W.) and others, Explorations
and surveys, p. 85, Washington, 1855, 4°.
Consists of 25 words used in comparison with
other languages of the same stock, the other
.   vocabularies being taken from printed sources.
 Vocabulary   of    the    Coppermine
Apache (Mimbreno) language.
Manuscript, 6 unnumbered leaves, written
on one side only, folio, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. " Obtained by Mr. Bartlett from Mancus Colorado, chief of the Coppermine Apaches, July, 1851. The language
abounds in gutturals. Mr. Turner identified it
as of the Chipewyan stock."
The vocabulary is recorded on one of the
Smithsonian forms of 180 English words, equivalents of about 150 of which are given. It is a
copy by Dr. Gibbs. The whereabouts of the
original I do not know.
John Russell Bartlett, author, born in Providence, R. I., 23 Oct., 1805, died there 28 May,
1886. He was educated for a mercantile career,
entered the banking business at an early age,
and was for six years cashier of the Globe bank
in Providence. His natural bent appears to
have been in the direction of science and belles-
lettres, for he was prominent in founding the
Providence athenaeum and was an active member of the Franklin society. In 1837 he engaged
in business with a New York house, but was
not successful, and entered the book-importing
trade under the style of Bartlett & Welford.
He became a member and was for several years
corresponding secretary of the New York historical society, and was a member of the American ethnographical society. In 1850 President
Taylor appointed him one of the commissioners
to fix the boundary between the United States
and Mexico under the treaty of Guadaloupe
Hidalgo. This service occupied him until 1853,
when he was obliged to leave the work incomplete, owing to the failure of the appropriation.
He became secretary of state for Rhode Island
in May, 1855, and held the office until 1872. He
had charge of the John Carter Brown Library
in Providence for several years, and prepared
a four-volume catalogue of it, of which one
hundred copies were printed in the highest
style of the art.—Appleton's Cyclop. o/Am.Biog.
Bastian (Philipp Wilhelm Adolf).   Ethnologic und vergleichende Linguistik.
In Zeitschrift f iir Ethnologie,vol. 4 (1872),pp.
137-162, 211-231, Berlin [n.d.3, 8°.
Bastian (P. W. A.) — Continued.
Contains examples in and grammatic comments upon a number of American languages,
among them the Athapaskan, p. 230.
Bates (Henry Walton). Stanford's | compendium of geography and travel j
haa'ed on Hellw aid's 'Die Erde und ihre
Volker'| Central America | the West Indies | and | South America | Edited and
extended | By H. W. Bates, | assistant-
secretary of the Royal geographical
society; | author of 'The naturalist on
the river Amazons' | With | ethnological appendix by A. H. Keane, B, A. |
Maps and illustrations |
London | Edward Stanford, 55, Charing cross, S. W. | 1878
Half-title verso blank 11. frontispiece 11. title
verso blank 1 1. preface pp. v-vi, contents pp.
vii-xvi, list of illustrations pp. xvii-xviii, list of
maps p. xix, text pp. 1-561, index pp. 563-571,
maps, 8°.
Keane (A. H), Ethnography and philology of
America, pp. 443-561.
Copies seen: British Museum, Congress,
Eames, Geological Survey, National Museum,
— Stanford's | Compendium of geography and travel | based on Hellwald's
'Die Erde und ihre Volker' | Central
America | the West Indies | and | South
America | Edited and extended | By H.
W. Bates, | Author of [&c. two lines.]
| With | ethnological appendix by A.
H. Keane, M. A. J. | Maps and illustrations | Second and revised edition. |
London | Edward Stanford, 55, Charing cross, S. W. | 1882.
Half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso blank 1
1. preface pp. v-vi, contents pp.vii-xvi, list of
illustrations pp. xvii-xviii, list of maps p. xix,
text pp. 1-441, appendix pp. 443-561, index pp.
563-571, maps, 8°.
Linguistics as under previous title,pp.443-561.
Copies seen: British Museum, Harvard.
 Stanford's | Compendium of geography and travel | based on Hellwald's
'Die Erde und ihre Volker' | Central
America | the West Indies | and | South
America | Edited and extended | By H.
W. Bates, | assistant-secretary [&c.
two lines.] | With | ethnological appendix by A. H. Keane, M. A. I. | Maps
and illustrations | Third edition |
London | Edward Stanford, 55, Charing cross, S. W. | 1885
Collation and contents as in second edition,
title and description of which are given above.
Copies seen; Geological Survey. 8
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE.
Beach (William Wallace). The | Indian
miscellany; | containing | Papers on the
History, Antiquities, Arts, Languages, |
Religions, Traditions and Superstitions
| of | the American aborigines; | with |
Descriptions of their Domestic Life,
Manners, Customs, | Traits, Amusements and Exploits; | travels and adventures in the Indian country; | Incidents of Border Warfare; Missionary
Relations, etc. | Edited by W. W.
Beach. |
Albany: | J. Munsell, 82 State street.
| 1877.
Title verso blank 1 1. dedication verso blank
11. advertisement verso blank 1 1. contents pp.
vii-viii, text pp. 9-477, errata 1 p. index pp. 479-
490, 8°.
Gatschet (A. S.), Indian languages of the
Pacific states and territories, pp. 416-447.
Copies seen: Astor,Brinton, British Museum,
.   Congress, Eames,Geological Survey, Massachusetts Historical Society, Puling, Wisconsin Historical Society.
Priced by Leclerc, 1878 catalogue, no. 2663, 20
fr.; the Murphy copy, no. 197, brought $1.25;
priced by Clarke & co. 1886 catalogue, no. 6271,
$3.50, and by Littlefield, Nov. 1887, no. 50, $4.
Beadle (J. H.) The | undeveloped West;
| or, | five years in the territories: |
| being | a complete history of that vast
region be- | tweeu the Mississippi and
the Pacific, | its resources, climate, inhabitants, natural curiosities, etc.,
etc. | Life and adventure on | prairies,
mountains, and the Pacific coast. | With
two hundred and forty illustrations,
from original | sketches and photographic views of the scenery, | cities,
lands, mines, people, and curi- | osities
of the great West. | By J. H. Beadle, |
western correspondent of the .Cincinnati Commercial, and author | of "Life
in Utah," etc., etc |
Issued by subscription only [&c. two
lines.] | National publishing company,
| Philadelphia,   Pa.;   Chicago,   111.;
Cincinnati, Ohio; | and St. Louis, Mo.
[1873.]
Title verso copyright 1 1. preface pp. 15-16,
list of illustrations pp. 17-22, contents pp. 23-
32, text pp. 33-823, map, plates, 8°.
Short vocabulary, Navajo, Mexican-Spanish,
and English, p. 545.—Numerals 1-20 of the
Navajo, p. 545.—Navajo words passim.
Copies seen: Boston AthensBum, Congress.
There is an edition, with title but slightly
different from the above, except in the imprint,
which reads: Published by | the National pub-
Beadle (J.'H.) — Continued.
lishing co., | Philadelphia, Pa., Chicago, HI.,
and St. Louis, Mo. (Brooklyn Public, Congress.)
Beaver:
Bible, Mark
Bible passages
Catechism
Catechism
Hymns
Hynins
Prayer book
Prayer book
Prayers
Primer
See Garrioch (A. C.)
Garrioch (A. C.)
Bompas (W. C.)
Garrioch (A. C.)
Bompas (W. C.)
Garrioch (A. C.)
Bompas (W. C.)
Garrioch (A. C.)
Bompas (W. C.)
Bompas (W. C.)
Ten commandments  Garrioch (A. C.)
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Bancroft (H. H.)
Bompas (W. C.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.
Garrioch (A- C.)
Howse (J.)
Kennicott (R.)
Latham (R. G.)
M'Lean (J.)
Morgan (L. H.)
Roehrig (F. L. O.)
Daa(L.K.)
Beaver Indian primer. See Bompas (W.
C.)
Berghaus (Dr. Heinrich). Physikal-
ischer Atlas. | Geographische Jahrbuch
| zur Mittheilung aller wichtigern neuer
Erforschungen | von | Dr. Heinrich Berghaus. | 18511 III. | Inhalt: | [&c. twenty-three lines in double columns.] |
Gotha: Justus Perthes.    [1851.]
Title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 1-66, 3 plates,
4°.
Ueber die Verwandtschaft der Schoschonen,
Komantschen und Apatschen, pp. 48-62, contains general comments on the Apache language
and its relations te the others mentioned, but
gives no examples.
Copies seen: Congress.
Bergholtz (Gustaf Fredrik). The Lord's
Prayer | in the | Principal Languages,
Dialects and | Versions of the World, |
printed in | Type and Vernaculars of
the | Different Nations, | compiled and
published by | G. F. Bergholtz. |
Chicago, Hlinois, | 1884.
Title verso copyright 1 1. contents pp. 3-7,
preface p. 9, text pp. 11-200,12°.
Lord's prayer in Chipewyan (from Kirkby),
p. 37; Slave (from Bompas), p. 169.
Copies seen: Congress.
Bible:
Genesis Taculli    See Morice (A. G.)
New test. Chippewyan Kirkby (W. W.)
New test. Tukudh M'Donald (R.)
Matthew Slave Reeve (W. D.) ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
Bible — Continued.
Mark Beaver
Mark Slave
Mark Tinne
John Tinne
Garrioch (A. C.)
Reeve (W. D.)
Kirkby (W. W.)
Kirkby (W. W.)
Gospels
Gospels
Gospels
John i-iii
Bible history:
Montagnais
Tukudh
Bible lesson:
Dene
Bible passages:
Beaver
Chippewyan
Dene
Hudson Bay
Slave
Slave
Tinne
Tinn6
Tiun6
Tinne
Tinne
Tukudh
Tukudh
Tukudh
Tukudh
Tukudh
Tukudh
Chippewyan Kirkby (W. W.)
Slave Bompas (W. C.)
Tukudh M'Donald (R.)
Tukudh        M'Donald (R.)
See Logoff (L.)
M'Donald (R.)
See Faraud (H. J.)
See Garrioch (A. C.)
Church.
Grouard (E.)
British.
British.
Gilbert & Sivington.
American.
Bible Society.
Bompas (W. C.)
British.
Gilbert & Rivingtou.
American.
Bible Society.
Bompas (W. C.)
British.
Church.
Gilbert & Rivington.
Bible Society.   Specimen verses | in 164
| Languages and Dialects | in' which
the j holy scriptures [ have been printed
and circulated by the | Bible' society.
| [Design and one line quotation.] |
Bible  house, | Corner Walnut   and
Seventh Streets, | Philadelphia. [1876?]
Cover title as above verso advertisement, no
inside title, text pp. 3-39, index pp. 40-41, historical sketches etc. pp. 42-46 and cover, 18°.
St. John,iii, 16, in Tinne (syllabic characters),
p. 36.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling,Wellesley.
 Specimen verses | in 215 | languages
and dialects | in which the | holy scriptures [ have been printed and circulated
by the | Bible society. | [Design and
one line quotation.] |
Bible house, | corner Walnut and
Seventh streets, j Philadelphia. | Craig,
Finley & co., prs. 1020 Arch st.Philada.
[1878t]
Printed covers (title as above on the front
one), no inside title, contents pp. 1-2, text pp.
3-48,18o.
St. John, iii, 16, in Tukudh (Loucheux Indians), p. 26; Chippewyan or Tinne (syllabic
characters), p. 27. The so-called "Chippewyan ' in roman on p. 27 is really Chippewa.
Copies seen: Pilling.
Bible Society — Continued.
Some copies have slightly variant title
(Barnes); others have the title printed in a different type and omit the line beginning with
the word "Craig."   (Eames.)
Bollaert (William).. Observations on the
Indian Tribes of Texas. By William
Bollaert, F. R. G. S.
In Ethnological Soc. of London, Jour. vol. 2,
pp. 262-283, London, n. d. 8°.
A few words in the Lipan language, pp. 278-
279.
[Bompas (Biahop William Carpenter).]
Beaver Indian primer.
Colophon: London: Gilbert & Rivington, Whitefriars Street, and St.
John's Square.    [187-?]
No title-page, heading only; text (with headings in English) pp. 1-36, 16°. Printed for the
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge.
Lord's prayer, creed, general confession, commandments, pp. 1-2.— Catechism, pp. 3-4.—
Prayers, pp. 5-7.—Lessons, pp. 8-11.—Texts, p.
11.—Lessons 1-26, pp. 11-24. — Hymns (double
columns), pp. 25-30.—Vocabulary (alphabetically arranged by English words, double columns), pp. 31-36.
Copies seen: Pilling, Society for Promoting
Christian Knowledge, Wellesley.
[ ] Chipewyan primer.
Colophon : London: Gilbert & Rivington, Whitefriars Street, and St.
John's Square.    [187-?]
No title-page, heading only; text (with English headings) pp. 1-36, 16°. Printed for the
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge.
Lessons 1-24, pp. 1-9.—Lord's prayer, creed,
commandments, prayers, etc., pp. 9-13.—Lessons 1-41, pp. 13-32.—Hymns (double columns),
pp. 33-36.
Copies seen: Pilling, Society for Promoting
Christian Knowledge, Wellesley.
[ ] Dog Rib primer.
Colophon : London: Gilbert & Rivington, Whitefrairs "Street, and St.
John's Square.    [187-?]
No title-page, heading only; text (with headings in English) pp. 1-22, 16°. Printed for the
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge.
Lord's prayer, morning prayer, creed, commandments, confession, prayers, etc., pp. 1-6.—
Scripture texts, pp. 6-16.—Hymns (double columns), pp. 17-22.
Copies seen: Pilling, Society for Promoting
Christian Knowledge, Wellesley.
[ ] Tinn6 primer.
Colophon: London: Gilbert & Rivington, Whitefriars Street, and St.
John's Square.    [187-?] \%
io
BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE
Bompas (W. C) —Continued.
No title-page, heading only; text (with headings in English) pp. 1-76,16°. Printed for the
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge.
Texts on scripture subjects, prayers, etc., pp.
1-37.—Catechism, pp. 37-40.—Creed, commandments, prayers, etc., pp. 40-48.—Catechism, pp.
48_55.—Creation, patriarchs, etc., pp. 55-65.—
Hymns (double columns), pp. 67-76.
Copies seen: Pilling, Society fqr Promoting
Christian Knowledge, Wellesley.
[ ] Tukudh primer.
Colophon: London: Gilbert & Rivington, Whitefriars Street, and St.
John's Square.    [187-?]
No title-page, heading only; text (with English headings) pp. 1-55, 16°. Printed for the
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge.
Scripture lessons, prayers, commandments,
gospels, collects, catechism, etc., pp. 1-51.—
Hymns (double columns), pp. 52-55.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, Wellesley.
[ ] Manual of devotion, | in the | Beaver Indian Dialect. | Compiled from the
manuals of the venerable | archdeacon
Kirkby, | by the | bishop of Athabasca.
| For the use of the Indians | in the |
Athabasca diocese, [ [Seal of the society.] |
London: [ Society for promoting
christian knowledge, | Northumberland avenue, Charing cross; | 43, Queen
Victoria street; and 48, Piccadilly.
[1880.]
Title verso syllabarium 1 1. text (in syllabic
characters with English headings in roman)
pp. 3-48, 24°.
Hymns nos. 1-21, pp. 3-24.—Prayers, pp. 25-
37.—Catechism, pp. 37-43.—Lessons nos. 1-7, pp.
44-48.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, Wellesley.
See Garrioch (A, C.) for another edition of
this work.
[ ] The four gospels, | translated into
the | SlavS language, j for the Indians
of  north-west  America. | By  the |
Right Rev. The bishop of Athabasca. |
London: | printed for the British and
foreign bible society, | Queen Victoria
street. | 1883.
Title verso printers 1 1. contents verso blank
1L text in roman characters pp. 1-282, 16°.
Matthew, pp. 1-84.—Mark, pp. 85-134 Luke,
pp.*135-221 John, pp. 222-282.
Copies seen: British and Foreign Bible Society, Puling, Wellesley.
Bompas (W. C.) — Continued.
 Colonial Church Histories. | Diocese
of Mackenzie river. |"By right reverend
| William Carpenter Bompas, D.D. |
bishop of the diocese. | With map. |
Published under the direction of the
Tract committee. |
London:       Society   for   promoting
christian   knowledge,  |   Northumberland avenne, Charing cross, W. C.; |
43,   Queen  Victoria   street,   E. C.; |
Brighton:    135,    North   Street. | New
York: E. & J. B. Young & co. | 1888.
Title verso blank 1 1. contents verso blank 1.
1. text pp. 1-108, map, 16°.
In some copies the author's name is misprinted Bompus.
Chapter v, Languages (pp. 51-5£), consists of
general remarks on the three languages within
the diocese — Tenni, Tukudh, and Western
Esquimaux—and gives in each St. John, iii, 16,
p. 55, and the Lord's prayer, pp. 57-58.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
[ ] Words of the Chipewyan Indians
of Athabasca, arranged according to
Dr. Powell's schedules [in the Introduction to the study of Indian languages, second edition].
Manuscript, 10 pages, 4°, in the library of
the Bureau of Ethnology, Recorded in the
early part of 1890.
In transcribing this material Bishop Horden
vhas given the Chipewyan words only, using
ttie numbers given in Powell's Introduction in
lieu of the English words there given. Some
at least of the words in each of the 29 schedules
in the Introduction are given, in some cases—
those of the shorter schedules—equivalents of
all the words being given, the vocabulary as a
whole embracing about 800 words, phrases, and
sentences.
The manuscript is clearly written, three
columns to a page.
[ ] Vocabulary of the language of the
Tene Indians of Mackenzie River,
being a dialectic variety only of the
Chipewyan language, with the same
linguistic structure.
Manuscript, 11 pages, 4°, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology, Washington, D. C. Recorded in the early part of 1890.
The vocabulary proper consists of about 2,000
words, arranged alphabetically by English
words, and is followed by the numerals, adverbs
of time, place, and quantity, conjunctions,
prepositions, interjections, pronouns, verbs,
with conjugations.
 See Kirkby (W. W.) and Bompas
(W. C.)
Mr. Bompas, a son of the late C. C. Bompas,
esq., sergeant-at-law, was born in London, Eng- ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
ii
Bompas (W, C.)—Continued
land, in 1834. Having been first trained to the
legal profession, he was ordained deacon by the
then Bishop of Lincoln in 1859. After serving
several curacies in the diocese of Lincoln, he
came to Canada as a missionary of the Church
missionary society in 1865, having first received
priestly orders from the present Bishop of
Rupert's Land acting as commissary for the late
Bishop of London. In 1874 he was again summoned to England to receive episcopal orders
as Bishop of Athabasca, and in 1884, the present diocese of Mackenzie being portioned off
from that of Athabasca, his title was changed
to Bishop of Mackenzie River, the Right Rev.
Dr. Young being consecrated as Bishop of Athabasca.
He has written and published material in the
Algonquian languages, as well as a primer in
Eskimo.
Boston Athenaeum: These words following a title
or within parentheses after a note indicate that
a copy of the work referred to has been seen by
the compiler in the library of that institution.
Boston, Mass.
. Boston Public: These words following a title or
within parentheses after a note indicate that a
copy of the work referred to has been seen by
the compiler in that library, Boston, Mass.
Bourke (Capt. John Gregory). An
Apache campaign | in the Sierra Madre.
| An account of the expedition in pursuit
of the | hostile Chiracahua Apaches in
the | spring of 1883. | By | John G.
Bourke, | Captain Third Cavalry, U. S.
Army, | Author of "The Snake Dance
of the Moquis." | Illustrated |
New York | Charles Scribner's sons.
| 1886.
Title verso copyright 11. preface pp. iii-iv, list
of illustrations verso blank 1 1. text pp. 1-112,
16°.
Many Apache terms with English definitions
passim.
Copies seen: Congress.
 Vesper hours of the stone age.   By
John G. Bourke.
In American Anthropologist, vol. 3, pp. 55-
63, Washington, 1890, 8°.   (Pilling.)
Contains a number of Apache terms passim.
 Notes upon the gentile organization
of the Apaches of Arizona.
In the Journal of American Eolk-Lore, vol.
3, pp. 111-126, Boston and New York, 1890, 8°.
(Pilling.)
List of Apache gentes, with English meanings, collected at San Carlos Agency and Port
Apache, Arizona, in 1881 and 1882, pp. 111-112;
of the Tonto Apaches, p. 112; of the Chima-
huevis, p. 113; of the Apache-Yumas, p. 113	
"Parcialidades" of the Apaches (from Escu-
dero), p. 125.
Bourke (J. G.) — Continued.
 Notes on Apache mythology.
In the Journal of American Eolk-Lore, vol.
3, pp. 209-212, Boston and New York, 1890, 8°.
(Pilling.)
Many Apache terms passim.
 Vocabulary of the Sierra Blanca and
Chiracahua dialects of the Apache-
Tinneh family. (*)
Manuscript in possession of its author. 'Consists of 2,500 words, etc., and includes a vocabulary of the same language prepared by Lieut.
Wm. G. Elliot, Ninth Infantry.
During the time Captain Bourke was on duty
as aide-de-camp to the late General Crook he
enjoyed exceptionally good opportunities for
compiling an Apache vocabulary, and succeeded in obtaining and analyzing a number of
complete sentences, prayers, invocations, many
names of animals, plants, places, etc.
Bririley: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy
of the work referred to was seen by the compiler at the sale of books belonging to the late
George Brinley, of Hartford, Conn.
Brinton: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of
the work referred to has been seen by the compiler in the library of Dr. D, G. Brinton, Philadelphia, Pa.
Brinton (Dr. Daniel Garrison). The
language of palaeolithic man.
In American Philosoph. Soc. Proc. vol.25,
pp. 212-225, Philadelphia, 1888, 8°. (Congress.)
General discussion of the Tinne or Athapascan language, pp. 214-215.—Terms for X, thou,
man, divinity, in Athapascan, p. 216.—Tinne
words, p. 220.
Issued separately as follows:
 The language | of | palaeolithic man.
| By | Daniel G. Brinton, M. D., | Professor of American Linguistics and Archaeology in the University of Pennsylvania. | Read before the American philosophical society, | October 5, 1888. |
Press of MacCalla & co., | Nos. 237-9
Dock Street, Philadelphia. | 1888.
Printed cover as above, title as above verso
blank 11. text pp. 3-16, 8°.
Linguistics as under title next above, pp. 6-
6,7,11.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
 Essays of an Americanist. | I. Ethnologic and Arehaeologic. | II. Mythology and Folk Lore. | III. Graphic
Systems and Literature. | IV. Linguistic. | By | Daniel G. Brinton, A.M.,
M.D., | Professor [&c. nine lines.] |
Philadelphia: | Porter &, Coates, |
1890. 12
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Brinton (D. G.) — Continued.
Title verso copyright 1 1. preface pp.iii-iv,
contents pp. v-xii, text pp. 17-467, index of
authors and authorities pp. 469-474, index of
subjects pp. 475-489, 8°. A collected reprint of
some of Dr. Brinton's more important essays.
The earliest form of human speech as revealed by American tongues (read before the
American Philosophical Society in 1885 and
published in their proceedings under the title
of "The language of palaeolithic man"), pp.
390-409.
Comments on the Tinn6 language, pp. 394-
395.—Tinne words, p. 405.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Eames,
Pilling.
 The American Race: | A Linguistic
Classification and Ethnographic | Description  of the  Native Tribes of |
North and South America. | By | Darnel
G. Brinton, A. M., M. D., | Professor
[&c. ten lines.] |
New York: | N. D. C. Hodges, Publisher, | 47 Lafayette Place. | 1891.
Title verso copyright notice 1 1. dedication
verso blank 11. preface pp. ix-xii, contents pp.
xiii-xvi, text pp. 17-332, linguistic appendix
pp. 333-364, additions and corrections pp. 365-
368, index of authors pp. 369-373, index of subjects pp. 374-392, 8°.
A brief discussion of the Athabascans
(Tinne), with a list of divisions of-the Athabascan linguistic stock, pp. 68-74.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
Daniel Garrison Brinton, ethnologist, born in
Chester County, Pa., May 13, 1837. He was
graduated at Yale in 1858 and at the Jefferson
Medical College in 1861, after which he spent a
year in Europe in study and in travel. On his
return he entered the army, in August, 1862, as
acting assistant surgeon. In February of the
following year he was commissioned surgeon
and served as .surgeon-in-cliief of the second
division, eleventh corps. He was present at the
battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and
other engagements, and was appointed medical
director of his corps in October, 1863. In consequence of a sunstroke received soon after the
battle of Gettysburg he was disqualified for
active service, and in the autumn of that year he
became superintendent of hospitals at Quincy
and Springfield, HI., until August, 1865, when,
the civil war having closed, he was brevetted
lieutenant-colonel and discharged. He then
settled in Philadelphia, where he became editor
of " The Medical and Surgical Reporter," and
also of the quarterly " Compendium of Medical
Science." Dr. Brinton has likewise been a
constant contributor to other medical journals,
chiefly on questions of public medioine and
hygiene, and has edited several volumes on
therapeutics and diagnosis, especially the popular series known as "Napheys's Modern Therapeutics," which has passed through many
editions.   In the medical controversies of the
Brinton (D. G.) — Continued.
day, he has always taken the position that medical science should be based on the results of
clinical observation rather than on physiological
experiments. He has become prominent as a .'
student and a writer on American ethnology,
his work in this direction beginning while he
was a student in college. The winter of 1856-'57,
spent in Florida, supplied him with material
for his first published book on the subject. In
1884 he was appointed professor of ethnology
and archaeology in the Academy of Natural
Sciences, Philadelphia. For some years he has
been president of the Numismatic and Antiquarian Society of Philadelphia, and in 1886 he
was elected vice-president of the American
Association for the Advancement of Science, to
preside over the section on anthropology. During the same year he was awarded the medal
of the Societe Americaine de France for his
"numerous and learned works on American
ethnology." being the first native of the United
States that has been so honored. In 1885 the
American publishers of the " Iconographic Encyclopaedia" requested him to edit the first volume, to contribute to it the articles on "Anthropology" and "Ethnology," and to revise that
on "Ethnography," by Professor Gerland, of
Strasburg. He also contributed to the second
volume of the same work an essay on the " Prehistoric Archaeology of both Hemispheres."
Dr. Brinton has established a library and publishing house of aboriginal American literature, for the purpose of placing within the
reach of scholars authentic materials.for the
study of the languages and culture 6"f the native
^races of America. Each work is the production
of native minds and is printed in the original.
The series, most of which were edited by Dr.
Brinton himself, include "The Maya Chronicles" (Philadelphia, 1882); "The Iroquois
Book of Rites" (1883); "The Giiegiience: A
Comedy Ballet in the Nahuatl Spanish Dialect
of Nicaragua" (1883); "A Migration Legend of
the Creek Indians" (1884); "The Lenape and
Their Legends" (1885); "The Annals of the
Cakchiquels" (1885). ["Ancient Nahuatl
Poetry" (1887); Rig Veda American us (1890)].
Besides publishing numerous papers, he has
contributed valuable reports on his examinations of mounds, shell-heaps, rock inscriptions,
and other antiquities. He is the author of " The
Floridian Peninsula: Its Literary History, Indian Tribes, and Antiquities" (Philadelphia,
1859); " The Myths of the New World I A Treatise on the Symbolism and Mythology of the Red
Race of America" (New York, 1868); "The
Religious Sentiment: A Contribution, to the
Science and Philosophy of Religion" (1876);
'' American Hero Myths: A Study in the Native
Religions of the Western Continent" (Philadelphia, 1882); "Aboriginal American Authors and
their Productions, Especially those in the Native
Languages" (1883); and "A Grammar of the
Cakchiquel Language of Guatemala" (1884)	
Appleton's Cyclop, of Am. Siog. ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
13
British and Foreign Bible Society: These words
following a title or within parentheses after a
note indicate that a copy of the work has bocn
seen by the compiler in the library of that institution, 146 Queen Victoria Street, London, Eng.
British and Foreign Bible Society. Specimens of some of the languages and
•■ dialects | in which | The British and
Foreign Bible Society | has printed or
circulated | the holy scriptures.
Colophon: London: printedby Messrs.
Gilbert &Rivington, for the British and
foreign bible society, Queen Victoria
street, E. C, where all information concerning the society's work may bo
obtained.    [I860?]
1 sheet, large folio, 28 by 38 inches, 6 columns.
St. John, iii, 16, in 134 languages, among them
the Tinne (syllabic characters), no. 128.
Copies seen: British and Foreign Bible Society, Pilling, Wellesley.
 St. John iii. 16 | in some of the | languages and dialects | in which the |
British & Foreign Bible Society | has
printed or circulated the holy scriptures. | [Picture and one line quotation.] |
London: | printed for the British and
foreign bible society, | By Gilbert &
Rivington, 52, St. John's Square, E. C.
| 1875.
Title as above verso contents 11. text pp. 3-30,
historical and statistical remarks verso officers
and agencies of the society 11.
St. John, iii, 16, in the Tinne (syllabic characters), p. 29.
Copies seen: British and Foreign Bible Society, Pilling, Wellesley.
Some copies are dated 1868.   (*)
The two "Specimens" of 1865? and 1868,
issued by this society and titled in the previous
bibliographies of this series, contain no Athapascan.
 St. John III. 16 | in some of the |
languages and dialects | in which the |
British and foreign | bible society | has
printed and circulated | the holy scriptures. |
London: | British and Foreign Bible
Society, Queen Victoria Street. | Philadelphia Bible Society, Cor. Walnut and
Seventh Sts., | Philadelphia.   [1876?]
Cover title verso contents, no inside title,
text pp. 3-30,16°.
St. John, iii, 16, in the Tinne (syllabic characters), p. 29.
Copies seen: Pilling.
British and Foreign Bible Society—C'td.
 St. John iii. 16 | in most of the | languages and dialects | in which the |
British & Foreign Bible Society | has
printed or circulated the holy scriptures, i [Design aud one line quotation.]
| Enlarged edition. |
London: | printed for the British and
foreign bible society, | By Gilbert «fc
Rivington, 52, St. John's Square, E. C.
| 1878.
Printed covers (title as above on the front one
verso quotation andnotes), no insido title, contents pp. 1-2, text pp. 3-48,16°.
St. John, iii, 16, in the Tukudh, p. 26 Chippewyan or Tinn6 (syllabic characters), p. 27.
Tho so-called " Chippewyan" version in roman
characters given in this and subsequent editions is really Chippewa.
Copies seen: American Bible Society" Pilling.
 St. John iii. 16 | in most of the | languages and dialects | in which the |
British & Foreign Bible Society | has
printed or circulated the holy scriptures. | [Design and one line quotation. ]
| Enlarged edition. |
London: | printed for the British aud
foreign bible society, | By Gilbert &
Rivington, 52, St. John's Square, E. C.
| 1882.
Title as above reverse quotation and notes 1
1. contents pp. 1-2, text pp. 3-48, historical and
statistical remarks verso officers and agencies
1 1. 16°.
Linguistic contents as in the edition of 1878,
titled next above.
Copies seen: British and Foreign Bible Society, British Museum, Pilling, Wellesley.
 Enanr. otb Ioaimn, rj.Sfi ct. 16. | 06pa3tuvi|
nepeBO^OBt CBamennaro nncania, | n^diintixt, |
BejHKOtipniaHCKnMi h nnocTpanin.nn, | 6a6jte-
iicKum o6mecTBOMTi. | [Design and one line
quotation.] |
HeiaTaHo hah OpnTaHCKaro n nnocTpannaro
BHftjeBcKaro | ouiuecTBa, | y LuboepTa it Ph-
BHHrroaa (Lmited), 52, Ct. 4<kouci. Ckbcp'd,
Joh^ohx.'I 1885.
IAteral translation: The gospel by John, 3d
chapter, 16th verse. | Samples | of the translations of the holy scripture, | published | by the
British and foreign | bible society. | "God's
word endureth forever." |
Printed for tho British and foreign bible |
society, | at Gilbert & Rivington's (Limited),
52, St. John's Square, London. | 1885.
Printed covers (title as above on front one
verso quotation and notes), contents pp. 5-7,
- text pp. 9-68, 16°.
St. John, iii, 16, in Chippewyan or Tinne (syllabic characters), Slave, and Tukudh, p. 37.
Copies seen: Pilling. 14
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
'/
British and Foreign Bible Society—Ct'd.
 Kv. St. Joh. iii. 16. | in den meisten
der | Sprachen und Dialecte I in welchen
die | BritischeundAuslandischeBibel-
gesellschaft | die heilige Schrift druckt
und verbreitet. | [Design and one line
quotation.] | Vermehrte Auflage. |
London: Britische und Auslandische
BibelgeseUschaft, | 146 Queen Victoria
Street, E. C. | 1885.
Title as above on cover reverse a quotation,
contents pp. 1-4, text pp. 5-67 (verso of p. 67
notes), remarks, officers, agencies, etc. 311..16°.
St. John, iii, 16, in the Slave of Mackenzie
River (syUabic and roman), p. 58; Tinne or
Chippewyan of Hudson's Bay (syllabic), p. 63;
Tukudh, p. 64.
Copies seen: PiUing.
In _ this and the following editions the languages are arranged alphabetically.
 St. Jean III. 16, &c. | Specimens | de
la traduction de ce passage dans laplu-
part | des langues et dialectes | dans
lesquels la | Soci6t6 Biblique Britan-
nique et Etrangere | a imprim<5 ou mis
en circulation les saintes ecritures. |
[Design and one line quotation.] |
Londres: | Socie'te' biblique britau-
nique et etrangere, [ 146, Queen Victoria Street, E. C. | 1885.
Title on cover as above reverse quotation,
contents pp. 1-4, text pp. 5-67 (verso of p. 67 observations), remarks etc. 3 11.16?.
Linguistic contents as in the German edition
of 1885 titled next above.
Copies seen: British and Foreign Bible Society, Pilling.
 St. John iii. 16,&c. | in most of the I
languages and dialects | in which the |
British and foreign bible society | has
printed or circulated the holy scriptures, j [Design and one line quotation.]
| Enlarged edition. |
London: | the British and foreign
bible society, | 146, Queen Victoria
Street, London, E. C. | 1885.
Title as above verso quotation and notes,
contents pp. 3-4, text pp. 5-67, remarks etc.
verso p. 67 and two following 11.16°.
Linguistic contents as in the German edition
of 1885 titled above.
Copies seen: British and Foreign Bible Society, Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
Some copies, otherwise unchanged, are dated
1886.  (Pilling.)
 St. John iii. 16, &c. | in most of the |
languages and dialects | in which the |
British and foreign bible society | has
British and Foreign Bible Society—Ct'd. :
printed or circulated the holy scrip- !
tures. | [Design and one line quota- '
tion.] | Enlarged edition. |
London: | the British and foreign
bible society, | 146, Queen Victoria
Street, London, E. C. | 1888.
Frontispiece (fac-simile of the Queen's text)
11. title as above verso quotation and notes 11.
contents pp. 3-4, text pp. 5-67, remarks etc.
verso p. 67 and two following 11.16°.
Linguistic contents as in the German edition
of 1885 titled above.
Copies seen.- Pilling, Wellesley.
 St. John iii. 16, &c. | in most of the |
languages and dialects | in which the |
British and foreign bible society | has
printed or circulated the holy scriptures. | [Design and one line quotation.]
| Enlarged edition. |
London: | the British and foreign
bible society, | 146 Queen Victoria
Street, Loudon, E. C. | 1889.
Title as above verso notes etc. 1 1. contents
pp. 3-4, text pp. 5-83, historical sketch etc. 211.
16°.
St. John, iii, 16, in Beaver, p. 10; Chipewyan,
p. 21; Slave (roman and syllabic), p. 73; Tinne
(syllabic), p. 79; Tukudh, p. 79.   The so-called
"Tinne," in roman characters, p.,78, is Chip-
. pewa.
-. Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
Some copies are dated 1890 (Pilling).
British Museum: These words following a title or
within parentheses after a note indicate that a
copy of the work referred to has been seen by
the compiler in the library of that institution,
London, Eng.
Bureau of Ethnology:   These words following a
title or within parentheses after a note indicate
j that a copy of the work referred to has been seen
by the compiler in the library of the Bureau of
Ethnology, Washington, D. C.
Buschmann (Johann C arl Eduard). Uber
denNaturlaut. Von Hrn. Buschmann.
In Konigliche Akad. der Wiss. zu Berlin,
Abhandlungen aus dem Jahre 1852, pt. 3, pp.
391-423, Berlin, 1853,4°.
Contains a few words of Tacullies, Kinai,
Ugalenzisch, andlnkilik.
Issued separately as follows:
 Uber | den   Natnrlaut, | von | Joh.
Carl Ed. Buschmann. |
Berlin, | InFerd. Diimmler'sVerlags-
Buchhandlung. | 1853. | Gedruckt in
der Druckerei der koniglichen Akademie | der Wissenchaften.
Title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 1-33, Inhalts-
Obersicht p. [34], 4°.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Eames,
Translated and reprinted as follows; ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
15
Buschmann (J. C. E.) — Continued.
 "On Natural Sounds," by Professor
J. C E. Buschmann. Translated by
Campbell Clarke, esq., from the Ab-
handlungen der konigl ichen Akademie
der Wissen8chaften zu Berlin, aus dem
Jahre 1852.
In Philologioal Soc. [of London] Proc. vol. 6,
pp. 188-206, London, 1854, 8°.
 Verwandtschaft  der  Kinai-Idiome
des russischen Nordamerika's mit dem
grossenathapaskischenSprachstamme.
In Konigliche Akad. der Wiss. zu Berlin,
Bericht aus dem Jahre 1854, pp. 231-236, Berlin,
[1855], 8°.
Comparative vocabulary of 66 words of the
Kenai-Sprachen (Kenai, Atnah, Koltschanen,
Inkilek, Inkalit, and Ugalenzen), with the
Athapaskische-Sprachen(Chepewyan,Tahkoli,
Kutchin, Sussee, Dogrib, Tlatskanai, and Umpqua), on folded sheet facing p. 236.
 Der   athapaskische   Spraehstamm,
dargestellt Aron Hrn. Buschmann.
InKoniglio.be Akad. der Wiss. zu Berlin, Ab-
handlungen aus dem Jahre 1855, pp. 144-319,
Berlin, 1856,4°.
Divisions of the Athapascan family, pp. 156-
161.—Numerals 1-6 of the Chepewyan and Kutchin, p. 163.—Words in the Chepewyan, Tah-
kali, Kutchin, Sussee, Dogrib, Tlatskanai, and
Umpqua, pp. 166-168.—Vocabulary,English and
Chepewyan (from Richardson), pp. 174-177.—A
few words of the Tacullies (from Mackenzie),
p. 177.—Vocabulary of the Tacullies (from Harmon), pp. 177-179.—A few Kutchin words (from
Richardson), p. 179.—Vocabulary of the Dogrib (from Richardson), pp. 179-180.—A short
vocabulary of the Umpqua (from Tolmie), p.
180.—A short Chepewyan vocabulary (from
Mackenzie), pp. 180-181.—Chepewyan vocabulary (from Thompson in Dobbs'), pp. 181-182.—
A few Chepewyan words (from Archaeologia
Americana), p. 182. — Chepewyan vocabulary
(from Richardson), pp. 182-183.—Short vocabulary of the Dogrib (from Richardson), p. 183.—
Short comparative vocabulary of the Chepewyan of Thompson, Mackenzie, and Richardson, p. 183; of the Chepewyan (from Dobbs,
Mackenzie, and Richardson) and Tacullie
(from Harmon), p. 184; of the Chepewyan (from
Thompson) and Tahkali (from Harmon), p. 184;
of the Chepewyan (from Mackenzie) and Tahkali (from Harmon), p. 184; of the Chepewyan
(from Richardson) and Tahkali (from Harmon),
p. 184.—Comparative vocabulary of the Chipewyan and Kutchin (Sussee), p. 185; of the
Chepewyan and Dogrib, pp. 185-186; of the
Chepewyan and Umpqua, pj. 186; of the Tahkali
and Kutchin, p. 186; of tho Tacullies and Dogrib, pp. 186-187; of the Tahkali and Umpqua;
Kutchin and Dogrib; Sussee and Umpqua;
Dogrib and Umpqua, p. 187; of the Tlatskanai
and Umpqua, p. 188.—Comparative tables of
words of the Chepewyan, Tahkali (from Har-
Buschmami (J. C. E.) — Continued.
moii), Kutchin, Dogrib, Umpqua, Tlatskanai,
Tahkali (from Hale), Sussee, p. 188-197.—Comparative vocabulary in 10 parallel columns of
the Chepewyan of Dobbs, Mackenzie, and
Richardson; Tacullies of Harmon and Hale;
Kutchin, Sussee, Dogrib, Tlatskanai, and
Umpqua, p. 198-209.—Alphabetisohe und sys-
tematische Verzeichnung zu den Wortverzeich-
nissen der athapaskischen Sprachen, pp. 210-
222.—Comparative tables of words of the Kinai
language of Dawydow, Resanow, Kinaize,
Wrangell, and Lisiansky, pp. 233-245 Alphabetisohe v erzeichnuug zu den Kinai-Wortver-
zeichnissen, pp. 245-249.—Divisions of the Athapaskische and Kinai, p. 260.—Ubersicht der
kinai-athapaskischen Worttafeln, pp. 264-266.—
Alphabetische Verzeichnung zu den Worttafeln
des athapaskischen Sprachstamms, pp. 266-
268.—Comparative vocabulary of the Chepewyan, Tahkali, Kutchin, Sussee, Dogrib, Tlats-
kanai.Umpqua, Navajo, Ticorilla, Kinai, Atnah,
Ugalenzen, Inkilik, Inkalit, Koltschanen, and
Koloschisch, pp. 269-272; of the Chepewyan,
Tahkali, Kutchin, Sussee, Dogrib, Tlatskanai,
Umpqua, Navajo, Ticorilla, Kinai, Atnah, Ugalenzen, Koltschanen and Koloschisch, pp. 273-
282; of the Chepewyan, Tahkali, Dogrib, Tlatskanai, Umpqua, Kinai, Atnah, Ugalenzisch, Inkilik, Inkalit, Koltschanen, and Koloschisch,
p. 283.—Comparative tables of words from the
above-named languages, pp. 284-312.
Issued separately as follows:
 Der | athapaskische    Spraehstamm
| dargestellt | von | Joh. Carl Ed.
Buschmann. | Aus den Abhandlungen
der konigl. Akademie der Wissen-
schaffen | zu Berlin 1855. |
Berlin. | Gedruckt in der Druckerei
der konigl. Akademie | der Wissen-
schaften | 1856. | In Commission bei F.
Diimmler's Verlags-Buclihandlung.
Cover title as above, title as above verso note
1 1. text pp. 149-313, Inhalts-Ubersicht pp. 314-
319, Berichtigungen p. [320], 4°.
Linguistic contents as in original article
titled next above.
Copies seen: Astor, Brinton, British Museum,
Eames, Pilling, Trumbull.
Triibner's catalogue, 1856, no. 639, prices it
6s.; the Fischer copy, catalogue no. 273, brought
11*.; the Squier copy, catalogue no. 142, $1.13;
priced by Leclerc, 1878, no. 2050, 10 fr.; the
Murphy copy, catalogue no. 2850, brought $2;
priced by Quaritch, no. 30031,7*. 6d.
 Die Spuren der aztekischen Sprache
im nordlichen Mexico und hoheren
amerikanischen Norden. Zugleich eine
Musterung der Volker'und Sprachen des
nordlichen Mexico's und der Westseite
Nordamerika's von Guadulaxara an bis
zum Eismeer. Von Joh, Carl Ed. Busch-'
inann, 16
(LBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Buschmann (J. C. E.)—Continued.
In Konigliche Akad. der Wiss. zu Berlin,
Abhandlungen aus dem Jahre 1854, Zweitcr
Supp.-Band, pp. 1-819 (forms the whole volume), Berlin, 1859, 4°.
General discussion of the Navajo, pp. 293-
298; of the Apache, pp. 298-322.—Comparative
vocabulary (42 words) of the Navajo and Ticorilla (from Simpson), p. 320.—General discussion " Athapaskischer Spraehstamm," pp. 322-
323.—Remarks on the Hoopah, with a short vocabulary, pp. 575-576.—Remarks on Hale's Ethnography and Philology, with linguistic classification of languages, pp. 602-608.-j-Remarks on
the Atnahs, pp. 690-691.—Wortverzeichniss der
Atnah am Kupferfluss, nach Wrangell, pp.
691-692.—Remarks on the Kinai, pp. 695-696.—
Remarks on the Inkilik and Inkalit, pp. 704-
707.—Wortverzeichniss der Inkilik nach Sagos-
kin und Wassiljew, pp.707-708.—Wortverzeichniss der Inkalit-Jug-eljnut-i nach Sagoskin, p.
708.
Issued separately as foUows:
 Die | Spuren der aztekischen Sprache
| im nordlichen Mexico | und hoheren
amerikanischen Norden. | Zugleich [
eine Musterung der Volker und Sprachen | des nordlichen Mexico's | und der
Westseite Nordamerika's | von Guadal-
axara an bis zum Eismeer. | Von | Joh.
Carl Ed. Buschmann. |
Berlin. | Gedruckt in der Buchdruck-
erei der Konigl. Akademie [ der Wissen-
schaften. | 1859.
Half-title verso blank 11. general title of the
series verso blank 11. title as above verso blank
1 1. abgekiirtzte Inhalts-Ubersicht pp. vii-xii,
text pp. 1-713, Einleitung in das geographische
Register pp. 714-718, geographische Register
pp. 718-815, vermischteNaohweisungenpp. 816-
818, Verbesserungen, p. 819,4°.
Copies seen: Astor, Brinton, Eames, Maisonneuve, Quaritoh, Smithsonian Institution,
Trumbull, Pilling.
Published at 20 Marks. An uncut half-morocco copy was sold at the Fischer sale, catalogue no. 269, to Quaritoh-, for 21. lis.; the latter
prices two copies, catalogue no. 12552, one 22.2s.
the other 2,1.10s.; the Pinart copy, catalogue no.
178, brought 9 fr.; Koehler, catalogue no.440,
prices it 13 M. 50 pf.; priced again by Quaritoh,
no. 30037,21.
 Systematische Worttafel des athapaskischen Sprachstamms, aufgestellt
und erljintert von Hrn. Buschmann.
(Dritte Abtheilnng des Apache.)
In Koniglicho Akad. dor Wiss. zu Berlin,
Abhandlungen, aus dem Jahre 1859, pt. 3, pp.
501-586, Berlin, 1800, 4°.
General discussion, with examples, pp. 501-
519.—Comparative vocabulary. English-Chep-
ewyan (two dialects), Biber (two dialects) and
Siceani (all from Howse), pp. 520-527; of the
Buschmann (J. C. E.) — Continued.
Chippewayan and Biber (both from McLean),
pp. 529-531.—General discussion, pp. 531-545.—
Systematische Worttafel des athapaskischen
Sprachstamms, including words of the Apache,
Apachen der Kupfergruben, Atnah, Biber-
Indianer, Chepewyan, Dogrib, Hoopah, Inkilik,
Inkalit, Kinai, Koltschanen, Koloschen, Kutchin, Kwalhioqua, Loucheux, Navajo, Northern
Indians, Pinalefio, Sussee, Sicani, Tahkali oder
Tacullies, Tlatskanai, Ugalenzen oder Ugal-
achmjut, Umpqua, and Xicarilla, pp.546-581.
Issued separately as follows:
 Systematische Worttafel | des athapaskischen Sprachstamms, j aufgestellt
und erlautert | von | Joh. Carl Ed.
Buschmann. | Dritte Abtheilnng des
Apache. | Aus den Abhandlungen der
konigl. Akademie der. Wissenschaften
zu Berlin 1859. |
Berlin. | Gedruckt in der Druokerei
der konigl. Akademie | der Wissenschaften. | 1860. | In Commission von
F. Diimmler's Verlags-Buchhandlung.
Cover title as above, title as above verso note
11. text pp. 501-581, Inhalts-Ubersicht pp. 582-
585, Bemerkungen p. 586, 4°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Astor, Eames, Pilling, Trumbull, Watkinson.
Published at 7 M. 80 pf.; a copy at the Fischer
sale, catalogue no. 277, brought 13s.; priced in
the Triibner catalogue of 1882, 3s.
—- Die Volker und Sprachen im Innern
des britischen Nordamerika's.
In Konigliche Akad. der Wiss. zu Berlin,
Monatsberichte aus dem Jahre 1858, pp. 465-486,
Berlin, 1859,8°.  (National Museum.)
Mainly devoted to the Athapascan and its
various divisions.
 Das Apache als eine athapaskische
Sprache erwiesen von Hrn. Buschmann
in. Verbindung mit einer systemati-
schen Worttafel des athapaskischen
Sprachstamms.   Erste Abtheilnng.
InKohigliohe Akad. der Wiss. zu Berlin, Abhandlungen, aus dem Jahre 1860, pp. 187-282,
Berlin, 1861, 4°.
Geschichte der athapaskischen Verwandt-
schaft,   pp. 187-202—Nachrichten  uber die
Volker, pp. 202-222 Sprachen, pp. 223-244	
Wortverzeichnisse, pp. 244-276.
Under the three divisions first named occurs
a general discussion of the various Athapascan
languages, with comments upon and examples
from the works of Turner, Eaton, Whipple,
Bartlett, Schoolcraft, Henry, and others.
In tho last division occur the following:
Comparative vocabulary of the Apache
(from Henry), Navajo (from Eaton), Navajo
(from Whipple), Pinaleno (from Whipple), and
Hoopah (from Gibbs), pp. 250-261,—Compara- ATHAPASCAN  LANGUAGES.
17
Buschmann (J. C. E.) — Continued.
tive vocabulary of the Apache (from Henry),
Navajo (from Eaton), and Pinaleno (from
Whipple), pp. 262-269.—Comparative vocabulary of the Navajo (from Eaton), and Pinaleno
<from Whipple), pp. 269-272.—Vocabulary of
the. Coppermine Apache (from Bartlett), p.
372.—Vocabulary of the Xicarilla (from Simpson), p. 273.
Issued separately as follows:
 Das Apache | als eine athapaskische
iSprache erwieseu | von | Joh. Carl Ed.
Buschmann; | in Verbindung miteiner
| systematischen Worttafel des athapaskischen Sprachstamms. | Erste Ab-
theilung. | Aus don Abhandlungen der
konigl. Akademie der Wissenschaften
zu Berlin 1860. |
Berlin. | Gedruckt iu der Druckerei
der konigl. Akademie | der Wissenschaften. | 1860. | In Commission von
F. Diimmler's Verlags-Buchhandlung.
Cover title, title 11. text pp. 187-252,4°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Dunbar, Pilling, Watkinson.
■ —    Die   Verwandschafts - Verhaltnisse
der athapaskischen   Sprachen dargestellt von Hrn. Buschmann.   Zweite
Abtheilung des Apache.
Buschmann (J. C. E.) — Continued.
In Konigliche Akad. der Wiss. zu Berlin, Abhandlungen, aus dem Jahre 1862, pp. 195-252,
Berlin, 1863,4°.
Die Sprachen zusammen, alle oder mehrere,
pp. 196-208. — Verwandschafts - Verhaltnisse
mit beschrankten Sprachen, pp. 208-226.—Bios
zwei Sprachen vergleichen, pp. 226-236.—Stu-
fenleiter der Verwandsohaft der athapaskischen Sprachen, pp. 251-252.
The languages treated are the Apache,
Navajo, Pinaleno, Xicarilla, Hoopah, Chepewyan, Sussee, Tahkali, Tlatskanai, Umpqua,
Kinai, Dogrib, Inkalik, Loucheux, Ugalenzi.
Issued separately as follows:
 Die   Verwandschafts - Verhaltnisse
| dor athapaskischen Sprachen | dargestellt von | Joh. Carl Ed. Buschmann.
| Zweite Abtheilung | des Apache. |
Aus den Abhandlungen der konigl.
Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Berlin 1862. |
Berlin. | Gedruckt in der Druckerei
der   konigl. Akademie | der  Wissen-
schaften, | 1863. | In   Commission   bei
F.  Diimmler's Verlags-Buchhandlung
| Harwitz und Gossmann.
Cover title, title 11. text pp. 195-252,4°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Bancroft, Pilling, Watkinson.
Campbell (John). The affiliation of the
Algonquin languages. By John Camp-
hell, M. A.
In Canadian Inst. Proc. new series,vol. 1, pt.
1, pp. 15-53, Toronto, 1879, 8°.
Comparison of characteristic forms in Algonquin, with the same in neighboring families,
among them the Athapascan.
Issued separately as follows:
 The affiliation of the Algonquin languages. By John Campbell, M. A., pro-
.  fessor of church history, Presbyterian
college, Montreal.
[Toronto, 1879.]
No title-page, text pp. 1-41,8°.
Linguistics as under title next abovo.
Copies seen: Shea-.
I— The unity of the human race, considered from an American standpoint.
In British and Foreign Evangelical Review,
new series, no. 37, pp. 74-101, London, January,
1880,8°.   (Pilling.)
By a copious exhibition and comparison of
grammatical and lexical forms, this article professes to discover in America two main families
of speech, and to connect these with the North-
ATH 2
Campbell (J.) — Continued.
ern Asiatic and Malay Polynesian families, respectively. It abounds in words and sentences
from and remarks concerning the American
languages, among them the Tinneh.
 Origin of the aborigines of Canada.
In Quebec Lit. and Hist. Soc. Trans, session
1880-1881, pp. 61-93, and appendix, pp. i-xxxiv,
Quebec, 1882,12°.  (Pilling.)
The first part of this paper is an endeavor to
show a resemblance between various families
of the New World and between these and various peoples of the Old World, and contains
words in Several American languages. Comparative vocabulary of the Tinneh and Tungus
languages, about 75 words and phrases, pp.
xii-xiv.
Issued separately as follows:'
 Origin I of the I aborigines of Can
ada. | A paper read before the Literary
and historical-society, | Quebec, | by |
prof. J.  Campbell, M. A., | (of Montreal,) | Delegu6 Gdndral de l'lnstitu-
tiou Ethnographique de Paris. | •
Quebec: | printed at the "Morning
chronicle" office. I 1881. Yt.
18
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Campbell (J.) — Continued.
Printed cover as above, title as above verso
blank 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. text pp.
1-33, and appendix pp. i-xxxiv, 8°. Twenty-five
copies printed.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Wellesley.
 Asiatic tribes in North America.  By
John Campbell, M. A.
In Canadian Last. Proc. new series, vol. 1, pp.
171-206, Toronto, 1884,8°.
General comments on the Tinneh family,
with a list of tribes and examples, pp. 172-173,
174-175.—Comparative vocabulary of the Tinneh
and Tungus languages (about 80 words, alphabetically arranged by English words), pp. 190-
191.—Numerals 1-10 of the Tinneh compared
with the Peninsular, p. 192.
Issued separately, repaged, as follows :*
 Asiatic | tribes in North America. |
By John Campbell, M.A., | Professor of
Church History, Presbyterian College,
Montreal.
[Toronto, 1884.]
Half-title reverse blank 1 l.no inside tide,
text pp. 3-38, 8°. Extract from the Proceedings of the Canadian Institute.
Linguistics as under title next above, pp. 4-
5,6-7,22-23,24.
Copies seen: Brinton, Pilling, Wellesley.
Canadian Indian. Vol. I. October, 1890.
No. I [-Vol. I. September, 1891. No.
12]. | The | Canadian | Indian | Editors
| rev.E.F.Wilson | H.B.Small. | Published under the Auspices of | the Canadian Indian Researchal [sic] | Society
| Contents | [&c. double columns, each
eight lines.] | Single Copies, 20 cents.
Annual Subscription, $2.00. |
Printed and Published by Jno. Rutherford, Owen Sound, Ontario [Canada].
[1890-1891.]
12 numbers: cover title as above, text pp. 1-
356,8°. A continuation of Our Forest Children,
described elsewhere in this bibliography. The
publication was suspended with the twelfth
number, with the intention of resuming it in
January, 1892. The word'' Researchal" on the
cover of the first number was corrected to
" Research " in the following numbers.
Wilson (E. F.), A comparative vocabulary,
vol. 1, pp. 104-107.
Copies seen: Eames,Pilling, Wellesley.
Carrier Indians.  See Taculli.
Catechism:
Beaver See Bompas (W. C.)
Beaver Garrioch (A. C.)
Chippewyan Kirkby (W. W.)
Chippewyan Kirkby (W.W.) and Bom
pas (W. C.)
Clut (J.)
Dene
Den6
Pen6
Morice (A. G.)
Seguin (—).
Catechism — Continued.-
Montagnais Legoff (L.)
Montagnais Perrault (C. O.)
Montagnais Vegreville (V. T.)
Slave Kirkby (W. W.)
Tukudh M'Donald (R.)
C atlin (George). North and South American Indians. | Catalogue | descriptive
and instructive | of | Catlin's | Indian
Cartoons.| Portraits, types,and customs.
| 600 paintings in oil. | with | 20,000
full length figures | illustrating their
various games, religious ceremonies,
and | other customs, | and | 27 canvas"
paintings | of | Lasalle's discoveries. |
New York: | Baker & Godwin, Printers, | Printing-house square, | 1871.
Abridged title on cover, title as above verso
blank 1 1. remarks verso note 1 1. text pp. 5-92,
certificates pp. 93-99,8°.
Proper names with English significations in
a number of American languages, among them
the Navaho, Copper, Athapasca, Dogrib, and
Chippewyan.
Copies seen: Astor, Congress, Eames, Wellesley, Wisconsin Historical Society.
Chap in (Col.  G.)     Vocabulary  of  the
language of the Sierra Blanco Apaches.
Manuscript, 10 unnumbered leaves, 4°, in the
library of the Bureau of Ethnology.   Collected
at Camp Goodwin, Arizona, July, 1867.
Recorded on one of the Smithsonian forms
\ (no. 170), containing 211 words, equivalents .of
^about 180 of which are given in the Apache.
There is in the same library a copy (611. folio)
of the vocabulary, also made by Dr. Chapin.
Charencey (Comte Charles Felix Hya-
cinthe Gouhi er de). Recherches sur les
noms des points de l'espace.
In Academie nationals des sciences, arts et
belles-lettres de Caen, Mem. pp. 217-303, Caen,
1882,8°.
Terms for the cardinal points of the compass,
with discussion thereon in Peau de Lievre, pp.
236-238; Chippewyan or Montagnais, p. 239;
Dindjie, pp. 239-240.
Issued separately as follows:
 Recherches | sur les | noms des points
de l'espace | par | M. leCtede Charencey |
membre [&c. two lines.] | [Design.] |
Caen | imprimerie de F. le Blanc-
Hardel | rue Froide, 2 et 4 | 1882
Cover title as above, title as above verso note
11. text pp. 1-86,8°.
Famille Athabaskane: Peau deLievre, Chippewyan or Montagnais, and Dindjie, pp. 21-23.
Copies seen: Brinton, Pilling, WeUesley.
Linguistic contents asunder title next above.
Chilig Takudh tshah zit. See M'Donald
(R.)
Chin Indians. SeeNagailer. ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
19
Chipewyan primer.
C)
Chippewyan:
Baptismal card
Bible, New test.
Bible, four gospels
Bible passages
Catechism
Catechism
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
Grammatic comments
Grammatic comments
Grammatic treatise
Hymn book
Hymns
Hymns
Hymns
Legends
Lord's prayer
Lord's prayer
Lord's prayer
Lord's prayer
Lord's prayer"
Lord's prayer
Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Prayer hook
Prayer book
Prayers
Prayers
Primer
Proper names
Songs
Syllabary
Syllabary
Ten commandments
Ten commandments
Text
Tribal names
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
See Bompas (W.
See
Church.
Kirkby (W. W.)
Kirkby (W.W.)
Church.
Kirkby (W.W.)
Kirkby (W. W.) and
Bompas (W. C.)
Adelung (J. C.) and
Vater (J. S.)
Duncan (D.)
Tache (A. A.)
Gallatin (A.)
Grandin (—).
Bancroft (H. H.)
Kirkby (W.W.)
Bompas (W. C.)
Kirkby (W. W.)
Kirkby (W.W.) and
Bompas (W. C.)
Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
Apostolides (S.)
Bergholtz (G. F.)
Bompas (W. C.)
Kirkby (W. W.)
Lord's.
Rost (R.)
Buschmann (J.C.E.)
Classical.
Ellis (R.)
Haines (E. J.)
James (E.)
Kirkby (W.W.)
Pott (A. F.)
Tolmie (W. F.) and
Dawson (G. M.)
Kirkby (W.W.)
Kirkby (W.W.) and
Bompas (W. C.)
Bompas (W. C.)
Tuttle (C. R.)
Bompas (W. C.)
Catlin (G.)
Petitot (E.F.S. J.)
Syllabariiun.
Tuttle (C. R.)
Bompas (W. C.)
Kirkby (W. W.)
Petitot (E.F.S. J.)
Anderson (A. C.)
Adelung (J. C.) and
Vater (J. S.)
Anderson (A. C.)
Balbi (A.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Bompas (W. C.)
Buschmann (J.C.E.)
Gallatin (A.)
Howse (J.)
Jehan (L.' F.)
Kennioott (R.)
Latham (R. G.)
Lefroy (J. H.)
Mackenzie (A.)
Chippewyan — Continued.
Vocabulary M'Lean (J.)
Vocabulary McPherson (H.)
Vocabulary Reeve (W. D.)
Vocabulary Richardson (J.)
Vocabulary Roehrig (F. L. O.)
Vocabulary Ross (R. B.)
Vocabulary Thompson (E.)
Vocabulary Whipple (A. W.)
Vocabulary Wilson (E. F.)
Words Charencey (H. de),
Words Ellis (R.)
Words Latham (R. G.)        ,
Words Lesley (J. P.)
Words Schomburgk (R.H.)
Words Tolmie (W.F.) and
Dawson (G. M.)
See also Athapascan; Montagnais ; Tinne".
Chiracahua Apache. See Apache.
Church Missionary Gleaner.   Languages
of N. W. America.
In Church Missionary Gleaner, no. 90, London, 1881,4°.   (Wellesley.)
Contains St. John, iii, 16, in Chippewyan or
Tinne in both roman and syllabic characters,
and in Tukudh.
Reprinted from the British and Foreign Bible
Society's Specimens, etc.
Church Missionary Society: These words following a title or inclosed within parentheses after
a note indicate that a copy of the work referred
to has been seen by the compiler in the library
of that institution, London, England.
Church Missionary Society. | Diocese of
Mackenzie river, | N. W. T. | One lord,
one faith, one baptism. | Matt. xxvm.
19. | Born  of Water | and | Of   the
Spirit. | Luke xvm.  16. | Name	
| Baptized by the Rev | at
 on    | Sponsors |
 | | [Scripture text from
Mark xvi. 16. two lines.]
[London: Church missionary society.   187-?]
Card, 6J by 5 inches, verso picture of baptism . Prepared for use among the Chippewyan
Indians.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
  [One  line  syllabic   characters.] |
Church Missionary Society. [ Diocese
of Mackenzie river, | N. W. T. | [One
line    syllabic    characters.]  | Indian
Name    | Baptized Name	
| By the Rev | on..,,.,
18.. | [One line syUabio characters.]
[London: Chur«h missionary society.   187-?]
Card, 4J by 3J inches, verso picture of bap.
tism. Prepared for use among the Chippewyan
Indians.
Copies seen • Eames, Pilling. 20
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Classical.   The | classical journal; | for I
| September and December | 1811.  Vol.
IV. I [Two lines   quotation in Greek
and a monogrammatic device.] |
London: | printed by A. J. Valpy, |
Took's court, Chancery lane; | sold by
| Sherwood, Neely, | and Jones, Paternoster row; | and all other booksellers.
[1811.]
Title verso blank 11. contents (of no. vii) pp.
iii-iv, text pp. 1-526, index pp. 527-537, verso p.
537 colophon giving date 1811,8°.
Numerals 1-10 in Chippewyan (from Mackenzie), p. 116.
Copies seen: Congress.
[Clut (ArchMshop J.)] Jesus-Christ
Nupankaunweri, w6 dz6 pahyenikcetcan
| laAvalessi unzin awoc16 yehiwen si tta,
degay6 Mokeri | Bare Alaco panniyat-
cini"en ce ckkwaaddi:
[Dayton,  Ohio:   Philip A. Kemper.
•  1888?]
A small card, about 3 by 5 inches in size,
headed as above and containing twelve "Promises of Our Lord to Blessed Margaret Mary"
in the Dog Rib (" Plats-Cotes '') language. On*
the reverse is a colored picture of the sacred
heart, with verse in English. Mr. Kemper has
published the same promises on similar cards
in many languages.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
 Den6 Castor catechism by R. P. J.
Clut, bishop of Erundel. (*)
Manuscript in possession of Father fimile
Petitot, Mareuil-les-Meaux, France, who has
kindly furnished me the above title. See
Petitot (E.F.S. J.)
Coleccion polidiomica Mexicana | que
contiene | la oracion dominical | ver-
tida en cincuenta y dos idiomas indi-
genos | de aquella republica \ dedicada
| £ N. S. P. el senor Pio IX, pont. max.
| por la | sociedad  Mexicana de geo-
grafia y estadistica. | [Vignette.] |
Mexico | libreria de Eugenio Maille-
fert y comp. | esquina del Refugio y
Pte. del Espiritu santo | [Imprenta de
Andrade y Escalante]    1860
Title verso printers 1 1. text pp. i-vii, 1-52,
folio.
Lord's prayer in the Lipan language, p. 12.
Copies seen: Pilling.
Congress: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a ncte indicates that a copy
of the work referred to has been seen by the
compiler in the Library of Congress, Washington, D. C.
Cook's Inlet Indians.   See Kenai.
Copper Indians.  See Ahtinne.
Coppermine Apache.  See Apache.
Coquille:
Tribal names See Dorsey (J. O.)
Vocabulary Abbott (G. H.)
Vocabulary Dorsey (J. O.)
Ooyotero Apache. See Apache.
Crane (Agnes).   The Origin of Speech
| and | Development of  Language. |
By | Agnes Crane.
[Brighton: J. G. Bishop, Printer,
"Herald" office, 188-?]
Cover title as above verso printer, no inside
title, text pp. 1-43, authorities p. [44], 16°.
Comments upon and examples in a number of
American languages, among them a few Tinne
words, p. 21.
Copies seen: Wellesley.
Cremony (John C.)   Life | among the
Apaches:   |  by | John C.  Cremony, |
interpreter [&c. four lines.] | [Monogram.] |
San Francisco: | A. Roman & company, publishers. | New York: 27 Howard Street. | 1868.
Title verso copyright 1 1. dedication verso
blank 1 1. contents pp. 5-10, preface pp. 11-12,
text pp. 13-322,123.
Apache numerals 1-1000, pp. 238-239.—A
short account of the Apache language, with
examples, pp. 239-243.
Copies seen: Geological Survey.
 Vocabulary |  of    the  |  Mescalero
Apache | language. | By | John C. Cremony, | capt. U. S. A. | 1863
"^Manuscript, pp. 1-78, 4°, in the  Bancroft
library, San Francisco, Cal.
Vocabulary of words in common use, 352
words, pp. 1-15.—Present, imperfect, and future
tenses, indicative mood, verb to be, p. 16.
Author unable to continue investigation by
reason of the lack of ability on the part of the
interpreter.—Personal pronouns, p. 17.—Present, imperfect, and future tenses, indicative
mood, and present of subjunctive mood, verb to
do, pp. 18-19.—All the tenses of indicative
mood, part of subjunctive and all of imperative
moods, verb to love, pp. 20-22.—Indicative and
imperative moods, verb to eat, pp. 24-26.—Same
moods, verb to sleep, pp. 26-28.—List of 125
verbs in common use, pp. 28-40.—Vocabulary of
fifty-four miscellaneous words, pp. 40-44.—
Thirty-eight short phrases in ordinary use, pp.
48-54.—Numerals to 20, irregularly to 100, for
200, 1000, 2000, pp. 56-58.—Apache and Spanish
names of thirty-six men and thirteen women
of the tribe, with signification in English, pp.
60-64.—Mode of bestowing names on persons,
pp. 64-66.—Additional words and phrases, pp.
68-78.
Vocabulary of tl
angnage of the
Mescalero Apaches.
Manuscript, 6 unnumbered 11. folio, in the
library of the Bureau of Ethnology.   Obtained ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
21
Cremony (J. C.) —Continued.
by Capt. Cremony at Fort Sumner, Bosque
Redondo, on the Pecos River, N. Mex., in 1863.
Recorded on one of the blank forms of 180
words issued by the Smithsonian Institution.
The Apache equivalents of about 160 of the
English words are given. This manuscript is
a copy, by Dr. Geo. Gibbs; the whereabouts of
the original, which was forwarded to the Smithsonian Institution by Brig. Gen. James H.
Carleton, then commanding the Department of
New Mexico, I do not know.
Crook (Gen. George). Vocabulary of
the Hoopah or Indians of the lower
Trinity river.
Manuscript, 2 leaves, 4°, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology, Washington, D. C.
Consists of about 150 words selected from
those used by the Smithsonian on its blank
form of 180 words.
 Vocabulary of the Taluwa language.
Manuscript, 3 unnumbered leaves, folio, in
the library of the Bureau of Ethnology, Washington, D. C.
Recorded on one of the Smithsonian forms
issued for the collection of American linguistics. The English words given number 180,
and the corresponding blanks in this vocabulary are all filled.
In the same library is a copy of this vocabulary, made by Dr. Goo. Gibbs.
George Crook, soldier, was born, near Dayton,
Ohio, Sept. 8, 1828. He was graduated at the
TJ. S. Military Academy in 1852, and was on
duty with the Fourth Infantry in California in
1852-1861. He participated in the Rogue river
expedition in 1856, and commanded the Pitt
river expedition in 1857, where he was engaged
in several actions, in one of which he was
wounded by an arrow. He had risen to a captaincy, when, at the beginning of the civil war,
he returned to the east and became colonel of
the Thirty-sixth Ohio Infantry. He afterward
served in the West Virginia campaigns, in
command of the Third provisional brigade,
from May I to Aug. 15, 1862, and was wounded
in the action at Lewisburg. He engaged in the
northern Virginia and Maryland campaigns in
August and September, 1862, and for his
services at Antietam was brevetted lieutenant-
colonel, TJ. S. Army. He served in Tennessee
in 1863, and on July 1 he was transferred to the
command of the Second cavalry division. After
various actions, ending in the battle of Chick-
amauga, he pursued Wheeler's Confederate
cavalry from the 1st to the 10th of October,
defeated it, and drove it across the Tennessee
with great loss. He entered upon the command
*of the Kanawha district in western Virginia in
February, 1864, made constant raids, and was
in numerous actions. He took part in Sheridan's Shenandoah campaign in the autumn of
that year and received the brevets of brigadier-
general and major-general in the TJ. S. Army,
March 13, 1865.   Gen. Crook had command of
I Crook (G.) — Continued.
the cavalry of the Army of the Potomac from
March 26 till April 9, during which time he was
engaged at Dinwiddie Court-House, Jetters-
villc, Sailor's Creek, and Farmville, till the surrender at Appomattox. He was afterward
transferred to the command of Wilmington, N.
C, where he remained from Sept. 1, 1865, till
Jan. 15,1866, when he was mustered out of the
volunteer service. After a six weeks' leave of
absence he was assigned to duty on the board
appointed to examine rifle tactics, was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the Twenty-
third infantry, TJ. S. Army, on July 28,1866, and
assigned to the district of Boise, Idaho, where
he remained until 1872, actively engaged against
the Indians. In 1872 Gen. Crook was assigned
to the Arizona district to quell the Indian disturbances. He sent an ultimatum to the chiefs
to return to their reservations or "be wiped
from the face of the earth." No attention was
paid to his demand, and he attacked them in
the Ton to basin, a stronghold deemed impregnable, and enforced submission. In 1875 he.
was ordered to quell the disturbances in the
Sioux and Cheyenne nations in the northwest,
and defeated those Indians in the battle oi
Powder River, Wyoming. In March another
battle resulted in the destruction of 125 lodges,
and in June the battle of Tongue River was a
victory for Crook. A few days later the battle
of the Rosebud gave him another, when the
maddened savages massed their forces and succeeded in crushing Custer. Crook, on receiving
reenforcements, struck a severe blow at Slim
Buttes, Dakota, and followed it up with such
relentless vigor that by May, 1877, all the hostile tribes in the northwest had yielded. In
1882 he returned to Arizona, forced the Mormons, squatters, miners, and stock-raisers to
vacate the Indian lands which they had seized.
In the spring of 1883 the Chiricahuas began
a series of- raids. General Crook struck the
trail, and, instead of following, .took it backward, penetrated into and took possession of
their strongholds, and, as fast as the warriors
returned from their plundering excursions,
made them prisoners. He marched over 200
miles, made 400 prisoners, and captured all the
horses and plunder. During tho two years following he had sole charge of the Indians, and
ho depredation occurred. [He died in Chicago
March21,1890.]—Appleton's Cyclop.of Am.Biog.
Curtin (Jeremiah). [Words, phrases,
and sentences in the language of the
Hoopa Indians, Hoopa Valley, Oregon.]
Manuscript, 101 pp. 4°, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Collected in the Hoopa
Valley, December, 1888 - January, 1889. Recorded in a copy of Powell's Introduction to
the Study of Indian Languages, second edition,
pp. 77-102,105,109-111, 113-125, 127-130, 132-136,
184-187,189-228, and 5 unnumbered pages at the
end. Of the schedules given in the work nos.
1,2,3,4,5,6,7, 8, 13,22, 24. 25, 26, 27, and 28 are BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Curtin (J.) — Continued.
completely filled, nos. 10, 12,14,16,17,18,19, 20,
21, and 23 are partly filled, and nos. 9,11, and 15
are blank.
The alphabet adopted by the Bureau of Ethnology is used.
Jeremiah Curtin was born in Milwaukee,
Wis., about 1835. He had little education in
childhood, hut at the age of twenty or twenty-
one prepared himself to enter Phillips Exeter
Academy, made extraordinary progress, and
soon entered Harvard College, where he was
graduated in 1863. By this time he had become
noted among his classmates and acquaintances
for his wonderful facility as a linguist. On
leaving college he had acquired a good knowledge of French, Spanish. Portuguese, Italian,
Rumanian, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Icelandic,
Gothic, German, and Finnish, besides Greek
and Latin. He had also made considerable
progress in Hebrew, Persian; and Sanskrit, and
was beginning to speak Russian. When Admiral Lissofsky's fleet visited this country, in
1864, Curtin became acquainted with the officers
and accompanied the expedition on its return
to Russia. In St. Petersburg he obtained
employment" as a translator of polyglot
telegraphic dispatches, but he was presently
appointed by Mr. Seward to the office of secretary of the United States legation, and he
held this place till 1868. During this period
he became familiar with the Polish, Bohemian, Lithuanian, Lettish, and Hungarian
languages, and made a beginning in Turkish. From 1868 till 1877 he traveled in eastern Europe and in Asia, apparently in the
service of the Russian government. In 1873, at
the celebration at Prague of the 500th anniversary of the birth of John Huss, he delivered
the oration, speaking with great eloquence in
the Bohemian language. During his travels in
the Danube country he learned to speak
Slovenian, Croatian, Servian, and Bulgarian.
He lived for some time in the Caucasus, where
■he learned Mingrelian, Abkasian, and Armenian. At the beginning of the Russo-Turkish
war in 1877, he left the Russian dominions, and,
after a year in London, returned to his native
country. Since then he has been studying the
languages of the American Indians and has
made valuable researches under the auspices
of Maj. John W. Powell and tho Bureau of
Ethnology. He is said to be acquainted with
more than fifty languages.—Appleton's Cyclop.
ofAm.Biog.
Cushing (Frank   Hamilton).    Vocabulary of the Navajo language.
, Manuscript in possession of Mr. A. S. Gatschet, Washington, D. C.
Recorded in a folio blank book, on p. 46 of
which are twenty-foursentenoes, and, on p. 73,
twenty-five words and phrases. This is a copy,
made by Mr. Gatschet from the original, which
is in the possession of its compiler.
Cushing (F. H.) —Continued.
 See Gatschet (A. S.)
Frank Hamilton Cushing was born in North1
east, Erie County, Pa., July 22,1857. He manifested in early childhood a love for archeoldg-
ical pursuits, and at the age of eight years
began to collect fossils and minerals,-made a
complete Indian costume, and lived in a bark
hut in the woods. He learned that wherever
Indian encampments had been long established
the soil and vegetation had undergone a change,
which assisted him in his search for relics. At
the age of fifteen he had discovered the process
of making arrow-heads from flint by pressure
with bone. In 1870 his father moved to Medina,
N. T., where the son's researches found n§w
ground. In the town of Shelby were ancient
remains of fortifications, rich in relics, and they,
with ancient burial grounds and camp sites in
Madison and Onondaga counties, were carefully
searched. In the spring of 1875 he became
a student in Cornell University, but later
spent most of his time as assistant to Dr.
Charles Ran in the preparation of the Indian
collections of the National Museum for the Centennial exposition at Philadelphia, and was
curator of the entire collection until the close
of the exhibition, when he was appointed
curator of the ethnological department of the
National Museum. During the summer of 1876
he gained his first knowledge of the Pueblo
Indians, and in 1879 he joined Maj. J. W.
Powell in his expedition to New Mexico. The
expedition spent two months among the ZuSi
Indians, and Mr. Cushing, at his own request, '
was left there. During the second year of his
sojourn he had so far made himself one of the
tribe and gained the esteem of the chiefs that
he was formally adopted and initiated into the
sacred esoteric society, the "Priesthood of the
Bow." In 1882 he visited the east with a party
of six Zunis, who came for the purpose 'of
taking water from the "Ocean of Sunrise," as
a religious ceremony, and carrying it to their
temple in the Pueblos. Four of the Zunis
returned, while Mr. Cushing remained with the
other two during the summer in Washington,
for the purpose of writing, with their aid, a
paper on Zufii fetiches. In September of the
same year he returned to Zufii; but in the spring
of 1884 failing health obliged his return for two
years to the east. Again he had with him for
some time three of the Zunis, to aid him in the
preparation of a dictionary and grammar of
their language and in translations of myth and
beast stories, songs, and rituals. In 1886 Mr.
Cushing organized the Hemenway Archaeological Expedition, and as its director discovered
and excavated extensive buried cities in Arizona and New Mexico; but in 1888 he was again
prostrated by illness. He is now writing contributions for the Bureau of Ethnology on the
relation of primitive drama to creation lore and
other Zufii works. ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
25
D.
baa (Ludwig Kristensen). On the affinities between the languages of the
horthern tribes of the old and new continents. By Lewis Kr. Daa, Esq., of
Christiania, Norway, (Read December
the 20th.)
In Philological Soc. [of London] Trans. 1856,
pp. 251-294, London [1857], 8°.   (Congress.)
Comparative tables showing affinities between Asiatic and American languages, pp.
264-285, contain words from many North
Amurican languages, the Athapascan being as
follows: Athabasca, Beaver,Kutchin, Sikauni,
Tahkali, Navajo, Jecorilla, Tlatskanai, Kinai,
Loucheux, Atnah, Ugalenz, TJinkwa, Dogrib,
Navajo, and Apache.
Dall (William Healey).   Alaska | and |
its resources. | By | William H. Dall, |
director of the scientific corps of the
late Western union | telegraph expedition. | [Design.] |
'Boston: | Lee and Shepard. | 1870.
Frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyright and
printers 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. introduction pp. v-viii, contents pp. ix-xii, half-title
verso blank 1 1. text pp. 3-526, appendix pp.
527-609, index pp. 610-627, notes etc. p. [628],
maps and plates, 8°.
Comparative vocabulary of 26 words and the
numerals 1-10 of the Dgalentsi, Ahtena, Kenai-
tena, Tenan-Kutch'in, Kutcha-Kutch'in, Kai-
yuhkhatana (TJlukuk), Kaiyukhatana (northeastern) and TJnakhatana, pp. 550-551.—"Words
towards vocabularies of the Tinneh tribes,"
constituting a comparative vocabulary of the
Nulato In'galik, TJlu'kuk In'galik, Tanand
In'galik, TJnakhatana, and Tenan Kutchin,
pp. 566-575.
Copies seen: Boston Athenaeum, British Museum, Congress, Eames, Powell, Trumbull,
Watkinson.
A copy at the Field sale, catalogue no. 480,
brought $1.50.
Some copies have the imprint, London: |
Sampson Low, Son, and Marston, | Crown
Buildings, 188, Fleet Street. | 1870. (British
Museum, Bureau of Ethnology.)
 On the Distribution of the Native
Tribes of Alaska and the adjacent territory.   By W. H. Dall.
In American Ass. Adv. Sci. Proc. vol. 18, pp.
263-273, and 2 folding sheets,Cambridge, 1870,8°.
Contains, on a folding sheet between pp. 272-
273, a vocabnlary of 26 words and the numerals
1-10 of the TJgalentsi, Ahtena, Tenan-kutchin,
Kutcha-kutchin, TJnakhatana, Kaiyuhkhotana
of TJluluk River and Kaiyuh River.
Dall (W. H.) —Continued.
 Address by William H. Dall.   Vice-
president,   section   H,   anthropology,
The native tribes of Alaska.
In American Ass. Adv. Sci. Proc. vol. 34, pp.
363-379, Salem, 1886,8°.   (Pilling.)
General discussion of the habitat and affinities of the Tinneh or Athabaskans, p. 376.—
Tribal divisions of the Tinneh, pp. 378-379.
Issued separately as follows:
 The native tribes of Alaska. | An |
address | before the | section of
anthropology | of the | American association for the advancement of science,
| at | Ann Arbor, August, 1885. | By |
William H. Dall. | Vice president, j
(From the Proceedings of the American
Association for the Advancement | of
Science, Vol. xxxiv, Ann Arbor Meeting, August, 1885.) |
Printed at the Salem press. | Salem,
Mass. | 1885.
Cover title as above, title as above verso
blank 11. text pp. 3-19,8°.
General remarks upon the habitat and affinities of the Tinneh or Athabaskans, p. 16.—
'Tribal divisions of the Tinneh, pp. 18-19.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
William Healey Dall, naturalist, was horn in
Boston, Mass., Aug. 21,1845. He was educated
at the Boston public schools, and then became
a special pupil in natural sciences under Louis
Agassiz and in anatomy and medicine under
Jeffries Wyman and Daniel Brainard. In 1865 he
was appointed lieutenant in the International
telegraph expedition, and in this capacity visited Alaska in 1865-1868. From 1871 till 1880
he was assistant to the TJ. S. Coast Survey
and underits direction spent the years 1871 to
1874 and 1884 in that district. His work, besides
the exploration and description of the geography, included the anthropology, natural history, and geology of the Alaskan and adjacent
regions. From the field work and collections
have resulted maps, memoirs, coast pilot, and.
papers on these subjects or branches of them..
[Since 1884 he has been] paleontologist to the*
TJ. S. Geological Survey, and since 1869 he has'
been honorary curator of the department of*
mollusks in the II. S. National Museum. In this
office he has made studies of recent and fossil,
mollusks of the world, and especially of North
America, from which new information has been*
derived concerning the brachiopoda, patellidas,.
chitonidae, and the mollusk fauna of the deep'
sea. These studies have grown out of those
devoted to the fauna of northwestern America,
and eastern Siberia. Mr. Dall has been honored 24
BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE
Dall (W. H.) — Continued.
with elections to nearly all the scientific societies in this country, and to many abroad. In
1882 and in 1883 lie was vice president of the
American Association for the Advancement of |
Science, and presided over the sections of biology and anthropology. His scientific papers
include about two hundred titles. Among the
separate books are "Alaska and its Resources"
(Boston, 1870); " Tribes of the Extreme Northwest" (Washington, 1877); "Coast Pilot of
Alaska, Appendix 1, Meteorology and Bibliography" (1879); "The Currents and Temperatures of Bering Sea and the Adjacent Waters"
(1882); "Pacific Coast Pilot and Islands of
Alaska, Dixon Entrance to Yakutat Bay, with
the Inland Passage" (1883); "Prehistoric
America," by the Marquis de Nadaillac, edited
(New York, 1885); and "Report on the Mol-
lusca, Brachiopoda, and Pelecypoda" of the
Blake dredging expedition in the West Indies (Cambridge, 1886),—Appleton's Cyclop, of
Am. liioy. •
David vi psalmut Tukudh. See M'Donald (R.)
Davidoff (Gavrilalvanovich). 4nyKpaTHoe
nyxeuiccTBie | Bb A.wepiiKy | MopcKiix'b o*nqc-
l»m | XBoCTOBa » 4'tW'i.WBa, | micaHiioe ciiml
iioc.i1>/(bbmi. | lacrb nepBaa [-Bropaa]. |
Bb G. HeTepbypii; | neianiauo ist MopcKott
Taaorpa*iH 1810 [-1812] roja. -
Translation.—Two voyages | to America | by
the naval officers | Khwostoff and Davidoff, |
written by tho latter. | Part firstf-second]. |
At St. Petersburg | printed in . the Naval
Printing Office in the year 1810[-1812].
2 vols. 8°. Vocabulary of the Kenai (of tribes
living on Kenai Gulf, Cook's Inlet), vol. 2, pp.
xiii-xxviii.
Copies seen: British Museum, Congress.
The German edition, Berlin, 1816,8°, contains
no linguistics.
Davidson (George). Report of Assistant
George Davidson relative to the resources and the coast features of Alaska
Territory.
In Coast Survey Ann. Rept. 1867, pp. 187-329,
l     Washington, 1869, 4°.  (Geological Survey.)
Vocabulary of the language of the natives of
| Kenai (about 300 words), alphabetically
arranged by English entries (from Lisiansky),
[     pp. 293-298.
Reprinted as follows:
 Report of Assistant George Davidson
relative to the coast features and resources of Alaska territory.
In 40th Congress, 2d session, House of Representatives, Ex. Doc. No. 177, Russian America,
Message from the President of the United
States, in answer to a resolution of the House
Davidson (G.) — Continued.
of 19th of December last, transmitting corfe-*
spondence in relation to Russian America.
[Washington, 1868.] Pp. 1-361, pt. 2, pp. 1-19,8°.
(Geological Survey.)
Mr. Davidson's report occupies pp. 219-361,
and contains, pp. 328-333, a vocabulary of the
Kenay (from Lisiansky) of 300 words, alphabetically arranged by English entries.
Reprinted as follows:
 United States coast survey. | Benjamin Peirce, superintendent. | Pacific
coast. | Coast pilot of Alaska, | (first
part,) | from southern boundary to
Cook's inlet. | By | George Davidson, |
assistant coast survey. | 1869. |
Washington; | Government printing
office | 1869.
Title verso blank 1 1. introduction pp. 3-4,
text pp. 5-192, appendices pp. 193-246, index pp.
247-251, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above,
pp. 215-221.
Copies seen: Pilling.
Davis (William Watts Hart). El Gringo;
| or, | New Mexico and her people. |
By | W. W. H.   Davis, | late  "United
States attorney. |
New York: | Harper & brothers,
publishers, | Franklin square. | 1857.
Frontispiece 11. title verso copyright 11. dedication verso blank 11. preface verso blank 1 1.
contents pp. vii-xii, text pp. 13-432,12°.
^"Vocabulary of upward of sixty words in
Navajo and English,"pp.419-420, furnished by
Captain H. L. Dodge and a young Indian.
Copies seen: British Museum, Congress,
Eames, Geological Survey, Pilling.
Dawson  (George  Mercer).   Geological
and natural history survey of Canada.
| Alfred R. C. Selwyn, C. M. G., LL.
D., F. R. S., Director. | Report | on an
exploration in the | Yukon district, N.
W. T., | and | adjacent northern portion of j British Columbia. | 1887. | By
| George M. Dawson, D. S., F. G. S. |
[Coat of arms.] | Published by authority of parliament. |
Montreal: | Dawson brothers. | 1888.
In Geological and Nat. Hist. Survey of Canada, Ann. Rept. (new series), vol. 3, part 1,
report B, Montreal, 1889. Title as above verso
blank 1 1. letter of transmittal verso blank 1 1.
text pp. 5B-277B, 8°.
Appendix II. Notes on the Indian tribes of
the Yukon district and adjacent northern portion of British Columbia (pp. 191B-213B), contains a general account of the languages of the
region aud "Short vocabularies   [about  100 ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
25
Dawson (G. M.) — Continued.
words each] of the Tahl-tan, Ti-tsho-ti-na, and
Ta-gish, obtained in 1887," pp. 208B-213B.
Copies seen: Geological Survey.
The appendix was issued separately as follows :
 Notes on  the Indian tribes of the
Yukon district and adjacent northern
portion of British Columbia. By.
George M. Dawson, D. S., F. G. S.,
Assistant Director, Geological Survey
of Canada. (Reprinted from the Annual Report of Geological Survey of
Canada, 1887.)
No title-page, heading as above; text pp. 1-
23,8°.
Linguistics as under title next above, pp. 18-
23.
Copies seen: Pilling.
 See Tolmie (W. F.) and Dawson (G.
M.)
George Mercer Dawson was born at Pictou,
Nova Scotia, August 1, 1849, and is the eldest
son of Sir William Dawson, principal of
McGill University, Montreal. He was educated at McGill College and the Royal School
of Mines; held the Duke of Cornwall's scholarship, given by the Prince of Wales; and took
the Edward Forbes medal in palaeontology and
the Murchison medal in geology. He was appointed geologist and naturalist to Her
Majesty's North American Boundary Commission in 1873, and at the close of the commission's
work, in 1875, he published a report under the
title of " Geology and Resources of the Forty-
ninth Parallel." In July, 1875, he received an
appointment on the geological survey of Canada. From. 1875 to 1879 he was occupied in the
geological survey and exploration of British
Columbia, and subsequently engaged in similar
work both in the Northwest Territory and
British Columbia. Dr. Dawson is the author of
numerous papers on geology, natural history,
and ethnology, published in the Canadian Naturalist, Quarterly Journal of the Geological
Society, Transactions of the Royal Society of
Canada, etc. He was in 1887 selected to take
charge of the Yukon expedition.
De Meulen (Liezit. E.) Vocabulary of
the Kenay (Kai-ta-na) language of
Cook's Inlet.
Manuscript, 10 unnumbered leaves, folio, in
the library of the Bureau of Ethnology. Obtained in 1870.
Recorded on one of the blank forms (no. 170)
issued by the Smithsonian Institution, containing the standard vocabulary of 211 words, equivalents of all of which are given in the Kenay.
Dene:
Bible lessons See Faraud (H. J.)
Bible passages Grouard (E.)
Catechism Clut (J.)
Catechism Morice (A. G.)
Dene — Continued.
Catechism
Dictionary
Dictionary
Grammar
Grammatic comments
Grammatic treatise
Hymns
Prayer book
Prayers
Primer
Sermons
Songs
Text
Tribal names
Vocabulary
Words
See also Tinne.
Dene* Dindjie.   See Dene.
Dictionary:
Dene
Dene
Kenai
Loucheux
Montagnais
Montagnais
Navajo
Peau de Lievre
Seguin (—).
Morice (A. G.)
Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
Morice (A. G.)
Morice (A. G.)
Petitot (E.F.S. J.)
Morice (A. G.)
Morice (A. G.)
Morice (A. G.)
Morice (A. G.)
Morice (A. G.)
Morice (A- G.)
Morice (A. G.)
Morice (A. G.)
Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
Charencey (H. de).
See Morice (A. G.)
Petitot (E.F.S. J.)
Radloff (L.)
Petitot (E.F.S. J.)
Petitot (E.F.S. J.)
Vegreville (V. T.)
Matthews (W.)
Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
Dobbs (Arthur). An | account | Of the
Countries adjoining to | Hudson's bay,
| in the | North-west Part of America:
| containing ) A Description of their
Lakes and Rivers, the Nature of the |
Soil and Climates, and their Methods of
Commerce, &c. | Shewing the Benefit
to be made by settling^olonies, and |
opening a Trade in these Parts; whereby the French will be [ deprived in a
great Measure of their Traffick in Furs,
and | the Communication between Canada and Mississippi be cut off. | With |
An Abstract of Captain Middleton's
Journal, and Observations upon | his
Behaviour during his Voyage, and since
his Return. | To which are added, [ I.
A Letter from Bartholomew de Fonte,
|-Vice-Admiral of Peru and Mexico; |
giving an Account of his Voyage from |
Lima in Peru, to prevent, or seize upon
| any Ships that should attempt to find
| a North-west Passage to the South
Sea. | II. An Abstract of all the Discoveries | which have been publish'd of the
Islands | and Countries in and adjoining to the | Great Western Ocean, between Ame- | rica, India, and China, &c.
pointing | out the Advantages that may
be made, | if a short Passage should be
found thro' J Hudson's Straight to that w
£6
BIBLIOGRAPHY OF" THE
Dobbs (A.) — Continued.
Ocean. | III. The Hudson's Bay Company's Charter. | IV. The Standard of
Trade in those | Parts of America; with
an Account | of the Exports and Profits
made an- | nually by the Hudson's Bay
Company. | V. Vocabularies of the Languages of se- | veral Indian Nations
adjoining to Hud-1 son's Bay. | The
whole intended to shew the great Probability of a North-west | Passage, so
long desired; and which (if discovered)
would be of the | highest Advantage
to these Kingdoms, | By Arthur Dobbs,
Esq; |
London: | Printed for J.Robinson, at
the Golden Lion in Ludgate-Street. |
MDCCXLIV   [1744].
Title verso blank 11." To the king " pp. i-ii,
folded map, text pp. 1-211, 4°.
Thompson (E.), A short vocabulary of the
language spoken among the Northern Indians,
pp. 206-211.
Copies seen: Astor, Boston Athenaeum, British Museum, Congress, Geological Survey,
Lenox, Trumbull.
Stevens' Nuggets, no.906, prices a copy 10s.6d.
A copy at the Field sale, no. 538, brought $2.50.
Priced by Quaritoh, no. 11650, 11. 5s., large
paper. At the Murphy sale, no. 804, a copy
brought $3.25. Priced by Quaritoh, no. 28278,
11. is.
Dodge (Capt. H. L.)    See Davis (W.W.
H.)
Dog Rib:
Hymns See Bompas (W. C.)
Lord's prayer Bompas (W. C.)
Numerals Tolmie (W. F.) and Daw
son (G. M.)
Prayers Bompas (W. C.)
Primer Bompas (W. C.)
Proper names Catlin (G.)
Ten commandments Bompas (W. C.)
Text Clut (J.)
Vocabulary Bancroft (H. H.)
Vocabulary Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Vocabulary Latham (R. G.)
Vocabulary Lefroy (J. H.)
Vocabulary Morgan (L. H.)
Vocabulary Murray (—).
Vocabulary O'Brien (—).
Vocabulary Richardson (J.)
Vocabulary Whipple (A. W.)
Words Daa(L.K.)
Words Ellis (R.)
Words Tolmie (W.F.)andDaw-
son (G. M.)
Dog Rib primer.   See Bompas (W. C.)
Domenech (Abhi Emanuel Henri Dieu-
donue).   Seven years'residence | in the
great) deserts of North America | by
the | abb6 Em, Domenech | Apostolical
Domenech (E. H. D.) — Continued.
Missionary: Canon of Montpellier:"
Member of the Pontifical Academy
Tiberina, | and of the Geographical and
Ethnographical Societies of France, &c-
| Hlustrated with fifty-eight woodcuts
by A. Joliet, three | plates of ancient
Indian music, and a map showing the
actual situation of | the Indian tribes
and the country described by the author
| In Two Volumes | Vol. I[-H]. |
London | Longman, Green, Longman,
and Roberts | 1860. | The right of translation is reserved.
Half-title verso printers 11. title verso blank
11. dedication pp. v-vi, preface pp. vii-xiii, contents pp. xv-xxi, list of illustrations pp. xxiii-
xxiv, text pp. 1-445; half-title verso printers 1
1. title verso blank 1 1. contents pp. v-xii, text
pp. 1-465, colophon p. [466], map, plates, 8°.
List of Indian tribes of North America, vol.
1, pp. 440-445.—Vocabularies, etc. vol. 2, pp. 164-
189, contain 84 words of the Navajo.
Copies seen: Astor, Boston Athenaeum, British Museum, Congress, Watkinson.
At the Field sale a copy,no. 550, brought$2.37,
and at the Pinart sale, no. 328,6 fr. Clarke &
co. 1886, no. 5415, price a copy $5.
Emanuel HenriDieudonne Domenech, French
author,was born in Lyons, France, November 4,
J.825; died in France in June, 1886. He became
a priest in the Roman Catholic church, and was
sent as a missionary to Texas and Mexico. During Maximilian's residence in America, Domenech acted as private chaplain to the emperor,
ancl he was also almoner to the French army
during its occupation of Mexico. On his return
to France he was made honorary canon of
Montpellier. His "Manuscrit pictographique
Am6ricain, precede d'une notice sur l'ideo-
graphie des Peaux Rouges" (1860) was published by the French government, with a facsimile of a manuscript in the library of the Paris
arsenal, relating, as he claimed, to the American
Indians; but the German orientalist, Julius
Petzholdt, declared that it consisted only of
scribbling and incoherent illustrations of a local
German dialect. Domenech maintained the
authenticity of the manuscript in a pamphlet
entitled "La verite sur le livre des sauvages"
(1861), which drew forth a reply from Petzholdt,
translated into French under the title of " Le
livre des sauvages an point de vue de la civilisation franeaise" (Brussels, 1861). During the
latter part of his life he produced several works
pertaining to religion and ancient history	
Appleton's Cyclop, of Am. Biog.
Dorsey (Bev. James Owen). Indians of
Siletz reservation, Oregon. By J. Owen
Dorsey.
In American Anthropologist, vol. 2, pp. 55-61,
Washington, 1889, 8°.  (Pilling.)
Grammatic notes and examples of the Athapascan, p, 56.—Kinship terms, p. 58. ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
27
Dorsey (J. O.) — Continued.
 The gentile system of the   Siletz
tribes.
In Journal of American Folk-Lore, vol. 3, pp.
227-237, Boston and New York, 1890, 8°. (Pilling.)
List of Upper Coquille villages (32), with
English definitions, p. 232.—Athapascans north
of Rogue River (22 names of villages with meanings), pp. 232-233.—Chasta Costa villages (33),
' with meanings, p. 234.—Athapascan villages
(21) south of Rogue River, pp. 235-236.—Athapascan villages in northwest California, pp. 236-
237.
 [Vocabulary of words and phrases
in the dialect of the Chasta Costa or
Ci'-sta kqwu'-stti Indians who lived on
the Rogue River or on one of its
branches, Oregon.]
Manuscript, 13 pp. 4°, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Collected at the Siletz
Indian Agency, Oregon, September and October, 1884, with the assistance of Government
George or Tfit-qe-8-sa and two other Indians of
the tribe. Recorded in a copy of Powell's Introduction to the Study of Indian Languages, second edition, pp. 77-79,97, 122, 131, 182-184, 192-
193,196, 228.
Of the schedules given in the work no. 1 is
filled and nos. 2, 8, 12, 14, 18, 24,25, and 30 are
partly filled.
 [Words, phrases, and sentences in
the language of the Chetco (TcS'-ti-
!).un-n8') formerly of Chetco River,
Oregon.]
Manuscript, 32 pp. 4°, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Collected at the Siletz
Indian Agency, Oregon, September, 1884, with
the assistance of Baldwin Fairchild, a Chetco.
Recorded in a copy of Powell's Introduction to
the Study of Indian Languages, second edition,
pp. 77-228 and 7 extra leaves at the end, many of
the pages being left blank.
Of the schedules given in tho work nos. 1,2,
and 30 are filled; nos. 3, 5,7, 8,12,18,24, 25, and
27 are partly filled; and the remaining numbers
are blank.   The unnumbered leaves at the end
- contain a list of the parts of the body in great
detail, dress and ornaments, the conjugation of
a number of verbs, a table of classifiers, and
pronouns.   The total number of entries is 480.
 [Vocabulary of words and phrases
in the language of the D&-ku-bS tS'-dS,
formerly living on Applegate Creek,
Oregon.]
Manuscript, 9 pp. 4°, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Collected at the Siletz
Agency, Oregon, October, 1884, with the assistance of Rogue River John, a Ta-kel-nia, whose
mother was a Da-ku-b8 tS'-dS. Recorded in a
copy of Powell's Introduction to the Study of
Indian Languages, second edition, pp. 77-79,184,
196,228, and 3 unnumbered pages at the end.
Dorsey (J. O.) — Continued.
Of the schedulos given in the work no. 30 is
filled and nos. 1, 2,18, and 25 are partly filled.
The final unnumbered pages at the end give the
parts of the body in detail.
 [Vocabulary of words and phrases in
the Kwa-ta'-mi or Sixes dialect of the
Tft'qwe-t'a'^hn-ne', formerly living on
Sixes Creek, Oregon.]
Manuscript, 23 pp. 4°, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Collected at the Siletz
Indian Agency, Oregon, AugusMDctober, 1884,
with the assistance of Jake Rooney and Jake
Stuart. Recorded in a copy of Powell's Introduction to the Study of Indian Languages, second edition, pp. 77-78,82,97-102,109-112,115-116,
196,206-207,210,220,228, and three unnumbered
pages at the end.
Of the schedules given in the work nos. 1,2,
3, 8, 12, 25, 27,28, and 30 are partly filled, the
remainder being blank. The entries sum up a
total of 356. The three pages at the end contain
a number of partial verbal conjugations.
 [Vocabulary of words and phrases of
the Mi'-kwii-nu' (pin-iie7 tribe or gens,
formerly living on the Lower Rogue
River, Oregon.]
Manuscript, 10 pp. 4°, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Collected at the Siletz
Indian Agency, Oregon, October, 1884, with the
assistance of William Simpson, a native.
^Recorded in a copy of Powell's Introduction to
the Study of Indian Languages, second edition,
pp. 76-81, 97, 196, 220, 228, and 8 unnumbered
pages at the end.
Of the schedules nos. 1,2,8, and 30 are partly
filled; the unnumbered pages at the end contain an extended list of the parts of the body,
pronouns, nouns used as classifiers, partial
conjugation of a number of verbs, etc.
—[Words, phrases, and sentences in the
language of the Nal'-tun-ne'-(iun-n8'
gens.]
Manuscript, 75 pp. 4°, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Collected "at the Siletz
Indian Agency, Oregon, October, 1884, with the
assistance of Alex Ross, chief of the gens, and
a full-blood. Recorded in a copy of Powell's
Introduction to the Study of Indian Languages,
second edition, pp. 77-228, and 5 unnumbered
leaves at the end, a number of the pages being
left blank.
Of the lists of words given in this work
schedules 1,2,3,4, 5, 8,10,12,13,15,18, and 30 are
completely filled and schedules 6,7,9,14,17,22,
and 24 partly filled. The extra leaves at the
end contain the parts of the body in great detail, a list of pronouns, verbal classifiers, correlatives, and the conjugation of a number of
verbs.  There are 1,345 entries in all.
— [Vocabulary of the Qa'-am-o'te-ne',
formerly living at the mouth of Smith
River, California.] 28
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF THE
Dorsey (J. 0.) — Continued.
Manuscript, 7 pp. 4°, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Collected at the Siletz
Indian Reservation, Oregon, Sept., 1884, with
the assistance of Smith River John. Recorded
in a copy of Powell's Introduction to the Study
of Indian Languages, second edition, pp. 77-78,
82,122-123,182,184, the remaining pages of the
work being left blank.
Of the schedules given in the work nos. 1,2,
and 18 are partly filled. The total entries amount
to 57.
 [A vocabulary of words and phrases
in the dialect of the Tal'-t'uc-t'un tft'-
de, or Galice Creek Indians who
formerly lived in Josephine County,
Oregon, 30 miles north of Kerby.]
Manuscript, 10 pp. 4°, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Collected at the Siletz
Indian Agency, Oregon, October, 1884, with the
assistance of Yael'-tftn or Galice Creek Jim
and Peter Muggins. Recorded in a copy of
Powell's Introduction to the Study of Indian
Languages, second edition, pp.77-228and2extra
leaves at the end, many of the pages being left
blank.
Of the schedules given in the work none is
completely filled, and nos. 1, 2, 3,4,8,12,18,24,
and 30 are hut partly filled. The 2 leaves at the
end contain the parts of the body in great
detail, a few possessive pronouns, and the conjugations in brief of the verbs to desire and to
know. The entries as a whole number 254.
 [Words, sentences, and grammatical
material in the Tu-tu'tun-nS', or Tu'-tu
language (dialect of several villages.)]
Manuscript, 155 pp. 4°, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Collected at the Siletz
Indian Reservation, Oregon, August-October,
1884, with the assistance of twelve members of
the Tu'-tu tribe. Recorded in a copy of Powell's
Introduction to the Study of Indian Languages,
second edition, pp. 76-86,88-89,95-103,106,108-
129, 131-147, 149-155, 162-173, 180-185, 188-199,
206-213, 220, 228, and 46 unnumbered pages at
the end, with many intercalated pages passim.
Of the schedules given in the work nos. 1,2.3,
8,12,13,14,15,16,18,22,23,25, and 30 are filled;
nos. 4,5,6,7,9,10, 17,19,21, 24, 26, 27, and 28 are
partly filled, and nos. 11,20, and 29 are blank.
The total entries number 3,962, besides a text
with interlinear and free translation.
 Vocabulary of the Upper Coquille
or Mi-ci-qwut-me tun-ne.
Manuscript, 38 pp. 4°, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Collected at the Siletz
Indian Agency, Oregon, August-October, 1884,
with the assistance of Coquille Thompson and
Coquille Solomon. Recorded in a copy of
Powell's Introduction to the Study of Indian
Languages, second edition, pp. 77,81,84, 88-89,
'96-98,100-103,109-111, 128-129, 132-136, 183-184,
192-198,228, and 4 unnumbered leaves at the end.
Dorsey (J. O.) — Continued.
Of the schedules given in the work nos. 1,2,
18, 24, and 30 are filled, and nos. 4,5,6,7,8, 9,12,
13, 14, 16, 17, 22, and 25 are partly filled; the
remaining numbers are blank. There is a total
of 745 entries.
 A vocabulary of the Yu'-ki-tcS or
Yu'-ki-tce' tun-ne dialect spoken by
the Indians formerly living on Euchre
Creek, Oregon.
Manuscript, 611.4°, written on one side only,
in the library of the Bureau of Ethnology. Collected at the Siletz Indian Agency, Oregon,
September, 1884, with the assistance of James
Warner, sr., who could speak a little English.
. The entries number 236, and are arranged in
the order of the schedules given in Powell's Introduction to the Study of Indian Languages,
second edition.
James Owen Dorsey was born in Baltimore,
Md., in 1848. He attended the Central High
School (now the City College) in 1862 and 1863,
taking the classical course. Dlness caused him
to abandon his studies when a member of the
second year class. In a counting room from 1864
to 1866. Taught from September, 1866, to June,
1867. Entered the preparatory department of
the Theological Seminary of Virginia in September, 1867, and the junior class of the seminary in September, 1869. Was ordained a deacon
of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the
United States by the bishop of Virginia, Easter
day, 1871. Entered upon his work among the
Ponca Indians, in Dakota Territory, in May of
that year. Had an attack of scarlet fever in
April, 1872, and one of typho-malarial fever in
July, 1873. Owing to this illness- he was
obliged to give up the mission work in August,
1873, soon after he had learned to talk to the
Indians without an interpreter. Ho returned to
Maryland and engaged in parish work till July,
1878, when, under the direction of Maj. J. W.
Powell, he went to the Omaha reservation in
Nebraska in order to increase his stock of linguistic material. On the organization of the
Bureau of Ethnology, in 1879, he was transferred thereto, and from that time he has been
engaged continuously in linguistic and socio-
logic work for the Bureau. He remained among
the Omaha till April, 1880, when he returned to
Washington. Since then he has made several
trips to Indian reservations for scientific purposes, not only to those occupied by tribes of
the Siouan family, but also to the Siletz reser.
vation, in Oregon. At the last place, which ho
visited in 1884, he obtained vocabularies, grammatic notes, etc., of languages spoken by Indians of the Athapascan, Kusan, Takilman,
and Yakonan stocks. The reports of his office
and field work will be found in the annual
reports of the Bureau of Ethnology.
Drake (Samuel Gardiner).    The | Aboriginal races | of | North America; |
comprising j biographical sketches of ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
29
Drake (S. G.) — Continued,
eminent individuals, | and | an historical account of the different tribes", |
from | the first discovery of the continent | to | the present period | with a
dissertation on their | Origin, Antiquities, Manners and Customs, | illustrative narratives and anecdotes, | and .1
I copious analytical index | by Samuel
G. Drake. | Fifteenth edition, | revised,
with valuable additions, [ by Prof. H.
L. Williams. | [Quotation, six lines.] |
New York'. | Hurst & company, publishers. I 122 Nassau Street.   [1882.]
Title verso copyright 11. preface pp.3-4, contents pp. 5-8, Indian tribes and nations pp. 9-16,
half-title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 19-767, index
pp. 768-787, 8°.
Gatschet (A S.), Indian languages of tho
Pacific states and territories, pp. 748-763.
Copies seen: Astor, Congress,Wisconsin Historical Society.
Clarke & co. 1886, no. 6377, price a copy $3.
Duflot de Mofras (Eugene). Exploration I du territoire | de l'Oregon, | des
Californies | et de la mer Vermeille, \
executeo pendant les annees 1840, 1841
et 1842, I par M. Duflot de Mofras,
I Attache" a la Legation de France a
Mexico; [ ouvrage publi6 par ordre du
roi, I sous les auspices de M. le mare"-
chalSoult, ducdeDalmatie, | President
du Conseil, | et de M. le ministre des
affaires e"traugeres. | Tome premier
[-second]. |
Paris, I Arthus Bertrand, 6diteur, |
libraire de la Socie*te* de gdographie, |
Rue Hautefenille, n° 23. | 1844.
2 vols.: half-title verso printers 11. title verso
blank 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. avant-
propos pp. vii-xii, avertissement verso note 11.
nota verso blank 1 1. text pp. 1-518, table des
chapitres pp. 519-521, table des cartes pp. 523-
Duflot de Mofras (E.) — Continued.
524; half-title verso printers 11. title verso blank
1 1. text pp. 1-500, table des chapitres pp. 501-
504, table des cartes pp. 505-506, table analy tique
etc. pp. 507-514, 8°.
Numerals 1-10 of a number of American languages, among them tho Hmpqua, vol. 2, p. 401.
Copies seen: Astor, Bancroft, Boston Athenaeum, British Museum, Congress, Geological
Survey.
Dufosse (E.) Americana | Catalogue de
livros I relatifs a l'Ameriquo | Europe,
Asie, Afriquo | et Oceanic | [&c.thirty-
four lines] I
Librairie ancienne et moderne de E.
Dufoss6 I 27, rue Gudnegaud, 27 | pres
le Pont-neuf | Paris [1887]
Printed cover as above, no inside title, table
des divisions 11. text pp. 175-422', 8°.
Contains, passim, titles of works in various
Athapascan languages.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
This series of catalogues was begun in 1876.
Dugan (Lieut. T. B.) Numerals [1-10]
of the White Mountain Apache.
In Allen (H. T.), Report of an expedition to
the Copper, Tanana and Koyukuk rivers, p.
135, Washington, 1887, 8°.
Reprinted in other articles by Allen (H. T.),
q.v.
Dunbar: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of
the.work referred to has been seen by the compiler in the library of Mr. John B. Dunbar,
Bloomfield, N. J.
Duncan (David). American races. Compiled and abstracted by Professor Duncan, M. A.
Forms Part 6 of Spencer (H.), Descriptive
sociology, London, 1878, folio.   (Congress.)
Under the heading " Language," pp. 40-42,
there are given comments and extracts from
various authors upon native tribes, including
examples of the Chippewyan.
Some copies have the imprint New York, D.
Appleton <fc co. [n. d.]   (Powell.)
E.
Barnes: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of
the work referred to has been seen by tho compiler in the library of Mr. Wilberforce Eames,
Brooklyn, N. Y.
Eaton (Capt. J. H.) Vocabulary of the
language of the Navajo of New Mexico.
By Capt. J. H. Eaton, U. S. A.
In Schoolcraft (H. R.), Indian Tribes, vol. 4,
pp. 416-431, Philadelphia, 1854, 4°.
A vocabulary of 300 words and the numerals
J-100,000.
Elliot (Lieut. William G.)   See Bourke
(J.G.)
Ellis (Robert).    On | numerals.! as signs
of primeval unity | among mankind. |
By I Robert Ellis, B. D., | late fellow of
St. John's college, Cambridge. |
London: | Triibner&co.,57&59Lud-
gate hill. | 1873. | All rights reserved.
Half-title verso blank 1 I. title verso printer
11. contents pp. i-iii, text pp. 1-94, 8°. 30
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF THE
Ellis (R.) — Continued.
Numerals and other words in Atnah, p. 52;
Chepewyan, pp. 42,45,54; Kenay (Athabaskan),
p. 88; Slave (Great Slave Lake), pp. 5,10,11;
Tahlewah (California), pp. 5,10,24; Takulli, pp.
8,11,54; Tlatskanai, p. 88.
Copies seen: Eames.
 Peruvia   Scythica. | The | Quichua
language of Peru: | its | derivation
from central Asia with the American ]
languages in general, and with the
Turanian | and Iberian languages of
the old world, | including | the Basque,
the Lycian, and the Pre-Aryan | language of Etruria. | By | Robert Ellis,
B.D., | author of" The Asiatic affinities
of the old Italians", and late fellow | of
St. John's college, Cambridge. | [Quotation, three lines.] |
London: | Triibner & co., 57 & 59,
Ludgate hill. | 1875. | All rights reserved.
Title verso printer 11. preface pp. iii-vii, contents pp.ix-xi, errata p. [xii], text pp. 1-219,8°.
Words in Atna, pp. 78, 81, 85, 105, 117, 131;
Athabaskan, p. 120; Apatsh, pp. 105, 123;
Chepewyan, pp. 62, 81, 96, 99; Dog-Rib, p. 127;
Hoopah, p. 78; Kenay, pp. 56,78,91,104,106,117;
Kutshin, pp. 104,106; Navaho.pp. 63, 68, 83,104,
105, 106, 107, 120, 122, 130, 134; Pinalero, p. 85;
Slave, p. 105; Takulli, pp. 51, 54, 61,78, 91. 105,
127; Tlatskanai, pp. 83, 85; TJmkwa, pp. 81,83,
89,104,120.
Copies seen: British Museum, Eames, Watkinson.
 Etruscan  numerals. | By | Robert
Ellis, B. D., | late fellow of St. John's
college, Cambridge. |
London: | Triibner & co., 57 & 59,
Ludgate hill. | 1876. | (All Rights
Reserved.) | Price Two Shillings and
Sixpence.
Cover title as above, inside title (as above,
omitting the last two lines) verso printer 1 1.
remarks on pronunciation verso erratum- and
addendum 11. text pp. 1-52, 8°.
A few numerals and words in Atnah, pp. 9,
13; Hoopah, p. 9. Remarks and criticisms on
Dr. J. H. Trumbull's essay on numerals in Indian languages, pp. 12-13, note.
Copies seen: Eames.
Ellis (R.) — Continued.
 Sources | of the | Etruscan and Basque
| languages. | By | Robert Ellis, B. D.,
j late fellow of St. John's college,
Cambridge. |
London: | Triibner & co., Ludgate
hill. | 1886. | (All rights reserved.)
Title verso printers 11. prefatory notice verso
blank 1 1. contents pp. v-vii, remarks on pronunciation p. [viii], text pp. 1-166, 8°.
A few numerals and words in Atnah, pp. 13,
17; Hoopah, p. 9.
Copies seen: Eames.
Erman (Georg Adolph). Ethnographische;
.Wahrnehmungen und Erfahrungen an
den Kiisten des Berings-Meeres von A.
Erman.
In Zeitschrift fur Ethnologie, vol. 2 (1870),
pp. 295-307, 309-393; vol. 3 (1871), pp. 149-175,
205-219, Berlin [n. d.], 8°.
Numerals 1-200 and a few words of the Ttynai
oder Kenaizi, vol. 3, p. 216.
Ettunetle choh   .    .    .   Takudh.    See
M'Donald (R.)
Ettunetle tutthug   .   .   .   Takudh. See
M'Donald (R.)
Everette (Will E.) [Words, phrases, and
sentences in the language of the Tu-tu-
te-ne and nine confederated tribes of
Siletz River, Oregon.]
-Manuscript, 158 pp. 4°, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Collected December,
1882. Recorded in a copy of Powell's Introduction to the Study of Indian Languages, second
edition. " Transliterated at the request of the
Director of the Bureau of Ethnology from vol.
22 of [Everette's] Indian Languages of North
America, into the ' Bureau alphabet' at Washington, July 1, 1883, and at Fort Simcoe, Washington Ty., July 23, 1883. Completed August
20, 1883."
Almost every word, phrase, and sentence
given in the 30 schedules of the'' Introduction "
has its equivalent given in Tu-tu-tS-ne, and
nearly every schedule has explanatory notes.
On the blank pages following the schedules Mr.
Everette has given the phonetic alphabet with
notes and explanations.
Ewbank (Thomas).    See "Whipple (A.
W.), Ewbank (T.),andTurner (W.W.)
F.
Fairchild (Baldwin). See Dorsey (J. O.)
Faraone.    See Apache.
Faraud (Mgr. Henry J.)   Dix-huit ans |
chez les Sauvages | Voyages et. missions | de Me1" Henry Faraud | eveque
d/Anemour, vicaire apostolique de Mac-
Faraud (H. J.) —Continued.
kensie, | dans 1'extreme nord de l'Ame-
rique Britannique | d'apres les docu-
I   ments de Mb*" PEveque d'Anemour | par
| Femand-Michel | membre de la So-
ci6te Eduenne | Avec la biographic et
le portrait de Mgr Faraud I ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
31
Faraud (H. J.) — Continued.
Librairie catholique de Perissefreres |
(nouvelle maison) | Regis Ruffet et Cie,
successeurs | Paris | 38, rue Saint-Sul-
pice. | Bruxelles | place Sainte-Gudnle,
4. | 1866 | Droits de traduction et de reproduction r6serves.
Half-title verso blank 1 1. portrait I ]. title
verso blank 1 1. preface pp. vii-xvi, text pp.
1-447, table pp. 449-456, 8°.
Tribns sauvages, pp. 333-383, contains names
of tribes, with meanings, scattered through.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Shea.
■ Dix-huit ans | chez | les Sauvages |
Voyages et missions | dans l'extreme
nord    de   l'Amerique   Britannique |
d'apres les documents de Mgr Henry
Faraud | Eveque [&c. one line] | par
Fernand-Michel | [Design] |
Nouvelle Maison Perisse Freres de
Paris | Librairie Catholique et Classi-
que | [&c. five lines] | 1870 | Droits de
traduction et de reproduction reserve's.
Printed cover, title 11. pp. i-xix, 1-364,12°.
Linguistics, as in earlier edition titled next
ahove, pp. 260-312.
Copies seen: British Museum.
 Abridgment of the  bible in Dene*
Tchippewayan, by Mgr. Faraud, Vicar
Apostolique of Mackenzie. (*)
In a letter from Father Emile Petitot, dated
from Mareuil, France, April 24,1889, he tells me
that among the manuscripts left by him at his
last residence, St. Raphael des Tchippewayans,
Saskatchewan, was a copy, written by himself,
of the above-named work.   See Grouard (E.)
Farrar (Bev. Frederic William). Families
of speech: | four lectures | delivered
before | the Royal institution of Great
Britain | In March 1869 | by the | rev.
Frederic W. Farrar, M. A., F. R. S. |
late fellow of Trinity college [&c. four
linos.] | Published by request. |
London: | Longmans, Green, and co.
| 1870.
List of works verso blank 11. half-title verso
printers 11. title verso blank 11. dedication verso
blank 1 1. preface pp. ix-x, contents pp. xi-xiii,
list of illustrations p. xiv, text pp. 1-187, table
of the chief allophylian languages p. [188],
index pp. 189-192, two tables and two maps, 12d.
A few words in Tlatskanai, p. 178.
Copies seen: Boston Athenaeum, Congress,
Eames.
 Families of Speech: | Four Lectures
| delivered before | the Royal Institution of Great Britain | In March 1869.
| By the I Rev. Frederic W, Fwrar, D.
Farrar (F. W.) — Continued.
I)., F. R. S. |  Late Fellow [<S
lines.] | New edition. |
London: | Longmans, Green,
1873. | All rights reserved,
p. i-xi, 11.1-142, 16°.
Copies seen: British Museum.
 Language and languages. |
" Chapters on language" | and
iree
&Co.
Being |
"Fam
ilies of speech." | By the | rev. Frederic
W. Farrar, D. D. F. R. S. | late feUow
[&c. three lines.] | New edition. |
London: | Longmans, Green, and co.
| 1878. | (AU rights reserved.)
Half-title verso printers 11. title verso blank
11. preface (November 15,1877) verso quotations
11. half-title (Chapters on language) verso dedication 1 1. preface to the first edition (August,
1865) pp. ix—xii, list of illustrations verso blank
1 1. synopsis pp. xiii-xx, text pp. 1-256, books
consulted pp. 257-260, half-title (Families of
speech, etc.) verso dedication 11. preface to the
second edition (August, 1873) verso blank 1 1.
contents pp. 265-267, text pp. 269-403, table of
languages p. [404], index pp. 405-411, verso
printers, two maps and two tables, 12°.
A few Tlatskanai words, pp. 396-397.
Copies seen: Astor.
 Language and languages. | Being |
"Chapters on language" | and | "Families of speech." | By the | rev. Frederic
W. Farrar, D. D. F. R. S. | late feUow
[&c. three lines.] | New edition. |
London: | Longmans, Green, and co.
| 1887. | (All rights reserved.)
Half-title verso printers 1 1. title verso blank
11. preface (November 15,1877) verso quotations
11. half-title (Chapters on language) verso dedication 1 1. preface to the first edition (August,
1865) pp. ix-xii, synopsis pp. xiii-xx, text pp. 1-
256, books consulted pp. 257-260, half-title (Families of speech, etc.) verso dedication 11. preface
to the second edition (August, 1873) verso list
of illustrations 11. contents pp. 265-267, text pp.
269-403, table of languages p. [404], index pp.
405-411, verso printers, two maps, and two
tables, 12».
Linguistics as under the next preceding title,
pp. 396,397.
Copies seen: Eames.
Faulmann (Karl). Illustrirte | Geschichte
der Schriffc | Popular-Wissenschaftliche
Darstellung | der | Entstehung der
Schrift | der | Sprache und der Zahlen
|sowieder | Schriftsysteme aller Volker
der Erde | von [ Karl Faulmann | Professor der Stenographie [&c. two lines.]
| Mit 15 Tafeln in Farben- und Tondruck
I undvielen. in den. Text gedruckten. 32
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Faulmann (K.) — Continued.
Schriftzeichen   und   Schriftproben. |
[Printer's ornament.] |
Wien. Pest. Leipzig. | A. Hartleben's
Verlag. | 1880. | Alle Rechto vorbehal-
ten.
Half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso printers
11. preface pp. v-x, contents pp. xi-xvi, text pp.
1-632, 8°.
Schrift der Tinne-Indianer, p. 231.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Watkinson.
Featherman (A.)   Social history | of the
| races of mankind. | First division: |
Nigritians[-Third  division:   |  Aoneo-
Maranonians]. | By | A. Featherman. |
[Two lines quotation.] |
London: | Triibner & co., Ludgate
Hill. | 1885[-89].'( All rights reserved.)
3 vols. 8°.
A general discussion of a number of North
American families occurs in vol. 3, among them:
the Apaches (pp. 184-192), including, on p. 188,
a brief sketch of their grammar, with a few
examples, among them the verb to drink; Nav-
ajos, pp. 193-200; and Taculles, pp. 378-384.
Copies seen: Congress.
Field   (Thomas  Warren).   An   essay |
towards   an | Indian   bibliography. j
Being a | catalogue of books, | relating
to the | history, antiquities, languages,
customs,   religion, | wars,   literature,
and origin of the | American Indians, |
in the library of | Thomas W. Field, j
With  bibliographical and   historical
notes, and | synopses of the contents of
some of | the works least known. |
New York: | Scribner, Armstrong,
and co. | 1873.
Title verso printers 11. preface pp. iii-iv, text
pp. 1-430,8°.
Titles and descriptions of works in or relating
to Athapascan languages passim.
Copies seen: Congress, Eames, Pilling.
Field (T. W.) —- Continued.
At the Field sale, no. 688, a copy brought $4.25;
at theMenzies sale, no. 718, a "half-crushed, red
levant morocco, gilt top, uncut copy," brought
$5.50. Priced by Leclerc, 1878, 18 fr.; by Quar-
itch, no. 11996,15s.; at the Pinart sale, no. 368,
it brought 17 fr.; at the Murphy sale, no. 949,
$4.50.   Priced by Quaritch, no. 30224, XI.
 Catalogue | of the | library | belonging to | Mr. Thomas W. Field. | To be
sold at auction, | by | Bangs, Merwin
& co., | May 24th, 1875. and following
days. |
New York. | 1875.
Cover title 22 lines, title as above verso blank
1 1. notice etc. pp. iii-viii, text pp. 1-376, list of
prices pp. 377-393, supplement pp. 1-59,8°. Compiled by Joseph Sabin, mainly from Mr. Field's
Essay, title of which is given above.
Contains titles of a number of works in
various Athapascan languages.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Congress,
.Eames.
At the Squier sale, no. 1178, an uncut copy
brought $1.25.
Four gospels   .    .    .   Slave language.
See Bompas (W. C.)
Friese (Prof. Valentine).   See Arny (W.
F. M.)
Froebel   (Julius).    Aus  Amerika. | Er-
fahrungen Reisen und Studieh | von |
Julius   Froebel. | Erster     [-Zweiter]
Barid. | Zweite wohlfeile Ausgabe. |
Leipzig | Dut'scho Buchhandlung.
[1858.]
2 vols. 12°.
A short Mescalero-Apache vocabulary, vol.
2, p. 163.
Copies seen: Bancroft, British Museum.
First edition, Leipzig, 1857-1858, 2 vols. 8°. (*)
There is an English edition of this work,
London, Bentley, 1859, 8°, which does not contain the vocabtdary. (Astor, Bancroft, Boston
Athenasum, British Museum, Congress.)
Sabin's Dictionaiy, no. 25993, titles an edition
Bruxelles, 1861,3 vols. 12°.
G.
G-abelentz (Hans Georg Conor von der).
Die Sprachwissenschaft, | ihre Aufga-
ben, Methoden | und j bisherigen
Ergehnisse. | Von | Georg von der
Gabelentz. | [Vigiiettc] |
Leipzig, | T. O. Weigel nachfolger |
(Chr. Herm. Tauchnitz). | 1891.
Cover title as above, title as above verso
blank 11. Vorwort pp. iii-vii, Inhalts-Verzeich-
niss pp. viii-xx, text pp. 1-466, Register pp.
467-502, Berichtigungen p. 502,8°.
Gabelentz (H. G. C.) — Continued.
Brief discussion and a few examples of Athapascan, p. 402.
Copies seen: Gatschet.
Galice Creek Jim.   See Dorsey (J. O.)
Gallatin (Albert). A svnopsis of the
Iudiau tribes within the United States
east of the Rocky Mountains, and in tho
British and Russiau possessions in North
America.   By the Hon. Albert Gallatin. ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
33
Gallatin (A.) — Continued.
In American Antiquarian Soc. Trans. (Ar-
chreologia Americana), vol. 2, pp. 1-422, Cambridge, 1836,8°.
Subdivisions by geographic limits of the
Kinai, pp. 14-16; of the Athapascas, pp. 16-20.—
Indian languages, with grammatical examples
of the Cheppeyan, p. 170. — Grammatical
notices, Athapascas, pp. 215-216.—Cheppeyan
conjugations, p. 269.—Comparative vocabulary
of 180 words of the Kinai (from Resanoff in
Krusenstern), Tacullie (from Harmon), Cheppeyan (from M'Kenzie), pp. 307-367.—Vocabulary of 44 words of the Sussee (from TJmfre-
ville), p. 374.—Vocabulary of 13 words of the
Atnah or Chin, p. 378.
 Hale's Indians of north-west America, and vocabularies of North America;
with an introduction. By Albert Gallatin.
In American Eth. Soc. Trans, vol. 2, pp. xxiii-
clxxxviii, 1-130, New York, 1848,8°.
Brief reference to the Athapascas, their habitat, etc., p. ci.—The Tahkali-TJmkwa family
(general discussion), pp. 9-10.—Vocabulary of
180 words of the Tahculi (from Anderson), pp.
78-82.—Vocabulary of 60 words of the Kenai
(from Resanoff), pp. 99-101.—Vocabulary of the
Cheppeyan, Tlatskani, and TJmkwa (50 words
and numerals 1-10 each), p. 105.
 Table of generic Indian families of
languages.
In Schoolcraft (H. R.), Indian Tribes, vol. 3,
pp. 397-402, Philadelphia, 1853,4<>.
Includes the Athapascans, p. 401.
Albert Gallatin was born in Geneva, Switzerland, January 29,1761, and died in Astoria, L. I.,
August 12,1849. He was descended from an an-
cientpatricianfamily of Geneva, whose name had
long been honorably connected with the history
of Switz%riand. Young Albert had been baptized by the name of Abraham Alfonse Albert.
In 1773 he was sent to a boarding school, and a
year later entered the University of Geneva,
where he was graduated in 1779. He sailed from
L'Orient late in May, 1780, and reached Boston
on July 14. He entered Congress onDecember7,
1795, and continued a member of that body until
his appointment as Secretary of tho Treasury in
1801, which office he held continuously until 1813.
His services were rewarded with the appointment of minister to France in February, 1815;
he entered on the duties of this office in January, 1816. Inl826, at the solicitation of President
Adams, he accepted the appointment of envoy
extraordinary to Great Britain. On his return to
the United States he settled in New York City,
where, from 1831'till 1839, he was president of the
National Bank of New York. In 1842 he was
associated in the establishment of the American
Ethnological Society, becoming its first president, and in 1843 he was elected to hold a similar office in the New York Historical Society, an
honor which was annually conferred on him
until hisdeath.—Appleton's Cyclop, of Am.Biog.
ATH-—3
Garrioch (Bev. Alfred Campbell). The
gospel according to | St. Mark, | translated into the | Beaver Indian language | by | the rev. A. C. Garrioch, |
missionary of the Church missionary
society. |
London: | British and Foreign Bible
Society. | 1886
Title verso blank 11. text entirely in the Beaver language (roman characters) pp. 3-79, colophon p. [80], 16°.
Copies seen: British and Foreign Bible Society, Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
Issued also in syllabic characters as follows:
 [Oneline syllabic characters.] [ The
gospel | according to | St. Mark. |
Translated by the | Rev. Alfred ('.
Garrioch, | missionary of the Church
missionary society, | into the | language of the Beaver Indians, | of the
diocese of Athabasca. | [Seal of the
S. P. C. K.] |
London: | Society for promoting
christian knowledge, | Northumberland avenue, Charing cross, W. C.
[1886.]
Frontispiece 11. title verso printers 11. sylla-
barium verso blank 1 1. supplementary syllaba-
rium verso blank 1 1. text (entirely in syllabic
characters) pp. 1-47, sq. 16°.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, Wellesley,
 Manual of devotion I in the I Beaver
Indian language. | By the | Rev. Alfred
C. Garrioch, | missionary of the Church
missionary society. | [Seal of the S. P.
C.K.]|
London: | Society   for    promoting
christian    knowledge, | Northumberland avenue, Charing cross, W. C. |
1886.
Frontispiece 11. title verso printers 11. sylla-
barium verso blank 11. supplementary syllaba-
rium verso blank 11. text (in syllabic characters,
with some headings in English and Latin) pp.
1-87,16°.
Order for morning prayer, pp. 1-23.—Order
for evening prayer, pp. 24-39.—Prayers, etc.,
pp. 40-52.—Watts's first catechism, pp. 53-57.—
Grace, ten commandments, prayers, etc., pp.
57-62.—Hymns, pp. 63-74.—Selections from
scripture, pp. 75-87.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, Wellesley.
See Bompas (W. C.) for other editions of this
work.
— A | Vocabulary | of the | -Beaver
Indian Language- | consisting of | Part
I   Beaver-English I Part   H   English- 34
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
(jlaj.rioch (A. C.) — Continued.
Beaver-Cree- | By the Rev. A. C. Garrioch | Missionary of the | Church Missionary Society- |
Society   for    Promoting   Christian
Knowledge. 1 London. Northumberland
Avenue.! Cyclostyledby | E. S. Brewer.
| Printed by Mrs Garrioch   [1885]
Title verso blank 11. text (on one side of the
leaf only) 11. I  ".38,;4°,
Part I Beaver-English (alphabetically arranged by Beaver words in double columns), 11.
1_64.—Part II English and Beavor [sic] [and
Cree] (alphabetically arranged by English
words, in triple columns), 11.65-138.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge.
The original manuscript of this work is in
the possession of its author. Fifty copies of the
work were printed from the copy made with the
cyclostyle by Mr. Brewer, an employe of the
society.
Mr. Garrioch, of St. Xavier's Mission, Fort
Dunvegan, Peace River, was bom in St. Paul's
Parish, Red River Settlement, or Manitoba, Feb.
10,1848, and is of Scotch and English parentage.
He was for three years a student at St. John's
College, Winnipeg, and in 1874 was engaged as
schoolmaster by Bishop Bompas for the Church
Missionary Society. The winter of 1875-76 he
spent in study with the bishop at Fort Simpson, McKenzie River, and was admitted to deacon's orders, and in the autumn of 1876 he
established a Church Missionary Society station
at Fort Vermilion under the name of TJnjaga
Mission. Mr. Garrioch subsequently visited
Canada and England, where he saw his translations printed; but in the spring of 1886 ho
returned to mission work among the Beavers of
Peace River, but at Dunvegan instead of Vermilion.
Gatschet: This word following a title or within
parentheses after anote indicates that a copy of
the work referred to has been seen by the compiler in the library of Mr. Albert S. Gatschet,
Washington, D. C.
Gatschet (Albert Samuel). Zwolf
Sprachen | aus dem | Siidwesten Nord-
amerikas | (Pueblos- und • Apache-
Mundarten; Tonto,Toukawa, | Digger,
Utah.) | Wortverzeichnisse | heraus-
gegeben, erlautert und mit einer Ein-
leitung uber Bau, | Begriffsbildung
und locale Gruppirung der amerikan-
ischen | Sprachen vcrsehen | von |
Albert S. Gatschet. | [Vignette.] |
Weimar | Hermann Bohlan | 1876.
Cover title as above, title as above verso note
1 1. Vorwort pp. iii-iv. Inhalt p. v, Einleitung
pp. 1-3, Lautbezeichnung p. 4, Literatur pp. 5-
6, text pp. 7-148, illustrations pp. 149-150, large
8°.
Gatschet (A. S.) — Continued.
Die Sprachen des Siidwestens (pp. 37-86) contains Apache and Navajo examples on pp. 39,
40, 52, 55, 59, 62; general discussion of the
Apache, linguistic divisions, etc., with comparison of Apache and Navajo words with those
of the Zufii, Kiowa, Comanche, and Shoshone,
pp. 62-69; Tinne (Apache, Navajo, Hoopa,
and Taculli) words, p. 79.—Sammlung von Wor-
tern und Satzen (pp. 87-91) contains a short I
Apache vocabulary and one of the Navajo, p.
88; an Apache vocabulary (from White and
Henry), p. 88-89.—Auswahl von Satzen aus den
Sprachen der Tehuas, Apaches, Tonkawas und
Acomas (pp. 91-95) contains 20 phrases in
Apache (from Laew).—Worttabellen dor zwolf
"Sprachen und Dialecte (pp. 97-115) contains a
vocabulary of 200 words of the Apache (from
Loew), Navajo (from Loew), and-Apache (from
White).—Anmerkungen zu den Worttabellen
(pp. 117-138) contains comments upon the various vocabularies.—Zahlworter (pp. 130-143) contains the numerals 1-10 of the Navajo (from
Eaton) and Hoopa (from Schoolcraft).
Copies seen: Astor, Brinton, British Museum,
Eames, Gatschet, Pilling, Trumbull,Wellesley.
  Indian   languages   of   the   Pacific
states and territories.
In Magazine of American History, vol. 1,
pp. 145-171, New York, 1877,4°.  (Congress.) \.
A general discussion, with examples passim.
The Tinne family,with its linguistic divisions,
the Hoopa, Rogue River, and Umpqua, is
treated on pp. 165-166.
Issued separately as follows:
 Indian  languages | of  the j Pacific
states and territories | by | Albert S.
Gatschet | Reprinted from March Number of The Magazine of American History.
[New York, 1877.]
Half-title verso blank 11. text pp. 145-171,4°.
Copies seen.- Astor, Congress, Eames, Pilling,
Wellesley.
Reprinted in the following:
Beach (W.W.), Indian Miscellany, pp. 416-
447, Albany, 1877,8°.
Drake (S. G.), Aboriginal Races of North
America, pp. 748-763, New York [1880], 8°.
A later article, with the same title, appeared
in the April, 1882, number of the same periodical, and was also issued separately. It contains no Athapascan linguistics,
— U. S. geographical surveys west of
the one hundredth meridian, 1st Lieut.
Geo. M. Wheeler, Corps of Engineers,
U. S. Army, in Charge. Appendix.
Linguistics. Prefaced by a classification
of western Indian languages. By Albert
S. Gatschet.
In Wheeler (G. M.), Report upon U. S. Geographical Surveys, vol. 7, pp. 399-485, Washington, 1879,4°. ATHAPASCAN  LANGUAGES.
35
Gatschet (A. S.) — Continued.
Areas and dialects of the seven linguistic
stocks (pp. 406-421), ombraces the Tinne, pp.
406-408.—General remarks, pp. 467-485.
Gilbert (G. K.), Vocabulary of tho Arivaipa,
pp. 424-465.
Loew (0.), Vocabulary of the Arivai'pa, pp.
468-469.
— Vocabulary of fclio Navajo, pp. 424-465,
469.
Yarrow (H. C), Vocabulary of the Jicarilla,
pp. 424-465,469-470.
 Apache-Tiime language. | Dialect of
the Na-isha band. | Collected at Kiowa,
Apache and Comanche Agency, [ Ana-
darko, Ind. Territory, | in Nov. and
Dec. 1884 | by | Albert S. Gatschet.
Manuscript, pp. 1-74, sm. 4°, in the library of
the Bureau of Ethnology.
Consists of words, phrases, and short texts
with interlinear translation into English.
• Lipan, | a   dialect of the Apache-
Tinn6 family | collected • at | Fort
Griffin, Texas, (Shackleford county),
from Apache John, a Mexican | and
Louis, a scout. | By Albert S. Gatschet
* | September, 1884.
Manuscript, pp. 1-69, sm, 4°. in the library of
the Bureau of Ethnology.
Consists of words, phrases, and sentences,
tribal and clan names, and short stories, all
accompanied by an English translation.
This manuscript has been partially copied by
Mr. Gatschet into a copy of Powell's Introduction to the Study of Indian Languages, second
edition.
 Terms, phrases and sentences | from
Apache dialects | gathered from various
informants | by | Albert S. Gatschet.
Manuscript, pp. 3-19, sm. 4°, in the library of
the Bureau of Ethnology.
Tribal names and other terms of the Chiracahua Apaches, obtained from delegates visiting
Washington, Feb. 12, 1881, pp. 5-6. —Short
vocabulary of the Tsigakina dialect, pp. 7-8.—
Sentences and words in the Navajo dialect,
obtained from F. H. Cashing, 1882, pp. 9-12.—
Navajo terms obtained from the ioterpreter of
a Navajo delegation present in Washington in
March, 1885, pp. 14-16.^-Some words of Jicarilla
Apache, from Eskie, an Apacho in Washington,
Jan. 1884, pp. 18-19.
 Vocabulary of the Navajo language.
Manuscript, 2 leaves, folio (a blank book),
in possession of. its compiler. Obtained from
Mr. Frank H. Cushing in 1884.
Consists of 10 words and 50 phrases.
 [Words, phrases, and sentences in
the Umpkwa language.]
Manuscript, 22 11. 4°, in the library of tho
Bureau of Ethnology.   Recorded in a copy of
Gatschet (A. S.) — Continued.
Introduction to the Study of Indian Languages,
first edition. Collected at Grande Ronde
Agency, Oregon, in 1877.
 [Words, phrases, and sentences in
the language of the Pinal Apache.]
Manuscript, pp. 3-108, sm. 4°, in possession
of its compiler. Collected from Na-ki, an
Apache whose English name is Robt. Mcintosh,
a student at Hampton, Va., in August,' 1883.
Contains also a number of texts wit li interlinear English translation.
Albort Samuel Gatschet was born in St. Beat-
enborg, in the Bernese Oberland, Switzerland,
October 3,1832. His propedeutic education was
acquired in the lyceums of Nenchatel (1843-1845)
and of Berne (1846-1852), after which he followed
courses in the universities of Berne and Berlin
(1852-1858). His studies had for their object the
ancient world in all its phases of religion, history, language, and art, and thereby his attention was at an early day directed to philologic
researches. In 1865 he began the publication of
a series of brief monographs on the local etymology of his country, entitled " Ortsetymolo-
gische Forschungen aus der Schweiz " (1865-
1867). In 1867 lie spent several months in London
pursuing antiquarian studies in the British
Museum. In 1868 he settled in New York and
became a contributor to various domestic and
foreign periodicals, mainly on scientific subjects. Drifting into a more attentive study of
the American Indians, he published several
compositions upon their languages, the most
important of which is " Zwolf Sprachen aus
dem Siidwesten Nordamerikas," Weimar, 1876.
This led to his appointment fo tho position
of ethnologist in the United States Geological
Survey, under Maj. John W. Powoll, in March,
1877, when he removed to Washington, and first
employed himself in arranging the linguistic
manuscripts of the Smithsonian Institution,
now the property of the Bureau of Ethnology,
which forms a part of the Smithsonian Institution, Mr. Gatschet has ever since been actively
connected with that bureau. To increase its
linguistic collections and to extend his own
studies of the Indian languages, he has made
extensive trips of linguistic and ethnologic exploration among the Indians of North America.
After returning from a six months' sojourn
among the Klamaths and Kalapuyas of Oregon,
settled on both sides of the Cascade Range, he
visited the Kataba in South Carolina and the
Cha'hta and Shetimasha of Louisiana in
1881-82, the Kayo we, Comanche, Apache, Yat-
tassee, Caddo, Naktche, Modoc, and other tribes
in the Indian Territory, the Tonkawe and
Lipans, in Texas, and the Atakapa Indians of
Louisiana in 1884-'85. In 1886 he saw the
Tlaskaltecs at Saltillo, Mexico, a remnant of the
Namia race, brought there about 1575 from
Anahuac, and was the first to discover the
affinity of tho Biloxi language with the Siouan
family. He also committed to writing the
Tunixka or Tonicalanguage of Louisiana, never 36
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF  THE
Gatschet (A. S.) — Continued.
before investigated, and forming a linguistic
family of itself. Excursions to other parts of
the country brought to his knowledge other
Indian languages, the Tuskarora, Caughna-
waga, Penobscot, and Karankawa.
Mr. Gatschet has written an extensive report
embodying his researches among the Klamath
Lake and Modoc Indians of Oregon, which
forms Vol. LT of "Contributions to North
American Ethnology." It is in two parts,
which aggregate 1,528 pages. Among the tribes
and languages discussed by him in separate
publications are the Timucna (Florida), Tori-
kawe (Texa8),Yuma (California, Arizona, Mexico), Churaoto (California), Beothuk (Newfoundland), Creek and II itch it i (Alabama). His
numerous publications are scattered through
magazines and government reports, some being
contained in the Proceedings of the American
Philosophical Society, Philadelphia.
General discussion:
Ahtinne See Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Apache Adelung (J. C.) and Vater
(J. S.)
Apache Bancroft (H. H.)
Apache Berghaus (H.)
Apache Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Apache Cremony (J. C.)
Apache J6han (L. F.)
Apache Orozco y Berra (M.)
Apache Pimentel (F.)
Apache Smart (C.)
Apache White (J. B.)
Athapascan Bastian (P. W. A.)
Athapascan Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Athapascani Campbell (J.)
Athapascan Gabelentz (H. G. C.)
Athapascan Keane (A. H.)
Athapascan Scouler (J.)
Athapascan Trumbull (J. H.)
Chippewyan Adelung (J. C.) and Vater
(J. S.)
Chippewyan Duncan (D.)
Chippewyan Tacho (A. A.)
Hupa Gatschet (AS.)
Hupa Gibbs (G.)
Hupa Powers (S.)
Inkalik Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Kenai Adelung (J. C.) and Vater
(J. S.)
Kenai Balbi (A.)
Kenai Bancroft (H. H.)
Kenai Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Kutchin Bancroft (H. H.)
Nabiltse Gibbs (G.)
Navajo Adelung (J. C.) and Vater
(J. S.)
Navajo Bancroft (H. H.)
Navajo Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Snrsoe Balbi (A.)
Taciilli Balbi (A.)
Tacnlli Bancroft (H.H.)
Tahlewah Gibbs (G.)
Tinne Bancroft (H. H.)
Tinne Bompas (W, C.)
General discussion — Continued.
See Brinton (D. G.)
Faulmann (K.)
Bompas (W. C.)
Gallatin (A.)
Gatschet (A. S.)
See Bonrke (J. G.)
Matthews (W.)
Hale (H.)
Hale (H.)
Tinne
Tinne
Tukudh
Umpkwa
Umpkwa
Gentes:
Apache
Navajo
Taculli
Upmkwa
Geographic names:
Athapascan      See Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
Geological Survey: These words following a title
or within parentheses after a note indicate that
a copy of the work referred to has been seen by
the compiler in the library of the United States
Geological Survey, Washington, D. C.
Gibbs (George). Observations on some of
the Indian Dialects of Northern California.   By G. Gibbs.
In Schoolcraft (H. I!.), Indian Tribes, vol. 3,
pp. 420-423, Philadelphia, 1853, 4°.
Includes brief remarks on the Hoopah, Tahlewah, and Nabiltse.
 Vocabularies of Indian Languages
in northwest California. By George
Gibbs, esq.
In Schoolcraft (H. R.), Indian Tribes, vol. 3,
pp. 428-445, Philadelphia. 1853, 4°.
Among these vocabularies are one of the
Hoopah and one of the Tahlewah, pp. 440-445.
 Notes on the Tinneh or Chepewyan
Indians of British and Russian America.   Communicated by George Gibbs.
In the Smithsonian Inst. Annual Report for
1866, pp. 303-327. Washington, 1867, 8°. (Pilling.)
The Louchenx Indians (pp. 311-320). based
upon communications from W. L. Hardest}-, of
the Hudson's Bay Co., contains a number of
Loucheux words on p. 315.
Issued separately also, without change.
(Eames, Pilling.)
 .Vocabularies of the | Alekwa | Arra
Arra & \ Ho-pa | of the Klamath and
Trinity Rivers | Northern California I
Collected in 1852 | by | George Gibbs.
Manuscript, 26 unnumbered leaves, written
on one side only, folio, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology.
Arranged alphabetically by English words in
four columns, the English column containing
about 700 words, the other languages from 300
to 500 words each, the Ho-pa (which is the only
one belonging to the Athapascan family) being
the most incomplete.
There are in the same library two partial
copies (180 words each) of the Hopa, made by
Dr. Gibbs, including only the words given in
the early issues of the Smithsonian Institution
" standard vocabulary." ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
37
Gibbs (G.) — Continued.
 Vocabulary of the Nabiltse language.
Manuscript, 1 loaf, 4°, in the library of tho
Bureau of Ethnology.
Contains about 100 words.
 Vocabulary of the Willopah (dialect
of the Tahcully Athabasca).
Manuscript, 6 unnumbered leaves, folio, in
the library of the Bureau of Ethnology. Collected "from an Indian at S. S. Ford's, Feb.
1856."
Includes the 180 words given in the standard
schedule issued by the Smithsonian Institution and about 20 words in addition.
George Gibbs, the son of Col. George Gibbs,
was horn on the 17th of Jnly, 1815, at Suns wick,
Long Island, near the village of Halletts Cove,
now known as Astoria. At seventeen he was
taken to Europe, where he remained two years.
On his return from Europe he commenced the
reading of law, and in 1838 took his degree
of bachelor of law at Harvard University. In
1848 Mr. Gibbs went overland from St. Louis to
Oregon and established himself at Columbia.
In 1854 he received the appointment of collector
of the port of Astoria, which he held during Mr.
Fillmore's administration. Later he removed
from Oregon to Washington Territory, and settled upon a ranch a few miles from Fort Steila-
coom. Here he had his headquarters*for several
. years, devoting himself to the study of the.In-
dian languages and to the collection of vocabularies and traditions of the northwestern tribes.
During a great part of the time he was attached
to the United States Government Commission
in laying.the boundary, as the geologist and botanist of the expedition. He was also attached
as geologist to the survey of a railroad route to
the Pacific, under Major Stevens. In 1857 he
was appointed to the northwest boundary survey under Mr. Archibald Campbell, as commissioner. In 1860 Mr. Gibbs returned to New
York, and in 1861 was on duty in Washington
in guarding the Capitol. Later he resided in
Washington, being mainly employed in the
Hudson Bay Claims Commission, to which he
was secretary. He was also engaged in the
arrangement of a large mass of manuscript
bearing upon the ethnology and philology of the
American Indians. His services were availed
of by the Smithsonian Institution to superintend its labors in this field, and to his energy and
complete knowledge of the subject it greatly
owes its success in this branch of the service.
The valuable and laborious service which he
rendered to the Institution was entirely gratuitous, and in his death that establishment as
well as the cause of science lost an ardent friend
and important contributor to its advancement.
In 1871 Mr. Gibbs married his cousin, Miss
Mary K. Gibbs, of Newport, R. I., and removed
to New Haven, where he died on the 9th of
April, 1873.
Gilbert (Grove Karl). Vocabulary of the
Arivaipa language.
Gilbert (G. K.) — Continued.
In Wheeler (G. M.), Report upon U. S. Geog.
Surveys,vol. 7, pp. 424-165, Washington,1879,4°.
Collected at Camp Grant, Arizona, December,
1871.   It contains 211 words.
Gilbert (—) and Rivington (—). Specimens | of the | Languages of all Nations, | and the | oriental and foreign
types | now in use in | the printing
offices | of | Gilbert & Rivington, |
limited. | [Eleven lines quotations.] |
London: | 52, St. John's square,
Clerkenwell, E. C. | 1886.
Printed cover as above, no inside title, contents pp. 3-4, text pp. 5-66, 16°.
St. John iii, 16, in Slav6 of Mackenzie River
(syllabic and roman), p. 58; Tinne or Chepewyan of Hudson Bay (syllabic), p. 62; Tukudh
of Youkon River, p. 64.
The so-called Tinn6 specimen in roman characters on p. 63 is really Chippewa.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
Gospel according to Saint John . . .
Tinne* language.    See Kirkby (W. W.)
Gospel of St. Mark translated into the
Slave' language.   See Reeve (W. D.)
Gospel of St.Matthew translated into the
Slave language.   See Reeve (W. D.)
Gospels of the four evangelists . . .
in the language of the Chipewyan Indians.   See Kirkby (W. W.)
Government George. See Dorsey (J. O.)
Grammar:
Dene See Morice (A. G.)
Montagnais Logoff (L.)
Montagnais Vegr6ville (V. T.)
Navajo Matthews (W.)
Grammatic comments:
Apache See Featherman (A.)
Apache Miiller (F.)
Apache White (J. B.)
Athapascan Dorsey (J. O.)
Athapascan Gallatin (A.)
Athapascan Grasserie (R. dela).
■ Chippewyan Gallatin (A.)
Chippewyan Grandin (—).
Dene Morice (A. G.)
Kenai Miiller (F.)
Kenai Radloff (L.)
Loucheux Miiller (F.)
Navajo Featherman (A.)
Navajo Miiller (F.)
Navajo Wilson (E. F.)
Peau de Lievre       Miiller (F.)
Sursee Wilson (E. F.)
Taculli Miiller (F.)
Tlatskenai Miiller (F.)
Umpkwa Miiller (F.)
Grammatic treatise:
Apache See Bancroft (H. H.)
Apache Cremony (J. C.) . 38
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
Grammatic treatise — Continued.
Chippewyan     See Bancroft (H. H.)
Dene Petitot (E.F. S. J.)
Loiieheux Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
Montagnais Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
Pean de Lievro       Petitot (E. F. S. J.'
Grandin (Bishop —). Some forms of
the Chipewyan verb.
Manuscript, 4 unnumbered leaves, written
on one side only, folio, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology.
Contains the indicative present, future, and
past of the verbs to eat, to walk, and to look.
This manuscript is a copy made by Dr. Geo.
Gibbs.
Grasserie (Raoul de la). Etudes de
granxmaire comparee. | De la conju-
gaison objective | par | Raoul de la
Grasserie, | docteur en droit, juge au
tribunal de Rennes, | membre de la
societe de liuguistique de Paris. | (Ex-
trait des Memo ires de la Socie*te* do
liuguistique, t. VI, 4e fascicule.) | [Design.] |
Paris. | Imprimerie nationale. | M
DCCC LXXXVIII [1888].
Printed cover as above, half-title reverse
blank 1 1. title as above reverse blank 1 1. text,
pp. 5-39, 8°.
In chapter 3 the conjugation "objective
polysynthetique" is illustrated by examples
from a nnmber of American languages, among
them the Athapascan.
Copies seen.- Gatschet, Powell.
 Etudes | de | grammaire compared |
Des relations grammaticales | cousid6-
ree3 dans leur concept et dans leur expression | ou de la | categorie des cas |
par | Raoul de la Grasserie | docteur en
Grasserie (R. de la)—Conlinued.
droit | Juge au Tribunal de Rennes |
Membre de la Soci6tc de Liuguistique
de Paris. |
Paris I Jean Maisouneuve, 6diteur |
25, quai Voltaire, | 25 | 1890
Printed cover as above, half-title verso blank
1 1. title as above verso blank 1 1. dedication
verso blank 1 1. text pp. 1-344, contents pp. 315-
351, 8°.
Examples from several North American languages are made use of by tho author: Nahuatl,
Dakota, Othomi, Maya, Quiche, Totonaque,
Tcherokess, Algonquin, Tarasque, Esquimau, .
Iroquois, Athapaske, Chiapaneque, Sahaptin,
Tchinuk, Choctaw, pp. 17,68,09, 70, 7"l, 72, 73, 74,
84,129-132, 133, 177, 325-326, 394, 395.
Copies seen.- Gatschet.
Grouard (Pere Emile).    Abridgment of
the bible in the Dene" Tehippewyan
language, syllabic characters.       (*)
In aletter from the Rev. Emile Petitot, dated
from Mareuil, France, Apr. 24, 1889, he tells me
that among the manuscripts left by him at his
last residence, St. Raphael des Tcheppewayans,
Saskatechewan, was a copy of the above work.
Whether the original was in manuscript or in
printed form he failed to inform me. In answer
to further inquiries on the subject, Father
Petitot wrote me under date of Jnne 1, 1891:
" Referring to your questions, I reiterate that
the abridgmsnt of the bible, a copy of which
was left by me at St. Raphael Mission, is the
wiSfk of Mgr. Faraud [q. v.], made while he was
a "Simple missionary at Athabasca, before my
arrival in the missions of tho far north in 1862.
The same work was printed .in Indian characters by Pero Grouard at Lac la Biche in 187S-'79,'
as well as a new and more complete edition
of the Den6-Tehippewyan prayer book, another
intended for the Dendjie, a third intended for
the Cree."
H.
Haines (Elijah Middlebrook). The |
American Indian | (Uh-nish-in-na-ba).
| The Whole Subject Complete in One
Volume | Illustrated with Numerous
Appropriate Engravings. | By Elijah
M. Haines. | [Design.] |
Chicago: | the Mas-sin-na-gau company, | 1888.
Title verso copyright notice etc. 1 1. preface
pp. yii-viii, contents and list of illustrations
pp. 9-22, text pp. 23-821, large 8°.
Chapter vi, Indian tribes, pp. 121-171, gives
special lists and a general alphabetic list of
the tribes of North America, derivations of
tribal names being sometimes given.—Numerals 1-102 of tho Navajo (from Catlin), p. 443; of
the Apache, pp. 444-445.—Numerals 1-10 of the I
Haines (E. M.) — Continued.
Chippewyan (four sots, one '" from a German
interpreter," one " fromMcKenzio," one "from
a woman, a native of Churchill.'' and one
" from a Chippewyan "-)', p. 450.
Copies seen : Congress, Eames, Pilling.
Haldeman (Samuel Stehman). Analytic
orthography: | an | investigation of
tho sounds of the voice, | and their |
alphabetic notation; | including | the
mechanism of speech, | and its bearing
upon | etymology. | By | S. S. Haldeman, A. M., | professor in Delaware
college; | member [&:c. six lines.] |
Philadelphia : | J. B. Lippincott&co.
I London: Triibner & co. Paris: Ben- ATHAPASCAN  LANGUAGES.
39
Haldeman (S. S.) —Continued,
jam in  Duprat. | Berlin:  Ferd. Diiinm-
ler. | 1860.
Half-title "Trovelyau prize essay" verso
blank 1 1. title verso blank 11. preface pp. v-vi,
• contents pp. vii-viii, slip of additional corrections, text pp. 5-147, corrections and additions
p. 148, 4°.
f Numerals 1-10 of the Apache, p. 146.
Copies seen: Boston Athenaeum, British Museum, Bureau of Ethnology, Eames, Trumbull.
First printed in American Philosoph. Soc.
Trans, new series, vol. 11.   (*)
Samuel Stelunan Haldeman, naturalist, was
born in Locust Grove, Lancaster County, Pa.,
August 12,1812; died in Chickics,Pa.,September
10, 1880. He was educated at a classical school
in Harrisburg, and then spent two years in
Dickinson College. In 1836 Henry D. Rogers,
having been appointed state geologist of New
Jersey, sent for Mr. Haldeman, who had been
his pupil at Dickinson, to assist him. A year
later, on the reorganization of the Pennsylvania
geological survey, Haldeman was transferred
to his own state, and was actively engaged on
the survey until 1842. Ho made extensive
researches among Indian dialects, and also in
Pennsylvania Dutch, besides investigations in
the English.Chinese, and other languages.—Ap-
pleton's Cyclop, of Am. Biog.
Hale (Horatio). United States | exploring expedition. | During the years |
1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842. | Under the
command of | Charles Wilkes, U. S. N.
| Vol. VI. | Ethnography and philology. | By | Horatio Halo, | philologist
of the expedition. |
Philadelphia: | printed by C. Sherman. | 1846.
Half-title '' United States exploring expedition, by authority of Congress " verso blank 11.
title verso blank 1 1. contents pp. v-vii, alphabet pp. ix—xii, half-title verso blank 11. text pp.
3-666, map, 4°.
General remarks on the Tahkali-Umkwa
family, including a list of clans, pp. 201-204.—
Vocabularies of the Tlatskanai (Tlatskanai and
Kwalhioqua) and Umkwa (Umpqua), lines B,
C, pp. 570-629.
Anderson (A. CM, Vocabulary of the Tahkali
(Carriers), line A, pp. 570-629.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Congress, Lenox, Trumbull.
At the Squier sale, no. 446, a copy brought
$13; at the Murphy sale, no. 1123, half maroon
morocco, top edge gilt, $13.
Issued also with the following title:
 United States | exploring expedition. | During the years | 1838, 1839,
1840, 1841, 1842. | Under tho command
of | Charles Wilkes, U. S. N. | Ethuog-
Hale(Il.       I
raphy and
mtiuued.
philology.
By
Hide. I philologist of the expedition. |
Philadelphia-: | Lea and Blanchard.
| 1816.
• Half-title " United States exploring expedition " verso blauk 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. contents pp. v-vii, alphabet pp. ix-xii, half-title
verso blank 11. text pp. 3-666, map, 4°.
Linguistic contents as under titlt, next ahove.
Copies seen: Eames, Lenox.
 Was America peopled from Polynesia?
In Congres Int. des Americanistes, Compte-
rendu, 7th session, pp. 375-387, Berlin, 1890, 8°.
Table of the pronouns I, thou, we (inc.), we
(oxc), ye, and they in the languages of Polynesia
and of western America, pp. 386-387, includes
tho Tinne.
Issued separately as follows:
 Was America peopled from Polynesia ? | A study in comparative Philology- I By | Horatio Hale. | Prom the
Proceedings of the International Congress of Americanists | at Berlin, in
October 1888. |
Berlin 1890. | Printed by H. S. Hermann.
Title verso blank 11. text pp. 3-15,8°.
Pronouns in the languages of Polynesia and
of western America, including the Tinne, p. 14.
Copies seen: Pilling, Wellesley.
Horatio Hale, ethnologist, born in Newport,
N. H., May 3,1817, was graduated at Harvard in
1837,and was appointed in the same year philologist to the United States exploring expedition
under Capt. Charles Wilkes. In this capacity
he studied a large number of the languages of
the Pacific islands, as well as of North and
South America, Australia, and Africa, and also
investigated the history, traditions, and customs
of the tribes speaking those languages. The
results of his inquiries are given in his " Ethnography and Philology" (Philadelphia, 1846),
which forms the seventh volume of the expedition .reports. He has published numerous
memoirs on anthropology and ethnology, is a
member of many learned societies both in
Europe and in America, and in 1886 was vice
president of the American Association for the
Advancement of Science, presiding over the
section of anthropology.—Appleton's Cyclop, of
Am. Biog.
Hamilton (Alexander S.)   .Vocabulary
of the Haynarger.
Manuscript, 5 unnumbered leaves, folio,
written on both sides the sheets, in the library
of the Bureau of Ethnology. Sent to the Smithsonian Institution by its compiler from Crescent
City, Cal., Nov., 1856. Recorded on one of the
Smithsonian forms of 180 words, with an added
leaf, the whole comprising about 220 words and
phrases. re
40
BIBLIOGKAPHY   OF   THE
Hamilton (A. S.) — Continued.
The same library has two copies of the original manuscript, made by Dr. Geo. Gibbs.
Hare Indians.   See Peau de Lievre.
Harmon (Daniel Williams).   A | journal
| of | voyages and travels | in the |
interiour of North America, | between
the 47th and 58th degrees of north latitude, extend- ing from Montreal nearly
to the Pacific ocean, a distance | of
about 5,000 miles, including an accouut
of the prin- | cipal occurrences, during
a residence of nineteen | years, in different parts of the country. | To which are
added, | a concise description of the face
of the country, its inhabitants, | their
manners, customs, laws, religion, etc.
and considera-1 ble specimens of the two
languages, most extensively | spoken;
together with an account of the princi-
| pal animals, to be found in the forests
and | prairies of this extensive region.
| Illustrated by a map of the country.
| By   Daniel   Williams   Harmon, | a
partner in the north west company." |
Andover: | printed   by   Plagg   and
Gould. | 1820.
Half-title verso blank 1 1. portrait 1 1. title
verso copyright 1 1. preface pp. v-xxiii, text
pp. 25-432, map, 8°.
A specimen of the Tacully or Carrier tongue
(a vocabulary of 280 words), pp. 403-412.—The
- numerical terms of the Tacullies (1-1000), p. 413.
Extracts from the linguistic portion of this
volume are given by many authors.
Copies seen: Astor, Bancroft, Boston Athenaeum, British Museum, Congress, Dunbar,
Eames, Geological Survey.
At the Field sale, no. 908, a half-morocco copy
brought $3.50; at the Brinley sale, no. 4685,
$5.25; at the Murphy sale, no. 1146, $2.25.
Harvard: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy
of the work referred to has been seen by the
compiler in the library of Harvard University,
Cambridge, Mass.
Haynarger.    See Henagi.
Hazen (Gen. William Babcock). Vocabulary of the Indians of Applegate
creek (Na;bilt-se).
Manuscript, 6 unnumbered leaves, folio,
■written on one side only, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Forwarded by its compiler to Dr. Geo. Gibbs, from Ft. Yamhill, Oregon, Jan. 10,1857.
Recorded on one of the Smithsonian forms of
180 words, all the blank spaces being filled.
William Babcock Hazen, soldier, born in
West Hartford, Vt., September 27, 1830,   died
Hazen (W. B.) —Continued.
in Washington, D. C, January 16, 1887. He
was a descendant of Moses Hazen. His
parents removed to Ohio in 1833. William was
graduated at the U. S. Military Academy in
1855, and after serving against the Indians in
California and Oregon joined the 8th Infantry
in Texas in 1857. He commanded successfully
in five engagements, until, in December, 1859, he
was severely wounded in a personal encounter
with the Comanehes. He was appointed
assistant professor of infantry tactics at the
U. S. Military Academy in February, 1861, 1st
lieutenant, April 6, and promoted captain on
May 14. In the autumn of 1861 he raised the
41st Ohio volunteers, of which he became
colonel on Oct. 29,1861. He was appointed brigadier-general of volunteers Nov. 29, 1862. He
assaulted and captured Fort McAllister, Dec.
13, 1864, for which service he was promoted a
major-general of volunteers the same day. ■ He
was in command of the 15th army corps from
May 19 till Aug. 1,1865. At the end of the war
he had received all the brevets in the regular
army up to major-general. He was made
colonel of the 38th infantry in 1866; was in
France during the Franco-Prussian war, and
was U. S. military attache at Vienna during the
Russo-Turkish war. In the interval between
those two visits, while stationed at Fort Buford,
Dak., he made charges of fraud against post-
traders, which resulted in revelations that were
damaging to Secretary Belknap. On Dec. 8,
1880, he succeeded.Gen. Albert J. Meyer as chief
signal-officer, with the rank of brigadier-general.—AppUton's Cyclop, of Am. Biog.
Hearne (Samuel).    A | journey | from |
Prince of  Wales's Fort  in  Hudson's
Bay, | to | the northern ocean. | Undertaken | by order of the Hudson's Bay
company, | for the discovery | of copper mines, a northwest passage, &c. |
In the Years 1769,1770, 1771, & 1772. j
By Samuel Hearne. |
London: | Printed for A. Strahan and
T. Cadell: | Aud   Sold   by   T.   Cadell
Jun. aud W. Davies, (Successors to |
Mr. Cadell,) in the Strand. | 1795.
Folded map, title verso blank 1 1. dedication
pp. iii-iv, preface pp. v-x, contents pp. xi-xix,
errata p. [xx], introduction pp. xxi-xliv, folded
plate, text pp. 1-458, list of books verso directions to the binder 1 1. seven other maps and
plates, 4°.
A number of Athapascan terms and proper
names passim.
"To conclude, I cannot sufficiently regret
the loss of a considerable Vocabulary of the
Northern Indian Language, containing sixteen
folio pages, which was lent to the late Mr.
Hutchins, then Corresponding Secretary to the
Company, to copy for Captain Duncan, when he
went on discoveries to Hudson's Bay in the ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
41
Hearne (S.) — Continued.
year one thousand seven hundred and ninety.
But, Mr. Hiiichins dying soon after, the Vocabulary was taken away with the rest of his
effects, and can not now be recovered; and memory, at this time, will by no means serve to
replace it."—Preface.
Copies seen: Lenox.
 A | journey       from   |   Prince   of
Wales's fort, | in Hudson's hay, [ to |
the Northern Ocean. | Undertaken |
by order of the Hudson's hay company.
| For the discovery of | copper mines,
a north west passage, &c. | In the
Years 1769, 1770, 1771, & 1772. | By
Samuel Hearne. |
Dublin: | printed for P. Byrne, No.
108, and J. Rice, No. Ill, | Grafton-
street. | 1796.
Half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso blank 1
1. dedication pp. iii-iv, preface pp. v-x, contents
xi-xxv, introduction pp. xxvii-1, text pp. 1-459,
directions*to the binder p. [460], maps, plates.
8°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Geological Survey.
Henagi:
Vocabulary See Anderson (A. C.)
Vocabnlary Hamilton (A. S.)
Henry (Dr. Charles C.) Vocabulary of
the Apachee language.
In Schoolcraft (H. R.), Indian Tribes, vol. 5,
pp. 578-589, Philadelphia, 1855, 4°.
The vocabnlary, consisting of about 400
words, pp. 578-587.— Numerals 1-10000000, pp.
587-589.
Collected in New Mexico in 1853.   •
Herdesty (W. L.) [Terms of relationship of the Kutchin or Louchieux, collected by W. L. Herdesty, Fort Liard,
Hudson's Bay Ty.]
In Morgan (L. H), Systems of consanguinity
and affinity of the human family, pp. 293-382,
lines 67, Washington, 1871, 4°.
 See Ross (R. K)
Higgins (N. S.)   Notes on the Apache
tribes     inhabiting   the   territory   of
Arizona.
Manuscript, pp. 1-30, folio, in the library of
the Bureau of Ethnology, Washington, D. C.
Transmitted by its author to the Smithsonian
Destitution, April 21,1866.
On pp. 1-2 is given a list of the names of the
Apache tribes with comments thereon. Pp. 3-
22 contain a general discussion of these Indians, their number, physical constitution,
picture writing, dress, etc. Pp. 23-29 contain
a vocabulary of about 100 words and phrases
arranged by classes.
in the library of tho
Collected at Washing-
Hoffman (Dr. Walter James). Vocabulary of the Jicarilla Apache language.
Manuscript, 2 11. 4°
Bureau of Ethnology,
ton, D. C, in 1880.
Consists of 50 words and several songs set to
music.
Hoopa.    See Hupa.
Howse (Joseph). Vocabularies of certain North American languages. By
T [J?] Howse, Esq.
I n Philological Soc. [of London], Proc. vol. 4,
pp. 191-206, London, 1850, 8°.    (Congress.)
Vocabulary (words, phrases, and sentences)
of the Chipewyan (1), Chipewyan (2), Beaver
(1), Beaver (2), and Sikanni of New Caledonia,
pp. 191-193.
Hubbard (Dr. —). Vocabulary of the
Lototen or Tutatamys (from Dr. Hubbard's Notes, 1856.)
In Taylor (A. S.), Indianology of California,
in California Farmer, vol. 13, no. 16, June 8,
1860.   (PoweU.)
List of rancherias and clans (13) of the Toto-
ten, and vocabulary of 61 words.
|  Hudson Bay:
Bible passages
Vocabulary
See British.
Adelung (J. C.) and
Vater (J. S.)
Whipple (A. W.)
Vocabulary
Hupa:
General discussion See Gatschet (A. S.)
General discussion
General discussion
Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Words
Words
Hymn book:
Chippewyan
Slave
Slave
Tukudh
Hymns:
Beaver
Beaver
Chippewyan
Chippewyan
Chippewyan
Dene
Gibbs (G.)
Powers (S.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Gatschet (A. S.)
Tolmie   (W. F.)  and
Dawson (G. M.)
Anderson (A. C.)
Azpell (T. F.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Crook (G.)
Curtin (J.)
Gatschet (A. S.)
Latham (R. G.)
Powers (S.)
Turner (W. W.)
Whipple (A. W.)
Ellis (R.)
Gatschet (A. S.)
Latham (R. G.)
See Kirkby (W. W.)
Hymns.
Kirkby (W.W.)
M'Donald (R.)
See Bompas (W. C.)
Garrioch (A. C.)
Bompas (W. C.)
Kirkby (W. AV.)
Kirkby (W. W.) and
Bompas (W. C.)
Morice (A. G.) 42
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Hymns — Continued.
Dog Rib See Bompas (W. ('.)
Montagnais Logoff (L.)
Montagnais Perrault (C.0.)
Slave Reeve (W.D.)
Tukudh M'Donald (R.)
Hymns | in the | Tenni or Slavi language | of the | Indians of Mackenzie
river, | in the | north-west territory of
Canada. | [Seal of the S. P. C. K.] |
Hymns — Continued.
[London:] Society for promoting
christian knowledge | Northumberland avenue, Charing cross, W. C.
[1890.]
Title verso blank 1 1. text in the Tenni-lan-
guage (154 hymns with English headings) pp.
1-118, 11. recto blank verso printers, 16°. Possibly by Rev. W. D. Reeve or Bishop Bompas.
Copies seen :• Eames, Pilling.
I-J.
Inkalik!
General discussion Seo Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Bancroft. (H.H.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Dall (W. H.)
Schott (W.)
Zagoskin (L. A.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabnlary
Words
Inkalit-Kenai.    See Kenai.
Isbester (J. A.)    On a short vocabulary
of the Loncheux language.    By J. A.
Isbester.
In Philological Soc. jof London] Proc. vol.4,
pp. 184-185, London, 1850, 8°.
Vocabulary (35 words) of the Loucheux, to
which are added for comparison a few woi'ds (14)
of the Kenay, p. 185.
James (Dr. Edwin).    A | narrative | of
| the captivity and adventures | of [
John Tanner. | (U. S. interpreter at the
San.t de Ste.Marie,) | during ]  thirty
years residence among the Indians |
in the | interior  of North America. |
Prepared   for   the   press | by   Edwin
James, M. D. | Editor of an Account of
Major Long's Expedition from Pittsburgh | to the Rocky Mountains. |
New-York: | G. & C. & H. Carvill,
108 Broadway. | 1830.
Frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyright 1 1. introductory chapter pp. 3-21, text pp. 23-426, 8°.
Numerals 1-10 of the Chippewyan (from a
German interpreter), asecond set (from McKen-
zie), and a third (from a woman, a native of
Churchill), pp. 324-333.
Copies seen: Boston Athenaeum, Brinton,
Congress, Dunbar, Eames, Lenox, Trumbull.
At the Field sale.no. 1113, a half-morocco copy
brought $3.63; at the Squier sale, no. 552, a
similar copy. $3.38. Priced by Leclerc, 1878, no.
1020. 35 frs. The Murphy copy, no. 2449, half
green calf, brought $3.50.
Reissued as follows:
 A | narrative | of | the captivity and
adventures | of | John Tanner, | (U. S.
interpreter at the Saut de Ste. Marie,) |
James (E.) — Continued.
during [ thirty years residence among
the Indians | in the | interior of North
America. [ Prepared for the press | by
Edwin James, M. D. | Editor of an Ac-
' count of Major Long's Expedition from
Pittsburgh | to the Rocky Mountains. |
London: | Baldwin & Cradock, Paternoster Row. | Thomas Ward, 84 High
Holborn. | 1830.
Pp. 1-426, portrait, 8°. The American edition
with a new title-pago only.
Copies seen: Astor, Trumbull.
Clarke, 1886, no. 6652, prices a copy in boards
$5.
Sabin's Dictionary, no. 35685, titles an edition
in German, Leipzig, 1840, 8°, and one in French,
Paris, 1855,2 vols. 8°.
Edwin James, geologist, born in Weybridge,
Vtrj*August 27,1797, died in Burlington, Iowa,
October 28, 1861. He was graduated at Middle-
bury College in 1816, and then spent three years
in Albany, where he studied medicine with his
brother, Dr. Daniel James, botany with Dr.
John Torry, and geology under Prof. Amos
Eaton. In 1820 he was,appointed botanist and
geologist, to the exploring expedition of Maj.
Samuel H. Long, and was actively engaged in
field work during that year. For two years following he was occupied in compiling and preparing for the press the report of the "Expedi-
jj tion to the Rocky Mountains, 1818-19 " (2 vols,
with atlas, Philadelphia and London, 1823). He
then received the appointment of surgeon in
the U. S. Army, and for six years was stationed
at frontier outposts. In 1830 he resigned his
commission and returned to Albany. In 1834
he again went west, and in 1836 settled in the
vicinity    of    Burlington,     Iowa Appleton's
Cyclop, of Am. Biog.
Jehan (Louis-Francois). Troisieme et
derniere | Encyclopedic thedlogique, |
[&c. twenty-four lines] | publiee | par
M. I'abb6 Migne | [&c. six lines.] |
Tome trente-quatrieme. | Dictionnaire
de liuguistique. | Tome unique. | Prix:
7 francs) 1 ATHAPASCAN  LANGUAGES.
43
Jehan (L. F.) — Continued.
S'lmpiimeetsevendchez J.-P.Migne,
dditcur, | aux ateliers catholiques. Rue
d'Amboise, an 1'etit-Montrouge, | Barriere d'enfer de Paris. | 1858.
Second title: Dictionnaire | do ] liuguistique
| et | do   philologie    compares. | Histoire    de
toutes les langues mortes et vivantes, | ou |
traite complet d'idiomographie, | embrassant |
1'examen critique des systemes et de toutes les
questions qui se rattachcnt | a. l'origine et a. la
filiation des langues, a leur essence orgariique
| et a- leurs rapports avec l'histoire des races |
humaines, do leurs migrations, etc. 1 Precede
d'un | Essai sur le role du langage dans revolution deViutelligencehuinaine. | ParL.-F.Jehan
(de Saint-Clavien), | Membre de la Societe geo-
logique de Franco, de l'Academie royale des
sciences   do   Turin,   etc. j [Quotation,   three
lines.] ! Public | par M. 1'Abbe Migne, | editour
de la Bibliotheque universelle du clerge, | ou |
des cours complete sur chaque branche de la
science ccc-lesiast-iqiie. | Tome unique. | Prix: 1
7 francs. |
S'Luprinie et so vend chez J.-P. Migne,
editeur, | aux ateliers catholiques, Rue d'Amboise, au Petit-Montrouge, | Barriere d'enfer
de Paris. | 1858.
Outside title 1 1. titles as above 2 11. columns
(two to a-pago) 9-1448, large 8°.
Copies seen: British Museum, Shea.
A later jedition as follows:
 Troisicme et dernierc [ Encyclop6die
| theologi que, | ou troisieme et der-
niere | serie de dictionnaires sur toutes
les parties de la science religieuse, |
off rant en I'nmcais, et par ordre alpha-
betique, | la plus claire, la plus facile,
la plus commode, la plus variee | et la
plus complete des thdologies: | [&c.
seventeen lines] | publiee | par M. I'abb6
Migne. | [&e. six lines.] | Tome trente-
quatrieme. | Dictionnaire de linguis-
tique. | Tome unique. Prix: 8 francs. |
S'imprime et se vend chez J.-P.
Migne, editeur, | aux ateliers catholiques, rue d'Amboise,20,au Petit-Montrouge, | autrefois Barriere d'enfer de
Paris, maintenant dans Paris. I 1864
Jehan (L. F.) —Conl iuued.
Second title ■ Dictionnaire | de | linguistique |
ot | do philologie comparee. | Histoire de toutes
les langues mortes e.t vivantes, | ou | traite complet d'idiomographie, I embrass:vnt | l'examen
critique des systemes et de toutes les questions
qui se rattachcnt 1 a l'origine et a la filiation
des langues, a leur essence organique ! eta leurs
rapports avec l'histoire des races humaines, de
leurs migrations, etc. | Precede d nu | Essai sur
le role du langage dans devolution de l'intelli-
gence humaine. I Par L.-F. Jehan (de Saint-
Clavien), | Membre de la Societe geologique de
France, do l'Academie royale des sciences de
Turin, etc. | [Quotation, three lines. | 1 Publie |
parM.l'abbeMigne, | editeurdelaBibliotheque
universelle du clerg6, | ou | des cours complete
sur chaque branche de la science eccl6siastique.
| Tome unique. | Prix: 7 francs. I
S'imprhne et se vend chez J.-P. Migne, editeur, | aux ateliers catholiques, rue d'Amboise,
20, au Petit-Montrouge, | autrefois Barriere
d'enfer de Paris, maintenantdans Paris. | 1864
First title verso "avis important" 11. second
title verso printer 11. introduction numbered by
columns 9-208,text in double columns 203-1250,
notes additionnelles columns 1249-1434, table
des maticres columns 1433-1448, largo 8°.
Tableau polyglotte des langues de la-region
alleghaniquc (Am6riqne du Nord). columns
243-248, comprises a comparative vocabulary of
twenty-six words in thirty-five languages, of
which lines 34 and 35 are Cheppowyan (Chep-
pewyan propre.) and Tacouillie or Carrier.—Tableau do l'cnchainemeut geographiqne des
langues americaines et asiatiques, columns 290-
299, contains a few words in Kinai.—The article
Apaches, column 308, contains general remarks
on the tribal divisions.—Tableau polyglotte des
langues do la cote occidontale de l'Ameriquedu
Nord, columns 445-448, comprises a comparative
vocabulary of twenty-six words in twelve
languages, of which line 12 is Kinai" or
Kinaitze. — Lennappe, ou Chippaways-Dela-
ware ou Algonquino-Moheganc, .columns 796-
824, contains in columns 804 and 805 remarks on
the languages of the Choppewyan propre and
Tacoullies.—Tableau polyglotte de la region
Missouri-Colombiehne, columns 899-900, comprises a comparative vocabulary of twenty-six
words in ten languages, of which lines 1 and 3
are Sussee and Atnah.
Copies seen: Eames.
Jicarilla Apache.   See Apache.
K.
Kaiyuhkhotana -.
Numerals
Vocabulary
Katolik   Deueya
Legoff (L.)
See Dall (W. H.)
Dall(W.H.)
'tiye   dittlisse.    See
Kauta (Gen. August Valentine). Vocabulary of the Indian language of the
Toutouten tribe.
Kautz (A. V.) — Continued.
Manuscript, 2 unnumbered leaves, folio,
written on both sides, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Transmitted to Dr. Geo.
Gibbs b3' its compiler, from Fort Oxford,
Oregon Territory, June 19, 1855.
The vocabulary is in double columns, English
and Toutouten, and contains about 200 words.
In the same library is a short vocabulary
(about 70 words) of the same language by the 44
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Kautz (A. V.) — Continued.
then Lieut. Kautz, which'contains a few words
not in the longer vocabnlary. There are also in
the same library two copies, by Dr. Geo. Gibbs,
of the longer vocabulary.
August Valentine Kautz, soldier, born in
Ispringen, Baden, Germany, Jan. 5, 1828. His
parents emigrated to this country in 1828, and
settled in Brown County, Ohio, in 1832. The
son served as a private in the 1st regiment of
Ohio volunteers in the Mexican war, and on his
discharge was appointed to the United States
Military Academy, where he was graduated in
1852 and assigned to the 4th infantry. He served
in Oregon and Washington Territory till the
civil war-, and in the Rogue River wars of
1853-55, and was wounded in the latter, and in
the Indian war on Pnget Sound in 1856, in
which he was also wounded. In 1855 he was
promoted 1st lieutenant, and in 1857 commended
for gallantry by Gen. Scott. In 1859-60 he
traveled in Europe. He was appointed captain
in the 6th U. S. cavalry in 1861, and served with
the regiment from its organization through the
peninsular campaign of 1832, commanding it
during the seven days until just before South
Mountain, when he was appointed colonel of
the 2d Ohio cavalry. He took part in the
capture of Monticello, Ky., May 1,1863, and on
June 9 was brevetted major for commanding in
an action near there. He was engaged in the
pursuit and capture of John Morgan, in July,
1863, preventing him from crossing the Ohio,
and afterward served as chief of cavalry of the
23d corps. On May 7, 1864, he was made brigadier-general of volunteers and assigned to the
command of the cavalry division of the army
of the James. He entered Petersburg with his
small cavalry command on June 9, 1861, for
which attack he was brevetted lieutenant-
colonel, and he led the advance of the Wilson
raid, which cut the roads leading into Richmond
from the south, for more than forty days. On
Oct. 28, 1864, he was brevetted major-general of
volunteers, aud in March, 1865, was assigned to
the command of a division of colored troops,
which he marched into Richmond on April
3. He was brevetted colonel in the regular
service for gallant and. meritorious service
in action on the Darbytown road, Virginia,
October 7, 1864. Also brigadier and major
general for gallant and meritorious services in
the field during the war, Mar. 13, 1865. Gen.
Kantz was appointed lieutenant-colonel of the
34th infantry in 1866, transferred to the 15th in
1869, and commanded the regiment on the New
Mexican frontier till'1874. He organized several
successful expeditions against the Mescalero
Apaches, who had fled from their reservation in
1864, and in 1870-'71 succeeded in establishing
the tribe on their reservation, where they have
since remained. In June, 1874, he was promoted colonel of the 8th infantry, and in 1875
was placed in command of the department of
Arizona. He served in California from 1878 till
1886, and is now (1887) in Nebraska.—Apple-
ton's Cyclop, of Am. Biog.
Keane (Augustus H.) Ethnography and
philology of America.   By A. H. Keene.
In Bates (H. W.), Central America, the West
Indies, etc. pp. 443-561, London, 1878,8°.
General scheme of American races and languages (pp. 460-497) includes a list of -the
branches of the Athabascan or Tinney family
divided into languages and dialects, pp. 463-
465.—Alphabetical list of all known American
tribes and languages, pp. 498-561.
Reprinted in the 1882 and 1885 editions of the
same work and on the same pages.
Eenai:
Dictionary Sei
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
Grammatic comments
Grammatic comments
Numerals
Numerals
Tribal names
Tribal names
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vgcabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Radloff(L.)
Adelung   (J.   C.)    and
Vater (J. S.)
Balbi (A.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Radloff (L.)
MuUer (F.)
Ellis (R.)
Erman (G. A.)
Gallatin (A.)
Latham (R. G.)
Adelung   (J.    C.)    and
Vater (J. S.)
Baer (K.E. von).
Balbi (A.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Dall (W. H.)
Davidoff (G. I.)
Davidson {(Z.)
DeMeulen (E.)
Gallatin (A.)
Jehan (L. F.)
Krusenstern (A. J.von).
Latham (R. G.)
Lisiansky (U.)
Priehard (J. C.)
Roehrig (F. L. O.)
Staffeief (V.) and  Pet
roff (I.)
Wowodsky (—).
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Daa(L.K.)
Ellis (R.)
Jehan (L. F.)
Latham (R. G.)
Pott (A. F.)
Schomburgk (R. H.)
Wilson (D.)
Kennicott (Robert). Kofcch-a^Kutchin
vocabulary.   Words from the language
. of the Kotch-a-Kutchiu—the Indians
of Yukon River, at the mouth of Porcupine River, in northern Alaska.
In Whymper (F.), Travel and adventure in
Alaska, pp. 322-323, London, 1868,8°.
Consists of 175 words and phrases and the
numerals. 1-30.
This vocabulary also appears in the reprint
of Whymper, N. Y., 1869, 8°, pp. 345-350, and in ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
45
Kennicott (R.) — Continued.
the same, N. V., 1871, 8°, same pages. It is also
printed in Whymper's article on Russian
America, in Eth. Soc. of London, Trans., vol. 7,
pp. 183-185, London, 1869, 8°. Issued also by
the Smithsonian Institution, as follows:
 Kutch-a'-kutchin. | Words from the
language of the Kutch-a'-Kutchin'—the
Indians of Youkon river, at the mouth
of the | Porcupine river, in Russian
America.—Kennicott.
[Washington, D. C.: Smithsonian
Institution.    1869?]
No title-page, heading only, text 11.1-5 printed
on one side only, folio.
Contains about 200 words.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Eames,
Pilling.
The original manuscript of this vocabulary
is in the library of the Bureau of Ethnology,
Washington, D. C, 5 11. folio; also a copy by
Dr. Geo. Gibbs, 511. folio, from which the printed
copy was set up.
 [Vocabulary of the] Slave Indians,
Tenne.
[Washington, D. C.: Smithsonian
Institution.   1869?]
No title-page, heading only, text 11. 6-12
printed on one side only; contains about 200
words.
"Slave Indians of Liard River, near Fort
Liard. They call themselves Ache-to-e-tin'-ne,
as distinguished from the other Tenne.
' A-ehe-t<S-e-tin'-ni' is 'People of the low lands,'
or ' People living out of the wind.' "
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
The original manuscript of this vocabulary
is in the library of the Bureau of Ethnology.
 [Biography   of   Robert   Kennicott
and extracts from his journal.]
In Chicago Academy of Sciences, Trans .vol.
1, part 2, pp. 133-224, Chicago, 1869, 8°. (Geological Survey.)
Numerous Athapascan terms, proper names,
etc. passim.
 [Terms of relationships of the Slave
Lake Indians (Achabtinne),Fort Liard,
Mackenzie river district, Hudson's
bay ty.]
In Morgan (L. H.), Systems of consanguinity
and affinity of the human family, pp. 293-382
lines 64,'Washington, 1871, 4°.
The schedules were filled in March, 1860.
 Vocabulary of the Chipewyan  of
Slave Lake.
Manuscript, 6 unnumbered leaves, folio, in
the library of the Bureau of Ethnology. Collected in 1862.  Contains about 160 words.
There is in the same library a copy of this
vocabulary, 6 11. folio, with corrected spelling,
made by Dr. Geo, Gibbs,
Kennicott (R.) — Continued.
 Vocabulary of the Hare Indians, of
Fort Good Hope, Mackenzie River.
Manuscript, 6 unnumbered leaves, folio, in
the library of the Bureau of Ethnology. Collected in 1862.
Contains about 175 words.
There is in the same library a copy of this
vocabulary, made by the compiler (6 11. folio),
and another with corrected spelling by Dr.
Geo. Gibbs, also 6 11. folio.
 Vocabulary of the Nahawny Indians
of the mountains west of Fort Liard.
Manuscript, 6 unnumbered leaves, folio, in
the library of the Bureau of Ethnology. Collected in 1862.
Contains about 150 words.
There is in the same library a copy of this
vocabulary, 6 11. folio, made by its compiler.
 Vocabulary of theTsuhtyuh (Beaver
People) — Beaver Indians of Peace
River west of Lake Athabasca; aud of
the Thekenneh (People of the Rocks)
Siccanies of the Mountains, south of
Fort Liard.
Manuscript, 6 unnumbered leaves, folio, in
tho library of the Bureau of Ethnology. Collected in 1862.
Contains about 175 words each.
In the same library is a copy of this manuscript, made by Mr. Kennicott. 6 11. folio. .
Kirkby (Bev. William West). Hymns
and prayers: | for the | Private Devotions | of the | Slave Indians of McKen-
zie's river. | By rev. W. W. Kirkby. |
New York: j Ronnie, Shea & Lindsay. | 1862.
Title verso blank 11. alphabet [syllabary | p.
1, text (in syllabic characters with headings in
English) pp. 2-16, 12°. u" A small tract, the
beginning of our work.'"—Hirkby.
Easy words, pp. 2-3.—Morning service, pp.3-
5.—Evening service, pp. 5-7.—Sunday service,
pp. 8-10.—Watts's catechism, pp. 10-13—Ten
commandments, pp. 14-16.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Trumbull.
 A manual | of | devotion and instruction | for the | Slave Indians of
M'Kenzie river, | by | the rev. W. W.
Kirkby. | [Seal of the " C. M. S." for
"the diocese of Rupert's land."] |
[London.] Printed by W. M. Watts,
| 80, Gray's inn road.    [186-?]
Title as above p. 1, text in roman characters
with headings in English pp. 2-65,16°.
Hymns, pp. 2-22 (page 23* blank). — The
apostles' creed, p. 24.—The general confession,
p. 25 Prayer of St. Chrysostom, prayer for a
child, p. 26.—The Lord's prayer, the beuedic- 46
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Kirkby (W. W.) — Continued.
tion, p. 27.—Sunday morning prayer, p. 28.—
Sunday evening, p. 29.—Morning prayer,p. 30.—
Evening prayev. p. 31.—Morning collect, p. 32.—
Evening collect, p. 33.—The decalogue, pp. 3*1-
36—Catechism, pp. 37-43.—Of God, p. 44.—Of
sin, p. 45.—Of providence, p. 46.—Of redemption, p. 47.—The Lord's day, p. 48.—The Lord's
book, p. 49—Of heaven, p. 50.—Of hell, p. 51.—
The Saviour, p. 52.—The Christian, p. 53.—Tho
way to heaven, p. 54.—The judgment, p. 55.—
Tho creation, p. 56.—The fall, p. 57.—The recovery, p. 58.—The deluge, p. 59.— Birth of Christ,
p. 60.—Baptism of Christ, p. 61. —Life of Christ,
p. 62.—Death of Christ, p. 63.—Resurrection of
Christ, p. 64.—Ascension of Christ, p. 65; ending with colophon, " W. M. Watts, 80, Gray's-
Inn-Road."
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
 A manual | of | devotion and instruction | for tho | Slave Indians of
McKeuzie River. | By | Rev. W. W.
Kirkby. |
London: | printed by W. M. Watts |
28, Whitefriars street. City.  [1870?]
Title verso blank 1 1. the alphabet [syllabary 1 p. 3, text (in syllabic characters with headings in English) pp. 4-76, 18°.
Easy words, p. 4.—Difficult words, p. 5	
Hymns, pp. 6-27.—Apostles' creed and other
prayers, pp. 28-37.—Decalogue, pp. 38-40.—Catechism, pp. 41-49.—Scripture lessons, pp. 50-76.
Copies seen: Church Missionary Society,
Eames. Pilling.
 A manual | of | devotion and instruction | for the | Slave Indians of
McKenzie River, | by rev. W. W.
Kirkby. | [Seal of tho " C. M. S." for
"the diocese of Rupert's land".] With
the approbation of | the lord bishop of
t he diocese.
[London: Church missionary society
1871?]
Title-page vorso alphabet [syllabary*| 11. text
(in syllabic characters with headings in English) pp. 3-86, 24°.
Easy words, p. 3.—Difficult words, p. 4.—
Sunday morning service, pp. 5-12.—Sunday
evening service, pp. 13-20.— Daily morning
service, pp. 21-28,—Daily evening service, pp.
29-41.-The alphabet, p. 43.—Prayers, etc., pp.
44-78—Catechism, pp. 79-86.
Copies seen.- American Tract Society, British
Museum, Pilling, Trumbull.
 Manual | of | devotion and instruction, | iu the | Chipewyan language, I
for the | Indians of Churchill. | By the
rev.W. W. Kirkby. |
London: | Church missionary house,
| Salisbury square.    [1872?]
Kirkby (W. W.) — Continued.
Title verso blank 11. alphabet [ syllabary] p.
3, text (in syllabic characters with headings in
English) pp. 4-113, picture of "The bible of the
world'" 11.18°.
"The same as the preceding [London, 1871?]
transliterated into the Chipewyan dialect, as:
spoken at Churchill, 3,000 miles from MrKen-
zie's River."—Kirkby.
Difficult words, p. 4.—Numerals 1-20, p. 5.—
Address, p. 6.—Hymns, pp. 7-29.—Prayers for
children, creed, etc., pp. 30-36.—Private morning devotions, pp. 37-39.—Private evening dovo- ■
tions, pp. 40-12.—Family morning devotions,
"pp. 43-46.—Family evening devotions, pp. 47-
50.—Public morning service, pp. 51-60.—Public
evening service, pp. 61-66.—Scripture lessons,
pp. 67-96. — Catechism, pp. 97-109. — Burial
service, pp. 110-113.
Copies seen: British Museum, Church Missionary Society. Eames, Pilling.
 Manual | of | devotion aud instruction | in the | Chipewyan language, |
for the | Indians of Churchill. | By the
rev. W.W. Kirkby. |
London: | Society for promoting
christian knowledge, | 77, Great Queen
Street,   Lincoln's-Inn-Fields.    [187-?]
Title verso syllabarium 1 1. text (in syllabic
characters with English headings) pp. 3-148, :
18°.
Difficult "words, p. 3.—Numerals 1-20, p. 4	
Address, p. 5.—Hymns (1-30), pp. 6-41.—The
creed, Lord's prayer, and benediction, pp. 42-
43. ^Decalogue, pp.44-46.—Prayers for children,
p. 47T^-Private morning devotions, pp. 48-50.—
Private evening devotions, pp. 51-53.—Family
morning devotions, pp. 51-57.—Family evening
devotions, pp. 58-61 .—Public morning service,
pp. 62-73. —Public evening service, pp. 74-80.—
Public baptismal service, pp. 81-81.— Service
for holy communion, etc.. pp. 85-91.—Marriage
service, pp. 92-94.—Burial service, pp. 95-97.—
Scripture lessons, pp. 98-139.—Catechism, pp.-
140-148.
Copies seen: Pilling, Society for Promoting
Christian Knowledge.
[ ] The gospel | according to | Saint
John. | Translated into tho Tinne" language. | [Three lines syllabic charac-
ters.] |
London: | British and foreign bible
society. | 1870.
Colophon: W. M. Watts, 80, Gray's Inn Road.
The transliteration of the three lines in syllabic characters on the title-page is: News good |
saint John by | Big river Indians language iu.
Title verso blank 11. alphabet [i. e. syllabary]
verso blank 11. text (in syllabic characters with
chapter headings in English) pp. 3-93, 16°.
Copies seal: British and Foreign Bible Society, Church Missionary Society, National
Museum,'Wellesley. ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
47
Kirkby (W. W.) —Continued.
[ ] Natsun     kaothet   nako   kendi |
Jesus Christ | be   konde   nezo | Saint
.Mark | ckaonie   adikles | Tinne   yatie
kesi. |
London : | 1871.
Translation: Our lord our savior j Jesus
Christ | his news good | Saint Mark | by him
written | Indian tongue according to.
Title verso printers 1  1. tcxl   in the Tinne
i£- language (roman characters) pp. 3-64, 18°.
Copies seen: British and Foreign Biblo Society, Wellesley.
[ ] St. Mark.
Colophon: [London.] W. M. Watts,
80, Gray's Inn Road.
No title-page, heading only; text in tho Tinne
language (entirely in syllabic characters, with
chapter headings in English) pp. 1-66, 18°.
The dialect is that spoken by tho Indians of
Ft. Simpson.
Copies seen: British and Foreign Biblo Soci-
et v, Hritish Museum, Wellesley.
[ ] Tbe gospels | of | the four evangelists, | St. Matthew, St. Mark. St. I.like.
I and  St. John. | Translated into the
language | of | The Chipewyan Indians
[ of | north-west America. |
London: | printed for tho British and
foreign bible society. | 1878.
Title verso printers etc. 11. syllabarium vorso
blank 1 1. text (entirely in syllabic characters)
pp. 5-344, 16°.
Matthew, pp. 5-100.— Mark, pp. 101-161.—
Luke, pp. 162-268.—John, pp. 269-314.
Copies seen: British and Foreign Bible Society, British Museum, Eames, Pilling.
, [Three lines syllabic characters.] |
The new testament. | Translated into
| the Chipewyan language, | by the |
vcn. archdeacon Kirkby. |
London: | printed for the | British
and foreign bible society, | Queen Victoria Street, E. C. | 1881.
Title verso printers 1 1. Chipewyan syllaba-
riuni verso blank 1 1. text (entirely in syllabic
characters) pp. 7-396,12°.
Matthew, pp. 7-56.—Mark, pp. 56-87.—Luke,
pp. 87-141.— John, pp. 141-179.— Acts-Revelation, pp. 180-396.
Copies seen : Eames, Pilling.
 Portions | of the | book of- common
prayer, | Hymns, &c, | in the | Chipewyan language. | By archdeacon
Kirkby. |
Printed at the request of | the bishop
of Rupert's land, | by the [ Society for
promoting  christian knowledge, | 77,
Kirkby (W. W.) —Continued.
Great    Queen    Street,   Lincoln's-Inn-
Fields, London. [1879?]
Title verso alphabet [syllabary] 1 1. w\\, (in
syllabic characters with English headings) pp.
3-195, colophon p. [190], 16°.
Morning prayer, pp. 3-18.—Evening prayer,
pp. 19-31—Litany, pp. 32-10.-Prayers, pp. 41-
49.—Holy communion, etc. pp. 50-80.—Hymns,
pp. 81-138. - Scripture lessons, pp. 139-181.—
Catechism, pp. 182-192.—Music Era hymns, pp.
193-195.
Copies seen: British Museum, Pilling. Socioty
for Promoting Christian Knowledge.
Sec Kirkby (\\. W.) and Bompas (W. C.)
below for an edition of this work adapted for
the use of tho Slavi Indians.
 [One   line   syllabic   characters.] |
Portions [ of   the | book   of   common
prayer, | and | administration   of   the
sacraments, | and other rites and ceremonies of the church, | According to
the use of the Church of England. [
Translated into the language | of the I
. Chipewyan Indians of N. W. America,
| by  the | vcn. archdeacon Kirkby. |
[Seal of the S. P. C. K.] |
Society for promoting christian
knowledge, | Northumberland Avenue,
Charing Cross, London. | 1881.
Title vorso printers 1 1. alphabet [syllabary]
verso blank 1 1. text (in syllabic characters
with headings partly in syllabic characters
and partly in English and Latin) pp. 5-160, 16°.
Prayers, etc., pp. 5-86.—The order of the administration of tho Lord's supper, or holy
communion, pp. 87-106.— Tho ministration of
public' baptism of infants, pp. 106-112. — The
ministration of baptism to such as aro of' riper
years, pp. 113-121.—A catechism, pp. 122-131.—
Tho order of confirmation, pp. 131-135. — The
form of solemnization of matrimony, pp. 135-
142.—Tho visitation of the sick, pp. 142-147	
The order for the burial of tho dead, pp. 148-
156.—The, cliurching of women, pp. 157-160.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
 Hymns, | prayers and instruction, |
in the | ..Chipewyan language. | By the
| ven. archdeacon  Kirkby. | [Seal  of
theS.P.C.K.] |
Society for promoting christian
knowledge, j Northumberland Avenue,
Charing Cross, London. | 1881.
Title verso blank 1 1. text (in syllabic characters with English headings) pp. 3-91, colophon p. [92], 16°.
Hymns in double columns, pp. 3-36.—Prayers,
pp. 37-62.—Lessons, pp. 63-91.
Copies semi: Eames, Society for Promoting
Christian Knowledge. 48
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Kirkby (W. W.) — Continued.
    See Bompas (W. C.)
 and Bompas (W. C.)   Portions | of
the | book of common prayer, | Hymns,
&c, | in the | Chipewyan language. |
By archdeacon Kirkby. | Adapted for
the use of | the Slavi Indians | by the
| right reverend W. C. Bompas, D. D.,
| bishop of Athabasca. |
Printed by the | Society for promoting christian knowledge, | 77,
Great Queen Street, Lincoln's-Inn-
Fields, London.    [1879?]
Title verso syllabarium 11. text (in syllabic
characters with headings in English) pp. 3-175,
colophon p. [176], 16°.
Morning prayer, pp. 3-15.—Evening prayer,
pp. 16-26 —The litany, pp. 27-34.—Prayers, pp.
35-42. — Holy communion, etc., pp. 43-68.—
Hymns, pp. 69-123.—Scripture lessons, pp. 124-
165.—Catechism, pp. 166-175.
Copies seen: British Museum, Eames, Pilling,
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge.
See Kirkby (W. W.) above for title of the
original edition of this work.
Issued also in roman characters as follows:
 Portions of the | book of common prayer, | hymns, etc., | in the |
Chipewyan language. | By archdeacon Kirkby. | Adapted for the use of
the Slavi Indians | by the | right rev.
W. C. Bompas, D.D., | bishop of Athabasca. |
London: | Society for promoting
christian knowledge; | Northumberland avenue, Charing cross.   [1882?]
Title verso syUabarium in roman 1 1. text
(entirely in roman characters) pp. 3-175,16°.
Morning prayer, pp. 3-15.—Evening prayer,
pp. 16-26.—The litany, pp. 27-34.—Prayers, pp.
35-42.—Service for holy communion, etc., pp.
43-68.—Hymns, pp. 69-123 Scripture lessons,
pp. 124-165.—Catechism, pp. 166-175.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, Wellesley.
See title next above for the same work in
syllabic characters.
 Part of the | book of common
prayer, | and administration of | the
sacraments, | and other | rites and
ceremonies of the church, | according
to the use of | The Church of England;
| translated into the language of the
| Chipewyan Indians of the queen's
dominion | of Canada | by the | A'en.
archdeacon W. W. Kirkby, D. D. |
Adapted to the use of the Tenni Indians
of | Mackenzie rivpr | by the | right rev.
Kirkby (W. W.) Bompas (W. C.)—Ct'd.
W. C. Bompas, D. D., | bishop of Mackenzie river. | [Seal of the S. P. C. K.] |
London:   |   Society   for   promoting
christian knowledge, (Northumberland I
avenue, Charing cross, W. C. | 1891.
Title as above verso blank 11. contents verso
blank 1 l.text (mostly in Chipewyan, roman
characters, with headings and instructions in -
English) pp. 1-276,16°.
Morning prayer, pp. 1-13.—Evening prayer,
pp. 14-23.—The creed of St. Athanasius   (in
English),  pp. 23-26 The litany, pp. 26-32.—
Prayers and thanksgivings upon several occasions, pp. 33-41.—The collects, epistles, and
gospels, pp. 42-187.—Holy communion, pp. 188-
.208.—Baptism of infants, pp. 209-221.—Baptism
of such as are of riper years, pp. 222-229.—Catechism, pp. 230-236.—Confirmation, pp. 236-
238. — Solemnization of matrimony, pp. 239-
247.—Visitation and communion of the sick,
pp. 248-258.—Burial of the dead, pp. 259-266.—
The churching of women (or the thanksgiving
of women after childbirth), pp. 266-269.—A com-
mination, or denouncing of God's anger and
judgments against sinners (partly in English
and partly in Chipewyan), pp. 269-276.
Copies seen: Pilling.
I have not been very successful in ascertaining
the dates of the works by Archdeacon Kirkby,
who writes me concerning them as follows:
"Being printed, for the most part, in England,
with no one to correct the proofs, many errors
crept in, and in some cases two orjthree editions
hacU-to be printed before we could get them
even" approximately correct. In this way the
same book was printed two or three times,
which would give to it so many dates."
William. W. Kirkby was born at Ham-
ford, Lincolnshire, in 1827, and received his
earlier education at a grammar school. When
about 18 years old he went to the diocesan
school at Litchfield to prepare for the duties
of a teacher, which he desired to become. His
stay at Litchfield was very happy, and after
two years his friend, the Rev. C. C. Layard, rector of Mayfield, Staffordshire, offered him the
mastership of the village national school, which
Mr. Kirkby accepted. Whilst there a strong
desire to enter the mission field came into his
mind, and he offered his services to the secretary of the church missionary society. The
offer was accepted, and in the spring of 1851
Mr. Kirkby entered St. John's College, London,
to prepare for his new duties. In May, 1852, a
sudden call came for a teacher to go at once to
Red River, and the committee selected Mr.
Kirkby for the post. He had not yet completed
his studies, but on the 6th of .June of that year
embarked ou the Hudson Bay Company's ship,
taking his bride of a few days with him, for
Red River. The voyage was made in safety,,
and the young couple reached their destination
$he 12tlj gf October, and in a few days after-' ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
49
Kirkby (W. W.) — Continued.
wards he entered upon his duties. On the 24th
of December, 1854, Mr. Kirkby was ordained to
the ministry by the Right Reverend David
Anderson, D. D., the first bishop of Rupert's
Land, and at once took temporary charge of St.
Andrew's church and parish.
In 1852 Mr. Kirkby was appointed to the
mission of Red River, arriving there in the
autumn of that year. His duties were to take
charge of a model training school and to superintend the work of education in the colony,
in those parishes belonging to the church
missionary society. Shortly afterwards Mr.
Kirkby, in addition to his other duties, was
appointed assistant minister of St. Andrews,
then the largest parish in the settlement, and
continued there four years. In the meanwhile
the church had spread northwards and westwards to Fairford, Cumberland, Lac la Rouge,
and the English River, 700 miles from Red
River, and then at a single bound it went into
the great McKenzie Valley. Archdeacon Hunter went thither on an exploratory tour in 1858,
and the next year the bishop appointed Mr.
Kirkby to take charge of tho work. He at once
proceeded there, and made Fort Simpson his
headquarters. This fort stands in latitude 62°
"N"., longitude 121° W., at the confluence of the
Liard and Slave rivers. He began his work
with much encouragement and hope. The first
care was the language, and then the erection of
suitable buildings for church and school purposes. These latter were soon supplied by the
kindness and liberality of the Hudson Bay
Company's officers, who took an interest in the
work. In the summer of 1862 Mr. Kirkby
resolved to carry the gospel within the Arctic
Circle, and if possible into Alaska. Securing
a good canoe and two reliable Indians he set off,
following the ice down the McKenzie to Peel
River Fort, the last trading post of the company and a great rendezvous of the Indians.
After a short stay here he left his canoe and,
accompanied by two guides, set out to walk
over the mountains. Up and down they went,
over several ridges rising from 700 to 2,800 feet,
and at last, by a sudden descent of 1,000 feet
into the valley, he reached La Pierre's house
and another of the Fur Company's forts. Here
Mr. Kirkby remained until the 30th of June, instructing the Indians and learning the Tukudh
language, a kindred one to the Tinne. He then
embarked in the company's boat on the Rat
River, and then down the Porcupine River, a
tributary of the Yukon. Two miles above the
confluence of these Fort Yukon stands. This
journey occupied three months, and at the close
of it Mr. Kirkby writes: "I have traveled over
at least 3,000 miles; have been honored of God
to carry the gospel far within the Arctic Circle
and to a people who had never heard it before."
The work at tho Yukon was then given to the
Rev. R. McDonald and Mr. Kirkby devoted his
time at Fort Simpson to the language. He translated two of the gospels and completed a little
ATH =4
Kirkby (W. W.) — Continued.
manual containing prayers, hymns, catechism,
and short bible lessons, such as the Indians
could readily understand. He also collected
materials for a grammar and vocabulary for the
use of others. The acquisition of the language
was thus rendered easier for future missionaries who might enter the field. In 1869 Mr.
Kirkby, having been seventeen years in the
field, went to England to place his Children at
school. Upon his return to the country, in
1870, he was appointed to York Factory, Hudson Bay, that he might meet the Chipewyans
of Churchill. Here he labored for nine years,
and then retired from the mission to make a
home for his children in the civilized world; and
this he has done, being now stationed at the
village of Rye, near New York.
Klatskenai. See Tlatskenai.
Koltschane:
Tribal names See Latham (R. G.)
Vocabulary Baer (K. E. von).
Vocabulary Bancroft (H. H.)
Vocabulary Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Vocabulary Latham (R. G.)
Kovar (Dr. Emil). Ueber die Bedeutung
des possessivischen Pronomen fiir die
Ausdrucksweise des substantivischen
Attributes.
In Zeitschrift fiir "Volkerpsychologio und
Sprachwissenschaft, vol. 16, pp. 386-394, Berlin,
1886.   (*)
Examples in a number of American languages, among them the Athapascan, p. 390.
Title from Prof. A. F. Chamberlain, from copy
in the library of Toronto University.
Krusenstern (Adam Johann von). Wor-
ter-Sammlungen | aus den Sprachen
| einiger Volker | des | ostlichen
Asiens | und | der Nordwest-Kiiste von
Amerika. | Bekannt geniacht | von | A.
J. v. Krusenstern | Capitain der Kus-
sisch kaiserlichen Marine. |
St Petersburg. | Gedruckt in der
Druckerey der Admiralitiit | 1813.
Title verso note 11. Vorbericht pp. i-xi, half-
title verso blank 11. text pp. 1-68, Druckfehler
verso blank 1 1.4°.
Wortersammlung aus der Sprache der Kinai
(from Dawidoff, Resanoff, and Lisiansky), pp.
57-68.
Copies seen: Astor, Bancroft, Brinton, British Museum, Eames, Pilling, Trumbull, Wat
kinson, Wellesley.
Kutchin. Vocabulary of the Hong Kutchin language.
Manuscript, 4 unnumbered leaves, folio,
written on one side only; in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology.
Contains about 130 words, entered on one of
the Smithsonian forms of the standard vocabulary. 50
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Kutchin:
General discuss
Numerals
^Numerals
Relationships
Tribal names
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
ion See Bancroft (H. H.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Dall (W. H.)
Herdesty (W.L.)
Latham (R. G.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Dall (W. H.)
Kennicott (R.)
Kutchin.
Morgan (L. H.)
Murray (A. H.)
Kutchin — Continued.
Vocabulary See Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Words
Kwalhiokwa:
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Roehrig(F.L.O.)
Ross (R. B.)
Whymper (F.)
Daa(L.K-)
Ellis (R.)
See Bancroft (H. H.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.;
Hale (H.)
Latham (R. G.)
L.
L. J. C. et M. I. Titles of anonymous
works beginning with these letters are
entered in this bibliography under
the next following word of title.
Latham (Robert Gordon). Miscellaneous
contributions to the ethnography of
North America. ByR. G. Latham, M.D.
In Philological Soc. [of London], Proc. vol. 2,
pp. 31-50 [London], 1846, 8°.   (Congress.)
Table of words showing affinities between
the Ahnenium and a number of other American languages, among them the Kenay, pp. 32-
34.
 On the languages of the Oregon territory. By R. G. Latham, M. D. Read
before the Society on the 11th December, 1844.
In Ethnological Soc. of London, Jour. vol. 1,
pp. 154-166. Edinburgh, [1848], 8°. (Congress.)
A table of 10 Sussee words showing miscellaneous affinities with a number of other American languages, among them the Kenay, Taculli,
and Chipewyan, pp. 160--161.
 On   Diie   ethnography   of   Russian
America. By R. G. Latham, M.D. Read
before the Society 19th February, 1845.
In Ethnological Soc. of London, Jour. vol. 1,
pp. 182-191, Edinburgh [1848], 8°.  (Congress.)
General discussion upon the classification of
the languages of the above-named region, and a
list of the vocabularies which have been
printed. Reference is made to the Kenay,
Atnah, and Inkalite.
 The | natural history | of | the varieties of man. | By | Robert Gordon
Latham, M. D., F. R. S., | late fellow of
King's college, Cambridge; | one of the
vice-presidents of the Ethnological society, London; | corresponding member
to the Ethnological society, | New
York, etc. | [Monogram in shield.] |
London: | John Van. Voorst, Paternoster row. | M.-'d.^VCL [1850].
Latham (R. G.) — Continued.
Half-title verso blank 11. title verso printers
' 11. dedication verso blank 11. preface pp. vii-xi,
bibliography pp. xiii-xv, explanation of plates
verso blank 1 1. contents pp: xix-xxviii, text
pp. 1-566, index pp. 567-574, list of works by Dr.
Latham verso blank 11.8°.
Division F, American Mongolidse (pp. 287-
460), includes : Comparative vocabulary (38
words) of the Loucheux and Kenay, pp. 297-
298; comments on the northern Athabaskans,
pp. 302-308; comparative vocabulary of the
Chippewyan, Tlatskanai, and Umkwa (60
words), pp. 308-310; of the Beaver and Chippewyan (50 words and phrases), pp. 370, 371.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Congress,
Eames.
  The I ethnology | of | the   British
colonies | and | dependencies. | By | R.
G. ^Latham, M. D., F. R. S., | corresponding member to the Ethnological
society, New York, | etc. etc [Monogram in shield.] |
London: | John Van Voorst, Paternoster row. | M. DCCC. LI   [1851].
Title verso printers 1 1. contents pp. v-vi,
preface verso blank 1 1. text pp. 1-264, list of
works by Dr. Latham etc. 11. 16°.
Chapter vi, Dependencies in America (pp.
224-264), contains a list of the divisions and
subdivisions of the Athabaskans, pp. 224-227.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Bureau
of Ethnology, Congress, Eames.
 The | native races | of | the Russian
empire. | By | R. G. Latham, M. D., F.
R. S., &c, | author of [&c. two lines.]
| With a large coloured map, | Taken
from that of the Imperial Geographical
Society of St. Petersburg, | and other
illustrations. |
London: | Hippolyte Bailliere, 219,
Regent street; | and 290, Broadway,
New York, U. S. | Paris:' J. B. Bailliere, rue Hautefeuille. | Madrid: Bailly
Bailliere, calle del Principe. J 1854. ATHAPASCAN  LANGUAGES.
51
Latham (R.G.) — Continued.
Frontispiece 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. notice
verso blank 1 1. contests pp. v-viii, large map,
text pp. 1-340, 12°.
The tribes of Russian America (pp. 2^9-297)
contains a brief account of the linguistic affinities of the various divisions, including the
Athabaskans, pp. 291-294.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Congress,
Eames.
 On the Languages of New California.   By R. G. Latham, M. D.
In Philological Soc. [of London], Proc.vol. 6,
pp. 72-86, London, 1854, 8°.   (Congress.)
Comments upon the Athabascans, pp. 74-75.—
A few words of Hoopah, "Navajo, and Jicorilla,
p. 85.
 On  the  languages   of    Northern,
Western, and Central America.   By R.
G. Latham, M. D.    (Read May the 9th.)
In Philological Soc. [of London], Trans. 1856,
pp. 57-115, London [1857], 8°.  (Congress.)
The Athabascan Group (pp. 65-70) contains
lists of tribal divisions of the Takulli, p. 66;
Kutshin, p. 67; Kenai, p. 67; Atna, pp. 67-68;
Koltshani, Ugalents, Atna, p. 68.—General discussion of the Athabaskan, pp. 68-70.—Comparative vocabulary of the "Navaho and Apatch
(27 words), pp. 96-97.—Table of words showing
affinities between the several Pueblo languages
and the Navahoand Jicorilla, pp. 99,100.
 Opuscula. | Essays | chiefly | philological and ethnographical | by | Robert Gordon Latham, | M. A., M. D., F.
R. S., etc. | late fellow of Kings college,
Cambridge, late professor of English |
in University college, London, late-
assistant physician | at the Middlesex
hospital. |
Williams & Norgate, | 14 Henrietta
street, Covent garden, London \ and |
20 South Frederick street, Edinburgh,
j Leipzig, R. Hartmann. | 1860.
Title verso printer 11. preface pp. iii-iv, contents pp. v-vi, text pp. 1-377, addenda and corrigenda pp. 378-418, 8°.
A reprint of a number of papers read before
the ethnological and philological societies of
London.
Addenda and corrigenda (1859) (pp. 378-418)
contains: Comparative vocabulary of the Nav-
aho and Pinaleno, p. 385; of the Beaver Indians
and Chippewyan, p. 413.
Copies seen: Astor, Boston Public, Brinton,
Bureau of Ethnology, Congress, Eames, Pilling,
Watkinson.
At the Squier sale a presentation copy, no.
639, brought $2.37. The Murphy copy, no. 1438,
sold for $1.
 Elements | of | comparative philology. | By | R, G. Latham, M. A., M. D.,
F. R. S., &c, | late  fellow of   King's
Latham (R. G.) —Continued,
college, Cambridge; aud late professor
of English | in University college, London. |
London: | Walton and Maberly, |
Upper Gower street, and Ivy lane,
Paternoster row; | Longman, Green,
Longman, Roberts, and Green, | Paternoster row. | 1862. | The Right of
Translation is Reserved.
Half-title verso printers 11. title verso blank
11. dedication verso blank 11. preface pp. vii-xi,
contents pp. xiii-xx, tabular view of languages
and dialects pp. xxi-xxviii, chief authorities pp.
xxix-xxxii, errata verso blank 1 1. text pp. 1-
752, addenda and corrigenda pp. 753-757, index
pp. 758-774, list of works by Dr. Latham verso
blank 11. 8°.
Chapter lv, Languages of America, The Eskimo, The Athabaskan dialects [etc. ] (pp. 384-
403), contains: Divisions of the Takulli, p. 388;
of the Kutshin with English definitions, p.
389.—Athabaskan tribal names with meanings,
p. 390. — Comparative vocabulary (35 words) of
the Kenay, Kutshin, Slave, and Dog-rib, pp.
390-391; of the Chepewyan and Takulli (47
words), pp. 391-392; of the Ugalents, Atna,
aud Kolstshani, pp. 392-393; of the Tlatskanai,
Kwaliokwa, and Umkwa (30 words), p. 391; of
the Navaho, Apatsh, and Pinaleno (27 words),
pp. 394-395; of the Hoopah and Jecorilla (12
-words), p. 395.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Congress, Eames, Watkinson.
Robert Gordon Latham, the eldest son of the
Rev. Thomas Latham, was born in the vicarage
of Billingsborough, Lincolnshire, March 24,
1812. In 1819 he was entered atEton. Two years
afterwards he was admitted on the foundation, and in 1829 went to Kings, where he took
his fellowship and degrees. Ethnology was
his first passion and his last, though for botany
he had a very strong taste. He died March 9,
1888.—Theodore Watts in The Athenosum, March
17,1888.
Leclerc (Charles). Bibliotheca | ameri-
cana | Catalogue raisonne" | d'une tres-
precieuse | collection de livres anciens
| et modernes | sur l'Ameriqu'e et les
Philippines | Class6s par ordre alpha-
b&tique de noms d'Auteurs. | Re'dige"
par Ch. Leclerc. | [Design.] |
Paris | Maisonneuve & Cie | 15, quai
Voltaire | M. D. CCC. LXVII [1867]
Cover title as above, half-title verso details of
sale 11. title as above verso blank 1 1. preface
pp. v-vii, catalogue pp. 1-107, 8°.
Includes titles of a number of works containing material relating to the Athapascan languages.
Copies seen: Congress, Eames, Pilling.
At the Fischer sale, a copy, no. 919, brought 52
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Leclerc (C.) — Continued.
10s.; at the Squier sale, no. 651, $1.50. Leclerc,
1878, no. 345, prices it 4 fr. and Maisonneuve, in
1889,4 fr. The Murphy'copy, no. 1452, brought
$2.75.
 Bibliotheca | americana | Histoire,
geographic, | voyages, archeblogie   et
liuguistique | des | deux Ameriques |
et | des iles Philippines | re'dige'e | Par
Ch. Leclerc | [Design] |
Paris | Maisonneuve et Cie, Hbraires-
6diteurs | 25, quai Voltaire, 25. | 1878
Cover title as above, half-title verso blank 1
1. title as above verso blank 1 1. avant-propos
pp. i-xvii, table des divisions pp. xviii-xx, catalogue pp. 1-643, supplement pp. 645-694, index
pp. 695-737, colophon verso blank 11. 8°.
The linguistic part of this volume occupies
pp. 537-643; it is arranged under names of languages and contains titles of books relating to
the following: Langues americaines en general,
pp. 537-550; Apache, p. 553; Athapasca,p. 554;
Dene, pp. 578-579.
Copies seen: Boston Athenaeum, Congress,
Eames, Harvard, Pilling.
Priced by Quaritoh, no. 12172, 12*.; another
copy, no. 12173, large paper, 1J. Is. Leclerc's
Supplement, 1881, no. 2831, prices it 15 fr., and
no. 2832, a copy on Holland paper, 30 fr. A large-
paper copy is priced by Quaritch, no. 30230, lis.
Maisonneuve in 1889 prices it 15 fr.
[ ]Bibliotheca | americana | Histoire,
gebgraphie, | voyages,  arch6ologie  et
linguistique | des | deux   Am6riques |
Suppl6ment | N" I [-2]. Novembre 1881
| [Design.] |
Paris | Maisonneuve & Cie, libraires-
editeurs | 25, quai Voltaire, 25 | 1881
[-1887]
2 parts: cover title as above, title as above
'verso blank 1 1. advertisement I 1. text pp. 1-
102, colophon verso blank 1 1.; printed cover,
title differing somewhat from the above (verso
blank) 11. text pp. 3-127, 8°.
These supplements have no separate section
devoted to works relating to American languages, but titles of works containing material
relating to Athapascan languages appear
passim.
Copies seen.- Congress, Eames, Pilling.
Maisonneuve, in 1889, prices each of the two
supplements 3 fr.
[ ] Catalogue | des | livres de fonds
| et en nombre | Histoire,Arch6ologie,
| Ethnographie et Linguistique de
l'Europe, | de l'Asie, de l'Afrique, | de
l'Amerique et del'Ocdanie.) [Design.] 1
Paris | Maisonneuve friires et Ch.
Leclerc, 6diteurs | 25, quai Voltaire—
quai Malaquais, 5 | (Ancienne maison
Th. Barrois) | 1885 [-1888-1889]
Leclerc (C.) — Continued.
3 parts: printed cover as above verso can-
tents, title as above verso note 11. advertisement j
verso blank 11. table verso blank 11. text pp. 1- j
153; printed cover differing slightly from above,
verso contents, titlelike printed cover verso note
1 1. text pp. 3-161, contents p. [162]; printed I
cover, title verso notice 11. text pp. 3-170, table j
11., 8°.
Contain titles of a number of American linguistic works, among them a few Athapascan. J
Copies seen: Pilling.
There were  issues for 1878 and 1887 also. ;
(Eames.)
Lefroy (Sir John Henry).   A Vocabulary
of Chepewyan and Dog-Rib Words.
In Richardson (J.), Arctic searching expedition, vol. 2, pp. 400-i02, London, 1851, 8°.
A vocabulary of 45 words in each of the above-
named languages. The first was collected at
Great Slave Lake from an interpreter, the second from Nanette, an interpreter at Fort Simpson, both in 1844.
Reprinted in the later editions of the same
work, for titles of which see Richardson (J.)
Legends:
Chippewyan See Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
Loucheux Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
Peau de Lievre Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
Slave Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
[Legoff (Bev. Laurent).] Promissiones
Domini Nostri Jesu Christi factae B.
Marg. M. Alacoque. | D6gay6 Margrit
Mari bepade ekkoredyain, Jesus |
ttahoneltte deneca hourzhzi, tta yed-
ziy*6 | padasanoudelni walessi, Don
aneltte sin: Addi:
[Dayton, Ohio: Philip A. Kemper.
1888.]
A small card, 3 by 5 inches in size, headed as
above and containing twelve "Promises of Our
Lord to Blessed Margaret Mary," in the Montagnais language, on the verso of which is a
colored picture of the sacred heart with inscription, in English, below. Mr. Kemper has
published the same Promises on similar cards
in many languages.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
 Cours | d'instructions | en | langue
montagnaise | par | le rev. pere Lego ft",
Ptre | oblat de Marie immaculee |
Montreal | imprimerie J. Fournier,
162, rue Montcalm | 1889
Cover title as above, letter to pere Legoff
fromtVital J.Ev.de St-Albert O.M.I, (dated
from He a. la Crosse, le 26 septembre 1887, approving the work) recto blank 11. title as above
verso blank 1 1. text (in roman characters with
some special characters, headings in French)
pp. 3-444, table des matieres pp. i-v, errata p.
[vi], 8°.
Symbols des apotres, Mystere de la ste-tri- ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
53
Legoff (L.) — Continued.
■ nito, crdatiou, etc. (instructions 1-47), pp. 3-
229.—Decalogue (48-56), pp. 229-263. —Vertus
theologales (57-59), pp. 263-274.—Sur la priere
(60-67), pp. 274-307. — Graudes verites (68-81),
pp. 307-370.— Sermons detaches ou de circon-
•itance (82-100), pp. 371-144.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Eames,
Gatschet, Pilling, Wellesley.
 Grammaire | de la | langue monta-
gnaise | par | le rev. pere Laurent
Legoff, ptre | oblat de Marie imma-
cul6e |
Montreal | 50, rue Cotte, 50 | 1889
Cover title as above, half-title verso blank
1 1. title as above verso blank 1 1. bishop's approval verso blank 11. dedication verso blank 1
1. introduction pp. 9-24, text pp. 25-342, table of
contents pp. 343-351, errata verso blank 1 1.
folding table of verbs between pp. 110-111,8°.
General remarks concerning the Montagnais
and their language, pp. 9-13. — Montagnais
alphabet and words, pp. 13-24.—Of the article
and other determinatives, pp. 25-28.—Noun or
substantive, pp. 29-44.—Pronouns, pp. 45-63.—
Adverbs, pp. 64-86.—Prepositions and postpositions, pp. 87-95.—Conjunctions, pp. 96-98.—Interjections, pp. 99-101. — Adjectives, pp. 103-
117.—Verbs, pp. 118-326.— Terms of relation-
t. shin, pp. 327-331.—Names of parts of the body,
pp. 331-336.—Names of parts of the bodies of
fishes and birds, pp. 336-337.—Sentences, the
most commonly employed in conversation, pp.
338-342.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Eames,
Pilling, Wellesley.
Reviewed by Gatschet (A. S.), in the American Antiquarian, vol. 11, p. 389, Nov., 1889.
(Pilling.)
 Histoire | de | l'ancien testament |
raeontee aux Montagnais | par | le rev.
pere Laurent Legoff, ptre | oblat do
Marie iinniaculee |
Montreal | 50, rue Cotte, 50 | 1889
Cover title as above, half-title verso blank
1 1. title as above verso blank 1 1. bishop's approval verso blank 11. dedication verso blank 1
1. text iu roman characters pp. 7-200, table of
contents pp. 201-214, errata 1 p. 8°.
The text consists of thirty-three chapters,
carrying the bible narrative from the creation
of the world to the time of Jesus Christ.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Eames,
Pilling, Wellesley.
 Katolik | Deneya   ' tiye   dittlisse |
Livre de prieres | en langue monta-
gnaise | Parle Rev. Pere Legoff, O.M.I.
[Two lines Latin; two lines Montagnais] | [Oblate seal] |
Montreal | C. O. Beanchemin &, fills,
Libraires-Imprimeurs, | 256 et 258 rue
Saint-Paul. | 1890 | [Two lines Mon-
tagnais]
Legoff (L.) — Continued.
Cover title as above, title as above verso approbation of t Vital J. Grandin O. M. I.
Eveque de St-Albert 1 1. alphabet (in roman
characters)^j. 3, systeme alphabetique montagnais [syllabary], pp. 4^5, text (roman characters, with a few special ones; headings in
French) pp. 7-398, table pp. 399-404, 16°.
Anciennes prieres du matin et du soir, pp. 7-
16. — Pridres corrigees, pp. 17-36. — Maniere
d'administrer le bapteme, pp. 37-46.—La sainte
messe, pp. 47-78.—Chemin de la croix, pp. 79-
108.—Devotions, etc. pp. 109-126.—Catechisme,
pp. 127-189.—Appendice au catechisme, pp. 190-
222.—Cantiques, pp. 223-394.— Hymn set to
music, pp. 395-398.
Copies seen: Eames, Gatschet, Pilling, Wellesley.
 Livre | de prieres | en langue mon-
tagnaise | [One line syllabic characters] | Par le Rev. Pere Legoff, O. M.
I. | [Two lines French; two lines syllabic characters] |
Montreal. | C. O. Beauchemin &. fils,
Libraires-Imprimeurs, | 256 et 258 rue
Saint-Paul. | 1890 | [Two lines syllabic
characters]
Cover title as above, title verso approbation
of t Vital J. Grandin O. M. I. Eveque de St-
Albert 11. roman alphabet p. 3, systeme alphabetique montagnais [syllabary] pp. 4-5, text (in
syllabic characters, with French headings) pp.
7-433, table pp. 435-440, 16°.
Contents as under the next previous title except that there is no "appendice" to the catechism, and the four pages of music are omitted.
Copies seen.- Eames, Gatschet, Pilling, Wellesley.
Pere Legoff was born at Landeda, diocese of
Quimper, Finistere. He pursued his classical
studies at the college of Lesneven, and his theological stndies partly at the Seminary of Quimper, partly at Au tun, at the scholasticate of tho
congregation of the Virgin Mary, to which he
belongs. Ordained a priest on the 26th of May,
1866, he immediately received instructions and
left France for America the 5th of the following
July. He arrived at St. Boniface on the 14th of
October, and was sent from there to St. Joseph,
near Pembina, where he remained until the
21st of May, 1867. On his return to St. Boniface he received orders to go to the mission of
St. Peter, on Lake Caribou, where he arrived
the 4th of October, remaining until the 15th of
June, 1870, when he left for the lie k la Crosse,
where he arrived at the end of July. There he
remained until July. 1881, during which time
he composed the books titled above. His health
failing, he proceeded to St. Boniface, where
he received medical treatment for nine months.
In May, 1882, he started for his mission, reaching there July 15, where he has since remained,
except during the time spent in Montreal while
his books were going through the press. 54
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
Lenox: This word following a title or within parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of the
work referred to has been seen by tho compiler
in the Lenox Library, New York City.
Lesley (Joseph Peter). On the insensible
gradation of words, by J. P. Lesley.
In American Philosoph. Soc. Proc. vol. 7, pp.
129-155, Philadelphia, 3861, 8°.   (Congress.)
Contains a fow words in Chippewyan.
Lessons and prayers | in the | Tenni or
Slavi language | of the | Indians of
Mackenzie river, | in the | north-west
territory of Canada. | [Seal of the S.
P.C.K.]|
[London:] Society for promoting
christian knowledge, | Northumberland
avenue, Charing cross,W. C.   [1890.]
Title verso blank 1 1. text in the Tenni language with English headings pp. 3-81, 16°.
Possibly by Rev. W. D. Reeve, or Bishop Bompas.
Lessons (1-66), pp. 3-66.—Family prayers, pp.
67-76.—Private prayers, pp. 76-81.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
Lipan:
Lord's prayer
Lord's prayer
Lord's prayer
Vocabulary
Words
See Bancroft (H. H.)
Coleccion.
Pimentel (F.)
Gatschet (A. S.)
Bollaert (W.)
■JflCflHCKlit (IOPlE). [Lisiansky (Capt.
Urey).] HyTeoiecTBie | BOKprt CB'BTa bt> |
1803.4.5. h 1806 ro^axt, | no noBCi'sniro |
ero HMnepampcKaro BejuiecTBa | A.ieKcaH^pa
HepBaro, | na i;opao.rI; | HeB*, | noAi> naia.n>c
TBO)f& I *.iora KanHTaHijeflTeaaHTa, nwirt
KanHTaHa | l-ro pa nra a KaBajcpa | K)pia
JlHcaacKaro. | Ibctb nepBa«[-BT0paa]. |
CaHKTiieTepfiyprii, B"b THDorpa*in 0. Apex-
ciepa, | 1812.
Translation.—Voyage | around the world | in
the years 1803,4, 5 and 1806, | by order of | his
imperial majesty | Alexander I, | on the ship |
Neva, | under command | of captain-lieutenant
of the navy, now captain | of the 1st rank and
knight | Urey Lisiansky. | Vol. I[-II]. |
St. Petersburg, in the printing-office of Th.
Drechsler, | 1812.
2 vols. 8°.
Vocabulary (about 500 words) of the languages of the northwestern parts of America,
Russian-Kadiak-Kenai, vol. 2, pp. 154-181.
Copies seen: British Museum, Congress.
 A | voyage round the world, [ in |
the years 1803, 4, 5, &6; | performed |
by order of his imperial majesty | Alexander the First, emperor of Russia, | in
| the ship Neva, j by | Urey Lisiansky,
Lisiansky (U.)—Continued.
| captain in the Russian navy, and |
knight of the orders of St. George and ^
St. Vladimer. |
London: |  Printed  for John Booth,
Duke   street, Portland   place;   and |  ;
Longman, Hurst, Rees,Orme, &. Brown,
Paternoster    row; | by    S.   Hamilton,
Weybridge, Surrey. | 1814.
Pp. i-xxi, 1 1. pp. 1-388, maps, 4°.
Linguistic contents as under next previous
title, pp. 329-337.
Copies seen: Astor, Boston Athenaeum, British Museum, Congress.
.A copy at the Pinart sale, no. 1372, brought
5 fr.
These vocabularies reprinted in Davidson
(G.), Report relative to * * * Alaska, in Coast
Survey, Ann. Rept. 1867, pp. 293-298, Washington, 1869, 4°; again in Davidson (G.), Report
relative to * * * Alaska, in Ex. Doc. 77,40th
Cong., 2d sess., pp. 328-333; and again in
Davidson (G.), in Coast Survey, Coast Pilot of
Alaska, pp. 215-221,Washington, 1869. 8°. For
extracts see Schott (W.); Zagoskin (L. A.);
Zelenoi (S. J.)
Loew (Dr. Oscar). Vocabulary of the
Apache and of the Navajo.
In Gatschet (A. S.), Zwolf Sprachen aus
dem Sudwesten Nordamerikas, pp. 98-115,
Weimar, 1876,8°.
Contains about 400 words each. Scattered
throughout the same work are many phrases,
remarks on grammatic construction, etc., all
from Dr. Loew's manuscripts.
 Vocabulary of the Arivaipa language.
In Wheeler (G. M.), Report upon H. S. Geog.
Survey, vol. 7, pp. 424-465, 469, Washington,
1879, 4°.
Contains 211 words in the first division and
80 words and sentences in the second. Collected
in Arizona, September, 1879.
 Vocabulary of the Navajo language.
In Wheeler (G. M.), Reports upon TJ. S. Geog.
Survey, vol. 7, pp. 424-465, 469, Washington,
1879, 4°.
Contains 217 words in the first division and 26
additional words and sentences in the second.
.  Collected in New Mexico, June, 1873.
Lord's. The Lord's Prayer | In one hundred and thirty-one tongues. | Containing all the principal languages |spoken
| in Europe, Asia, Africa, and America. |
London: | St. Paul's Publishing Company, | 12, Paternoster Square,   [n. d.]
Title verso blank 1 1. preface (signed F. Pin-
cott, fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society) pp.
1-2, contents pp. 3-4, text pp. 5-62, 12°.
Lord's prayer in the Chippewyan or Tinne
(roman and syllabic), p. 61.
Copies seen: Church Missionary Society. ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
55
Lord's prayer:
Chippewyan
Chippewyan
Chippewyan
Chippewyan
Chippewyan
Chippewyan
Dog Rib
Lipan
Lipan
Lipan
Slave
Slave
Slave
Slave
Tinne
Tukudh
Tukudh
See Apostolides (S.)
Bergholtz (G.F.)
Bompas (W. C.)
Kirkby (W. W.)
Lord's.
Rost(R.)
Bompas (W. W.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Coleccion.
Pimentel (F.)
Bergholtz (G.F.)
Kirkby (W.W.)
Reeve (W.D.)
Rost (R.)
Bompas (W. C.)
Bompas (W. C.)
Rost (R.)
Lototen.   See Tututen.
Loucheux:
Dictionary See Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
Grammatic comments Miiller (F.)
Grammatic treatise Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
Legends Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
Relationships Morgan (L. H.)
Songs Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
Text Promissiones.
Vocabulary Bancroft (H. H.)
Vocabulary    ,_ ■ • Buschmann (J. C.E.j
Vocabulary Isbester (J. A.)
Vocabulary Latham (R. G.)
Words Daa (L. K.)
Words Gibbs (G.)
Words Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
Lubbock (Sir John). The | origin of
civilisation | and the | primitive condition of man. | Mental and social condition of savages. [ By | sir John Lubbock, Bart., M. P., F. R. S. | author
[&c. two lines.] |
London: | Longmans, Green, and co.
| 1870.
Half-title verso printers 1 1. frontispiece 1 1.
title verso blank 1 1. preface pp.v-viii, contents p. ix, list of illustrations pp. xi-xii, list
of principal works quoted pp. xiii-xvi, text
pp. 1-323, appendix pp. 325-362, notes pp. 363-
365, index pp. 367-380, four other plates, 8°.
A few words in Tahkali, Tlatskanai, and
Athabascan, p. 288.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Congress, Eames.
 The I origin of civilisation | and the
| primitive condition of man. | Mental
and social condition of savages. | By |
sir John Lubbock, Bart., M. P., F. R. S.
| Author [&c. two lines.] |
New York: | D. Appleton and  company, | 90, 92 &   94   Grand   street. |
1870.
Lubbock (J.) — Continued.
Half-titlo verso blank 1 1. froutispiece 1 1.
title verso blank 1 1. preface to the American
edition pp. iii-iv, preface pp. v-viii, contents
p. ix, illustrations pp. xi-xii, list of principal
works quoted pp. xiii-xvi, text pp. 1-323, appendix pp. 325-362, notes pp. 363-365, index pp.
367-380, four other plates, 12°.
Linguistics as under title next above, p. 288.
Copies seen: Pilling.
 The | origin of civilisation | and the
| primitive condition of num. | Mental
and social condition of savages. | By |
sir John Lubbock,Bart., M. P., F. R. S.
| Author   [&c. two lines.]   |   Second
edition with additions. |
London: | Longmans, Green, and co.
| 1870.
Pp. i-xvi, 1-426, 8°.
Linguistics as under titles above, p. 327.
Copies seen: British Museum.
 The | origin of civilisation [ and the
| primitive condition of man.. [Mental
and social condition of savages. | By |
sir John Lubbock, Bart., M. P., F. R.
S^ | Vice Chancellor [&c. three lines.]
| Third edition, Avith numerous additions. |
London: | Longmans, Green, and co.
| 1875.
Linguistics as under titles above, pp. 416-
417.
Copies seen: British Museum.
 The | origin of civilisation | and the
| primitive condition of man. | Mental
and social condition of savages. | By |
Sir John Lubbock, Bart. M. P. F. R. S.
| D. C. L. LL. D. | President [&c. five
lines.] | Fourth edition, with numerous
additions. |
London: | Longmans, Green, and co.
| 1882.
. Half-title verso list of works "'by the same
author " 11. frontispiece 11. title verso printers
1 1. preface pp. v-viii, contents pp. ix-xiii,
illustrations pp. xv-xvi, list of the principal
works quoted pp. xvii-xx, text pp. 1-480, appendix pp. 481-524, notes pp. 525-533, index pp. 535-
548, five other plates, 8°.
Linguistics as under titles above, p. 427.
Copies seen: Eames.
 The | origin of civilisation | and^the
| primitive condition of man | Mental
and social condition of savages | By |
sir John Lubbock, hart. | M. P., F. R.
S., D. C. L., LL. D. | Author [&c. four
lines] | Fifth Edition, with numerous
Additions I 56
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
Lubbock (J.) — Continued.
London | Longmans, Green, and co |
1889 | All rights reserved
Half-title verso printers 11. frontispiece 1 1.
title verso blank 1 1. preface (dated February,
1870) pp. vii-x, contents pp. xi-xvi, illustrations
pp. xvii-xviii, list of principal works quoted
pp. xix-xxiii. text pp. 1-486, appendix pp. 487-
529, notes pp. 531-539, index pp. 541-554, list of
works by the same author verso blank 1 1. five
other plates, 8°.
Linguistics as under titles above, p. 432.
Copies seen: Eames.
Lucy-Fossarieu (M. P. de). Extrait | du
compte rendu st<Snographique | du
Congres international | des sciences
ethnographiques, | tenu a Paris du 15
au 17 juillet 1878. | Les langues indi-
ennes | de la Californie. | Etude de
philologie ethnographique, | par M. P.
de Lucy-Fossarieu, | membre du con-
seil central de l'Institution ethnographique, | laur6at de la Societe" ameri-
caine de France. | [Design.] |
Paris. | Imprimerie nationale. | M
DCCC LXXXI [1881].
Cover title as above, half-title verso blank 1
1. title as aboveverso blank 11. text pp. 5-55,8°.
Vocabulary of the Loloten or Tutatamys, pp.
20,24,28,32, 36,40,44,48,52,54.
Copies seen: Brinton, Pilling.
Ludewig (Hermann Ernst). The | literature | of | American aboriginal languages. | By | Hermann E. Ludewig. |
With additions and corrections | by
professor Wm. W. Turner. | Edited by
Nicolas Triibner. |
London: | Triibner and co., 60, Paternoster row. | MDCCCLVIII [1858].
Half-title " Triibner's bibliotheca glottica I"
verso blank 1 1. title as above verso printer 11.
preface pp. v-viii, contents verso blank 1 1. editor's advertisement pp. ix-xii, biographical
memoir pp. xiii-xiv, introductory bibliographical notices pp. xv-xxiv, text pp. 1-209, addenda pp. 210-246, index pp. 247-256, errata pp.
257-258, 8°. Arranged alphabetically by languages. Addenda by Wm. W. Turner and
Nicolas Triibner, pp. 210-246.
Contains a list of grammars and vocabularies,
and among others of tho following peoples:
American languages generally, pp. xv-xxiv;
Apaches, pp. 8, 211; Athapascan, pp. 14, 211;
Atnah, pp. 15, 212; Beaver, p. 18; Chepewyan,
pp. 35-36,215-216; Dogrib, p. 66; Hoo-pah, p. 82;
Hudson's Bay, pp. 83-84, 223; Kinai, pp. 92-93,
225; Koltschanes, p. 96; Kutchin, Loucheux,
pp.99,226; Lipan, p.226; Navajos, pp. 132-133,
233; Pinalefios, p. 150; Sicannis, p. 175; Sussee,
p. 178; Tacullies, pp. 178-179,240; Tah-lewah, p.
Ludewig (H. E.) — Continued.
179; Ticorillas (Jicarillas),  p.   186, 241; Tlatskanai, p. 189; TJmpqua, pp. 195, 244.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Congress,
Eames, Pilling.
At the Fischer sale, no. 990, a copy brought
5*.6d.; at the Field sale, no. 1403, $2.63; at the
Squier sale, no. 699, $2.62; another copy, no. 1906,
$2.38. Priced by Leclerc, 1878, no. 2075. 15 fr.
The Pinart copy, no. 565, sold for 25 fr., and the
Murphy copy, no. 1540, for $2.50.
Dr. Ludewig has himself so fully detailed the
plan and purport of this work that little more
remains for me to add beyond the mere statement of the origin of my connection with the
publication, and the mention of such additions
for which I am alone responsible, and which, j
during its progress through the press, have
gradually accumulated to about one-sixth of
the whole. This is but an act of justice to the
memory of Dr. Ludewig; because at the time of
his death, in December, 1856, no more than 172
pages were printed off, and these constitute the
only portion of the work which had the benefit
of his valuable personal and final revision.
Similarity of pursuits led, during-my stay in.
New York in 1855, to an intimacy with Dr.
Ludewig, during which he mentioned that he,
like myself, had been making bibliographical
memoranda for years of all books which server
to Illustrate the history of spoken langu age. As
a first section of amore extended work on the literary history of language generally, he had pre-
pared a bibliographical memoir of the remains of
the aboriginal languages of America. The manuscript had been deposited by him in the library
of the Ethnological Society at New York, but
at my request he at once most kindly placed it
at my disposal, stipulating only that it should
be printed in Europe, under my personal superintendence.
Hpon my return to England, I lost no time in
carrying out the trust thus confided to me, intending then to confine myself simply to producing a correct copy of my friend'smanuscript.
But it soon became obvious that the transcript
had been hastily made, and but for the valuable assistance of literary friends, both in this
country and in America, the work would prob-.
ably have been abandoned. My thank s are more
particularly due to Mr. E. G. Squier, and to Prof.
William W. Turner, of Washington, by whose
considerate and valuable cooperation many difficulties were cleared away and my editorial
labors greatly lightened. This encouraged me
to spare neither personal labor nor-expense in
the attempt to render the work as perfect as
possible; with what success must be left to
the j udgment of those w ho can fairly appreciate
the labors of a pioneer in any new field of literary research.—Editor's advertisement.
Dr. Ludewig, though but little known in this
country [England], was held in considerable
esteem as a jurist, both in Germany and the
United States of America. Born at Dresden in
1809, with but little exception he continued to ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
57
Ludewig (H. E.) — Continued.
reside in his native city until 1844, when he
emigrated to America; but, though in both
countries he practiced law as a profession, his
bent was the study of literary history, which
was evidenced by his " Livre des Ana, Essai
de Catalogue Manuel," published at his own
cost in 1837, and by his "Bibliothekonomie,"
which appeared a few years later.
But, even whilst thus engaged, he delighted in
investigating the rise and progress of the land
of his subsequent adoption, and his researches
into the vexed question of the origin of the
peopling of America gained him the highest
consideration, on both sides of the Atlantic, as
a man of original and inquiring mind. He was
a contributor to Naumann's '• Serapseum;" and
amongst the chief of his contributions to that
journal may be mentioned those on "American
Libraries," on the "Aids to American Bibliography," and on the "Book-Trade of the United
States of America." In 1846 appeared his "Literature of American Local History," a work of
much importance and which required no small
amount of labor and perseverance, owing to
the necessity of consulting the many an d widely
scattered materials, which had to be sought
out from apparently themost unlikely channels.
These studies formed a natural induction to
the present work on " The Literature of American Aboriginal Languages," which occupied
his leisure concurrently with the others, and the
printing of which was commenced in August,
1856, but which he did not live to see launched
upon the world; for at the date of his death, on
the 12th of December following, only 172 pages
were in type. It had been a labor of love with
him for years; and if ever author wero mindful
Ludewig (H. E.) — Continued.
of the nonum prematur in annum, he was when
he deposited his manuscript in the library of the
American Ethnological Society, diffident himself as to its merits and value on a subject of
such paramount interest. He had satisfied himself that in due time the reward of his patient
industry might be the production of some more
extended national work on the subject, and
with this he was contented; for it was a distinguishing feature in his character, notwithstanding his great and varied knowledge and
brilliant acquirements, to disregard his own
toil, even amounting to drudgery if needful, if
he could in any way assist in the promulgation
of literature and science.
Dr. Ludewig was a corresponding member of
many of the most distinguished European and
American literary societies, and few men were
held in greater consideration by scholars both
in America and Germany, as will readily be
acknowledged should his voluminous correspondence ever see the light. In private life.he
was distinguished by the best qualities which
endear a man's memory to those who survive
him: he was a kind and affectionate husband
and a sincere friend. Always accessible and
ever ready to aid and counsel those who applied
to him for advice upon matters appertaining to
literature, his loss will long be felt by a most
extended circle of friends, and in him Germany
mourns one of the best representatives of her
learned men in America, a genuine type of a
class in which, with singular felicity, to genius
of the highest order is combined a painstaking
and plodding perseverance but seldom met
with beyond the confines of " the Fatherland."—Biographic memoir.
M.
McDonald (Bev. Robert). [Terms of
relationship of the Tukuthe, collected
by R. McDonald, esq., a factor of the
company, Peel River Fort, Hudson's
Bay Territory, June, 1865.]
In Morgan (L. H.), Systems of consanguinity
and affinity of the human family, pp. 293-382,
lines 68, Washington, 1871,4°.
 A selection | from the | book of common prayer, | according to the use of
the | United Church of England and
Ireland. | Translated into | Tukudh, |
by the rev. R. M'Donald, | missionary
of  the Church   missionary society. |
[Seal of the S. P. C. K.] |
London: | Society for Promoting
Christian Knowledge, | 77, Great Queen
street, Lincoln's-innTfields; | 4, Royal
exchange; and 48, Piccadilly. | 1873.
Title verso printers 11. text with headings in
English pp. 1-123, 18°.
Order for morning prayer, pp. 1-9.—Order for
McDonald (R.) — Continued.
evening prayer, pp. 10-18 Prayers,   pp. 19-
20.—Order of the administration of the Lord's
supper, pp. 20-53.—Baptism of infants, pp. 54-
66; of adults, pp. 66-78.—Solemnization of matrimony, pp. 79-93.—Burial of the dead, pp. 94-
104.—Chilig [hymns, nos. i-xxx], pp. 105-123.
Copies seen: Church Missionary Society,
Eames, Pilling, Society for Promoting Christian
Knowledge.
[ ] Nuwheh kukwadhud Jesus Christ
| vih kwunduk nirzi | Matthew, Mark,
Luke, John | ha rsiotitinyokhai kirre
| kwitinyithutluth    kwikit.   |   John
rsiotitinyoo   vih   etunetle | tig    ha |
Tukudh tsha zit | thleteteitazya. |
London, | 1874.
Colophon: London: printed by Wm. Clowes
and sons, Stamford street | and Charing cross.
Literal translation.—Our lord Jesus Christ |
the gospel of | Matthew, Mark, Luke, John |
by them written | epistle first of | John written
by him | into the | Tukudh tongue [translated. 58
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF  THE
McDonald (R.) — Continued.
Title verso blank 11. text (with chapter titles
in English) pp. 3-267, 12°.
Matthew, pp. 3-75.—Mark, pp. 76-121.—Luke,
pp. 122-199 John,   pp.  199-257.—Epistles of
John i-iii, pp. 257-267.
Copies seen : Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
■ Ettunetle   choh | kwunduk | nyuk-
wun treltsei.   | Rev.  M.   Ostervald, |
kirkhe. | Ven. archdeacon   McDonald,
| kirkhe  thleteteitazya Takudh tsha
zit. | [Seal of the S. P. C. K.] |
London: | Society for promoting
christian knowledge, I Northumberland
avenue, Charing cross, W. C. [1885.]
Title verso blank 1 1. text (Osterwald's
abridgment of the history of the bible; with
the exception of chapter titles in English, entirely in the Takudh language) pp. 3-23,16°.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, Wellesley.
 Ettunetle | tutthug   enjit    gichin-
chik | ako | sakrament rsikotitinyoo |
ako chizi | thlelchil nutinde akp kindi
| kwunttlutritili | Ingland thlelchil )
tungittiyin kwikit. | Takudh tsha
zit thleteteitazya | ven. archdeacon
McDonald, D. D., j kirkhe. | [Seal of
the S. P. C. K.] |
London: | Society for promoting
christian knowledge, | Northumberland
avenue, Charing cross, W. C. [1885.]
English HUe: Book of common prayer | and
| administration of the sacraments, | and other
| rites and ceremonies of the church | according to the use of the | church of England.]
(Tho Preface and Tables are printed in English, and the Epistles | and Gospels are not inserted, except those taken from the Old | Testament, which are given at the end. The
Psalter, the Form \ of Prayer to be used at Sea,
the Ordination Service, and the | Articles of
Religion are omitted from this Edition.) |
Translated into the Takudh tongue | by I ven.
archdeacon McDonald, D. D. | [Seal of the
S.P.C.K.] |
London: | Society for promoting christian
knowledge, | Northumberland avenue, Charing
cross, W. C.   [1885.]
Takudh title verso 1.1 recto blank, English
title recto 1.2 verso blank, preface, concerning
the service of the church, of ceremonies, etc. 2
11. proper lessons etc. 4 11. tables and rules 411.
text (with the exception of a few headings in
English, entirely in the Takudh language) pp.
1-221,16°.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, Wellesley.
Some copies differ in title-page aud collation,
as follows:
McDonald (R.) — Continued.
 Ettunetle | tutthug enjit gichinchik
| ako | sakrament rsikotitinyoo | ako
chizi | thlelchil nutinde ako kindi |
kwunttlutritli | Ingland thlelchil |
tungittiyin kwikit. | (The Epistles and
Gospels are not inserted.) | Takudh
tsha zit thleteteitazya | ven. archdeacon McDonald, D. D., | kirkhe. | [Seal
of the S. P. C. K.] |
London:   |   Society   for   promoting
christian knowledge, ] Northumberland
avenue, Charing cross, W. C. [1885.]
'  English  title:   Book  of common  prayer |
and | administration of the  sacraments | and
other | rites and ceremonies of • the church |
according to the use of the | Church of England. | (The Preface and Tables are printed in
English, and the Epistles and Gospels are not
inserted, except those taken from the Old |
Testament, which are given  at  the end.) |
Translated into the Takudh tongue | by | ven.
archdeacon   McDonald, D. D. | [Seal  of the
S.P.C.K.] |
London: | Society for promoting christian
knowledge, | Northumberland avenue, Charing
cross, W. C.    [1885.]
Takudh title verso 1. 1 recto blank, English
titlo recto 1.2 verso blank, text (with the exception of a few headings in English, entirely in
the Takudh language) pp. 1-221, 16°.
Tha preface and tables mentioned on the
English title-page are omitted from the only
copy I have seen.
Copies seen: Pilling.
 Ochikthud   ettunetle    trootshid, |
ako | ettunetle choh trorzi ochikthud |
ettunetle ] ako | thlukwinadhun   ket-
chid trorzi kah | dr. Watts, | kirkhe. |
Thleteteitazya  |  archdeacon  McDonald, D. D., | kirkhe. |
London: | printed by the Religious
tract society. | 1885.
Title verso blank 1 1. text (entirely in the,
Takudh language) pp. 3-17,16°.
Catechism, pp. 3-8.—Old Testament passages, pp. 9-13.—New Testament passages, pp.
14-17.
Copies seen.- Pilling.
[ ] Tukudh hymns.
[London: Society for promoting
christian knowledge.   1885.]
Colophon: Printed by William Clowes and
sons, limited, London and Beccles.
No title-page or heading, title above from
outside cover, syllabarium pp. i-iv, text (entirely in the Tukudh language) pp. 1-74,16°.
Chilig [hymns, nos. i-lxxvi], pp. 1-58.—
Doxologies, nos. i-iv, p. 59.—Canticles, pprfiO-
65.—Catechism, pp. 66-74. ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
59
McDonald (R.) — Continued.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, Wellesley.
A later edition, with title-page, as follows:
 Chilig | Takudh tshah zit. | Hymns
| in Takudh language. | Composed and
translated | by the | ven. archdeacon
McDonald, D.D. | [Seal of the S. P. C.
K.]|
London: | Society for promoting
christian knowledge, | Northumberland
avenue, Charing cross, W. C. | 1890.
Colophon: Printed by William Clowes and
sons, limited, | London and Beccles.
Title on cover "Takudh hymns," inside title
as above verso blank 1 1. syllabarium pp. iii-vi,
text (entirely in the Takudh language) pp. 1-89,
colophon p. [90], 16°. The textual matter of
pp. 1-58 of this edition agrees page for page
with- those pages in the edition titled next,
above; though the matter has been entirely
reset, I think.
Chilig [hymns, nos. 1-94], pp. 1-73.—Doxol-
ogies, nos. i-iv, p. 74.—Canticles, pp. 75-80.—
Ochikthut etunetle [catechism], pp. 81-89.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
 Zzehkko enjit gichinchik | nekwazzi
ttrin ihthlog kenjit | ako gichinchik |
ttrin kittekookwichiltshei kenjit kah.
| Bp. Oxenden  vut   sun   kwut   sut |
thleteteitazya | chizi gichinchik kah |
tikyinchiknut ako trinyunnut enjit. |
Chutrua kenjit gichinchik tthui, | ako
| chunkyo rsotitinyoo enjit gichinchik,
| archdeacon McDonald.   |  Kirkhe. |
[Seal of the S. P. C. K.]'|
London: | Society for promoting
christian knowledge, [ Northumberland
avenue, Charing cross, W. C.    [1885.]
Title verso blank 1 1. text (Oxenden's family
prayers, entirely in the Tukudh language, with
the exception of a few phrases in English) pp.
3-50, 16°.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, Wellesley.
 David vi   psalmnut. | Takudh tsha
zit   thleteteitazya | veu.    archdeacon
McDonald,   D.  D. | kirkhe. | [Seal   of j
the S. P. C. K.] |
Winnipeg, Man.: [ Printed by Robt.
D.  Richardson | for   the | Society   for
Promoting    Christian    Knowledge, |
London. | 1886.
Title verso blank 11. text (with the exception
of headings in English and Latin, entirely iu
the Takudh language) pp. 1-195, 16°.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, Wellesley.
McDonald (R.) — Continued.
 The | new testament | of | our lord
and saviour | Jesus Christ. [Translated
into     Takudh   by | ven.   archdeacon
McDonald, D. D. |
London: | printed   for   the   British
and foreign bible society. | 1886.
Title verso blank 11. text (with chapter designations in English) pp. 5-576, 16°.
Matthew, pp. 5-76.—Mark, pp. 77-122.—Luke,
pp. 123-200.—John, pp. 200-257.—Acts, pp. 259-
333.—Epistles, pp. 333-537.—Revelation, pp. 538-
576.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
On page 251 of his work entitled "The Indians," Toronto, 1889, Rev. John McLean comments on a syllabary by Archdeacon McDonald
as follows:
1' Several -years ago the Venerable Archdeacon McDonald, whose mission is on the Yukon
and who for a term of years dwelt one mile
within the Arctic Circle, invented a very elaborate syllabary, which he applied to the Tukudh
language, one of the family of the Hyperborean
languages. The syllabary consisted of 400 syllables, which, when thoroughly memorized,
enabled the Tukudh Indians to read their own
language with perfect ease. Having translated
the New Testament and Prayer Book, he
utilized his syllabic system, and so accurate
was its construction that in four months the
natives could read the Word of God. Great
benefits flowed to the people from this invention,
as they speedily learned the truths of morality
and religion for themselves."
Having never seen any publication in the
Tukudh language printed in what is usually
termed a syllabary, my interest was aroused,
and under date of March 9, 1889, I wrote Mr.
McLean for such further particulars as he
might be able to furnish. Under date of March
28 he replied as follows:
" My statement is based upon the following:
The archdeacon was in Winnipeg three or four
years ago and was interviewed by a reporter
of the Manitoba Free Press. The report of that
interview was a long one, which I have preserved in my scrapbook. In this report is the
' following: A syllabary has been made of the
syllable's made use of in the language. While
the syllables of the Cree language number only
about 32, the syllabary required for the Tukudh
contains about 500 syllables; and this, notwithstanding the apparent difficulty, some of the
Indians have learned in a fortnight. These
syllables are written out in Roman letters.
Some of the more intelligent have learned to
read the gospels fairly within three months.'
I have an interview held with the archdeacou's
brother, and several references to the archdeacon in letters which he wrote himself and were
printed in the newspapers; also letters and
notes of travel by Hudson Bay Company's
officers.    This, however, is the only reference,.' 60
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF   THE
McDonald (R.) —Continued.
to the syllabary; but, a3 it was so explicit, I
felt that surely there could be no doubt concerning it. Should you find it to be incorrect I
would feel obliged if you would kindly let me
know, as I am very desirous of being accurate "
Under date of August 6, 1890, Mr. McLean
again wrote ino, as follows:
" When first I read the accountof Archdeacon
McDonald's syllabary I was under the impression that it was composed of characters similar
to the Evans characters, in the Tukudh language. I am not now of that opinion. I think
he must arrange the Roman characters in the
form of a syllabary and by this means teach
the Indians to read rapidly."
In his letter was inclosed a clipping from the
Regina Leader of July 8, 1890, published at
Regina, Assiniboia, N. W. T., reading as follows:
" Oyer one year ago a famous American ethnologist wrote to the Rev. Dr. McLean, Moose
Jaw, calling in question some statements made
by him in his book on The Indians of Canada,
relating to the existence of a syUabary of tho
Takudh language. Dr. McLean replied that he
had excellent authority for his statement, but
that he would write at once to Dr.- R. McDonald,
of Peel River, inventor of the syllabary, and
learn particulars. As Dr. McDonald's mission
house for a time was one mile within the Arctic
Circle it was expected that it would take two
years to receive a reply to the letter. An answer has just been received, within thirteen
months, and a copy of the syllabary, the contents of the letter corroborating Dr. McLean's
statements in his book 'The Indians of Canada,' and in his latest work, just published,
' James Evans, Inventor of the S3'llabic System of the Cree Language.' The following is
a copy of the letter:
"' St. Matthew's,
"'Peel River, January22, '90.
"'TheRev. John McLean:
" 'Dear Sir: I send you a copy of the syllabary referred to. You will observe that very
few of the rows after the first page are complete, simply through want of space. This will
show that there is no exaggeration. As to the
time taken in learning to read in the Takudh
tongue by means of the syllabary, instead of
exaggerating, the fact is it is understated rather
than otherwise in some cases; for instance,
there is one that learnt the syllabary in three
days and to read the gospels in about a month.
I may say that I do not claim great credit for
the invention of the syllabary. It was suggested by Evans's syllabic characters.
"' With high consideration,
• • 'Yours respectfully,
"' R. McDonald, D. D.,
" 'Archdeacon.'"
Mr. McLean was correct as to the make-up of
the syllabary.  In the'' Tukudh Hymns,'' titled
above, the "syllabarium" is given in the preliminary pages and consists simply of combi-
McDonald (R.) — Continued.
nations of two, three, four, and five Roman
characters, such as ha, he, bi, zoo, zou, zei,
zui, zit, Dhoo, Dhou, Dhei, Kdha, Tdhoo,
Kthou, etc.
For a lengthy description and afac-simile of
the Evans syllabary referred to, see the Bibliography of the Algonquian Languages, pp.
186 et seq.
McElroy (Patrick D.) Comparative
vocabulary of the English and Jicarilla Apache languages. Compiled at
Cimarron, Colfax County, New Mexico.
By Patrick D. McElroy.    1875.
Manuscript, 14 unnumbered leaves, 4°, in the
library of the Bu reau of Ethnology, Washington, D.C.
The first 511. of this manuscript consist of a
letter from the author, in which he includes a
"Vocabulary of numerals as far as seven
thousand." The succeeding 911. comprise the
"Comparative vocabulary" issued by the
Smithsonian Institution to collectors, known as
"Blank no. 170," containing 211 words (in English, Spanish, French, and Latin), of which
equivalents were desired, nearly all of which
Mr.McElroy has given.
Under the title on the first page is the following certificate :
"Tho within was prepared by P. D. McElroy,
interpreter at the Cimarron Indian Agency,
Hew Mexico, and has been tested and found to
be correct.
" AiEXR. G. Irvine,
" U. S. Indian Agent.
"W.F.M.ARNY,
"U. S. Indian Agent, New Mexico."
Mcintosh (Robert). See Gatschet (A.
S.)
Mackenzie (Sir Alexander). Voyages |
from | Montreal, | on the river St.
Laurence, | through the | continent of
North America, | to the | Frozen and
Pacific oceans; | In the Years 1789 and
1793. | With a preliminary account | of
the rise, progress, and present state of
| the fur trade | of that country. | Illustrated with maps. | By Alexander
Mackenzie, esq. |
London: | printed for T. Cadell, jun.
and W. Davies, Strand; Cobbett and
Morgan, | Pall-mall; andW. Creech, at
Edinburgh. | By R. Noble, Old-Bailey.
| M.DCCC.I [1801].
Half-title verso blank 1 1. portrait 1 1. title
verso blank 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1.
preface pp. iii-viii, general history of the fur
trade etc. pp. i-cxxxii, text pp. 1-412, errata 11.
3 maps, 4°.
Some account of the Chepewyan Indians (pp. ATHAPASCAN  LANGUAGES.
61
Mackenzie (A.) —Continued.
cxvi-cxxxii) includes "Examples of the Chepewyan tongue," a vocabulary of 140 words and
phrases, pp. cxxix-cxxxii. — Vocabulary (24
words) of the Nagailer or Chin Indians, and of
the Atnah or Carrier Indians, pp. 257-258. The
Atnah given here is Salishan, not Athapascan.
Copies seen: Astor, Bancroft, British Museum, Congress, Dunbar, Eames, Geological
Survey, Trumbull, Watkinson.
Stevens's Huggets. no. 1775, priced a copy 10s.
6d. At the Fischer sale, no. 1006, it brought 5s.;
another copy, no. 2532,2s. 6d.; at the Field sale,
no. 1447, $2.38; at the Squier sale, no. 709, $1.62;
at the Murphy sale, no. 1548, $2.25: Priced by
Quaritch, no. 12206, Is. 6d.; no. 28953, a half-
russia copy, 12.; Clarke & co. 1886, no. 4043,
$5.50; Stevens, 1887,11. Is. 6d.
 Voyages | from | Montreal,*! on   the
river St. Laurence, | through the |
continent of North America, | to the |
Frozen and Pacific oceans: | in the years
1789 and 1793. | With a preliminary
- account of | the rise, progress, and present state of | the fur trade | of | that
country. | Illustrated with a map. | By
Alexander Mackenzie, Esq. | First
American edition. |
New-York: | printed and sold by G.
F. Hopkins, at Washington's head, No.
118, Pearl-street. | 1802.
Title verso blank 1 1. dedication verso blank
1 1. preface to the London edition pp. v-viii,
text pp. 1-296, map, 8°.
Linguistics as in the edition of 1801 titled
next above, pp. 91-94, 271.
Copies seen : Astor, Boston Athena;inn.
j Voyages | from | Montreal, | on tho
river St. Laurence, | through the |
continent of North America, | to the |
Frozen and Pacific oceans; | in the years
1789 and 1793. | With a preliminary
account | of the rise, progress, and present state | of | the fur trade | of that
country. | Illustrated with | a general
map of the country. | By sir Alexander
Mackenzie. |
Philadelphia: | published by John
Morgan. | R. Carr, printer. | 1802.
2 vols, in one: half-title verso blank 1 1. title
verso blank 11. dedication verso blank 11. pref.
ace pp. i-viii, text pp. i-exxvi. 1-113; 115-392,
map, 8°.
Linguistics as in the London edition of 1801
titled above, pp. cxiii-exxvi, 246.
Copies seen: Geological Survey.
Some copies have on the title-page tho
words: " Illustrated with a general map of tho
country and a portrait of the author." (*)
At the Field sale, a copy, no. 1448, brought
$2.62,
Mackenzie (A.) — Continued.
- Voyages | d'Alex.,,rc Mackenzie; |
dans rinterienr | de | l'Anierique Sep-
tentrionale, | Faits en 1789, 1792 et
1793; | Lel.er, do Montreal aufort Chi-
piouyan et a la mer Glaciale; | Le 2.me,
du fort Chipiouyan jusqu'aux bords de
l'Oce'an | pacifique. | Pr6ce"des d'uu Tableau historique et politique sur | le
commerce des pelleteries, dans le Canada. | Traduits de 1'Anglais, | Par J.
Castdra, | Avec des Notes et uu Itino"-
raire, tire's en partie des | papiers du
vice-amiral Bougainville. | Tome Premier [-III]. |
Paris, | Dentu, Imprimeur-Libraire,
Palais du Tribunal, | galeries de hois,
n.° 240. | An X.—1802.
3 vols, maps, 8°.
Linguistics as in the first edition titled above,
vol. 1, pp. 304-310, vol. 3, p. 20.
Copies seen: Astor, Congress.
At the Fischer sale, no. 2533, a copy brought
1*.   Priced by Gagnon, Quebec, 1888, $3.
For title of an extract from this edition see
under date of 1807 below.
 Alexander Mackenzie's Esq. | Reisen
| von | Montreal durch Nordwestameri-
ka | nach dem | Eismeer und der Sitd-
See | in den Jahren 1789 und 1793. |
Nebst | einer Geschichte des Pelzhan-
dels iu Canada. | Aus dem Englischen. -
| Mit einer allgemeinen Karte und dem
Bild- | nisse des Verfassors. |
Berlin und Hamburg. | 1802.
Pp. i-ix, 11-408, map, 8°.
Linguistics as under titles above, pp. 133-135,
365.
Copies seen: British Museum.
 Voyages | from | Montreal, | on  the
river St. Laurence, | through the |
continent of North America, | to the |
Frozen and Pacific oceans; | In the
Years. 1789 and 1793. | With a preliminary account | of the rise, progress,
and present state of | the fur trade | of
that country. | With original notes by
Bougainville, and Volney, | Members of
the French senate. | Illustrated with
maps. | By Alexander Mackenzie, esq.
! I Voi.i[-ii]. |
London: | printed for T. Cadell, jun.
aud W. Da vies, Strand; | Cobbett and
Morgan, Pall-mall; and W. Creech, | at
Edinburgh. | By R. Noble, Old-bailey.
M.DCCC.II [1802].
2 vols, in onei halt-title verse blank 1 1. title 62
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF  THE
Mackenzie (A.) —Continued.
verso blank 11. dedication verso blank 11. preface pp. vii-xiv, text pp. 1-284, contents pp. 285-
290; half-title verso blank 1 1. title (varying
somewhat in punctuation from that of vol. 1)
verso blank 1 1. text pp. 5-310 (wrongly num'
berod 210), notes pp. 311-312, appendix pp. 313-
325, contents pp. 326-332, maps, 8°.
Linguistic contents as in the first edition
titled above, vol. 1, pp. 158-162, vol. 2, pp. 148-
149.
Copies seen: Congress, Goological Survey.
Clarke & co. 1886, priced a copy, no. 4050, $3.50.
 Voyages | from | Montreal, | on  the
river St. Laurence, | through the |
continent of North-America, | to the |
Frozen and Pacific oceans: in the years
1789 and 1793. | With a Preliminary
Account of | the rise, progress, and
present state of tho | fur trade | of that
country. | Illustrated with a map. | By
Alexander Mackenzie, esq. | Third
American edition. |
New-York: | published by Evert
Duyckinck, bookseller, j Lewis Nichols,
printer. | 1803.
Title verso blank 1 1. dedication verso blank
11. preface pp. v-vUi, text pp. 9-437,16°.
Linguistic contents as in previous editions
titled above, pp. 110, 314.
Copies seen: Congress.
 Tableau | historique et  politique |
du commerce des pelleteries | dans lo
Canada, | depuis 1608 jusqu'a nos jours.
| Contenant beaucoup de details sur
les nations san- | vages qui l'habitent,
et sur les vastes contrees qui y | sont
contigues; | Avec un Vocabulaire de la
langue de plusieurs peuples de ces |
vastes contrees. | Par Alexandre Mackenzie. | Traduit de 1'Anglais, | par J.
Castera. I Orn6 du portrait de l'auteur. I
Paris, | Dentu, Imprim.-Lib.rc,ruedu
Pont-de-Lody, n.° 3. | M. D. CCC. VII
[1807].
Half-title 11. title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 1-
310, table des matieres 1 unnumbered page, 8°.
An extract from vol. 1 of the Paris edition of
1802, titled ahove.
Linguistic contents as in previous editions,
pp. 304-310.
Copies seen: Congress.
Leclerc, 1867, sold a copy, no. 920, for 4 fr.:
priced by him, 1878, no. 756, 20 fr.
 Voyages | from | Montreal, | on the
river  St.   Laurence,  | through the |
continent of North America, | to the |
Frozen   aud   Pacific oceans; | in  the
years 1789 and 1793. | With a prelimi-
Mackenzie (A.) — Continued,
nary account | of the rise, progress, and
■present state | of | the fur trade | of
that country. | Illustrated with maps
and a portrait of the author. | By sir
Alexander Mackenzie. | Vol. I[-II]. |
New-York: | published by W. B. Gil-
ley. | 1814.
2 vols.: 3 p.ll.pp. i-viii, i-cxxvi, 1-113; 1 1.
pp. 115-392,8°.
Linguistic contents as under previous titles,
vol. 1, pp. cxxiii-cxxvi, 247.
Copies seen: Congress.
Sir Alexander Mackenzie, explorer, born in
Inverness, Scotland, about 1755; died in Dal-
■ housie, Scotland, March 12,1820. In his youth
he emigrated to Canada. In June, 1789, he set
out on his expedition. At the western end of
Great Slave Lake he entered a river, to which
he gave his name, and explored it until July 12,
when he reached the Arctic Ocean. He then
returned to Fort Chippewyan, where he arrived
on September 27. In October, 1792, he undertook a more hazardous expedition to the western coast of North America, and succeeded in
reaching Cape Menzies, on the Pacific Ocean. He
returned to England in 1801 and was knighted
the following year. —Appleton's Cyclop, of Am.
Biog.
M'Lean (John). Notes | of a | twenty- t
five years' service | in the | Hudson's
bay territory. | By John M'Lean. | In
two volumes. | Vol. I [-II]. |
London : | Richard Bentley, new Burlington street, | Publisher in Ordinary
to Her Majesty. | 1849.
2 vols.: half-title verso printer 11. title verso
blank 11. preface (dated 1st March, 1849) pp. v-
viii, contents pp. ix-xii, text pp. 13-308; title
verso printer 11. contents pp. iii-vii, text pp. 9-
328,12°.
Vocabulary of the principal Indian dialects
in use among the tribes in the Hudson's Bay
Territory, Sauteu, or Ogibois, Cree, Beaver
Indian, and Chippewayan, in parallel columns,
about 130 words each, vol. 2, pp. 323-328.
Copies seen: Astor, Boston Athenaeum, British Museum, Congress, Eames, National Museum.
At the Field sale, no. 1450, a half-morocco copy,
uncut, brought $3.75; at the Murphy sale, no.
1558, a defective copy, $1.50.
McLean (Bev. John). American Indian
literature.
In Canadian Methodist Mag. vol. 21, pp. 456-
463, Toronto, 1885, 8°.    (Pilling.)
A general account of the subject, including
references to a number of writers and works on
the Athapascan.
 Indian languages and literature in
Manitoba, North-west Territories and
British Columbia. ATHAPASCAN LANGUAG
DO
McLean (J.) — Continued.
In Canadian Institute, Proc. third series, vol.
5, pp. 215-218, Toronto, 1888, 8°.
Contains (1) list of languages in Manitoba,
Keewatin, and Norlh-wcst Territories; (2) languages in British Columbia; and (3) the languages of which vocabularies and grammars
have been published, the authors and place of
publication, the latter containing a number of
references to tho Athapascan.
 The Indians | their manners and customs. | By | JohnMcLeau, M. A.,Ph. D.
| (Robin   Rustler.) | With   Eighteen
full-page Illustrations. |
Toronto: | William Briggs, 78 & 80
King street east. | C. W. Coates, Montreal.   S. F. Huestis, Halifax. | 1889.
Frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyright notice
1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. preface pp. vii-
viii, contents pp. ix-x, list of illustrations verso
blank 11. text pp. 13-351, 12°.
Chapter vii, Indian languages and literature,
pp. 235-258. This consists first of a notice of the
development of Indian languages from picture-
writing through ideographic symbols to phonetic signs classified in alphabets. Then the
field of literature in general devoted to the
Indians is scanned, enumerating works of
special interest to the student of philology,
commencing on p. 241. This includes titles of
works in a number of American languages,
among them the Tukudh. Indian syllables
(Tukudh, Cherokee, Cree), pp. 251-253.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Powell.
Bev. John McLean was born in Kilmamoch,
■ Ayrshire, Scotland, Oct. 30, 1852; came to Canada in 1873, and was graduated B. A. from Victoria University, Cobourg, Ontario. Some years
afterward his alma mater conferred on him the
degree of M. A. In 1874 he entered the ministry
of the Methodist church. In 1880, at Hamilton,
Ontario, he was ordained for special work
among the Blackfoot Indians, leaving in June
of the same year for Fort MacLeod, Northwest
Territory, accompanied by his wife. At this
point were gathered about 700 Blood Indians,
which number was subsequently increased by
the arrival of Bloods and Blackfeet from Montana to 3,500. Mr. McLean settled upon the
reserve set apart for these Indians and diligently set to work to master their language,
history, etc., and on these subjects he has published a number of articles in the magazines
and society publications. At the request of the
anthropological committee of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, Dr.
McLean has for several years prepared notes on
the language, customs, and traditions of the
Blackfoot Confederacy, and the results of this
labor are partly given in one of the reports of
the committee. Although burdened with the
labors of a missionary, he found time to prepare
a post-graduate course iu history and took the
degree of Ph. D. at the Wesleyan University,
McLean (J.) — Continued.
Bloomington, 111., in 1888. Besides the articles
which have appeared under his own name. Dr.
McLean has written extensively for tho press
under the nom de plume of Robin Bustler. He
is now (February, 1892) stationed at Moose.Taw,
Northwest Territory, having left the Indian
work in July', 1889. He has for several years
been inspector of schools, and is now a member
of the board of education and of the board of
oxaminors for the Northwest Territory.
M'Murray (Alexander H.)   See Murray
(A. H.)
M'Pherson (Murdoch). Vocabulary of
the Chepewyan language.
In Richardson (J.), Arctic searching expedition, vol. 2, pp.382-385, London, 1851, 89.
Contains about 100 words and the numerals
1-300.
Reprinted in the later editions of tho same
work; see Richardson (J.)
M'Pherson (Mrs. Murdoch). See Richardson (J.)
Maisonneuve. This word following a title or included within parentheses after a note indicates
that a copy of the work referred to has been
seen by the compiler in the hookstoro of Maisonneuve et Cie., Paris, France.
Manual of devotion in the Beaver Indian
dialect.    See Bompas (W. C.)
Massachusetts Historical Society: These words
following a title or within parentheses after a
note indicate that a copy of the work referred
to has been seen by the compiler in the library
of that society, Boston, Mass.
Matthews (Dr. Washington). A part of
the Navajo's mythology. By W. Matthews.
In American Antiquarian, vol. 5, pp. 207-224,
Chicago, 1883, 8°.   (Bureau of Ethnology.)
Contains many Navajo terms and names of
mythic personages passim.
Issued separately as follows:
 A Part of the Navajos' Mythology. |
By W. Matthews. | From the American
Antiquarian for April, 1883.
[Chicago: 1883.]
Half-title on cover as above, no inside title;
text pp. 1-18, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Pilling.
[ ]    A night with the Navajos.    By
Zay Elini.
In Forest and Stream, vol: 23, pp. 282-283,
New York, Nov. 6, 1884, folio. (Bureau of Ethnology.)
Contains a number of Navajo words with
meanings passim. 64
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF TH1
Matthews (W.) — Continued.
 Mythic dry-paintings of the Navajos.   By Dr. W. Matthews.
In American Naturalist, vol. 19, pp. 931-939,
Philadelphia, 1885, 8°. (Congress.)
Contains a number of Navajo terms and
proper names passim.
 The origin of the Utes.    A Navajo
myth.
In American Antiquarian, vol. 7, pp. 271-274,
Chicago, 1885, 8°.   (Bureau of Ethnology.)
A number of Navajo words and phrases.
 Navajo names for plants.  By Dr. W.
Matthews, U. S. A.
In American Naturalist, vol. 20, pp. 767-777,
Philadelphia, 1886, 8°.    (Pilling.)
Many Navajo words with English meanings
and explanations.
 Some   deities   and   demons of the
Navajos. By Dr. W. Matthews, U. S.
Army.
In American Naturalist, vol. 20. pp. 841-850,
Philadelphia, 1886, 8°.
A number of Navajo words and names of
mythic personages, passim.
 The mountain chant: a Navajo ceremony.   By Dr. Washington Matthews,
U. S. A.
In Bureau of Ethnology, Fifth Ann. Rept.
pp. 379-467, Washington, 1887, royal 8°. (Pilling.)
Original texts and translations of songs, pp.
455-467, contain twenty-two songs and prayers
with literal and free translations into English.—Numerous Navajo terms, including local
and mythic names, passim.
Issued separately, with title-page, as follows:
 The  | mountain  chant | a   Navajo
ceremony | by | Dr. Washington Matthews, U. S. A. | Extract from the fifth
annual report of the Bureau of ethnology I [Vignette] |
Washington | Government printing
office | 1888
Cover title as above, half-title verso blank 1
1. no inside title, contents pp. 381-382, illustrations p. 383, text pp. 385-467, royal 8C. One
hundred copies issued.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Eames,
Pilling.
 The prayer of a Navajo shaman. By
Dr. Washington Matthews, TJ. S. A.,
Army medical museum.
In American Anthropologist, vol. 1, pp. 149-
170. Washington, 1888, 8°. (Pilling.)
The prayer in English (in 55 paragraphs),
with interlinear translation in Navajo, pp. 151-
163.—Glossary (127 words), alphabetic by Navajo words, pp. 165-170.
Issued separately, with title-page, as follows i
Matthews (W.) — Continued.
 The prayer | of | a Navajo shaman.
| By | Dr. Washington Matthews, | TJ.
S. army. | From the American Anthropologist, Vol. I, No. 2, April, 1888.
Washington, D. C.: | Judd & Det-
weiler, printers. 11888.
Cover title as above, title as above verso
blank 11. text pp. 5-26, plate, 8°.
Linguistics as under title next above, pp. 7-
19,21-26.
Copies seen: Pilling.
 Navajo   gambling  songs.   By  Dr.
Washington Matthews, TJ. S. army.
In American Anthropologist, vol. 2, pp. 1-19,
Washington, 1889, 8°.   (Pilling.)
Contains twenty-one short songs m Navajo,
each followed by translation and notes.
Issued separately, also, without change,
(Pilling.)
 Noqoilpf,  the   gambler:  a   Navajo
myth.
In Journal of American Folk-Lore, vol. 2, pp.
89-94, Boston and New York, 1889,8°. (Pilling.)
A number of Navajo terms, passim.
Issued separately, also, without change.
(Pilling.)
 The gentile system of the Navajo
Indians.
In Journal of American Folk-Lore, vol. 3, pp.
89-110, Boston and New York, 189C, 8°. (Pilling.)
List of the Navajo gentes (51), with meanings
in English, pp. 103-104.—Phratries of the Navajos (from TaU Chanter, and a second list from
Capt. Bourke), p. 109.—Many4Navajo terms
passim.
Issued separately, with title-page, as follows:
 The gentile system | of | the Navajo
Indians | by | Washington Matthews,
M; D., LL. D.  | major   and   surgeon,
United  States  army | Delivered as a
Lecture before the Anthropological |
Society, Washington, D. C.
[Boston and New York: 1890.]
Half-title on cover as above, no inside title';
text pp. 89-110, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Pilling.
 [Texts, grammar, and dictionary of
the Navajo language.] (*)
Manuscript. Dr. Matthews, who is now
(1892) stationed at Ft. Wingate, N. M., is collecting material for a monograph on the Navajo
Indians. Concerning the linguistic portion he
wrote me under date of September 22, 1891, as
follows:
" My work on the Navajo language is growing, but it is in such a chaotic state as yet that
I can not give you a very satisfactory account
of it.   I have, I think, grammatic material to ATHAPASCAN  LANGUAGES.
65
Matthews (W.) —Continued.
fill 200 or 250 printed quarto pages, and I have
about 10,000 words in my dictionary. My collection   of    texts    and    translations—songs,
prayers, myths, rituals,etc would forroagood-
sized volume of themselves. It will take time
and leisure to put them in shape, however."
Dr. Washington Matthews was born in Kil-
linoy, a suburb of Dublin, Ireland, July 17,
1843. His mother dying, his father emigrated
to America while he was yet in his infancy,
and, after extensive travel in America, settled
first in Wisconsin, then a territory, and later
in Iowa. He was gradnated in medicine at the
medical department of the State University of
Iowa in the spring of 1864, and in 1888 received
the honorary degree of LL.D. from the same
I university in recognition of his philologie
I studies. In 1864 he entered tho United States
service as an acting assistant surgeon, and
served as such until the close of the war. In
the summer of 1865 he again entered the military service and has continued therein until
the present time, having been commissioned
major and surgeon July 10, 1889. His service
has carried him over all the States and Territories west of the Mississippi and brought him
into contact with a majority of the tribes of
that extensive region. His first serious study
of the Indians began when he ascended the
Upper Missouri in 1865. In the autumn of that
year he went to Fort Berthold, Dakota, where
he came in contact Tvith Arickarees, Hidatsas,
and Mandans. He resided, with some interruptions, in the neighborhood of these three
tribes for about six years, and gave special
attention to their languages and ethnography.
In the winter of 1870-71 his manuscripts and
notes on these tribes had assumed extensive
proportions; but on the 28th of January, 1871,
his quarters at Fort Buford were destroyed by
fire, and all his notes and manuscripts, with a
valuable collection of books of early travel and
exploration on tho upper Missouri, were consumed. In 1872 he went east, and in 1873 published the Grammar and Dictionary of the
Language of the Hidatsa. From New York he
went to California, prepared a second edition
of his work, under the title of Ethnography
and Philology of the Hidatsa Indians, which
was issued from the Government Printing
Office in 1877, and spent some five years in the
more remote parts of California and on campaigns against hostile Indians, in the course of
which he'traveled extensively through Nevada,
Oregon, Idaho, and Washington, and met many
wild tribes whose languages and customs he
noted. In 1880 he went to New Mexico, where
he began to study the Navajo Indians. In 1884
he went to Washington, D. C, and remained
there on duty in the Army Medical Museum
until May, 1890. From Washington he made
two excursions into tho Southwest in the pursuit of archseologic and ethnographic investigations—one in the interest of the Bureau of
Ethnology, the other in the interest of the
ATH -5
Matthews (W.) —Continued.
Hemenway Southwestern Archtelogical Expedition. While in the Army Medical Museum
his time was largely devoted to somatological
studies, particular attention being given to the
large collection of crania and other human
bones in the museum, and he has written an
extensive illustrated monograph on "The
Human Bones of tho Hemenway Collection,"'
which is yet unpublished. In 1890 he returned
to New Mexico, where he still remains.
Mescalero Apache.    See Apache.
Midnooski.    See Ahtinne'-.
Mi-lhau (Dr. John J.) Vocabulary of the
Umpqua Valley people, Oregon.
Manuscript, 3 unnumbered leaves, folio,
written on both sides; in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Collected during November, 1856. Recorded on one of the Smithsonian blanks of 170 words, equivalents of the
whole number being given.
In the same library are two copies of this
vocabulary, both by Dr. Geo. Gibbs, in one of
" which (where he designates the language as
Hewut) he follows Dr. Milhau's spelling, in the
other he uses an alphabetic notation of his own.
A third copy is in the same lib»ary, made by
Dr. Roehrig for comparison with the Willopah
vocabulary of Dr. Gibbs.
Mimbreno Apache.   See Apache.
Montagnais:
Bible history       See Legoff (L.)
Catechism Legoff (L.)
Catechism Perrault (C. O.)
Catechism Vegreville (V. T.)
Dictionary Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
Dictionary Vegreville (V. T..)
Grammar Legoff (L.)
Grammar Vegreville (V. T.)
Grammatic treatise    Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
Hymns Legoff (L.)
Hymns Perrault (CO.)
Prayer book Legoff (L.)
Prayer book Perrault (CO.)
Sermons Legoff (L.)
Songs Vegreville (V. T.)
Syllabary Perrault (CO.)
Ten commandments  Legoff (L.)
Text Legoff (L.)
Tribal names Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
Vocabulary Adam (L.)
Words Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
See also Athapascan; Chippewyan ; Tinned
Morgan (Lewis Henry).    Smithsonian
Contributions  to   Knowledge. | 218 |
Systems | of | consanguinity and affinity | of   the | human   family. | By |
Lewis H. Morgan. [
Washington city:-| published by the
Smithsonian institution. | 1871.
Colophon: Published by the Smithsonian institution, [ Washington city, | June, lSTO. 66
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
Morgan (L. H.) — Continued.
Title on cover as above, inside title differing
from above in imprint verso blank 1 1. advertisement p. iii verso blank, preface pp. v-ix
verso blank, contents pp. xi-xii, text pp. 1-583,
index pp. 585-590, 14 plates, 4°.
Also forms vol. 17 of Smithsonian Contributions to Knowledge. Such issues have no cover
title, but the general title of the series and 6
other prel. 11. preceding the inside title.
Chapter v, System of relationship of the
Ganowanian family continued. Athapasco-
Apache and other nations (pp. 230-253) includes
the following: A short comparative vocabulary
(23 words) of the Slave Lake Indians (from
Kennicott), Beaver Indians (from Kennicott),
Chepewyan, Dog Rib, and Kutchin (the three
latter from Richardson), p. 232.
System of consanguinity and affinity of the
Ganowanian family (pp. 291-382) includes the
following, collected by Mr. Morgan: Hare Indians (Ta-na'-tin-ne), lines 65; Red Knives
(Tal-sote'-e-na), lines 66.
Also the following:
Herdesty (W. L.), Relationships of the Kutchin or Loucheux, lines 67.
Kennicott (R.), Relationships of the Slave
Lake Indians, lines 64.
McDonald (R), Relationships of the Tu-kit-
the, lines 68.
Copies seen: Astor, British Musum, Bureau
of Ethnology, Congress, Eames, Pilling, Trumbull.
-At the Squier sale, no. 889, a copy sold for
$5.50.   Quaritoh, no. 12425,* priced a copy il.
Lewis H. Morgan was born in Aurora, Cayuga
County. N. Y., November 21, 1818. He was
graduated by Union College, Schenectady, in the
class of 1840. Returning from coUege to Aurora,
Mr. Morgan joined a secret society composed of
the young men of the village and known as the
Grand Order of the Iroquois. This had a great
influence upon his future career and studies.
The order was instituted for sport and amusement, but its organization was modeled on the
governmental system of the Six Nations; and,
chiefly under Mr. Morgan's direction and leadership, the objects of the order were extended,
if not entirely changed, and its purposes
improved. To become better acquainted with
the social polity of the Indians, young Morgan
visitedthe aborigines remaining in New York,
a mere remnant, but yet retaining to a great
extent their ancient laws and customs; and he
went so far as to be adopted as a member by the
Senecas, Before the council of the order, in
the years 1844,1845, and 1846, he read a series of
papers on the Iroquois, which were published
under the nom de plume of "Shenandoah."
Mr. Morgan died in Rochester, N. Y., December 17,1881.
[Morice   (Pere Adrien  Gabriel).]    The
New | Methodical, Easy and Complete
| Dene syllabary.
[Stuart's Lake mission, B. C. 1890.]
Morice (A. G.) — Continued.
2 separate leaves, verso of the first one
blank, 8°.
On the first leaf is given the syllabary with
explanatory notes; the second presents''Some
of the Advantages of the New Syllabary." See
the fac-similes on the three following pages.
Copies seen.- Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
[ ] A New | Improved & Easy Alphabet or   Syllabary | suggested to  the
"Cherokee nation" | By a Friend | and
earnest sympathizer. |
Stuart's Lake Mission Print No. 9.
[1890.]
1 leaf, verso blank, 8°.
" The sounds and orthography of the above
are those of the Cherokee Alphabet such as
reproduced in Pilling's Iroquoian Bibliography.
Should they be incomplete or defective, the new
Syllabary can easily be completed or corrected
out of the Dene Alphabet, from which it is
extracted."
' Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
[ ] Preces | Post   privatam    Missam
recitandse. | [One line syllabic characters.]
[Stuart's Lake mission, B. C. 1890.]
1 leaf, verso blank, 8°.
A prayer in the Dene language, syllabic
characters, followed by a prayer in Latin, roman
characters.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
 [Two   lines syllabic characters.] |
[Picture of the virgin and child.] |
[Three lines syllabic characters.]
[Stuart's Lake mission, B. C. 1890.]
Transliteration : Pe tcestlces oets6tceleh |
Jezi Kli hwoeztli et hwotscen |
Hwol 1890t nahwotizoet | Nakraztli et | pel
Molis oeyinla.
Translation: With paper one-learns | Jesus
Christ waS-born then since |
With-it 1890 times it-annually-revolved
[year] | Stuart's-Lake there | father Morice
made-it.
Title verso blank 1 1. text (entirely in the
Dene language and in syllabic characters) pp.
3-32, sq. 16°. See the fac-simile of the title-
page on p. 70 of this bibliography.
The first book printed in these characters.
It is a sort of primer containing spelling and
elementary reading lessons.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
 [Two lines  syllabic  characters.] |
[Oblate seal.] | [Three lines syllabic
characters.]
[Stuart's Lake mission, B. C. 1890.]
Transliteration: Lcekateshisyaz keiskcez. |
Jezi Kli hwoeztli et hwotsoen | [Seal.] |
Hwo 1890t nahwotizoet | Nakraztli  et f pel
Mblis oeyinla. ATHAPASCAN  LANGUAGES.
67
.The  New
Methodical, Easy and Complete
DENE   SYLLABARY.
With A
<E
E    I
0
u
^*-»
wm a
(E
£
I
0
tf
A CE &c.
<l
>
|>   t>
A
V Alone
Y
Q.
9
5)
9
Q
\c) Alone
H
<
>
>   >
A
V
h
Q
Oh
10
18
\Q
Q
s
a
<
>
>   >
A
V
//
Q
OX
ys>
©
)Q
9
s
1
<
>
>   >
A
V
II
w
<
>
>   >
A
V
L
G
0
9
D
Q
0
i
Hw
<
>
>   >
A
V
Tl
C
D
D
D
Q
u
f
C
O
CD
O
Q
0
p
TD(1)
c
D
1 3
n
u
T
Tf
a
E>
E>
D
Q
u
Th
a
D
D D
Q
0
Tf
a
3
J3
B
C2
CS
T
G
D
D D
Q
o
(3)
Z
c
0
3
3
n
U
z z
PB(1)
a
D
E> D
P
u
J.
Ta Dz
G
O
S>
ED
Q
0
(4)
(1)
S
£
3
3
3
1
US
s s
K G,, 10
• £
3
3 3
m
LU
I
Sh
a
3
3
3
ffl
ttf
s
X, Kh
a
B
B B
m
CO
V
Ch
a
3
3
3
«
ft
k, w
a
B
B B
ra
00
V
Ts
s
3
3
3
m
0J
(2)
Ts
a
3
3
B
m
ts
N
c
J
J) J)
n
o
)   w
M
£.
3
3 3
"i
lw
<
Hiatus
-^
ccessoriei
C-     c
*.
EXPLANATORY   NOTES.
(1) These letters are not differentiated in Dene. (2) « is the nasal 71. (3) z
is the French y. (4) s is phonetically intermediate between $ and s.
' The vowels as in Italian, except oz as the e in Fr. je, te. — The r of Kr, Kr
is hardly perceptible. 2Z", % are very guttural. R is the result of uvular vibrations. Kh, Th -k+h, t+h. Q almost = ty. p is a peculiarly sibilant. I. The
dot accompanying consonants represents the exploding sound (rendered by { incorporated in the signs). * is prefixed to proper names, and o is suffixed to'
syllables the vowel of which it is necessary to render long.  The rest as in Engl. 68
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
SOME  OF THE
Advantages of the New Syllabary.
I.— The direction of the curve, or angle of each sign infallibly determines
the nature of the vowel added to the fundamental consonant of each syllable,
and this direction is always perceived without the least effort of the mind. In
the Cree Alphabet such as given in Petitot's Grammaire'raisonnee, this direction ou which depends the vowel of the syllable is either difficult to discern or
governed by no fixed rules. Thus, in that Syllabary, (^ points to the right,
!| to the left, (5 upwards, ^ downwards, though the consonants expressed by
these differently turned signs are all in connection with the same vowel a. Hence confusion—with co-relative difficulty—for the mind of the pupil.
II.— All the cognate sounds are rendered in the new syllables by similarly
formed characters the general shape of which denotes the phonetic group to
which they belong, while their intrinsic modifications determine the nature of
the particular sound they represent. Thus the dentals are expressed by a single
curve; the gutturals by a double curve; the soft sibilants by a curve with undulating extremities; the hard sibilants by a double curve with like extremities,'etc. Therefore our 30 sets of letters are practically reduced to 9, viz.:
OCCISCQCCS' So that the pupil who has become familiar
with these 9 signs may almost be said to have mastered the whole Alphabet;
for another good point in its favor is that
III.— The modifications of each fundamental character take place internally
and in conformity with logical and therefore easily learnt rules. To illustrate
this remark, we will refer to the sign g. The student who already possesses
the aforesaid 9 principal signs will recognize it at sight—through its double
undulating curve—as a hard sibilant which, being affected by no modification,
must be given the primary hissing sound Sa. Let us now insert therein the
perpendicular line which, when used as an internal accretion to a sign, corres- -
ponds to the h of the Eoman Alphabet (as in < lira, <^ hwa, Q tha, Q kha)}
and we obtain. Qf sha. Should we cross the end of its horizontal line, we will
thereby add a | to that sign which will then become Q? tsha-or cha. In like manner, £ may be changed into g tsa which in its turn is liable to be
transformed into gj tsa. (2, £, etc. may also become Q, Q, etc. —This
logic and consequent facility are sadly Avanting in the old Syllabary which is
made up of disconnected signs many of which are differentiated only by additional and externa I smaller signs (/Uj /£ ,\^ i($ j-^i l^( <<] //<] <].)
most of which are also used as non-syllabic letters, and as such sometimes have in that same Alphabet a meaning quite different from that which is attribu- ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
69
ted to them when they are considered as mere accessories. This arbitrary
change of value joined to the fact that these modifying signs sometimes precede, sometimes follow, the main character must unavoidably confuse the mind
of the beginner and render the acquisition of reading unnecessarily difficult.
IV.— In our system, all the small signs (except o which, as its form indicates, is zero when alone) are consonants without vowel, and in no instance is any
of them used in another capacity They have always the same value, and tho
method and logic which we have noticed in the formation of the main or syllabic signs have also presided to the composition of those which are merely
consonantal. Thus the non-syllabic gutturals- are expressed by vertical lines
(\ / v); the nasals by semicircles (><«), &c. Note also the transformation of
S into s, sh; z into x, zh or/, etc. through the insertion of the 1 or modifying
h of the large characters. —The old Alphabet not only lacks this method and
resulting simplicity, but it would seem as if its inventor had purposedly contrived to render its acquisition unduly difficult to the white student by giving
to s the value of I, to z that of g, to h that of /, etc.
V.— The new Syllabary is complete, while it is universally conceded that
the Cree Alphabet lacks about half a dozen sets of syllabic signs which are indispensable in such delicate languages as the Dene. Those who know the numberless and most ridiculous contresens this scarcity leads to need no other reason to reject the whole system as practically worthless. Besides, in connection
with none of its signs is there any provision for such important vowel sounds
as those of ce (French e muet) and u (00, Fr. ou). Yet in several dialects ffi
characterizes the present tense and E the past, while the distinction between
o and u is no less essential.
VI.— Lastly, we claim for our Syllabary a greater synthesis which renders
the writing shorter and, by avoiding the accumulation of non-syllabic signs,
makes the reading easier. For instance, the Chippewayan word intan-cliare}
"leaf" which with the old syllabics cannot be written without three consecutive small signs (AOw£-2) is simply !>>Gv85> with the new system.
In conclusion, we may be permitted to state as illustrative of the practical
worth of the new Syllabary that through it Indians of common intelligence
have learnt to read in one week's leasurely study before they had any Primer
or printed matter of any kind to help them on. We even know of a young
man who performed the feat in the space of two evenings.   72
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Morice (A. G.)—Continued.
Translation: The-little-eateohism drawn-on
(written). I Jesus-Christ was-born then since |
[Seal.] I
With-it 1890-times it-annnally-revolved |
Stuart's-Lake there | fatherMorice made-it.
Title as above verso blank 1 1. test (entirely
in the Dene language and in syUabio characters) pp. 8-18, sq. 16°. See the" fac-simile of the
title-page on p. 71 of this bibUography.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
Some copies of this catechism differ in collation : Title as above verso blank 11. text pp. 41-
56. The author informs me that an edition of
500 of these was printed "to form part of a
'RecueU de Prieres' which I am noi yet prepared to publish."   (Eames, Pilling, Shea.)
 The western Dene's—their manners
and customs. By the Rev. Father A.
G. Morice, O. M. I., Stuart's Lake, B. C.
In Canadian Inst. Proc. third series, vol.7
(whole no. vol. 25), pp. 109-174, Toronto, 1890,8°.
(Bureau of Ethnology, Pilling, Wellesley.)
Classification of the Dene tribes, p. 113.—
Dene songs with music, 156-157.— Apologue
(three lines) in the language of the Carrier Indians ("written with the new signs" with
interlinear transliteration and followed by
EngUsh translation), p. 166.—Remarks on tne
language of the western Denes, pp. 166-167.
 The Den6 languages.    Considered in
Themselves and Incidentally in their
Relations to Non-American Idioms.
By the Rev. Father A. G. Morice, O. M. I.
Bi Canadian Inst. Trans, vol. 1, pp. 170-212.
Toronto, 1891, 8°.    (PiUing.)
Introduction, pp. 170-171.—Phonetics and
graphic signs (pp. 172-175) includes "the new
methodical easy and complete Dene syllabary,"
p. 175.—General characteristics of the Dene
languages, pp. 176-181.—The nouns; their varieties and inflections, pp. 181-184 The adjectives and the pronouns, pp. 185-189.—The simple or primary verbs, pp. 189-195.—The composite verbs, pp. 195-200.—Varieties of verbs,
pp. 200-204.—MisceUaneous notes, pp. 204-212.
Issued separately with half-title (The Dene
languages), on the verso of which begins the
text, paged as in the original article, 170-212.
(Eames, Gatschet, Pilling, Powell.)
It has also been translated into French and
is in course of publication in the Missions de la
Congregation des Missionnaires Oblats de
Marie Immaculee, Paris.
 Le | petit catechisme | al'usage | des
sauvages porteurs | Texte & Traduction avec Notes | snivi des | prieres du
matin | et du soir | Par le R. P. Morice,
O. M. J. | [Two lines quotation] |
Mission | du lac Stuart \ 1891
Colophon: Typographic de la Mission du Lac
Stuart.   No. 10.
Morice (A. G.) — Continued.
Half-title (Le Petit Catechisme et prieres)
verso blank 1 1. title as above verso blank 1 1.
avertissement pp. 5-6, text (Carrier and French,
usually on facing pages) pp. 8-143, (half-titles at
pp. 7, 51 and 95). table des matieres p. 144, sq.
16°.
On each page of the work are given foot-notes
explanatory of peculiarities in the Carrier text
and of the translation.
Catechism, pp. 7-49.—Prayers for the morning, pp. 52-69.—Prayer for the evening, pp. 70-
73.—Divers prayers (pp. 74r-93): Prayer on
arising, p. 74.— Prayer on retiring, p. 75.—The
mysteries of the rosary, pp. 76-79.—Salve,
Regina, p. 80.—Prayer to St. Joseph, pp. 81-83.—
Prayer for the dead, p. 84.—Acts for the benediction of the holy sacrament, pp. 85-93, verso a
note in French by the author.—Cantiques (pp.
96-143): To the sacred eucharist, pp. 96-103.—
To the Holy Spirit, p. 104.—To the Holy Virgin,
pp. 105-112.—To St. Joseph, pp. 113-115.—To
the Holy Angels, pp. 116-117. — For various
occasions, pp. 118-143.
Copies seen: Eames, PiUing, Powell.
 [Tcestlces-Nahwoelncek, or   Carrier
Review.
Stuart's Lake, 1891.]
Pp. 9-32, 8°.
An eight-page periodical, printed entirely in
the Dene syllabic characters invented by Pere
Morice. At this writing (January, 1892) but
three numbers have been issued—those for
October, November, and December,_1891. No. 1
begins,with page 9, the preceding pages being
held, p-presume, for the preliminary matter
relating to the volume.
The contents are of a varied nature—the first
number, for example, containing: Indian or
local names, p. 9.—News from below [i. e. from
the colonized portion of British Columbia}, p.
9.—News from the New World, p. 10; from the
Old World, p. 10.—Scripture text, p. 11.—Life
of St. Athanasius, p. 11.—Bible questions and
answers, p. 12.—Letter from the bishop, p. 12.—
A picture and its explanation, p. 13.—Concerning the Review, p. 13.—A story, pp. 14-15.—
Hymns, p. 15.—Useful information, etc., p. 16.
Copies seen: Pilling, Powell.
[ ] Dictionnaire  | de  la  Langue |
Chilkohtine. | Mission | du lac William.
|Avrili884. (")
Manussript; title verso blank 1 1. text pp.
1-170, double columns, 8°.
Contains about 5,000 words, which need
rearrangement and retranscription. It has
been prepared for publication as far as the letter F.
[ ] Pe | Kuti-Nitsil-in | poegenni | g€
yateelthik.    [1884.] (*)
Literal    translation:   With | Above-Chief
[God] | his-word | after one-speaks.
Manuscript; pp. 1-42,12°.
Contains 5 sermons in Chilkohtin. ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
73
Morice (A. G.) — Continued.
 Dictionnaire | Des   Verhes | De   la
Langue Porteur | par | le R. P. A. G.
Morice, O. M. I. | Mission du lac Stuart
| 1887-18 . . (*)
Manuscript; title verso and following leaf
blank, text pp. 1-128, double column, small 4°.
A-C only finished.
[ ] Grammaire | Des   Parties   conju-
gahles du Discours | de la Langue
Porteur.    1887. (*)
Manuscript; pp. 1-96, double column,broad8°.
Contains four chapters, subdivided into 19
articles and 132 rules.
[ ] Manuel | Du Sauvage | contenant
| Prieres. Instructions, Cantiques | Et
Catechisme. | Mission du Lac Stuart |
1888. (*)
Manuscript; title verso blank, text pp. 1-120,
16°, in the Carrier language.
Contains: Part I. Morning and evening
prayers, examination of conscience, acts before
and after communion, acts and hymn for the
benediction and diversmisceUaneousprayers.—
Part II. Instructions on confession and communion and the reception of sacraments gener-
aUy.—Part III. 45 hymns, aU original.—Part
IV. The short catechism of Christian doctrine.
[ ] Yakrestape* tcestloes ra cctata hok-
wcen natscehwoslncek.    [1889.]     (*)
Literal translation: Sky-on-sits [God] his-
paper after old-time about one-narrates.
Manuscript; pp. 1-55,12°, being a free translation and adaptation of the book of Genesis,
in the Carrier dialect.
 Den6 roots | By the Rev. Father A.
G. Morice, O. M. I.    [1890.] (*)
Manuscript; 30 pages, folio.
Introduction, 13 pp.—Vocabulary of 370 English words which are roots in Dene, with their
equivalents in 17 or 18 Dene dialects, 17 pp.
 Les    Evangiles | Pour    tous    les
Dimanches | Et | Fetes  d'ohligation |
De l'Annee | Traduits | Par le R. P. A.
G. Morice, O. M. I. | Mission  du Lac
Stuart | 1890. (*)
Manuscript; title verso blank 1 1. text 78
pages, note-paper size.
Contains the selections from the gospels read
in Roman Catholic churches on aU Sundays
and feasts of obligation through the whole
year, translated into the Carrier language.
[ ] Twelve | Stories of adventure j in
Carrier.   1890. (*)
Manuscript; 60 pages, note-paper size, being
translations and adaptations of the most thrilling stories found in English periodicals and
destined by the translator for publication in a
projected monthly review in the new syUabics.
See page 70 for title of the Review.
Morice (A. G.) — Continued.
[ ] Twelve | Short Lives of the Saints.
1891. (*)
Manuscript; 26 pages, 4°.
 [Words,  phrases, and sentences in
the Dene" language.   1891.] (*)
Manuscript in possession of its author, who
has prepared it for the use of the Bureau of
Ethnology. Recorded in a copy of Powell's
Introduction to the study of Indian languages.
 Grammar | of | The Carrier Language | With Notes | On Local Peculiarities and Idiotisms | By Rev. A. G.
Morice, O. M. I. (*)
Manuscript, 73 pages, broad 8°, begun in
February, 1891, and yet unfinished; in possession of its author, who tells me he has reached
the chapter on the pronoun.
 Are   the   Carrier    Sociology   and
Mythology indigenous or exotic?    (*)
Manuscript, 30 pages folio, recently prepared
by its author for publication in the Transactions of the Royal Society of Canada.
Contents: Introductory — Ethnological —
Sociological—Carrier sociology exotic; general
arguments—Carrier sociology exotic; proved
by facts—Carrier mythology partially exotic—
Creation myths.
The manuscripts titled above are in the
possession of their author, who has kindly
furnished me information concerning them, as
also the notes from which I have compiled the
foUowing biographic notice:
Father Morice was born on the 27th of
August, 1859, at Saint-Mars-sur-Cohnont,
France. After the usual elementary studies at
the Christian Brothers' school at Oisseau,
where his family had removed, he was sent,
when 13 years of age, to the Ecclesiastical
College at Mayenne, with a view to prepare
himself for the priesthood. Feeling called to
the foreign missions, he subsequently joined
the Order of the Oblates of Mary Immaculate
(O. M. I.) and made his final vows therein in
October, 1879. While stiU studying theology
and being as yet in minor orders, the famous
decrees of 1880 commanded the dispersion of the
members of such religious orders as had not
the official sanction of the French Government.
Previous to the execution of these decrees he
was sent by his superiors to British Columbia,
where he arrived on the. 26th of July, 1880. At
the completion of his theological studies and
after he had learned a little of the English language he was promoted to the priesthood, July
2, 1882, and given charge of the Chilkotin Indians, whose language he immediately proceeded to learn. After two years of study ho
found himself able to preach to them without
the aid of an interpreter. Iu 1885 he was sent to
his present station, Stuart's Lake, where he
repeated—but with less difficulty, owing to the
grammatical affinity of the two languages—his
linguistic stndies in the dialect of the Carrier. 74
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
Miiller (Friedrich). Grundriss | der |
Sprachwissenschaft | von | Dr. Fried-
richMiiller j Professor[&c. three lines.]
| I. Band | I. Ahtheilung. | Einleitung
in die Sprachwissenschaft [-IV. Band.
| I. Ahtheilung. | Nachtriigezum Grundriss aus den Jahren | 1877-1887]. |
Wienl876[-1888]. | Alfred Holder | K.
K.Universitats-Buchhiindler. | Rothen-
thurmstrasse 15.
4 vols. (vol. 1 in 2 parts, vol. 2 originally in 4
divisions, vol. 3 originally in 4 divisions, vol. 4
' part 1 all published), each part and division
with an outside title and two inside titles, 8°.
Vol. 2, part 1, which includes the American
languages, was originally issued in two divisions, each with the following special title:
Die Sprachen | der | schlichthaarigen Rassen
| von | Dr. Friedrich Miiller | Professor [&c.
eight lines.] | I. Abtheilung. | Die Sprachen der
australischen, der hyperboreischen | und der
amerikanischen Rasse. |
Wien 1879[-1882]. | Alfred Holder | K. K.
Hof-nnd TJniversitats-Buchhandler | Rothen-
thurnistrasse 15.
Die Sprachen der anierikanischen Rassen;
Allgemeiner Charakter dieser Sprachen (including some Athapascan examples), vol. 2,
first part, second division (1882), pp. 181-183.—
Miiller (F.) —Continued.
Die Sprachen der Athapasken- (Tirme-) und
Kinai-Stamme, pp. 184-192, treats of sounds,
roots, nouns, adjectives, pronouns, verbs, and
numerals, making use of examples from the
Tschippewyan, Peau de lievre, Loucheux,
Tahkali, Tlatskanai, Hmkwa, Apatshe, Navajo,
Hupa, and Kinai.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Bureau
of Ethnology, Eames, Watkinson.
Murray (Alexander H.) Vocabulary of
the Kutchin of the Yukon or Kutchi-
Kutchi, drawn up by Mr. M'Murray
[ste]; to which the Chepewyan synonyms were added by Mr. M'Pherson.
In Richardson (J.), Arctic searching expedition, vol. 2, pp. 382-385, London, 1851, 8°.
A list of about 100 words and the numerals
1-300.
Reprinted in the later editions of the same
work; see Richardson (J.)
 CoUection of words having a similar
sound aud signification in the Kutchin
and Dog-rib languages.
In Richardson (J.), Arctic searching expedition, vol.1, pp. 399^100, London, 1851, 8°.
A vocabulary of 22 words.
Reprinted in the later editions of the same
work; see Richardson (J.)
N.
Nabiltse:
General discussion
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Nagailer:
Vocabulary"
See Gibbs (G.)
Anderson (A. C.)
Dorsey (J. O.)
Gibbs (G.)
Hazen (W. B.)
See Adelung (J. C.) and
Vater (J. S.)
Mackenzie (A.)
Vocabulary
Nahawny.   See Nehawni.
National Museum: These words foUowing a
title or within parentheses after a note indicate
that a copy of the work, referred to has been
seen by the compiler in the Ubrary of that institution, Washington, D. C.
Natsun kaothet . . . Saint Mark . . .
Tinne".    See Kirkby (W. W.)
Navajo:
Dictionary See Matthews (W.)
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
Gentes
Grammar
Grammatic comments  Featherman (A.)
Grammatic comments  Miiller (F.)
Grammatic comments  Wilson (E. F.)
Numerals Beadle (J. H.)
Numerals Gatschet (A. S.)
Numerals Haines (E. M )
Adelung   (J.  C.) and
Vater (J. S.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Matthews (W.)
Matthews (W.)
Navajo — Continued.
Numerals Set
Prayer
Proper names
Proper names
Proper names
Relationships
Songs
Text
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Voeahnlary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Tolmie   (W.   F.)  and
Dawson (G. M.)
Matthews (W.)
Catlin (G.)
Matthews (W.)
Smithsonian.
Packard (R. L.)
Matthews (W.)
Matthews (W.)
Amy (W. F. M.)
Bancroft (H H.)
Beadle (J. H.)     |
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Cushing (F. H.)
Davis (W. W. H.)
Domenech (E. H. D.)
Eaton (J. H.)
Gatschet (A. S.)
Loew (O.)
Matthews (W.)
Nichols (A. S.)
Petitot (E.F.S.J.)
Pino (P. B.)
Powell (J. W.)
Schoolcraft (H.R.)
Shaw (J. M.)
Simpson (J. H.)
Thompson (A. H.)
Turner (W. W.)
Whipple (A. W.) '
Whipple (W. D.) '
Willard (C. N.) ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
75
Navaj o -— Continued.
Vocabulary See
"Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Nehawni:
Vocabulary
Vocabnlary
Vocabnlary
Wilson (E. F.)
Barreiro (A.)
Daa (L. K.)
Ellis (R.)
Gatschet (A. S.)
Latham (R. G.)
Matthews (W.)
Tolmie   (W. F.)
Dawson (G. M.)
Wilson (D.)
and.
See Kennicott (R.)
Roehrig (F. L. 0.)
Ross(R.B.)
New Improved & Easy alphabet. See
Morice (A. G.)
New Methodical . . . Dene syllabary.    See Morice (A. G.)
Nichols (A. Sidney). Vocabulary of the
Navajo language.
Manuscript, 10 unnumbered leaves, 4°, in the
library of the Bureau of Ethnology. Collected
in New Mexico, 1867-1868.
Recorded on one of the blank forms (no. 170)
of the Smithsonian Institution, issued to collectors, and containing 211 words. Of these,
equivalents are given in about 180 cases.
Northern Indians.    See Athapascan.
Nulato Inkalik.    See Inkalik.
Numerals:
Ahtinne
Ahtinne
Ahtinne
Apache
Apache
Apache
Apache
.   Apache
Apache
Apache
Apache
Apache
Apache
Chippewyan
Chippewyan
Chippewyan
Chippewyan
Chippewyan
See Allen (H. T.)
Dall(W.H.)
Ellis (R.)
Allen (H.T.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Cremony (J. C.)
Dugan (T.B.)
Gatschet (A. S.)
Haines (E. M.)
Haldeman (S. S.)
Muller (F.)
Pimentel (F.)
Tolmie (W. F.) and Dawson (G. M.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Classical.
Ellis (R.)
Haines (E. M.)
James (E.)
Numerals — Continued.
Chippewyan     See Kirkby (W. W.)
Muller (F.)
Pott (A. F.)
Tolmie (W. F.) and Daw-
sou (G. M.)
Tolmie (W. F.) and Dawson (G.M.)
Bancroft (H.H.)
Gatschet (A. S.)
Muller (F.)
Tolmie (W. F.) and Dawson (G. M.)
Dall(W.H.)
Ellis (R.)
Erman (G. A.)
Muller (F.)
Buschmann (J.C.E.)
Dall(W.H)
Muller (F.)
Beadle (J. H.)
Gatschet (A. S.)
Haines (E. M.)
Muller (F.)
Tolmie (W.F.) and Daw
son (G. M.)
Muller (F.)
Ellis (R.)
Sullivan (J. W.)
Ellis (R.)
Harmon (D. W.)
Muller (F.)
Pott (A. F.)
Tolmie (W. F.) and Dawson (G. M.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Ellis (R.)
Tolmie (W. F.) and Dawson (G. M.)
Campbell (J.)
Ellis (R.)
Muller (F.)
Dall(W.H)
Duflot de Mofras (E.)
Muller (F.)
Tolmie (W. F.) and Dawson (G.M.)
Dall (W. H.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Tolmie (W. F.) and Dawson (G. M.)
Nuwheh kukwadhud Jesus Christ .   .   .
Tukudh.    See McDonald (R.)
Chippewyan
Chippewyan
Chippewyan
Dog Rib
Hupa
Hupa
Hupa
Hupa
Kaiyuhkhotana
Kenai
Kenai
Kenai
Kutchin
Kutchin
Loucheux
Navajo
Navajo
Navajo
Navajo
Navajo
Peau de Lievre
Slave
Sussee
Taculli
Taculli
Taculli
Taculli
Taculli
Tahlewah
Tahlewah
Tahlewah
Tinne
Tlatskenai
Tlatskenai
Ugalenzen
Umpkwa
Umpkwa
Umpkwa
Unakhotana
Wailabki
Wailakki
0.
O'Brian (—). A Vocabulary of Fort
Simpson Dog-Rib, by Mr. O'Brian, of
the Hudson's Bay Company.
In Richardson (J.), Arctic searching expedition, vol. 2, p. 398, London, 1851, 8°.
Contains about 75 words.
Reprinted in the later editions of the same
work; see Richardson (J.)
 Vocabulary of the language  of  a
tribe dwelling near the sources of the
O'Brian (—) — Continued.
River of the Mountains, and known to
the voyagers by the name of " Mauvais
Monde," and of the Dog-rib dialect,
drawn lip by Mr. O'Brian, of the Hud-
sou's Bay Company's service.
In Richardson (J.), Arctic searching expedition, vol. 2, pp. 399-400, London, 1851,8°.
Contains about 50 words in each-dialect. 76
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
O'Brian (—) — Continued.
Reprinted in the later editions of the same
work; see Richardson (J.)
Ochikthud   ettunetle   [Tukudh]. |  See
McDonald (R.)
Orozco y Berra (Manuel). Geograffade
las lenguas | y | carta etnogratica | de
Mexico | precedidas de un ensayo de
clasificacion de las mismas lenguas | y
de apuntes para las inmigraciones de
las tribus | por el lie. | Manuel Orozco
y Berra | [Five lines quotation] | [Design.] |
Mexico | imprenta de J. M. Andrade
y F. Escalante | [C]alle de Tiburcio
num.19 | 1864 .
Half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso blank 1
1. dedication verso blank 1 1. introduction pp.
vii-xiv, half-title (primera parte) verso blank 1
1. text pp. 3-387, index pp. 389-392, map, folio.
Chapter viii, Familia apache 6 yavipai, pp.
40-41, refers to the Yuman.— Section viii of
chapter xii, Familia apache, p. 59, refers both
to the Athapascan and Yuman.—Chapter xxv,
Apaches, pp. 368-387, is a general discussion on
the geographic distribution of these peoples
and includes the Tontos, Chiricaguis, Gilenos,
Mimbrenos, Faraones, Mescaleros, Llaneros,
Lipanes, Navajos, Chemegue [Shoshonean],
Tuta [Shoshonean], Muca Oraive [Shoshonean], and the Toboso ("lengua perdida").
Copies seen: Bancroft, Boston Athenaeum,
Boston Public, Brinton, British Museum, Congress, Eames, Watkinson.
Our Forest Children. | Vol. 1, No. 1.
Shingwauk Home. February, 1887
[-Vol. IV.   No. 6.  September, 1890].
Edited by Rev. E. F. Wilson and published!
monthly at the Shingwauk Home, Sault Ste.
Marie, Ontario; sm. 4°. No. 10 of vol. 1 is a
"Christmas number." In 1888 a "Summer
number" appeared, no. 4 of vol. 2; also a
"Christmas number," "no. 10" of vol. 2,
although the next issue is numbered 10 also.
These special issues are larger than the regular
ones, and illustrated. The regular issues consisted of 2 11. or 4 pp. each nntil no. 3 of vol. 3
(for June, 1889), when the periodical was made a
16-page illustrated monthly. The first seven
numbers of vol. 1 were in size about 6 by 9
inches and were unpaged; with no. 8 the size
was increased to about 8 by 10 inches, and the
pages numbered, each issue being paged independently (1-4) until the beginning of vol. 2, from
which a single pagination continues (excepting
nos. 4 and 10) to no. 1 of Vol.' 3 (pp. 1-48), the
next no. being paged 5-8. No. 3 of vol. 3 (June,
1889) begins a new series and a new and continuous pagination (pp. 1-256), each issue since
then having 16 pp. 4°, and being provided with
a cover. The last issue—that for September,
1890—says: "As has already been announced,
this is the last issue of 'Our Forest Children.'
Next month, October, will appear the first number of the 'Canadian Indian.' "   [q. v.]
Reeve (W. D.), The Chipewyan Indians, vol.
2, pp. 6-7.
Wilson (E. F.), The Sarsee Indians, vol. 3,
pp. 97-102.
 .-The Navajo Indians, vol. 3, pp. 113-117.
-   Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
P.
Palliser (Capt. John). Exploration.—
British North America. | The | journals,
detailed reports, and observations | relative to | the exploration, | by captain
Palliser, | of | that portion of British
North America, | which, | in latitude,
lies between the British boundary line
and the | height of land or watershed of
the northern | or frozen ocean respec-
• tively, j and | in longitude, between
the western shore of lake Superior and
| the Pacific ocean, | During the Years
1857,1858,1859, and 1860. | Presented to
both Houses of Parliament by Command
of Her Majesty, | 19th May 1863. |
[English arms.] |
London: | printed by George Edward
Eyre and William Spottiswoode, | printers to the queen's most excellent majesty. | For her majesty's stationery office. | 1863. | (Price 3s. 6cl.)
Palliser (J.) — Continued.
Printed cover as above, title as above
(omitting the price) verso blank 1 1. text pp.
3-325, colophon 1 p. folio.
Sullivan (J. W.), Vocabularies of the Northwest Indians, pp. 207-216.
Copies seen: Boston Athenaeum, Geological
Survey.
Priced by Du fosse, Paris, 1887, no. 24911,12 fr.
Packard (Robert Lawrence). Terms of relationship used by the Navajo Indians.
Manuscript, 4 leaves, folio, in the library of
the Bureau of Ethnology. Collected at the
Navajo Reservation, New Mexico, in 1881. This
manuscript has been corrected and supplemented by Dr. Washington Matthews, Fort
Wingate, N. Mex.
Palmer (Dr. Edward). Vocabulary of
the Pinella and Ariva Apache language.
Manuscript;. 5 unnumbered pages, 4°, in the
library of the Bureau of Ethnology. It bears
the Smith sonian Institution receipt stamp of
Dec. 24, 1867. ATHAPASCAN  LANGUAGES.
77
Palmer (E.) — Continued.
Contains the 180 words adopted by the Smithsonian Institution as a standard vocabulary.
Arranged four columns to the page, two of
English and two of Apache.
There is a copy of this vocabnlary in the
same library, made by its compiler; 6 unnumbered leaves, folio, written on one side only.
Peau de Lievre:
Dictionary See Petitot (E. F.S.J.)
Grammatic comments Mimer (F.)
Grammatic treatise      Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
Legends
Relationship
*    Text
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Words
[Perrault (CI
Petitot (E.F.S. J.)
s Morgan (L. H.)
Promissiones.
Kennicott (R.)
Petitot (E. F.S.J.)
Roehrig (F. L. O.)
Charencey (C.F.H.G.)
Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
larles Ovide).]    L. J. C. &,
M. J. | Prieres, | Cantiques | et Catechisme | en | langue Montagnaise ou
Chipeweyan. | [One line syUabic characters.] | [Oblate seal.] |
Montreal: | Imptimerie de Louis Perrault. | 1857. (*)
Title verso approbation of t Alexandre, Eveque de St. Boniface, 0. M. I. 1 1. text pp. 3-144,
18°.
Prayers, etc., pp. 3-46.—Syllabary, p. 47.—
Cantiques (22), pp.49-92.—Catechism.pp.93-144.
Title from Dr. J. H. Trumbull from copy in
his possession. Referring to the note under the
next succeeding title, descriptive of the addition of pp. 145-180,he says: "My copy is in
the original binding, fresh and unused, and is
evidently complete as issued."
 ] L. J. C. & M. J. | Prieres, | can
tiques et catechisme | en langue | Montagnaise ou Chipeweyan. | [One line
syUabic characters.] | [Oblate seal.] |
Montreal: | imprimerie de Louis Perrault et compagnie. | 1865.
Title verso approbation of t Alexandre
Eveque de St. Boniface, O. M. 1.1 1. " quelques
notes" signed Chs. Ovide Perrault pp. i-xi,
text in syllabic characters with French headings in italics pp. 3-174, table des cantiques
(alternate lines Montagnais in syllabic characters and French in italics) pp. 175-179,18°. Signatures alternately in twelves and sixes. See
the fac-simile of the syllabary, p. 78.
In the preliminary "notes" the author includes a letter, "A Messieurs les Redacteurs
du Pays," which contains the alphabet [syllabary], p. iv, and an "exemple" of the characters with transliteration and translation into
French, p. v. Also a " Lettre de Monseigneur
Faraud, Eveque d'Anemour, a Chs. 0. Perrault, Ecr., Avocat de Montreal," pp. vii-x,
giving examples and explanations of the syllabic characters "que nous employons pour les
langues sauvages."
Perrault (C. O.) —Continued.
Prayers, pp. 1-17.—Way of the cross, pp. 18-
40—Alphabet [syllabary], p. 41.—Hymns (nos.
1-38), pp. 43-117.—Catechisme, pp. 119-174.
Copies seen: Eames, O'Callaghan, Pilling,
Shea.
The copies of this work belonging to Mr.
Wilberforce Eames and myself differ from the
other two. They lack the six preliminary
leaves paged i-xi; and following page 179 are
pages 145-180 (signatures 9 in twelve and 10 in
six). Page 145 is headed "Explications de
quelques Images propres & l'instruction des
Montagnais," embracing hymns nos. 1-13 in
syllabic characters, with headings in French, in
italics. These copies are in the original binding and seem to be as issued from the press.
It is probable that the copies of this kind are
of the earlier issue. The first sheet is complete ; the title-leaf is connected with leaf paged
23-24; the second leaf with leaf paged 21-22, &c.
The Explications appear to have been printed as
a supplement to the edition of 1857. The copies
left over were bound up with the edition of
1865. Subsequently, I presume, the six leaves
containing the quelques noteswere inserted and
the book issued without the Explications.
A similar copy was priced by Dufosse in December, 1889 (no. 36739), 10 fr.; and another in
June, 1890 (no. 40911), at the same figure.
Petitot (Pb'e Emile Fortune" Stanislas
Joseph). Etude sur la nation montagnaise par le R. P. Petitot de la Congregation des Oblats de Marie Irnma-
cule"e.
In Les Missions Catholiques, vol. 1, pp. 129-
216; vol. 2, pp. 1-64, Lyon, 1868-1869, folio.
(Pilling.)
List of names of divisions of the Athapascan
family, with English signification, vol. 1, p.
136.—Langue montagnaise (general discussion),
pp. 159-160.—List of words showing affinities
in various Athapascan languages, pp. 215-216.—
Names Of the months in Loucheux, Peau de
Lievre, and Montagnais, vol. 2, p. 48.—Many
Athapascan words, phrases, and sentences
passim.
Issued separately: Paris, A. Hennuyer et fils,
Paris, 1868, 63 pp. 12°. (*)
—— D6ne" Dindjies.
In Congres Int. des Americanistes, Compte-
rendu, premiere session, vol. 2, pp. 13-37, Nancy
et Paris, 1875, 8°.   (Eames, Pilling.)
Comparison of Dene-Dindjie terms with those
of various other languages, pp. 13-15.—Comparative table Navajo, Dene (different dialects),
and Dindjie, pp. 20-21.
 Outils en pierre et en os du Mac-
Kenzie (cercle polaire arctique).
In Materiaux pour l'histoire primitive et
naturelle de l'homme, pp. 388-405, Toulouse,
1875, 8°.   (PiUing*)
Contains a number of Chippewyan and Eski-
mauan names of implements passim. 78
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
41
ALPHABET.
<a
Ve
A»
>o
"TJ^'A
<3an
^eh-
A"1
£>on
•Ed*
<ba
yi>e
Abi
>'bo
|HI
Cda
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FAC-SIMILE OF THE SYLLABARY FROM   PERRAULT'S MONTAGNAIS
PRAYER-BOOK OF  1865. ATHAPASCAN  LANGUAG
i
Petitot (E.F. S. J.) — Continued.
 Dictionnaire | de la | langue Dene-
Dindji6 | dialectes |  Montagnais   ou
Chipp6wayan,   Peaux   de  Lievre   et
Loueheux | renfermant  en   outre | un
grand nombro de termes propres a sept
autres dialectes de la mane langue |
prdccdc | d'une monographie des Dene-
Diudjid | d'une  grammaixe  et de tableaux synoptiques des conjugaisons |
par | le K. P. E. Petitot | Missionnaire-
Oblat   de  Marie Immaculee,  Officier
• d'Acadc'mie, Membre correspondant de
1'Academic de Nancy, | de la Socidte"
d'Anthropologie et Membre honoraire
de la Soci6t6 de Philologie de Paris. |
[Two lines quotation.] | [Design.] |
Paris | Ernest Leroux, Editeur |
libraire des socie"tcs Asiatiqnes de
Paris, de Calcutta, de New-Haven
(Etats-Unis), de Shanghai (Chine) \ de
l'Ecole des langues Orientales vivantes,
de la Society philologique, etc. | 28,
rue Bonaparte, 28 | Maisonneuve, quai
Voltaire, 15 | San Francisco, A.-L. Bancroft and C°. | 1876
Cover title as above, omitting the design,
and with the addition of five lines at the beginning (Bibliotheque | de | linguistique et
d'ethnograjihioamericaines | PublieeparAlph.
L. Pinart | Volume II), half-title verso notes 1
1. title as above verso blank 1 1. dedication
verso blank 11. preface pp.vii-ix, avant-propos
pp. xi-xviii, monographie des Dene-Dindjie
pp. xix-xxvi, essai sur l'origine des Dene-
Dindjie pp. xxvii-xlv, abreviations p. [xlvi],
precis de grammaire comparee des trois princi-
paux dialectes Dene-Dindjie pp. xlvii-lxxxv,
errata pp. lxxxvii-lxxxviii, text pp. 1-367, colophon p. [368], 5 folded tables, 4°.
Comparative grammar of the Montagnais,
Peaux-de-lievre, and Loueheux, pp. xlvii-
lxxxv.—Dictionary of the Dene-Dindjie in four
columns, French, Montagnais, Peaux-de-lievre,
and Loueheux, arranged alphabetically by
French words, pp. 1-367.—Tableau general des
verbes Montagnais, folded table no. 1.—Suite
des conjugaisons des verbes Montagnais, folded
table no. 2.—Tableau general des verbes Peaux
de Lievre, folded table no. [3].— Tableau general des verbes Loueheux, folded table no.
1 [4].—Verbes Loueheux a. desinences irregu-
lieres, folded table no. 2 [5]. '
Copies seen: Astor, Bancroft, Congress,
Pilling, Wellesley.
Fifty copies were issued " sur papier de Hol-
lande extra," at 175 fr.; 150 copies " sur papier
fort, "at 125 fr.; and 150 copies " sur papier ordinaire," for the use of the Mackenzie mission.
 Monographic | des J Dene-Dindj ie" |
par | le r. p. E. Petitot | Missionnaire-
Objat   de   Marie-Immaculee,   Officier
Petitot (E. F. S. J.) — Continned.
d'Acadehiie, | Membre correspondant
de 1'Academic de Nancy, | de la Soci6t6
d'Anthropologie | et Membre honoraire
de la Socict6 de Philologie et d'Eth-
nographie de Paris. |
Paris | Ernest Leroux, dditeur | libraire de la societ6 Asiatique de Paris, |
de l'ecole des langues orientales vivantes et des societies Asiatiqnes de
Calcutta, | de New-Haven (Etats-
Unis), de Shanghai (Chine) | 28, rue
Bonaparte, 28 | 1876
Cover title as above, half-title verso printer
11. title as above verso blank 11. text pp. 1-109,
list of publications 11. 8°.
General discussion on language, pp. 1-6.—
General discussion of the Athapascan languages (pp. 7-22) includes a short comparative
vocabulary, French, Latin, Montagnais, Peaux
de Lievre, and Loueheux, p. 16.—A comparative
vocabulary of the Nabajo, Done (de divers dialectes) and Dindjie, p. 22. — Comparative
vocabulary of the "Walcish (Tetes-Plates) and
Ynkultas (Tetes-Longues), p. 104.—Comparative vocabulary of the languages of the Haidas
(Kollouches, Des Charlottes), Tonguas (Kol-
louches, Alaska), Ynkultas (Tetes-Longues,
Colombie britannique), TVakish (TStes-Plates,
Oregon), Dnaln6 (Atnans, Alaska), Dindjie
(Mackenzie), and Dene (Territoire du Ko.-O.),
p. 105.—Also scattered phrases and terms with
significations.
Copies seen: Astor, Brinton, Eames, Pilling.
 Six legendes americaines identifiees a
l'histoire de Moise et du peuple hdbreu.
In Les Missions Catholiques, vol.10,pp.476-624,
vol. 11, pp. 1-160, Lyon, 1878-79, folio. (Pilling.)
A legend from each of the following peoples:
Chippewyan, Peaux de Lievre, Loueheux, Sixi-
caques ou Pieds-noirs, Chaktas, Tzendales, in
all of which native words occur passim.
 De l'origine asiatique des Indiens
de l'Amerique arctique. Par le K. P.
Emile Petitot, O. M. I. Missionnaire an
Mackenzie, officier d'Academie, etc.
In Les Missions Catholiques, vol. 12, pp. 529-
611, Lyon, 1879, folio.   (Pilling, Wellesley.)
Many Athapascan terms passim.
 De l'origine asiatique des Indiens de
l'Am6rique arctique.
In Societe Philologique, Actes, vol. 12, pp. 39-
76, Alencon, 1883, 8°.,
Une version de la legende nationale de la
femme au metal . . . chez les Denes (parallel columns French and Dene), pp. 41-46.
 On the Athabasca   District of the
Canadian North-west Territory. By
the Rev. Emile Petitot.
In Royal Geog. Soc. Proc. vol. 5, pp. 633-655,
London, 1883, 8°.    (Pilling.)
Contains a number of geographic, tribal, and
personal names. 80
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF  THE
Petitot (E. F. S. J.) — Continued.
 De la formation du langage; mots
forme's par le redoublement de racines
he'te'rogenes, quoique de signification
synonyme, c'est-it-dire par reiteration
copulative.
In Association francaise pour l'avancement
des sciences, compte-rendu, 12th session (Rouen,
1883), pp. 697-701, Paris, 1884, 8°. (Geological
Survey, Pilling.)
Contains examples in a number of North
American languages, among them the Dene
Atnan, and Dindjie.
 La femme au serpent.    L6gende des
D6n6 Chippewayans.
In Melusine, Revue de Mythologie, littera-
ture populaire, traditions et usages, vol. 2, no.
1, columns 19-21, Paris. April 5, 1884, 4°.
(Gatschet.)
The legend is first given in French, with the
"Texte original du conte chippewayan" following.
— On the Athapasca district of the
Canadian North-west Territory. By the
Rev. Emile Petitot.
In Montreal Nat. Hist. Soc. Record of Nat.
Hist, and Geology, pp. 27-53, Montreal, 1884,4°.
Contains numerous names of rivers, lakes,
etc., in Chippewyan.
Reprinted with the same title in: Montreal
Nat. Hist. Soc. Canadian Record of Science, vol-
1, pp. 27-52, Montreal, 1884, 8°.
This latter magazine took the place of the
Record of Natural History and Geology above
mentioned, only one number of that serial having been issued.
— Parallele des coutumes et des croy-
ances de lafamille Caraibo-Esquimaude
avec celles des peuples Altaiques et
Puniques.
La Association francaise pour l'avancement
.des sciences, compte-rendu, 12th session (Rouen,
1883), pp. 686-697, Paris, 1884, 8°.   (Geological
Survey, Pilling.)
A number of Dene words with French meanings passim.
— Melanges americains. Vocabulaire
pieganiw. Deuxieme dialecte des Nin-
nax ou Pieds-Noirs. Recueilli par
Emile F. S. Petitot.
In Societe Philologique, Actes, vol. 14, pp.
170-198, Alencon, 1885, 8°.
Petit vocabulaire Sards, pp. 195-198.
— Traditions indiennes | du | Canada
nord-oue'st | par | Emile Petitot | ancien
missionnaire | [Design] |
Paris I Maisonneuve  freres   et  Ch.
Leclerc | 25, quai Voltaire, 2 [5] | 1886
I Tous droits reserve's
Colophon: Achev6 d'imprimer le 19 Aout
1886 I par G. Jacob imprimeur a Orleans | pour
Petitot (E. F. S. J.) — Continued.
Maisonneuve  freres | et  Charles  Leclerc | li-
braires editeurs | & Paris
Half-title of the series (Les | litteratures populates I tomexxiii) verso blank 1 l.titleof the
series verso blank 11. half-title verso blank 11.
title as above verso blank 11. dedication verso
blank 1 1. introduction pp. i-xvii, remarque p.
[xviii], text pp. 1-507, index et concordance pp.
509-514, table desmatieres pp. 515-521, ouvrages
du meme auteur 1 1. colophon verso blank 1 1.
list of the series verso blank 1 1.16°. Forms
vol. 23 of "Les litteratures populaires de toutes
les nations."
Deuxieme partie, Legendes et traditions,
des Dindji6 ou Loueheux (pp. 13-102), besides
many terms passim, contains: Texte et traduction litterale de la premiere legende [inter
linear], pp. 95-100.—Heros et divinites des
Dindjie, pp. 101-102.
Troisieme partie, Legendes -et traditions
des Dene Peaux-de-Lievre (pp. 103-306), besides
many terms passim, includes: Texte et traduction litterale [interlinear of a legend], pp. 302-
303.—Liste des heros, des divinites et des
monstres Peaux-de-Lievre, pp. 304r-306.
Quatrieme partie, Legendes et traditions
des Dune,Flancs-de-Chiens et Esclaves (pp. 307-
344), besides native terms passim, contains:
Texte et traduction litterale de la premiere
legende, pp. 341-343.—Heros et divinites des
Flancs-de-chiens, p. 344.
Cinquieme partie, Legendes des Dene
Tchippewayan (pp. 345-442), besides many
native words passim, includes: Texte et traduction litterale de la premiere legende, pp.
437-44(L—Heros et divinites des Dene Tchippe-
wayanrpp. 441-442.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Eames,
Gatschet, Pilling, Powell.
The original texts of these traditions, with
literal translations, were subsequently published as follows:
 Traditions   indiennes | du j Canada
nord-ouest | Textes originaux & traduction litt6rale | par | Emile Petitot |
Ancien Missionnaire, Officier d'Acade--
niie, Membre de la | Socie'te' de Philologie, etc. I [Two lines quotation] |
Alencon | E. Renaut-de Broise, Imp.
et Lith. I Place d'Armes, 5. | 1888
In Societe Philologique, Actes, vols. 16 &, 17
(half-title 1 1. title as above 1 1.) pp. 169-614,
Alencon, 1888, 8°.   (Eames, Wellesley.)
The whole work is in double columns,
French and the native language.
Deuxieme partie, Traditions (1-10) des
Dindjie ou Loueheux (Bas-Mackenzie, Anderson et Montagnes-Rocheuses), pp. 175-253.
Troisieme partie, Traditions (1-43) des Dene
Peaux-de-Lievre, pp. 255-414.—Observances et
superstitions (1-17), pp. 415-447—Contes et
notions physiques (1-16), pp. 448-463.
Quatrieme partie, Traditions (1-9) des Dune
des Flancs-de-chiens, pp. 465-503. ATHAPASCAN  LANGUAGES.
81
Petitot (E. F. S. J.) — Continued.
Cinquieme partie, Traditions (1-17) des Dene
Tchippewayans, pp. 505-588.
Issued separately, also, as follows:
 Traditions   indiennes | du | Canada
nord-ouest | Textes originaux & traduction litterale | par | Emile Petitot,
| Ancien Missionnaire, Officier d'Academic, Membre de la | Societ6 de Philologie, etc. | [Two lines quotation] |
Alencon | E. Renaut-de Broise, Imp.
et Lith | Place d'Armes, 5. | 1887
Cover   title:   Emile    Petitot  I   Traditions
indiennes | du | Canada nord-ouest | (1862-1882)
| Textes  originaux  & traduction  litterale |
[Two lines quotation] | ,
Alencon | E. Renaut-de Broise, Imp. et Lith.
| Place d'Armes, 5. | 1888
Cover title as above, half-title verso printers I 1. title as above verso '' Extrait du bulletin " etc. IV. introduction pp. i-vi, 1 blank 1. text
pp. 1-439, table des chapitres pp. 441-446, colophon verso blank 11.8°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above,
pp. 7-85,87-246,247-279,280-295,297-335, 337-420.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Eames,
Gatschet, Pilling.
The original manuscript of this work has
title as follows:
 1862-1866 | Textes    originaux   et |
traductions Litterales | des | Traditions
et Legendes | des | habitans du nord-
ouest | du Canada | recueillies et tra-
duites | par | Emile Fortune Stanislas
Joseph | Petitot | Ancien [&c. two
lines]
Manuscript, pp. 1-321, folio, in the library of
the Comte de Charencey, Paris, France, under
whose auspices the work was published.
 En route | pour | la   mer glaciale |
par | Emile Petitot | Ancien missionnaire, Officier d'Acadeinie, | Laureat
des Soci6tes de geographic de Paris- et
de Londres, | Membre de plusieurs
Socie'tes savantes. | Ouvrage accom-
pagn6 de .gravures d'apres les dessins
. de l'auteur. | [Two lines quotation.] |
Paris | Letouzey et Ane", etliteurs | 17,
rue du Vieux-Colombier | [1888] | Tous
droits re'serve's.
Cover title as above, half-title verso list
of works by the same author 1 1. portrait 1 1.
title as above verso blank 1 1. dedication verso
errata 1 1. introduction pp. 1-3, text pp. 5-394,
list of engravings 1 p. 12°.
A few Tchippewayan, Iroquois, and other
terms and expressions passim.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Pilling.
 La femme aux me'taux, legende na-
tionale des Danites.
ATH 6
Petitot (E. F. S. J.) — Continued.
Mt'.'iux, 1888, Marguerith-Dupre',
impr. (*)
24 pp. 12°. Title from the same author's
Autour du grand lac des Esclaves.
 Quinzo ans | sons le | cercle polaire
| Mackenzie, Anderson, Youkon | par
| Emile Petitot | Ancien Missionnaire,
Officier d'Acad6mie, | Laureat des
Societies de Geographic de Londres et de
Paris, | Membre de plusieurs Socie'tes
savantes. | Ouvrage accompagn6 de 1*8
gravures de H. Blanchard | et d'une
carte d'Erhard | d'apres les dessins de
l'auteur | [Two lines quotation] |
[Design] |
Paris | E.   Dentu,   dditeur | libraire
de la Societe" des gens de lettres | 3,
Place de Valois,  Palais-royal | 1889 |
(Tous droits reserves.)
Cover title differing somewhat from above,
half-title verso list of works by the same
author 1 1. continuation of list verso frontispiece 1 Is title as above verso blank 1 1. dedication vorso blank I 1. introduction pp. xi-xvi,
contents pp. xvii-xxi, list of illustrations verso
blank 11. text pp. 1-322, errata verso blank 11.
map, 12°.
Names of the sixteen seasons, or divisions of
the year, in the Peau-de-Lievre language, p.
87—Names of the fifteen lunar months in the
Pean-de-Lievro language, p. 88.—Specimen of
Dindjie songs, with translation, p. 187.—
Words, sentences, and names of geographic
features in Esquimaux, Dindjie, and Peau-de-
Lievre or Dene, passim, especially on pp. 15,
19,34,169,180,188,189, 213.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Gatschet,
Pilling.
 Accord | des | mythologies | dans la
| cosmogonie des Danites arctiques |
par | Emile Petitot, Prfitre J ex-mission-
naire et explorateur   arctique | [Five
lines quotation] | [Device] |
Paris | Emile Bouillon, dditeur | 67,
rue Richelieu, 67 | 1890
Printed cover nearly like above, half-title
verso works by the same author 1 1. title as
above verso blank 11. dedication verso blank 1
1. introduction pp. i-xiii, text pp. 1-452, notes
pp. 453-462, authors cited pp. 463-468, index pp.
469-488, table of contents pp. 489-490, errata
and omissa pp. 491-493, 12°.
Many Dene-Dindjie words passim.—Cosmogonie table of the Mexicans, p. 460.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Eames,
Gatschet, Pilling.
 Origine Asiatique | des Esquimaux
| Nouvelle   Etude   ethnographique |
Par Emile Petitot I Ex-Missionnaire et BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
Petitot (E. F. S. J.) — Continued.
Explorateur arctique, Cure' de Mareuil-
les-Meaux (S.-et-M.) | [Two lines quotation] | [Vignette] |
Rouen | imprimerie de Esperance
Cagniard | Rues Jeanne-Dare, 88, et
des Basnage, 5 | 1890.
Cover title as above, title as above (verso
"Extrait du Bulletin de la Societe normande
de Geographic") 11. text pp. 3-33, sm. 4°.   .
On pp. 25V-33 are given tables of words showing similarities between the words of various
languages of the Old and New World. Among
the North American languages a number of
examples are given from the Dindjie, Pean-
de-Lievre, Ingalik, Slave, Tchippewyan, and
Apache.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Pilling.
 Autour du grand lac | des Esclaves
I par | Emile Petitot | ancien missionnaire et explorateur arctique | Ouvrage
accompagne" de gravures et d'une carte
par l'auteur | [Two lines quotation] |
[Design] |
Paris | Nouvelle librairie parisienne
| Albert Savine, ecliteur | 12, rue des
Pyramides,  12 | 1891 | Tous   droits reserve's.
Cover title: Emile Petitot | Autour | du
grand lac | des | Esclaves | Ouvrage accompagne de gravures et d'une carte par l'auteur
[ [Two lines quotation] | [Design] |
Paris | Nouvelle librairie parisienne | Albert
Savine, editeur | 12, rue des  Pyramides, 12 |
Tous droits reserves.
Cover title, ouvrages d'Emile Petitot pp. i-iv,
errata pp. v-vi, half-title verso portrait of the
author 11. title as above verso blank 11. dedication verso blank 1 1. introduction pp. xi-xiii,
text pp. 1-358, notes j>p. 359-364, table des
matieres pp. 365-369, tables des gravures verso
blank 11. map, 12°.
Les Tchippewayans (pp. 1-180), besides many
native terms passim, contains, on pp. 97-111, a
general account of the Athapascan and their
-divisions.—Les Flancs-de-chiens, pp. 183-314,
contains many native terms passim. — Les
Esclaves, pp. 315-358, inclndes many native
terms passim.—Nomenclature des peuplades
Danites, pp. 360-363.
Copies seen: Pilling.
 Comparative vocabulary of several
Athapascan languages.
Manuscript, 10 unnumbered leaves, 4°, in the
library of the Bureau of Ethnology. Recorded
at Fort Good Hope, McKenzie River, in the
summer of 1865.
Entered on one of the Smithsonian forms (no.
170) of 211 words. The first page is headed
Famille Montagnaise ou Dene (Chippewaya-
nanok des Crees); 3e Nation: Esclaves—Tribu
des Peaux de Lievre,   The blank pages are
Petitot (E. F. S. J.) — Continued.
ruled in four columns, headed respectively
" demi-tribu des Kat'a-gottine (fleuve McKen- I
zie)"; "demi-tribu des Yeta-gottine (mon-.;
tagnes-rocheuses)"; "demi-tribu des Katcho- j
gottine (limite des bois au N. E. de Good- :
Hope)"; "demi-tribu des Nnea-gOttine (limite
des hois au S. E. de Anderson)".
The schedule in the firstcolumn is completely \
filled, there are scarcely any words in the second, the third is one-fourth filled, and in the
fourth about three-fourths of the words are
given.
%— Notes on the Montagnais or Chippe-
wayans.    By Father Petitot.
Manuscript, 3 unnumbered pages, 4°, in the
library of the Bureau of Ethnology. Received
at the Smithsonian Institution, Oct. 11,1865.
This material, which is in French, opens on
the first page with an account of the Montagnais, their habitat, and division into nations
and tribes. The second and third pages contain a short vocabulary of words (pere, mere,
enfant, etc.) with pronominal prefixes.
 Comparative vocabulary of several
D6ne languages.
Manuscript, 10 unnumbered leaves, 4°, in the
library of the Bureau of Ethnology. Recorded
at Fort Norman-Franklins, Great Bear Lake,
Jan. 11, 1869.
Entered on one of the Smithsonian forms (no.
170) of 211 words, to which a score of words have
been added by Father Petitot, The blan k pages
of the form have been ruled in four columns,
headed respectively:
Dene (homo) Chippayananok (des Crees),
Chippewyans (des Anglais), Montagnais (des
Francais); Dene (homo) Kkayttchane othne
(des Chippewyan), Hare Indians (des Anglais),
Peaux de Lievre (des Francais); Dindjie (homo)
Dehkewi (des Peaux de Lievre), Kutchin (de
Richardson), Loueheux (des Francais); Innok
(sing.) Innoit (plur. homo) Wiyaskimew (des
Crees), Otzelna, Ennahke (des Denes), Hoskys
(des Anglais), Esquimaux (des Francais).
 [Manuscripts   in   the  Athapascan
languages.] (*)
Iu response to a request for a list, with detailed description, of his unpublished manuscripts, Father Petitot wrote me from Mareuil-
les-Meaux, France, April 24,1889:
My linguistic manuscripts still in my hands
are as follows:
A Dene (Peau-deLievre)-French vocabulary,
not comprising verbs. This I had not time to
finish while at the mission.
A work on the Dene (Peau-de-Lievre) roots,
in alphabetic order.
A work on the formation of language by juxtaposition of roots synonymous but heterogeneous. This subject I treated casually at the
Rouen meeting of the French Association for
the Advancement of Science, Aug. 23, 1883.
A book of prayers for the use of the Indians
among whom I worked.   It comprises Catholic ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
83
Petitot (E. F. S. J.) — Continued.
prayers in Esquimau and Dene (Peau-de-Lievre)
by myself; Dindjie by R. P. Seguin; Dene
(Tchippewyan), by Archbishop Tache; and
Dane castor by R. P. J. Clut, now bishop of
Erindel.
An Esquimau Tchiglit cateohism.
I was obliged to leave at my last residence,
St. Raphael, Saskatchewan, 75 leagues north of
Ft. Pitt., several manuscripts by myself, among
them the following:
A complete course of instructions and sermons in the Dene Peau-de-Lievre, and many
instructions in Dene Tchippewyan.
A copy, written by myself, of the abridgment
of the bible in Dene Tchippewyan, by Mgr.
Faraud, vicar apostolic of Mackenzie.
 Chants indiens du Canada | Nord-
Ouest | recueillis, classes et note's par
| Emile  Petitot | pretre missionnaire
. au Mackenzie | de 1862 a 1882. | Offert
a la Smithsonian Institution | avec les
horn in ages respectueux | de l'auteur |
Emile Petitot ptre | cur6 de Mareuil-
les-Meaux | (S. & M.) | 1889.
Manuscript, 7 by 11 inches in size; title as
above verso table 1 1. songs with musical notes
pp. 1-16; in the library of the compiler of this
bibliography.
Cree songs, p. 1.—Dene Tchippewayan songs,
pp. 2-3.—Dene Esclave songs, pp. 3-5.—Dune
Flancs-de-Chien songs, pp. 6-7.—Dene Peau-de-
Lievre songs, pp. 7-10.— Dindji6 or Loueheux
songs, pp. 11-15.—Esquimaux Tchiglit songs,
pp. 15-16.
Fmiile Fortune Stanislas Joseph Petitot was
born, December 3,1838, at Grancey-le-Chateau,
department of Cote-d'Or, Burgundy, France.
His studies were pursued at Marseilles, first at
the Institution St. Louis, and later at the
higher seminary of Marseilles, which he entered
in 1857. He was made deacon at Grenoble, and
priest at Marseilles March 15, 1862. A few
days thereafter he went to England and sailed
for America. At Montreal he found Mon-
seigneur Tache, bishop of St. Boniface, with
whom he set out for the Northwest, where he
was continuously engaged in missionary work
among the Indians and Eskimos until 1874,
when he returned to France to supervise the
publication of some of his works on linguistics
and geography. In 1876 he returned to the
missions and spent another period of nearly six
years in the Northwest. In 1882 Be once more
returned to his native country, where he has
since remained. In 1886 he was appointed to
the curacy of Mareuil, near Meaux, which he
still retains. Tho many years he spent in the
inhospitable Northwest were busy and eventful
ones, and afforded an opportunity for geographic, linguistic, and ethnologic observations
and studies such as few have enjoyed. He was
the first missionary to visit Great Bear Lake,
which he did for the first time in 1866.  He went
Petitot (E. F. S. J.) — Continued.
on foot from Good Hope to Providence twice,
and made many tours in winter of forty or fifty
days' length on snowshoes. He was the first
missionary to the Eskimos of the Northwest,
having visited them in 1865, at the mouth of
the Anderson, again in 1868 at the mouth of
the Mackenzie, and in 1870 and again in 1877 at
Fort McPherson on Peel River. In 1870 his
travels extended into Alaska. In 1878 illness
caused him to return south. He went on foot
to Athahaska, whence he passed to the Saskatchewan in a bark. In 1879 he established the
mission of St. Raphael, at Angling Lake, for
the Chippewyans of that region; there he
remained until his final departure for France in
January, 1882.
For an account of his linguistic work among
the Eskimauan and Algonquian tribes, see the
bibliographies of those families.
Petroff (Ivan). See Staffel (V.) and
Petroff (I.)
Pilling: This word following a title or within parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of
the work referred to is in the possession of the
compiler of this bibliography.
Pilling (James Constantine).   Smithsonian institution—Bureau of ethnology |
J."W. Powell director | Proof-sheets | of
a | bibliography | of | the languages |
of the | North American Indians | by |
James Constantine Pilling | (Distributed only to collaborators) |
Washington | Government printing
office | 1885
Title verso blank 1 1. notice signed J. W.
Powell p. iii, preface pp.v-viii, introduction pp.
ix-x, list of authorities pp. xi-xxxvi, list of libraries referred to by initials pp. xxxvii-
xxxviii, list of fac-similes pp. xxxix-xl, text pp.
1-839, additions and corrections pp. 841-1090,
index of languages and dialects pp. 1091-1135,
plates, 4°.
Arranged alphabetically by name of author,
translator, or first word of title. One hundred
and ten copies printed, ten of them on one side
of the sheet only.
 Some queer  American   characters.
By James C. Pilling.
In the Analostan Magazine, vol. 1, pp. 58-67,
Washington, 1891,4°.
Contains an account of the various hieroglyphs, alphabets, and syllabaries in use among
the Indians, with a number of fac-similes,
among them one (reduced) of the title-page of
Father Morice's Dene primer.
Pimentel (Francisco). Cuadro descrip-
tivo y comparativo | de las | lenguas
indigenas de Mexico | por | D. Francisco Pimentel | socio de numero | de
la Sociedad Mexicana de geografia y 84
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Pimentel (F.) — Continued,
estadistica. | [Two lines quotation.] |
Tomo primero[-segundo]. | [Design.] |
M6xico | imprenta   de   Andrade   y
Escalaute | calle de Tibnrcio numero
19. 11862[-1865].
2 vols.: half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso
blank 11. introduction pp. v-lii, half-titles versos
blank 211. text pp. 5-539, index verso blank 11.;
half-title verso works "del mismo autor" 1 1.
title verso blank 11. advertencia pp. v-vi, half-
title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 3-427, note verso
blank 11. index verso blank 11.8°.
Lord's prayer in the Lipan (los Apaches son
una nacion barbara que recorren las provincias
del Norte de Mexico), vol. 2, p. 251.
Copies seen: Bancroft, Boston Athenaeum,
British Museum, Congress, Eames, Watkinson.
 Cuadro descriptivo y comparativo |
de las | lenguas indigenas de Mexico, |
0 tratado de filologia mexicana, | por |
Francisco Pimentel | miembrodevarias
| sociedades cientificas y literarias de
Mexico, | Europa y Estados Unidos de
America. | (Segunda edicion unica com-
pleta.) | Tomo Primero[-Tercero]. |
M6xico. | Tipografia de Isidoro
Epstein | Calle de Nuevo-Mexico N°. 6.
| 1874[-1875].
3 vols.: printed cover nearly as above, half-
title verso notices 11. title as above verso blank
1 1. prologo pp. iii-xvi, text pp. 1-422, erratas
verso blank 1 1. indice pp. 425-426, printed
notices on back cover; printed cover, half-title
verso "obras del mismo autor" 1 1. title (1875)
verso blank 1 1. text pp. 5-468, erratas verso
blank 1 1. indice pp. 471-472, notice on back
cover; printed cover, half-title verso "obras
del mismo autor " 11. title (1875) verso blank 1
1. text pp. 5-565, erratas pp. 567-568, indice pp.
569-570, copyright notice verso blank 11. notice
on back cover, 8°.
El Apache, vol. 3, pp. 483-524, contains a
•general account of the Apache languages and
dialects, including a comparative vocabulary in
Spanish, Apache, and Othomi (pp. 486-488), a
vocabulary of the Apache Mexicano with
Spanish definitions (pp. 512-514), the Apache
numerals 1-2000 (pp. 515-516), a comparison of
forty words in eight Apache dialects, viz,
Apache norte-americano, Apache mexicano,
Minibreno (Copper mine), Pinaleno, Navajo,
Xicarilla (Faraon), Lipan, and Mescalero (pp.
516-521), and the Lord's prayer in Lipan (p. 522).
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
Pinaleno Apache.   See Apache.
Finart   (Alphonse   L.)   Alph.  Pinart |
Sur | les Atnahs | Extraittle la Revue de
Philologie et d'Ethnographie, n° 2. |
Paris | Ernest    Leroux,     Editeur j
libraire   des   soci^tes Asiatiques   de
Pinart (A. L.) — Continued.
Paris, de Calcutta,  de New-Haven |
(Etats-Unis), de Shanghai (Chine) |
28, rue Bonaparte, 28 | 1875
Cover title as above, no inside title; text pp.
1-8, 8°.
The dialect treated is the Atnaxthynne.
General remarks, pp. 1-3.-—Vocabulary of 275
words and phrases, alphabetically arranged by
Atnaxthynne words, pp. 3-8.
Copies seen: Pilling.
 Vocabulary of the Atnah language. (*)
Manuscript, 90 pp. folio, in possession of its
author. Russian and Atnah. Collected at
ICadiak in 1872. May or may not belong to the
Athapascan family of languages.
Some years ago, in response to a request of
mine for a list of the manuscript linguistic
material collected by him, Mr. Pinart wrote me
as follows:
" I have collected, during my fifteen years of
traveling, vocabularies, texts, songs, etc., general linguistic materials in the following languages or dialects. It is impossible at present
to give you the 'number of pages, etc., as most
of it is to be found among my note-books, and
has not been put in shape as yet."
Among the languages mentioned by Mr.
Pinart were the Tlatskenai, Chiracahua
Apache, and White Mountain Apache.
Pino (Pedro   Bautista).    Exposicion |
Sucinta y Sencilla | de la Provincial) del
| Nnevo Mexico: | hecha | por su dipu-
tado" en Cortes | Don Pedro Baptista
Pino, | con arreglo a sus instrucciones. j
Cadiz: j Imprenta del Estado-Mayor-
General. | Ano de 1812. (*)
51 pp. 8°.
"Del Nahajoe," ten words and phrases, pp.
40-41.
Title from the late Dr. J. G. Shea, from copy
in his possession.
 Noticias | historicas  y  estadisticas
| de la antigua provincia del | Nuevo-
Mexico, | presentadas por su diputado
en cortes | D. Pedro Bautista Pino, |
en Cadiz en ano de 1812. | Adicionadas
por el Lie. D. Antonio Barreiro en j
1839; y ultimamente anotadas por el
Lie. | Don Jose" Agustin de Escudero, |
para la comisiou de estadistica militar
| de  la | republica Mexicana. | [Five
lines quotation.] |
Mexico. | Imprenta de Lara, calle de
la Palma num 4. | 1849.
Title verso blank 11. dedication pp. i-iv, text
pp. 1-98, indice 211. map, sm. 4°.
DelNavajoe, pp. 85-86, contains a short vocabnlary (ten "words) with definitions in Spanish.
Copies seen: British Museum, Congress, Shea. ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
85
Pope (Maj. F. L.)   Vocabulary of words
from the Siccany language.
Manuscript, pp. 1-13, 4°, in tho library of
tho Bureau of Ethnology.   Collected in 1865.
Contains about 280 words and phrases, in the
I handwriting of Dr. Geo. Gibbs.   The whereabouts of the original I do not know.   On tho
first page is the following note:
" The tribe known as the Siocanhies inhabit
tho tract of country lying to the northwest of
I Lake Tat la, in British Columbia, and their language is nearly the same as that spoken by the
Connenaghs, or Nahonies, of the Upper Sti-
kine."
Pott (August Friedrich).   Die | quinare
und  vigesimale |  Zahlmethode | bei
Volkern aller Welttheile. j Nebst aus-
f iihrlieheren Bermerkungen | uber die
Zahlworter Indogermanischen Stammes
| und einem Anhange fiber Fingerna-
"men. | Von |.Dr. August Friedrich Pott,
| ord. Prof. [&c. four lines.] |
Halle, | C.A. Schwetschke und Sohn,
| 1847.
Cover title nearly as above, title as above
verso blank 11. dedication verso blank 11. dedicatory notice 1 1. preface pp. vii-viii, text pp.
1-304, 8°.
Many North American languages are represented by numerals, finger names, etc., among
them the Chippewyan (from Mackenzie) and
TacouHies (Carrier), p. 66.
Copies seen: Astor, Boston Public, British
Museum, Eames, Watkinson.
 Doppelung | (Reduplikation, Gemination) j als | eines der wichtigsten Bil-
dungsmittel der Sprache, | beleuchtet
| aus Sprachen aller Welttheile | durch
| Aug. Friedr. Pott, Dr. | Prof, der
AUgemeinen Sprachwiss. an der Univ.
zu Halle [&c. two lines.] |
Lemgo & Detmold, | im Verlage der
Meyer'schen Hof buchhandlung 1862.
Cover title as above, title as above verso quotation 1 1. preface pp. iii-iv, contents pp. v-vi,
text pp. 1-304, list of books on verso of hack
cover, 8°.
Contains examples of reduplication in many
North American languages, among them the
Athapascan, p. 37; Atnah, p. 42; Kenai, pp. 42,
54,120; Tahculi, pp. 42, 62; Tlatskanai, p. 41, and
TJmkwa, pp. 37,42.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Eames.
 Einleitung in die allgemeine Sprachwissenschaft.
In Internationale Zeitschrift fiir allgemeine
Sprachwissenschaft, vol. 1, pp. 1-68, 329-354;
vol. 2, pp. 54-115, 209-251; vol. 3, pp. 110-126,
249-275; Supp., pp. 1-193; vol.4, pp. 67-96; vol.
5, pp. 3-18, Leipzig, 1884-1887, and Heilbronn,
1889, large 8Q, (Bureau of Ethnology.)
Pott (A. F.) — Continued.
The literature of American linguistics, vol. 4,
pp. 67-96. This portion was published after Mr.
Pott's death, which occurred July 5, 1887. The
general editor of the Zoitschrift, Mr. Teohmer,
states in a note that Pott's paper is continued
from the manuscripts which he left, and that it is
to close with the languages of Australia. In the
section of American linguistics publications in
all themoreimportantstocksof North America
are mentioned, with brief characterization.
Powell: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of
the work referred to has been seen by the compiler in the library of Major J. W. Powell,
Washington, D. C.
Powell (Maj. John Wesley). Indian linguistic families of America north of
Mexico.    By J. W. Powell
In Bureau of Ethnology, Seventh Annual
Report, pp. 1-142, Washington, 1891, royal 8°.
Athapascan family, with a list of synonyms
and principal tribes, derivation of the name,
habitat, etc., pp. 51-56.
Issued separately as follows:
 Indian linguistic families of America
| north of Mexico | By | J. W. Powell |
Extract from the seventh annual report
of the Bureau of ethnology [Vignette]
Washington | Government printing
office | 1891.
Cover title as above, no inside title, half-title p.
1, contents pp. 3-6, text pp. 7-142, map, royal 8°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Eames,
Pilling, Powell.
 [Vocabulary of the Navajolanguage.]
Manuscript, 8 11. folio, written on one side
only. Collected at Fort Defiance, Ne w Mexico,
in 1870.   In possession of its author.
Contains about 100 words aud the numerals
1-1000.
Powers (Stephen).   The northern California Indians.
Xa Overland Monthly, vol. 8, pp. 325-333,425-
435,530-539; vol. 9, pp. 155-164, 305-313,498-507,
April-December, 1872. Continued under the
title of " The California Indians, "no. 7 to no. 13,
vol.10, pp. 322-333, 535-545; vol.11, pp. 105-116;
vol. 12, pp. 21-31, 412-424, 530-540; vol. 13, pp.
542-550. April, June, and August, 1873; January, May, June, and December, 1874. San Francisco, 1872-1874,8°.   (Eames.)
The first series consists of six articles, scattered through whichare a few native terms. Article no. iv.vol. 9,pp.l55-164,relates to the Hoopa
or Hoopaw Indians, and contains, onpp.157-158,
some remarks on the Hoopa language, a specimen of its vocabulary, and outlines of grammar.
 Vocabularies of the Wailakki and
Hupa languages.
Manuscript, 6 unnumbered leaves, written on 86
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Powers (S.) — Continued.
one side only, folio, in the library of the Bureau
of Ethnology.
Each of these vocabularies contains the 211
words adopted by the Smithsonian Institution on
one of its later blanks as a standard vocabulary.
and
Prayer book:
Beaver
See
Bompas (W. C.)
Beaver
Garrioch (A. C.)
Dene
Morice (A. G.)
Chippewyan
Kirkby (W.W.)
Chippewyan
Kirkby  (W.   W.)
Bompas (W. C.)
Montagnais
Legoff (L.)
Montagnais
Perrault (C. 0.)
Slave
Kirkby (W.W.)
Slave
Lessons.
Slave
Reeve (W.D.)
Tukudh
McDonald (R.")
Prayers:
Beaver
Set
s Bompas (W. C.)
Bompas (W. C.)
Tuttle (C. R.)
Morice (A. G.)
Bompas (W. C.)
Matthews (W.)
privatam  [Den6].
Chippewyan
Chippewyan
Dene
Dog Rib
Navajo
Preces    post    privatam  [Den6].   See
Morice (A. G.)
Prichard (James Cowles). Researches |
into the | physical history | of | mankind. | By | James Cowles Prichard,
M.D. F.R. S. M.R.I. A. | corresponding member [&c. three lines.] | Third
edition. | Vol.I[-V]. |
London: | Sherwood, Gilbert, and
Piper, | Paternoster row; | and J. and
A. Arch, | Cornhill. | 1836[-1847].
5 vols. 8°. The words '' Third edition," which
are contained on the titles of vols. 1-4 (dated
respectively 1836,1837,1841,1844), are not on the
title of vol. 5. Vol. 3 was originally issued with a
title numbered " Vol. III.—Part I." This title
was afterward canceled, and a hew one (numbered "Vol. LTI.") substituted in its place. Vol.
1 was reissued with a new title containing the
words "Fourth edition" and bearing the imprint "London: | Sherwood, Gilbert, and Piper,
| Paternoster row. | 1841." (Astor); and again
"Fourth edition. | Vol.1. | London: | Houlston
and Stoneman, | 65, Paternoster row. | 1851."
(Congress.) According to Sabin's Dictionary
(no. 65477, note), vol. 2 also appeared in a
"Fourth edition," with the latter imprint.
These several issues differ only in the insertion
of new titles in the places of the original titles.
Of the Languages of the Nations inhabiting
the Western Coast of North America (pp. 438-
441) contains on p. 440 a short comparative
vocabulary of the Esquimaux, Kinai, and Ugal-
jachmutzi.
. Copies seen: Bancroft, Boston Athenaeum,
Congress, Eames.
The earlier editions, London, 1813, 8°, and
London, 1826,2 vols., 8°, contain no Athapascan
material,
Prieres, cantiques et catechisme en
langue montagnaise. See Perrault (C.
O.)
Primer:
Beaver
Chippewyan
Dene
Dog Rib
Tinne
Tukudh
See Bompas (W. C.)
Bompas (W. C.)   '
Morice (A. G.)
Bompas (W. C.)
Bompas (W. C.)
Bompas (W. C.)
Promissiones Domini Nostri Jesu Christi
factae B. Marg. M. Alacoque. | Ncepwe-
kakwadhet Jesukri dakay Marguerite
| Marie Alacoque pat kudjozji, tchoeu-
tiftkcet | chidzji ttset si6kinidheil
kwehdjcet kndjidhizji.
[Dayton, Ohio: Philip A. Kemper.
1890.]
A small card, 3 by 5 inches in size, headed as
above and containing twelve "Promises of Our
Lord to Blessed Margaret Mary" in the
Loueheux language, on' the verso of which is a
colored picture of the sacred heart, with inscription in English below.
Mr. Kemper has published the same " promises" on similar cards in many languages.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
Promissiones Domini Nostri Jesu Christi
factae B. Marg. M. Alacoque. ! Nacett-
senkagower Jesukri dekaye" Marguerite
| Marie Alacoque pa kudezi; meiiikce'
sedz^e" | ttseh sokeyeniweii kupa
kudezi.
[Dayton, Ohio: Philip A- Kemper.
1890.]
A small card, 3 by 5 inches in size, headed as
above and containing twelve "Promises of
Our Lord to Blessed Margaret Mary" in the
Peau de Lievre language, on the verso of
which is a colored picture of the sacred heart
with inscription in Latin below.
Mr.Kemper has published the same "promises" on similar cards in many languages',
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
Promissiones     domini    nostri    [Montagnais] .   See Legoff (L.)
Proper names:
Apaehe
Apache
Apache
Athapascan
Athapascan
Dog Rib
Chippewyan
Navajo
Navajo
Navajo
Taculli
Umpkwa
Psalm book:
Tukudh
See Catlin (G.)
Cremony (J. C.)
White (J.B.)
Catlin (G.)
Petitot (E.F.S. J.)
Catlin (G.)
Catlin (G.)
Catlin (G.)
Matthews (W.)
Smithsonian.
Anderson (A. C.)
Stanley (J. M.)
See McDonald (R.) ATHAPASCAN  LANGUAGES.
87
Q.
: Quaritch: This word following a title or included
within parentheses after a note indicates that
a copy of the work referred to has been seen
by tho compiler in the bookstore of Bernard
Quaritch, London, Eng.
Quaritoh (Bernard).   A general | catalogue of books, | offered to the public
at   the   affixed   prices | by | Bernard
Quaritch. I
London: | 15 Piccadilly. | 1880.
Title verso printers 1 1. preface (dated July,
1880) pp. iil-iv, table of contents pp. v-x, catalogue pp. 1-2166, general index pp. 2167-2395,8°.
Includes the parts issued with the numbers 309-
330, from July, 1877, to November, 1879.
American languages, pp. 1261-1269, contains
titles of a few works containing material
relating to the Athapascan languages.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Congress,
Eames.
 Catalogue | of books on the | history,
geography, | and of | the philology | of
| America, Australasia, Asia, Africa. |
I. Historical geography,voyages, and |
travels. | II. History, ethnology, and
philology | of America. | III. History,
topography, and ethnology | of Asia,
Polynesia, and Africa. | Offered for Cash
at the affixed net prices by | Bernard
Quaritch. |
London: | 15 Piccadilly, June 1885 to
October 1886. | 1886.
Title verso contents 1 1. catalogue pp. 2747-
3162, index pp. i-lxii, 8°. Lettered on the hack:
QUARITCH'g | GENERAL | CATALOGUE | PART XII.
| VOYAGES'I AND | TRAVELS [ AMERICANA" | AND [
ORnsNTALiA | London 1886.   This volume comprises nos. 362-364 (June, July, and August,
1885) of the paper-covered series, with the addition of a special title and a general index.
American languages, pp. 3021-3042, contains
Quaritch (B.) —Continued.
titles of books relating to the Athapascan languages.
The complete " General Catalogue," of which
the above is a part, comprises 15 volumes bound
in red cloth, paged consecutively 1-4066. Each
volume has its own special title and index, with
the title of the series and the number of the part
lettered on the back. It was originally issued
as nos. 332-375 of the paper-covered series, from
November, 1880, to August, 1887, at which date
the publication was discontinued.
Copies seen: Eames.
A large paper edition as follows:
 A general | catalogue of books | offered to the public at the affixed prices
| by | Bernard Quaritch | Vol.I[-VI] |
London: | 15 Piccadilly, | 1887.
6 vols, royal 8°. An index volume was-an-
nounced. but it has not yet (March, 1892) appeared.
American languages, as under the preceding
title, vol. 5, pp. 3011-3042.
Copies seen: Lenox.
This edition was published at 151. for the set,
including the seventh or index volume.
 No. 86.  London, December, 1887. | A
rough list | of | valuable and rare
books, | comprising | the choicest portions of Various Libraries, | and many
. very cheap works of every class of Literature, | at greatly reduced prices, |
offered by | Bernard Quaritch, ,15, Pio-
cadilly, W.
Printed cover (with title: "The miscellaneous and the musical library of Mr. William
Chappell," etc.), catalogue with heading as
above, pp. 1-128, 8°.
American languages, pp. 1-13, contains titles
of a few works giving information relating to
the Athapascan languages.
Copies seen: Eames, PiUing.
R.
Radloff (Leopold). Einige kritische
Bemerkungen fiber Hrn. Buschmann's
Behan'dlung der Kinai-Sprache; von
Leopold Radloff.
In Academic Imp. des Sciences, Melanges
russes.vol. 3, pp. 364-399, St. Petersburg, 1857,
8°.    (Eames.)
The grammatical sketch of the Kinai in this
article is extracted from the works of Lisi-
• ansky, Resanow, Dawydow, and Wrangell.
At the end of the article is the note: (Aus
dem Buu.hist.-pbil., T. xiv, No. 17,18,19).
Radloff (L.) — Continued.
 Memoires |   de | l'Academie impe"-
riale "des sciences de St.-Petersbourg,
VIP sft-ie. | Tome XXI, N° 8. | Leopold
Radloff's | Worterbuch der Kinai-
Sprache | herausgegeben | von | A.
Schiefner. | (Ln le 5 mars 1874.) |
St.-Petersbourg, 1874. | Commission-
naires de l'Academie Imperiale des
sciences: | a St.-Petersbourg: | MM.
Eggers et Cie, H.  Schmitzdorff, | J, 88
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Radloff (L.) — Continued.
Issakof et Tcherkessof; | a Riga: | M.
N. Kymmel; | a   Odessa: | M. A. E.
Kechribardshi; | a  Leipzig: | M. Leopold Voss. | Prix: 40 Kop.=13 Ngr.
Cover title as above, title as above verso
notices 1 1. preface (by A. Schiefner) pp. i-x,
text pp. 1-33, 4°.
Brief grammatic sketch, with songs, pp. i-
x. — German-Kinai dictionary (double columns), pp. 1-32.—Numerals, 1-1000, pp. 32-33.
Copies seen: British Museum, Congress,
Eames, Pilling.
Reeve (Archdeacon W. D.)  The | lord's
prayer, apostles' creed, | &c. | in the |
Slavi language. |  Compiled | by the
rev. W. D. Reeve. |
London: | Church missionary house,
| Salisbury square. | 1881
Title verso printers 1 1. half-title ("Syllaba-
rium") p. [3] the verso p. [4] giving the syllabary, " Syllabarium" in roman characters
p. [5], text (alternate pages syllabic and roman
characters) pp. 6-11, 16°.
Christ's love (hymn) in syllabic characters,
p. 6; same in roman, p. 7.—The Lord's prayer,
ten commandments in brief, syllabic, p. 8; same
in roman, p. 9.—The apostles' creed, and a
prayer, syllabic, p. 10; same in roman, p. 11.
Copies seen: Church Missionary Society,
Eames, Pilling.
 The Chipewyan Indians.
In Our Forest Children, vol. 2, pp. 6-7, Shingwauk Home [Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario], April
1888,4°.
Contains a list of Chipewyan tribes and
twenty-nine Chipewyan words and short sentences with English meanings.
 See Bompas (W. C.) andReeve (W.
D.), in the Addenda.
The index Entries under Bible, page 8, referring to this author are incorrect; they should
read "Bompas (W. C.) and Reeve (W. D.)"
Titles of the works referred to will be found in
the Addenda.
 See Hymns.
 See Lessons.
Relationships:
Apache See Morgan (L. H.)
Apache White (J. B.)
Athapascan Dorsey (J. O.)
Kutchin Herdesty (W. L.)
Loueheux Morgan (L. H.)
Navajo Packard (R. L.)
Peau de Lievre Morgan (L. H.)
Slave Kennicott (R.)
Slave Morgan (L.H.)
Tukudh McDonald (R.)
Tukudh Morgan (L. H.)
Richardson (Sir John).   Arctic j searching expedition: | a | journal of a boat-
Richardson (J.) — Continued,
voyage | through Rupert's land to the
Arctic sea, | in search of | the discovery
ships under command of | sir John
Franklin. | With an appendix on the
physical geography | of North America.
| BysirJohnRichardson,C.B.,F.R.S. |
inspector of naval hospitals and fleets,
| etc. etc. etc. | In two volumes. | Vol.
I[-II]. | Published by authority. |
London: | Longman, Brown, Green,
and Longmans. | 1851.
2 vols.: frontispiece 11. title verso notice and
printers 1 1. contents pp. iii-viii, text pp. 1-413
verso printers, eight other plates; frontispiece
1 1. title verso printers 1 1. contents pp. iii-vii,
text pp. 1-157, appendix pp. 159-402, explanation
of plates I & II pp. 403-416, postscript pp. 417-
426, folded map, 8°.
Chap, xii, On the Kutchin or Loueheux, vol.
1, p,p. 377-413, contains a number of tribal names
with English meanings.—Chapter xiii, Of the
'Tinne or Chepewyans, vol. 2, pp. 1-32, contains
a number of tribal names with definitions.—
Vocabulary of the Chepewyan of Athabasca
(about 330 words and phrases collected from
Mrs. McPherson), vol. 2, pp. 387-395.—Dog-rib
vocabulary (32 words, collected by Sir John
Richardson at Ft, Confidence), vol. 2, pp. 395-
396.—Dog-rib vocabulary (60words collected by
an officer of the Hudson Bay Co. at Ft. Simpson), vol. 2, p. 397.
Contains also the following :
Lefroy (J. H.), Vocabulary of Chepewyan and
Dog-rib-words, vol. 2, pp. 400-402.
McPherson (M.), Vocabulary of the Chepewyan, vol. 2, pp. 382-385.
Murray (A. H.), Comparative vocabulary of
the Kutchin and Dog-rib, vol. 1, pp. 399-400.
 Vocabulary  of  the   Kntehin   of  the
Yukon, vol. 2, pp. 382-385.
O'Brian (—), Vocabulary of Fort Simpson
Dog-rib, vol. 2, p. 398.
 Vocabulary of the Mauvais Monde and
of the Dog-rib of the River of the Mountain,
vol. 2, pp. 397-400.
Copies seen: Astor, Bancroft, Boston Athe-
nreum, British Museum, Congress, Eames, Geological Survey, Trumbull.
 Arctic I searching expedition: | a |
journal of a boat-voyage through Rupert's | land and the Arctic sea, | in
search of the discovery ships under
command of | sir John Franklin. | With
an appendix on the physical geogra- |
phy of North America. | By sir John
Richardson, C. B., F. R. S., | inspector
of naval hospitals and fleets, | etc.,etc.,
etc. |
New York: | Harper and brothers,
publishers, | 82 Cliff street. | 1852. ATHAPA8CAN
AM.
AG
89
Richardson (J.) — Continued.
Tille verao blank 1 1. con ten is pp. v-xi, text
pp. 13—130, appendix pp. 337-510, advert isements
pp. 1-0,1-3,3 ininiimbfriMl pp. 8°.
Linguistics aa in the original edition titled
next above, pp. 262-277, 422-443,501-509.
Copies tMn: Harvard, Gen. A. W. Oreely,
Washington, D. C.
 Arctic | searching expedition: | a |
journal of a boat-voyage through Rupert's | land and the Arctic sea, | in
- search of the discovery ships under
command of | sir John Franklin. | With
an appendix on the physical geogra- |
phy of North America. | By sir John
Richardson, C. B., F. R. S., | inspector of
naval hospitals and fleets, | etc., etc.,
etc. |
New York: | Harper and brothers,
publishers, | 329 & 331 Pearl street,
Franklin square. | 1854. (*)
510 pp. 8°.   Title from Gen. A. W. Greely.
Field's sale catalogue, no. 1971, mentions an
edition, New York, Harper & Brothers, 1856,518
pp. 12°.
Rivington (—). See Gilbert (—) aud
Rivington (—).
Roehrig (F. L. 0.) [A comparative
vocabulary of the Chepewyan (according to R. B. Ross), the Chipewyan
(according to Kennicott), the Slave
-Indians (according to Kennicott), the
Hare Indians of Fort Good Hope
(according to Kennicott), and the Hare
Indians of Great Bear Lake (according
to Petitot), with remarks on each by
F. L. O. Roehrig.   January 15, 1874.]
Manuscript, 22 unnumbered leaves, 4°, in
the library of the Bureau of Ethnology.
The vocabularies, 180 words each (copied
from manuscripts at that time in the library
of the Smithsonian Institution), are in parallel
columns and ocenpy 9 leaves. These are followed by 13 pages of " remarks," each vocabulary being treated of separately.
 [A comparative vocabulary of the
languages of tho Kutchin tribes, embracing tho Knt-ch^-kut-chin (according to Herdesty); the Kut-cha-kut-
chin (according to Kennicott's manuscript), and theKut-cha-kut-chin (from
a printed copy of Kennicott), with
remarks by F. L. O. Roehrig. January
15, 1874.]
Manuscript, 17 unnumbered leaves, 4°, in the
library of the Bureau of Ethnology.
The three vocabularies, of 180 words each
(copied from manuscripts "then in the library of
the Smithsonian Institution), are in parallel
Roehrig (F. L. O.) — Continued;
columns, oocnpy the first 0 leaven, and are followed by Dr. Roehrig's remarks, 811.. in which
ho treats of each vocabnlary separately.
 [A comparative vocabnlary of the
Nahawney, or Indians of the mountains
northwest of Fort Liard (according to
Kennicott), and of the Nehawney of
Nehawney River (according to R. B.
Ross), with remarks by F. L. O.
Roehrig.  February, 1874].
Manuscript, 14 unnumbered pages, 4°, in the
library of the Bureau of Ethnology.
The vocabularies, consisting of 180 words
each (copied from manuscripts then in the
library of the Smithsonian Institution), are in
parallel columns, followed by a third column
headed "remarks," which are comparatively
few in number; they occupy 9 pages. Following these are 5 pages, containing two sets of
"remarks," also by Prof. Roehrig, two pages of
which refer to the vocabulary of Kennicott and
three to that of Ross.
 [A comparative vocabnlary of the
Tahcnlli (according to Anderson, in
Hale's exploring expedition) and of
the Kenai (from the governor of Russian America), with remarks by F. L.
O. Roehrig.   February, 1874.]
Manuscript, 14 nnnumbered pages, in the
library of tho Bureau of Ethnology.
The vocabularies (the first of 180 words, the
second of 60) are in parallel columns and occupy 10 pages. These are followed by 4 pages
containing two sets- of "remarks," the first
three pages relating to the vocabulary of Anderson and one to that last montioned in the title.
 [A comparative vocabulary of the
Hong-kutchin (with the original
spelling of the anonymous vocabulary),
the Natsit kutchin (according to R. B.
Ross), and another Kutchin dialect
(not specified; according to R. B. Ross),
with remarks by F. L. O. Roehrig.
August 17, 1874.]
Manuscript, 15 unnumbered leaves, 4°, in
the library of the Bureau of Ethnology.
The vocabularies, 180 words each (copied
from manuscripts then in the library of the
Smithsonian Institution), are in parallel columns, occupying 9 leaves, followed by the
remarks, by Dr. Roehrig, each set of words
being treated of separately.
 [A comparative vocabulary of the
Sikani and Beaver Indians, embracing
the Si-kan-i (according to R. R. Ross);
the Si-kan-i (according to F. L. Pope);
the Sikani of the mountains south of
Fort Liard; and the Beaver Indians of
Peace River west of Lake Athabasca 90
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Roehrig (F. L. O.) — Continued.
(according to Kennicott); with remarks
by F. L. O. Roehrig.   August 20,1874.]
Manuscript, 16 unnumbered leaves, 4°, in
the library of the Bureau of Ethnology.
The vocabularies, 180 words each (copied from
manuscripts then in the library of the Smithsonian Institution), are in parallel columns and
occupy 9 leaves; these are followed by 7 leaves
containing remarks on each by Dr. Roehrig.
While in charge of the pliilologic collections
made by the Smithsonian Institution Dr. Gibbs
was accustomed to refer the material relating
to the several linguistic families to specialists
throughout the country, in order that he might
have the benefit of their knowledge of the subject. In pursuance of this policy Prof. Roehrig
was called upon for assistance, and the collections relating to a number of families in the
northwest were sent to him for criticism, among
them the Athapascan.
The various manuscripts noted above under
the head of "Remarks" are the result of this
plan.
Rogue River:
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Tribal names
See Barnhardt (W. H.)
Dorsey (J. 0.)
Dorsey (J. 0.)
Rogue River John.  See Dorsey (J. O.)
Rooney (Jake).    See Dorsey (J. O.)
Ross (Alexander).   See Dorsey (J. O.)
Ross (R. B.) Vocabulary of the pure
Chepewyan,or language of the Cariboo-
eaters and Yellowknives.
Manuscript, 6 unnumbered- leaves, written
on one side only, folio, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology.
Recorded on one of the " standard vocabulary" forms of the Smithsonian Institution, containing 180 words, equivalents of all of which
.are given. The manuscript is in the handwriting of Dr. Geo. Gibbs.
 Vocabulary of the Kutcha Kutchin,
Yukon River.
Manuscript, 6 unnumbered leaves, folio,
written on one side only, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Procured from Mr.
Herdesty, who had resided among these
Indians about ten years.
Recorded on one of the Smithsonian Institution's standard vocabulary forms of 180 words,
equivalents of nearly all of which are given.
The handwriting is that of Dr. Gibbs.
 Vocabulary of the Natsit Kutchin
(Strong Men) language.
Manuscript, 6 unnumbered leaves, folio,
written on one side only, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Procured from an Indian
who had been several years in tho Hudson Bay
Company's service.
Recorded on one of the forms of the Smith-
Ross (R. B.) —Continued.
sonian Institution's standard vocabulary of 180
words, nearly all the blanks being filled. The
handwriting is that of Dr. Gibbs.
 Vocabulary   of   the   Nehaunay  of
Nehaunay River.
Manuscript, 6 unnumbered leaves, folio,
written on one side only; in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Collected from a member of one of the tribes residing in the mountainous country between the Liard 'and Mackenzie rivers.
Recorded on one of the Smithsonian Institution's standard vocabulary forms of 180 words,
equivalents of nearly all of which are given.
The manuscript is in the handwriting of Dr.
Gibbs.
 Vocabulary   of  the   Si-kan'-i   language.
Manuscript, 6 unnumbered leaves, written on
o ne side only, folio, in the library of the Bureau
of Ethnology.
Recorded on one of the Smithsonian forms of
180 words, equivalents of all of which are given.
 Vocabulary of a dialect of the Tin-
nean language.
Manuscript. 6 unnumbered leaves, folio,
written on one side only, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology.
Recorded on one of the Smithsonian Institution's forms of a standard vocabulary of 180
words, equivalents of nearly all of them being
given.    The handwriting is that of Dr. Gibbs.
Rost (Reinhold). The | lord's prayer |
In Three Hundred Languages | comprising the | leading languages and
their principal dialects | throughout
the world | with the places where
spoken | With a preface by Reinhold
Rost, | CLE., LL.D., PH.D. |
London | Gilbert and Rivington |
Limited | St. John's house, Clerkenwell,
E.C. | 1891 | (All rights reserved) |   \
Title verso quotations 1 1. preface 2 11. contents 11. text pp. 1-88, 4°.
The Lord's prayer in a number of American
languages, among them the Chippewyan (syllabic) , p. 14; Chippewyan or Tinne (roman), p. 14;
Slave-Indian (roman), p. 75; Slave-Indian (syllabic), p. 75; Tukudh, p. 84.
Copies seen: Eames.
— The | lord's prayer | In Three Hundred Languages | comprising the |
leading languages and their principal
dialects | throughout the world | with
the places where spoken | With a preface by Reinhold Rost, | CLE., LL.D.,
PH. D. | Second edition |
London I Gilbert   and   Rivintrton I ATHAPASCAN LANGUAGES.
91
Rost (R.) — Continued.
Limited | St. John's house, Clerkenwell,
E.C. | 1891 | (All rights reserved) |
Title verso quotations 1 1. preface 2 11. contents 11. text pp. 1-88,4°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Pilling.
Ruby   (Charles).    Vocabulary of   the
Chiracahua-Apache language.
Manuscript, 3 unnumbered leaves, folio,
written on one side only, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Recorded, Sept., 1886,
with the assistance of Mickey Free, interpre-
s.
Sabin   (Joseph).    A | dictionary | of |
Books relating to America, | from its
discovery  to   the  present  time. | By
Joseph  Sabin.   | Volume  I[-XIX]. |
[Three lines quotation.] |
New-York: | Joseph Sabin, 84 Nassau
street, | 1868 [-1891].
19 vols. 8°. Still in course of publication.
Parts cxv-cxvi, now in press (March, 1892),
have reached the entry "Smith," and will commence vol. 20. Now edited.by Mr. Wilberforce
Eames.
Contains titles of many books in and relating
to the Athapascan languages.
Copies seen:   Congress, Eames,  Geological
Survey, Lenox.
 See Field (T.W.)
St. Mark [in the Tinne" language].    See
Kirkby (W.W.)
Sayce (Archibald Henry). Introduction
to the | science of language. | By | A.
H. Sayce, | deputy professor of comparative philology in the university of
Oxford. | In two volumes. | Vol. I[-H].
| [Design.] |
London: | C Kegan Paul & co., 1,
Paternoster square. | 1880.
2 vols.:- half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso
quotation and notice 11. preface pp. v-viii, table
of contents verso.blank 1 1. text pp. 1-441, colophon verso blank 11.: half-title verso blank 11.
title verso quotation and notice 1 1. table of
contents verso blank 11. text pp. 1-352, selected
list of works pp. 353-363, index pp. 365-421,12°.
A few Hoopah and Navaho words, with explanations, vol. 1, p. 121.
Copies seen.- Bureau of Ethnology,Eames.
Schomburgk (Sir Robert Herman). Contributions to^he, Philological Ethnography of South America. By Sir R. H.
Schomburgk.
In Philological Soc. [of London] Proc. vol. 3,
pp. 228-237, London, 1848,8°.
Affinity of words in the Guinau with other
languages and dialects in America, pp. 236-237,
contains, among others, examples in Atnah.
 A vocabulary of the   Maiangkong
language [South America].
In Philological Soc. [of London] Proc. vol. 4,
pp. 217-222, London, 1850,8°.
Schomburgk (R. H.) —Continued.
Contains the word for sun in the languages
of the-Chippewyan, Kinai, and "Tribes of the
northwest coast of America."
Robert Herman Schomburgk, a German explorer, was born in Freiburg on the Unstrnth,
Prussia, June 4, 1804; died in Schoneberg. near
Berlin, March 11,1865. >He entered commercial
life, and in 1826 came' to the United States,
where, after working as a clerk in Boston and
Philadelphia, he became a partner in 1828 in a
tobacco manufactory at Richmond, Va. The
factory was burned and Schomburgk was
ruined. After unsuccessful ventures in the
West Djdies and Central America, he went to
the island of Anegada, one of the Virgin
group, where he undertook ts make a survey of
the coast. Although he did not possess the
special knowledge that is required .for such a
work, he performed it well, and his reports procured him in 1834, from the Geographical Society of London and some botanists, means to
explore the interior of Biitish Guiana, which
was then entirely unknown. After a thorough
exploration during 1833-1839, he went to London
in the summer of 1839 with valuable collections
of animals and plants, mostly now species.
Schomburgk sailed again from London for
Georgetown in December, 1840, as president of
a commission to determine the boundary line
between British Guiana and Brazil, and to
make further geographical and ethnological
observations. He was joined there by his
brother, Moritz Richard. On their return to
London in June, 1844, Schomburgk presented a
report of his journey to the Geographical
Society, for which the queen knighted him in
1845. After a few months' rest he was given
an appointment in the colonial department
and sent to make researches upon the idioms of
the aborigines of South America. In 1848 tie
: read before the British Association a paper in
• which, he proposed an alphabetical system for
the Indian dialects.—Appleton's Cyclop, of Am.
Biog.
Schoolcraft (Henry Rowe). Historical
| and | statistical information, | respecting the, | history, condition and
prospects |- of $h.& \ Indian tribes of the
United States:' j'teollected and prepared
under the direction | of the | bureau of
Indian affairs, | per act of Congress of
March 3d, 1847, | by Henry R. School- 92
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Schoolcraft (H. R.) — Continued,
craft, LL.D. | Illustrated by S. Eastman, capt. TJ. S. A. | Published by Authority of Congress. | ParfcI[-VI]. |
Philadelphia: Lippincott, Grambo &
company, | (successors to Grigg, Elliot
& co.) | 1851[-1857].
Engraved title: [Engraving.] [ Historical |
and | statistical information | respecting the |
history, condition and prospects | of the | Indian tribes of the United States: | Collected and
prepared under the | direction of the bureau of
Indian affairs per act of Congress | of March 3rd
1847, | by Henry R. Schoolcraft L.L.D. [Illustrated by | S. Eastman, capt. IT. S. army. | [Coat
of arms.] | Published by authority of Congress.
|PartI[-VI]. |
Philadelphia: I Lippincott, Grambo & co.
6 vols. 4°. Beginning with vol. 2 the words
"Historical and statistical" are left off the
title-pages, both engraved and printed. Subsequently (1853) vol. 1 was also issued with the
abridged title beginning " Information respecting the history, condition, and prospects of the
Indian tribes," making it uniform with the
other parts.
Two editions with these title-pages were published by the same house, one on thinner and
somewhat smaller paper, of which but vols. 1-5
were issued.
Part i, 1851. Half-title (Ethnological researches, i respecting | the red man of America)
verso blank 1 1. engraved title as above verso
blank 11. printed title as above verso blank 11.
introductory documents pp. iii-vi, preface pp.
vii-x, list of plates pp. xi-xii, contents pp. xiii-
xviii, text pp. 13-524, appendix pp. 525-568,
plates, colored lithographs and maps numbered
1-76.
Part n, 1852. Half-title (as in part I) verso
blank 11. engraved title (Informationrespecting
the history condition and prospects, etc.) verso
blank 1 1. printed title (Information respecting
the history, condition and prospects, etc.) verso
printers 11. dedication verso blank 11. introductory document pp. vii-xiv, contents pp. xv-xxii,
list of plates pp. xxiii-xxiv, text pp. 17-608,
plates and maps numbered 1-29, 31-78, and 2
plates exhibiting the Cherokee alphabet and its
application.
Part in, 1853. Half-title (as in part I) verso
blank ll.engraved title (as in part n) verso blank
11. printed title (as in part ii) verso printers 11.
tbird report pp. v-viii, list of divisions p. ix,
contents pp. xi-xv, list of plates pp. xvii-xviii,
text pp. 19-635, plates and maps numbered 1-21,
25-45.
Part iv, 1854. Half-title (as in part I) verso
blank 11. engraved title (as in part n) verso blank
1 1. printed title (as in part n) verso blank 1 1.
dedication pp. v-vi, fourth report pp. vii-x, list
of divisions p. xi, contents pp. xiii-xxiii, list of
plates pp. xxv-xxvi, text pp. 19-668, plates and
maps numbered 1-42,
Schoolcraft (H. R.) — Continued.
Part v, 1855. Half-title (as in part i) verso
blank 1 1. engraved title (as in part u) verso
blank 11. printed t itle (as in part n) verso blank
11, dedication pp. vii-viii, fifth report pp. ix-xii,
list of divisions p. xiii, synopsis of general
contents of vols, i-v pp. xv-xvi, contents pp.
xvii-xxii, list of plates pp. xxiii-xxiv, text pp.
25-625, appendix pp. 627-712, plates and maps
numbered 1-8,10-36.
Part vi, 1857. Half-title (General history | of
the | North American Indians) verso blank 1 1.
portrait 11. printed title (History ] of the j Indian
tribes of the United States: | their j present
condition and prospects, | and a sketch of their
| ancient status. | Published by order of Congress, | under the direction of the Department, of
the interior—Indian bureau. | By | Henry Rowe
Schoolcraft, LL. D. | Member [&c. six lines.] |
With Hlustrations by Eminent Artists. ] In one
volume. | Part vi. of the series. | Philadelphia:
| J. B. Lippincott & co. | 1857.) verso blank 1 1.
inscription verso blank 1 1. letter to the President pp. vii-viii. report pp. ix-x, preface pp. xi-
xvi, contents pp. xvii-xxvi, list of plates pp.
xxvii-xxviii, text pp. 25-744, index pp. 745-756,
fifty-seven plates, partly selected from the
other volumes, and three tables.
Eaton (J. H.), Vocabnlary of the Navajo,
vol. 4, pp. 416-431.
Gallatin (A.), Table of generic Indiaiwfami-
lies of languages, vol. 3, pp. 397-402.
Gibbs (G.), Observations on some of the
Indian dialects of northern California, vol. 3,
pp. 420-423.
 Vocabularies  of Indian  languages  in
northwest California, vol. 3, pp. 428-445.
Henry (C. C), Vocabulary of the Apache,
vol. 5, pp. 578-589.
Copies seen.- Astor. Bancroft, Boston Athenaeum, British Museum, Congress, Eames,
National Museum, Powell, Shea, Trumbull.
At the Fischer sale, no. 1581, Quaritch bought
a copy for il. 10*. The Field copy, no: 2075, sold
for $72; the Menzies copy, no. 1765, for $132; the
Squier copy, no. 1214, $120; no. 2032, $60; the
Ramirez copy,no. 773 (5 vols.). 52.5s.; the Pinart
copy, no. 828 (5 vols, in 4), 208 fr.; the Murphy
copy, no. 2228, $69. Priced by Quaritch, no.
30017, 10J. 10s.; by Clarke & co. 1886, $65; by
Quaritch, in 1888,151.
Reissued with title-pages as follows:
 Archives \ of | Aboriginal Knowledge.
| Containing all the | Original Papers
laid before Congress | respecting the |
History, Antiquities, Language, Ethnology, Pictography, | Rites, Superstitions, and Mythology, | of the j Indian
Tribes of the United States | by | Henry
R. Schoolcraft, LL. D. | With Illustrations. | Onrendun ih ieu muzzinyegun
un.—Algonquin. | In six volumes, j
Volume I[-VI]. | ATHAPASCAN  LANGUAGES.
93
Schoolcraft (H. R.) — Continued.
Philadelphia: | J. B. Lippincott &
'   Co. | 1860.
Engraved title: Information | respecting the
| History. Condition and Prospects | of the |
Indian Tribes of the United States: | Collected
and prepared under the | Bureau of Indian
Affairs | By Henry R. Schoolcraft L. L. D. |
Mem: Royal Geo. Society, London.   Royal Antiquarian Society.  Copenhagen.   Ethnological
Society, Paris, &.c. &c. | niustrated by | Cap.'
S. Eastman, TJ. S. A. and other eminent artists. I
[Vignette.] | Published by authority of Congress. |
Philadelphia: | J. B. Lippincott & Co.
6 vols