Open Collections

BC Historical Books

BC Historical Books

BC Historical Books

Twenty-first annual report of the British Columbia Board of Trade, together with various appendices,… Victoria (B.C.). Board of Trade 1900

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcbooks-1.0222250.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcbooks-1.0222250.json
JSON-LD: bcbooks-1.0222250-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcbooks-1.0222250-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcbooks-1.0222250-rdf.json
Turtle: bcbooks-1.0222250-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcbooks-1.0222250-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcbooks-1.0222250-source.json
Full Text
bcbooks-1.0222250-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcbooks-1.0222250.ris

Full Text

Array 
TWENTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 
British  COLUMBIA  
BOARD OF TRADE 
1900. 
VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA. 
With Illustrated Supplement, "Victoria, Past and Present."  TWENTY-FIRST 
ANNUAL REPORT 
OF THE 
British Columbia 
Board of Trabe,
Together with Various Appendices, List of Members, 
Office Bearers, Commercial Charges, Etc. 
AND 
ILLUSTRATED SUPPLEMENT,
"VICTORIA, PAST AND  PRESENT." 
OFFICE:     BOARD-OF  TRADE   BUILDING,   VICTORIA,   B.   C. 
OCTOBER,   1900 
INCORPORATED    OCTOBER    28th,    1878.
Victoria, B. C.
The Colonist Printing and Publishing Co., Ltd.
1900. CONTENTS.
PAGE
Salmon Pack  48 
B. C. Sealing: Catch, 1899  50
Exports from B. C      51
Imports into B. C  52
Customs Statistics, Imports for year ending
30th June, 1900  56
Customs Statistics, Exports for year ending1
30th June, 1900  57
Imports into B. C. for 29 years ending" June
30th, 1900  58
Exports from B. C. for 29 years ending" June
30th, 1900  59
Shipping"  6x
Game Protection Act of B. C  62
Inland  Revenue, Canada, Divisions No. 37 .
and 38  64
Area of British Columbia  64
Statement of Timber Cut during 1899.  64
Postal Statistics  65
Land Return  66
Climate  67
Average Monthly and Annual Rainfall and
Snowfall   68
Comparative Table of Average Rainfall  68
Meteorological  Register for one year at 13
Stations in B. C  69
Education   70
Scale of Commercial Charges  71
Rates on Storage of Merchandise  72
Mining Regulations  73
Provincial Government Lands  81
ILLUSTRATED SUPPLEMENT,
VICTORIA,   PAST  AND   PRESENT.' BRITISH COLUMBIA BOARD OP TRADE.
OFFICERS  1900-1901,
W.  A. WARD,
L. G. McQuade,
F. Elworthy,
President
Vice-President
Secretary
J. G.
Cox,
H. M
. Grahame,
S. Le
ISER,
A. G.
McCandless,
H. J.
Scott,
J. G.
Cox,
Benj.
Gordon,
D. R
Ker,
F. B.
Pemberton,
COUNCIL:
Lindley Crease,
D. R. Ker,
C. H. Lugrin,
T. W. Patterson,
J. Thomson,
BOARD OF ARBITRATION
Lindley Crease,
H. M. Grahame,
G. A. Kirk,
J. J. Shallcross,
A. B. Fraser,
G. A. Kirk,
J. A. Mara,
E. G. Prior,
C. F. Todd.
F. C. Davidge,
C. A. Holland,
L. G. McQuade,
C. F. Todd.
STANDING COMMITTEES.
FISHERIES:
B. C. Mess, C. F. Todd, Beaumont Boggs,
Walter Morris, D. J. Munn.
MANUFACTURES:
D. R. Ker, J. J- Shallcross, John A. Hall,
H. J. Scott, Ed. Pearson.
HARBOURS AND NAVIGATION:
F. W. Vincent, J. G. Cox, Chas. E. Clarke,
Capt. Wm. Grant, N. Hardie.
PUBLIC WORKS AND RAILWAYS:
B. W. Pearse, T. W. Patterson, C. H. Lugrin,
H. F. Bullen, J. A. Mara.
FINANCE:
H. B. Wilson, Geo. Gillespie, G. A. Taylor.
MINING AND PROPERTY:
Hy. Croft, F. J. Claxton, Lindley Crease.
AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY:
John Nicholles, |I Baker, John Earsman.
AUDITORS:
Beaumont Boggs, R- S. Day, Harrie G. Ross. Officers of tlie Chamber of Commerce of Victoria, Vancouver Island,.
FROM 1863 TO DATE OF INCORPORATION, OCT. 28th, 1878.
VICE-PRESIDENT.
Jules David	
ules David	
James Lowe ,
Henry Rhodes	
Gustav Sutro ,
Gustav Sutro	
Gustav Sutro	
Gustav Sutro	
Gustav Sutro	
E. Grancini	
T. L. Stahlschmidt
T. L. Stahlschmidt
T. L. Stahlschmidt
T. L. Stahlschmidt
T. L. Stahlschmidt
T. L. Stahlschmidt
SECRETARY.
A. F. Main.
A. F. Main.
A. F. Main.
A. F. Main.
Robert Plummer.
Robert Plummer.
Robert Plummer.
Robert Plummer.
Robert Plummer.
Robert Plummer.
Robert Plummer.
Robert Plummer.
Robert Plummer.
Robert Plummer.
Robert Plummer.
Robert Plummer.
Officers and lemliersliip of tlie Britisli ColnmMa Board of Trade,
FROM DATE OF INCORPORATION, OCT. 28th, 1878, TO JUNE, 1900.
YEAR.
PRESIDENT.'
VICE-PRESIDENT.
SECRETARY.
Oct  28th, ~|
1878,  to   V
July 3, '80 J
1880-I . . .
I88I-2 . ..
1882-3 . . .
1883-4 . . .
1884-5 • • •
1885-6 . . .
1886-7 . . .
1887-8 . . .
1888-9 . .
1889-90 , .
1890-1 . . .
1891-2 . . .
1892-3 . . .
1893-4 • •
1894-5 . . .
1895-6 . . .
1896-7 . . .
1897-8 . . .
R. P. Rithet, J. P..
William Charles	
E. Crow Baker.
R. P. Rithet, J. P..
R. P. Rithet, [. P. .
R. P. Rithet, "[. P..
R. P. Rithet, J. P..
R. P. Rithet, J. P..
Jacob H. Todd, J. P
Jacob H. Todd, J". P
Robert' Ward, J. P..
Robert Ward, J". P..
Robert Ward, I. P.
Robert Ward, J. P.
Thomas B. Hall....
Thomas B. Hall....
A. C. Flumerfelt...
A. C. Flumerfelt...
D. R. Ker	
Wjlliam Charles ....
Roderick Finlayson..
Roderick Finlayson  .
Mat. T. Johnston....
.   Edgar Crow Baker...
.   Thos. Earle	
E. Crow Baker.
E. Crow Baker.
E. Crow Baker.
E. Crow Baker.
E. Crow Baker.
Wm. Monteith.
Wm. Monteith.
T. R. Smith	
.   Thos. Earle	
Wm. Monteith.
Wm. Monteith.
.    Thomas B. Hall	
.   Thomas B. Hall	
.   A. C. Flumerfelt	
A. C. Flumerfelt....
.   C. E. Renouf.	
Wm. Monteith.
F. Elworthy.
F. Elworthy.
F. Elworthy.
F. Elworthy.
F. Elworthy.
F. Elworthy.
F. Elworthy.
D. R. Ker	
.   G. Leiser, G. A. Kirk.
.   W.A.Ward	
.   W. A. Ward	
.   L. G. McQuade	
G. A. Kirk	
F. Elworthy.
F. Elworthy.
F. Elworthy.
1898-9 . . .
1899-1900
G. A. Kirk  	
W. A. Ward	 J-§'iJ8^i!ifc_S«ii
MEMBERSHIP   ROLL.
NAME. FIRM. BUSINESS.
Aikman, H. B. W   Drake, Jackson'& H    Barrister-at-Law.
Anderson, W. J   Builder.
Andrews, W. T	
B
Baker, M    R. Baker & Son	
Barnard,  F. S    B. C. Elec. Ry. Co., Ld...
Beckwith, J. L	
Beeton, H. C   33 Finsbury Circus	
Bell, H. P 	
Belyea, A. L	
Bethune, J. T   White Horse, Y. T	
Billinghurst, E.   E    B.C. Development Co....
Bodwell, Ernest V    Bodwell & Duff	
Boggs, Beaumont	
Bone, W. H  T. N. Hibben & Co	
Bostock, Hewitt, M.P	
Brenchley, A   F. R. Stewart & Co	
Brown, George McL   Canadian Pacific Ry	
Brown, P. R    The Colonist	
Bryce, Jas Victoria Truck & Dray Co.
Bryden, Jno   Albion Iron Works	
Bullen, H. F   B. C. Marine Ry. Co	
Bullen, W. F., J. P     Esquimalt Marine Ry	
Burns, Gavin H   Bk. Brit. North America..
Hay and Grain.
Managing Director.
Commission Agt.
London.
Civil Engineer.
Barrister-at-Law.
Mining Broker.
Agent.
Barrister-at-Law.
Insur. and Gen. Agt.
Bookseller and Statn'r.
Manager.
Executive Agent.
Manager.
Managing Director.
Director.
Ship Builder.
Manager.
Manager.
. Cassidy, Robert  Barrister-at-Law.
Challoner, W. L   Challoner, Mitchell & Co. Jeweler.
Christie, Wm...';   C. P. R. Telegraph Co.... Manager.
Clarke, Chas. E  Harbour Master.
Claxton, Fred. J  Land ASent-
Cohen, H. Hirschell   Cassiar Central Ry  Man. Director. 6 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
NAME. FIRM. BUSINESS.
Coigdarippe, J   Retired.
Courtney, Geo. L   Esq. & Nanaimo Ry  Traffic Manager.
Cox, Capt. J. G  E. B. Marvin & Co  Ship Chandler.
Crease, Lindley   Crease & Crease    Barrister-at-Law.
Croft, Henry, J. P   Consulting Engineer.
Davidge, F. C   Davidge & Co., Ltd   Shipping Agent.
Day, Robert S    Architect.
Dewdney, Hon. Edgar	
Dunsmuir, James, M.P.P.. Union Collieries    President.
Dupont, Major C. T   Retired.
Earle, Thos., M.P   Merchant.
Earsman, John   Earsman & Co   Commission Agent.
Eberts, Hon. D.M.,M.P.P. Eberts & Taylor   Barrister-at-Law.
Ellis, W. H	
Elworthy, F   B. C. Board of Trade   Secretary.
Erskine, R   Erskine, Wall & Co    Grocer.
Ewen, Alexander  Ewen & Co. (Westminster) Canner.
Flint, A. St. G   Insurance and Gen. Agt.
Flumerfelt, A. C, J. P....  Granby Smelter, (Greenwood).
Forrester, J. L   Paints, etc.
Foster, F. W., J. P   (Ashcroft, B. C.)    Merchant.
Foulkes, J. F  J. F. Foulkes & Co   Mining Broker.
Fraser, A. B    Merchant.
G
Bank of Montreal   Manager.
Galletly, A. J. C	
Giffen, J. B    R. G. Dun & Co	
Gillespie, George   Bk. of British Columbia.
Goodacre, Lawrence     Queen's Market (Meat)..
Gordon, B   Hiram Walker & Sons  .
Gowen, C. N     Vic. Brew & Ice Co., Ld
Grahame, H. M	
Grant, Capt. Wm   Ship Owner
Greenwood, A. E   G., Smith & Randolph ...  Printer.
Greer, B. W  Canadian Pacific Ry   Agent.
Manager.
Supt. of B. C. Branches.
Proprietor.
Agent.
Director.
Real Estate. BRITISH  COLUMBIA   BOARD  OF TRADE.
NAME.
Hall, R. H., J. P	
Hall, Richard, M. P. P...
Hall, John A	
Hardie, Norman	
Harvey, J. S	
Hayward, Charles	
Helmcken, H. D., M.P.P.
Henderson, A	
Henderson, Wm	
Higgins, Hon. D. W	
Hinton, Jno. A	
Holland, C. A	
Holland, Joshua	
Hunter, Joseph, M. P. P...
H
FIRM.
Hudson's Bay Co	
Hall & Goepel	
Victoria Chemical Wks....
Dodwell, Carlill & Co	
F. C. Davidge & Co., Ld.
Drake, Jackson & H	
Vic. Transfer Co., Ltd....
Henderson Bros    	
BUSINESS.
In charge.
General Agent.
Managing Director.
Agent.
Vice-President.
Contractor and Builder.
Barrister-at-Law.
Superintendent.
Druggist.
Hinton Electric Co., Ltd.. Electrician.
B. C. Land & Invt. Agy.. Managing Director.
  Insurance Agent.
E. & N. Railway  General Supt.
I
Irving, Capt. J   Can. Pac. Nav. Co.
Manager.
Jamieson, Robt	
Jensen, William   Dawson Hotel   Proprietor.
Johnson, E. M   Financial Agent.
Johnston, M. T  Findlay, Durham & B   Merchant.
Jones, A. W   Insurance Agent.
Jones, Stephen    Dominion Hotel   Proprietor.
K
Ker, D. R  Brackman & Ker Mill Co., Ltd., Man. Director.
King. Chas. R   Manfg. Agent.
Kirk, G. A  Turner, Beeton & Co   Merchant.
Langley, W. H   Martin & Langley   Barrister-at-Law.
Leiser, Simon   S. Leiser & Co  Wholesale Grocer.
Lenz, M   Lenz & Leiser	
Lindsay, Jas. A   R. Dunsmuir & Son	
Loewen, Joseph  Vic. Brew. & Ice Co., Ld.
Lubbe, T	
Lugrin, C. H   Daily Colonist
Wholesale Dry Goods.
Auditor.
Director.
Furs and Skins.
Editor.
Luxton, A. P   Davie, Pooley & Luxton..  Barrister-at-Law. BRITISH  COLUMBIA  BOARD  OF TRADE.
M
NAME. FIRM.
Macaulay, H. C	
Macaulay, Norman	
Maclure, J. C   Robt. Ward & Co	
Mara, J. A	
Marvin, E. B   E. B. Marvin & Co	
Mason, C. Dubois   Mason & Bradburn	
McAlister, John   (San Jose, Cal.)	
McCandless, A. G,   McCandless Bros	
McGregor, M   McGregor & Jeeves	
McQuade, L. G   P. McQuade & Sons	
Mess, Bernhard C   Findlay, D. & Brodie	
Milne, G. L	
Mitchell, James    	
More, A. W   A. W. More & Co	
Morris, Walter  Federation Brand Salmon
Munn, D. J    (New Westminster)	
Munsie, W   Shawnigan Lake Lum. Co.
BUSINESS.
Merchant.
Merchant.
Joint Manager.
Merchant.
Ship Chandler.
Barrister-at-Law.
Clothier.
Contractor.
Ship Chandler.
Assistant Manager.
Physician and Surgeon.
Manufacturers' Agent.
Ins. and Mining Broker.
Can. Co., President.
Cannery Proprietor.
Manager.
N
Nicholles, Major John...
Norris, Fred'k	
Nicholles & Renouf, Ltd., H'dw'r and Ag'l Imp's.
  Saddler & Harness Mkr.
Palmer, E. J	
Patterson, Jas	
Patterson, T. W	
Payne, Robert Home	
Pearse, B. W	
Pearson, Ed., J. P	
Pemberton, F. B	
Pendray, Wm. J	
Peters, Hon. Fred	
Piercy, J	
Pike, M. Warburton	
Pither, Luke	
Pooley, Hon. C. E., Q. C.
Prior, Lt.-Col. Hon. E. G.
Vic. Lum. and Mfg. Co., Ld. (Chemainus), Mgr.
The Patterson Shoe Co.... Managing Director.
Victoria & Sidney Ry  Manager.
Sperling & Co., 8 Austin Friars, London.
  Retired.
Clarke & Pearson  Hardware.
Pemberton & Son  Financial Agent.
Pendray & Co  Soap Manufacturer.
Tupper & Peters  Barrister-at-Law.
J. Piercy & Co  Wholesale Dry Goods.
  Explorer.
Pither & Leiser  Wine Merchant.
, M. P. P  Barrister-at-Law.
, M. P., E. G. Prior & Co., Ld., Hardware, etc.
Redfern, Chas. E.
Rithet, R. P	
R. P. Rithet & Co., Ld.
Manufacturing Jeweler.
Mer. and Shipping Agt. _B@Sl*il
BRITISH  COLUMBIA  BOARD  OF TRADE. 9
NAME. FIRM. BUSINESS.
Robertson, Arthur   Martin & Robertson   Commission Agent.
Robertson, A. Stuart   Globe Can. & Mill. Co. (Claxton, B. C), Manager.
Robins, S. M  Van. Coal Co. (Nanaimo).. Superintendent.
Ross, Harrie G   Dixie H. Ross & Co   Grocer.
Sayward, J. A    .
Scott, H.J     Hamilton Powder W'ks...
Seabrook, R   R. P. Rithet & Co	
Sehl, Jacob   B. C. Furniture Co	
Shallcross, J.J   Shallcross, Macaulay & Co.
Shotbolt, Thomas, J. P ..	
Smith, H   M. R. Smith & Co	
Smith, Thos. R Robt. Ward & Co., Ltd...
Spencer, C   David Spencer	
Spratt, C. J. V  Victoria Machinery Depot.
Stemler, Louis   Stemler & Earle	
Swinerton, R. H   Swinerton & Oddy	
Lumber Merchant.
Manager.
Vice-President.
Manager.
Merchant.
Druggist.
Biscuit Manufacturer.
Merchant and Shipper.
Dry Goods.
Proprietor.
Coffee and Spice Mills.
Land Agent.
Taylor, Geo. A   Mer. Bank of Halifax  Manager.
•Temple, Ernest Hickman Tye Co., Ltd.. . Manager.
Templeman, Hon. Wm...  Times Printing Co., Ltd. . Managing Editor.
Thomson, Jas   Hudson's Bay Co  Manager.
Todd, C. F  J. H. Todd & Son  Wholesale Grocer.
Turner, Hon. J. H.',M.P.P. Turner, Beeton & Co  Merchant.
Vincent, F. W	
Voss, J.  C  	
C. P. N. Co   Asst. Manager.
Victoria and Queen's Hotel, Proprietor.
w
Walker, Walter  Coal Merchant.
Ward W. A  Merchant and Shipper.
Ward, Robt   70 Basinghall Street  London, E. C.
Warren, Jas. D., Capt  General Agent.
Weiler, Otto   Weiler Bros  Furniture Manufacturer.
Welsh, E. E   B. C. Market  Manager.
Wey, W. G   Bradstreet Co  Superintendent.
Wilkinson, C. H   S3 New Broad Street  London.
Williams, B  Land Agent* 10 
BRITISH  COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
NAME. FIRM. BUSINESS.
Williams, Robert T  Publisher.
Wilson, William  W. & J. Wilson  Clothier.
Wilson, H. B.    Molson's Bank  Manager.
Woolley, Clive Phillips  Barrister.
Wootton, E. E   McPhillips, Wootton & B.. Barrister-at-Law.
Memo.—All members of the Board,  unless otherwise' herein shown, reside at
Victoria, B. C.
SCENE  IN  BEACON  HILL  PARK,   VICTORIA,   B. C. Twenty-first Annual Report
The British Columbia Board of Trade
JULY 1st, 1599, TO JUNE 50th, 1900.
To the Members of the British Columbia Board of Trade :
Gentlemen,—For twenty years past our predecessors, when
retiring, have presented the Board with a brief resume of the
conditions and leading commercial events of British Columbia
during their respective terms of office. It is our privilege to
submit for your consideration a similar report covering the past
twelve months.
Mining. Of the various industries, mining continues to
       occupy the place of first importance and its uniform yearly growth for so  new an enterprise is certainly very
encouraging, the following table of production during the ten
years ending 1899 speaking for itself:
Production for Each Year from 1890 to 1899 (inclusive).
AMOUNT.
YEAR _ ^    - o
1890 $2,608,803
1891  3'52^102
1892  2'9fs'53°
l893  3'588'413
.894  4'225'717 12       * BRITISH  COLUMAIA  BOARD  OF  TRADE.
YEAR. AMOUNT.
1895 $ 5,643,042
1896    7.507,9S6
1897   10,455,268
1898   I0,906,86l
I899   12,356,555
The increase of 13^ per cent, during 1899, compared with
the previous year, is due to a large output of gold (placer and
lode), copper and coal. The output of silver and lead shows a
falling off, due principally to the closing down of galena mines
in the Slocan district, consequent upon the failure of the mine
owners and miners to agree on average schedule. Although
the shortage in 1899 amounted to $879,480, the result of the
actual workings has strengthened the belief, previously expressed, in the richness and permanency of the mines in the
Slocan district.
Trail Creek. Notwithstanding labour troubles and closing
down for a time of the two principal mines, the
Trail Creek division holds its leading position as a producer,
last year's shipments totalling 180,300 tons of ore, valued at
$3,229,086. Six mines contributed 178,600 tons of this quantity
and 1,700 tons represent the output of other properties, of which
there are over twenty where development works are proceeding
worthy of note. The outlook for this division is good, now
that a satisfactory agreement has been arrived at between the
miners and mine owners.
Boundary The country to the west of Trail Creek is known
Creek. as Boundary Creek and embraces Grand Forks
and Kettle River. It is highly mineralized, principally in gold and copper. The shipments so far have been
small, the ore being mostly low grade, rendering long transportation unprofitable. This difficulty will soon be overcome
by the erection of smelters near the mines and two are now
nearly completed. In the meantime much development work
has been done and it is claimed that on one property alone ore
to the gross value of over eleven million dollars has been revealed. A large area of the Boundary Creek country is not yet
properly prospected and it is complained that there are no maps annual report. 13
of that portion north of Kettle River. The number of free
miners' certificates issued during 1899 was 2,359, nearly double
the number issued in the previous year. These figures, however, do not accurately indicate the increased mining activity
in Boundary Creek, for it must be remembered that during the
1899 session of the legislature the mining law was amended to
make it unnecessary for a miner working in a mine to take out
the certificate, which was previously compulsory.
Osoyoos. In Osoyoos, the country west of and adjoining
that mentioned, the character of the ore bodies is
varied and besides gold and copper includes galena and free
milling ores. There are several stamp mills working and one
company has already received in dividends a return of about
50 per cent, of their capital. A large area of this mining division
has not yet been properly prospected and quite recently many
deposits have been discovered, said to be rich in silver and lead.
During 1899 there were 1,053 mineral locations recorded, against
only 496 in 1898.
Nelson. The value of the Nelson division  output has
not yet reached the million dollar mark, but shows
an increase compared with previous years and would have been
larger had the differences between the mine owners and miners
not interfered with production. In this division there were
1,869 certificates of work issued, representing the number of
claims under development, but not yet advanced sufficiently to
secure a Crown Grant, and furnishing an indication of what
may be expected from the Nelson division when these properties
are put on a shipping basis.
East Kootenay. The District of East Kootenay includes a very
large area practically unprospected. Recent discoveries to the west of Windermere, on the east slope of the
Gold range, promise to become a valuable addition to those
previously located and being developed. The difficulties of the
prospector in East Kootenay, like in other districts, are increased from lack of proper communications, but it is expected
chat the work now progressing will result in the construction of
several branch lines of railway and more waggon roads and H
BRITISH  COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
trails and induce capitalists to provide the funds necessary to
prove the numerous prospects.
Slocan. The output of the Slocan division, $1,740,372,
was nearly 50 per cent, under that of 1897, due
entirely to differences between the mine owners and miners and
the closing down of the principal mines for some months. Happily these differences appear on the eve of disappearing and
there are indications of an early return of activity equal to, if
not exceeding, anything heretofore experienced.
Cariboo. Mining in Cariboo is still confined to hydraulic-
ing and placer but on a larger scale. The increased capital invested in hydraulic works during 1899, together
with the experience gained in previous workings, augurs well
for the future of Cariboo. The knowledge that twenty million
dollars in gold was taken from two and a half miles of Williams
Creek, while two miles of Lightning Creek yielded twelve millions additional, is still fresh in the memory of the operators,
many of whom believe that the riches of that district are yet untold. It is to be regretted that quartz mining does not receive
more attention in Cariboo as experts are unanimous in their belief that all the natural conditions exist to ensure a rich reward
for such enterprise, when better means of communication are
provided. Unfortunately, the district is at present served by
only one good waggon road.
Cassiar and Of Cassiar and Omineca not so much is heard
Omineca. as °f some of the Districts mentioned, but their
mineral value is not lost sight of by the prospectors, whose number appears small simply on account of the
great territory over which they are scattered. Important hy-
draulicing works are being carried out in Omineca, the conditions being similar to those in Cariboo.
Atlin. The placer mines of Atlin yielded $800,000 dur
ing 1899. The open season extends over about
only four months and last year the early part of it was lost, in
many cases, owing to the confusion between rival claim owners.
Upon arrival, at the scene, of a Judge of the Supreme Court, ANNUAL  REPORT.
15
matters were set right and general satisfaction was expressed
with the decisions  and promptness  with  which they were delivered.    This district is reached during the summer by rail and
lake steamers   within twenty-four hours of leaving  the ocean
steamships.    This   convenience   together   with   the   excellent
climate   and   comparatively   cheap   living  has   brought wages
down to an average of $5.00 per day.    The placer claims are
100 feet long by the entire width of the creek upon which located.    The representatives of several companies were on the
spot early  and purchased,  from  the locators,   groups of them
with the intention of hydraulicing.    This will  necessitate the
importation of heavy plants,  the cost of which will be greatly
increased by transportation,   the  rail   charges  alone between
ocean navigation and  Lake Bennett amounting to  $60.00 per
ton.    It is hoped that the railway company may see it to their
own interest to reduce the freight on mining plants.    Prospecting for quartz is progressing with  encouraging results, some
well defined  fissure veins having been  discovered containing
gold with iron, copper and lead.     It is probable that there will
be great development in quartz mining in the Atlin district.    It
would be a great advantage to the Atlin  district if increased
powers were vested in the  Gold  Commissioner.    In the past,
Gold  Commissioners  have exercised the powers  desired in a
manner generally satisfactory, as evidenced by the few appeals
against their decisions.
Vancouver In the case of Vancouver Island a departure
|s|andi       can be made by mentioning the Lenora mine. This
 '       property is situated   south   of Chemainus, about
six miles from the Esquimalt and Nanaimo railway, with which
it is connected by three miles of waggon road and the remainder
tramway. Development consists of a tunnel over 500 feet and
there are 400 feet of crosscuts, drifts and upraises. The shaft
is down 200 feet with a crosscut at the bottom 150 feet. This
mine gives employment to 80 men. The output is now 50 tons
per day and could be greatly increased if better means of communication to the railway existed. The ore, which contains
gold, silver and copper, is easily mined in consequence of the
country rock being very soft.  It has been treated at the Texada
.^_-_-_M-£-_£_-iuc4< i6
BRITISH  COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
Island smelter and after paying all mining, transportation and
smelting charges returned a profit of about $10.00 per ton. A
company has recently been formed and $100,000 subscribed for
developing the adjoining property on the north, known as the
Tyhee. Another company has commenced work on the same
vein but adjoining the Lenora on the south. There are other
excellent prospects nearer Victoria. On the Ralph claim, distant
about 12 miles, some 200 tons of ore has been taken out in development which is expected to average 15 per cent, copper,
with gold and silver.
There are many claims upon which development work has
been done in the San Juan valley, west of Victoria, but it is too
limited to comment upon further than to remark that the results
have encouraged owners to continue to exploit their property.
Alberni is the oldest lode mining district on Vancouver Island
and on some of the properties extensive works have been performed underground while on hundreds of others assessment
work is proceeding with the object of obtaining Crown grants.
All along the west coast, to the north end of the island, mineral
locations have been recorded and the aggregate of the various
works is yearly increasing.
In the opinion of some experts who have visited the various
camps on the west coast of Vancouver Island the indications of
values are equal to anything found on the mainland under similar development. That these views are also shared by owners
is shown in the extensive improvements made on properties
near Alberni where some of them will very soon be in a condition to commence shipping. Most of the claims are near navigable salt water, afforded by the numerous inlets with which
the coast is indented. This will prove, of great advantage in
the early stages of the development of these properties and all
the necessary fluxes have been formed for smelting on the spot
as soon as plants are erected.
^tgjBland Coast.      These remarks will mostly apply to the mainland coast as well, where, some $75,000 was expended in development work during 1899. ANNUAL  REPORT.
17
Texada and On Texada  Island  prospecting and develop- ■
Other Islands, ment work increased during 1899 and at the close
"of the year 1,016 mineral claims stood on the
records as in good standing. The shaft of the Van Anda mine
has reached the 400 foot level and is now being sunk another
100 feet. As the company smelted their own ore, returns of
value are not available further than, "The matte contained
about 50 per cent, of copper and very good values in gold and
silver."
The openings in British Columbia for mining investments
are practically unlimited and varied to an extent seldom met
with. The mining laws are liberal, allowing any person to
stake a claim 1,500 ft. by 1,500 ft., about 50 acres, and hold it
by improving to the value of only $100 per annum. After five
such annual improvements, the survey being reckoned an improvement worth $100, a Crown grant can be obtained.
Thousands of claims are in the hands of locators who have not
the means to prove values. Such are freely offered for sale outright, but in some cases the owners insist upon retaining an interest. It is desired to urge upon holders of claims, when seeking capital, the necessity of putting the property in the best
possible condition for estimating its worth. Complaints are
too common when visiting mining claims with the object of
purchase that the improvements made are either insufficient or
of a character which do not afford much assistance in arriving
at conclusions. If the full benefit of the mining industry is to
accrue to the Province, the owners of claims for sale must conform to the requirements of capitalists and their agents. The
ease with which claims can be re-staked without doing any
work upon them is a matter which the Government should consider without delay as there is no doubt much valuable property
is thus locked up and remaining unimproved.
Coal. During   1899 the Vancouver   Island collieries
gave employment to 3,317 hands and the Crow's
Nest collieries 371 additional. The total output of 1,306,324
tons was the largest on record. About half of this quantity
was exported to California, representing over one-third of the
importations into that state and fully up to the average of pre- i8
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
vious years. Other shipments were made to Alaska and elsewhere. Hitherto a large number of Chinese and Japanese have
been employed in the Vancouver Island collieries. Messrs. R.
Dunsmuir & Son have recently decided to employ only white
labor and the Mongolians are being relieved as fast as possible.
The benefits which Vancouver Island will receive in consequence are important.
The Crow's Nest collieries produced 103,000 tons of coal,
which was mostly consumed in Canada. For the first year's
output this* may be considered satisfactory in view of the limited
local demand. The very high grade of this coal will undoubtedly commend itself in more distant fields in the near
future and supplant that now offering. It has been used on H.
M. warships and understood to have given satisfaction, but the
official report is not yet available.
Coke. Kootenay was  supplied  with coke from the
Crow's Nest collieries. This was only to be expected from the proximity of those collieries to the smelters
when compared with the collieries of Vancouver Island. As
there is a market for coke in California the Vancouver Island
collieries are likely to be fully employed in serving our neighbors to the south. The output of coke during 1899 was 34,251
tons.
Other Minerals. So far only gold, silver, copper, lead and coal
have been referred to. It is now desired to direct
attention to deposits of iron, gypsum, mica, plumbago, quicksilver and asbestos, none of which are yet developed. It is expected that the saving of platinum in placer workings will hereafter receive more attention.
In dealing with the foregoing the very excellent report of
the Minister of Mines has been consulted and the statements
herein made are generally confirmed by that work. It is to be
regretted that official returns are published only once a year
and it has been repeatedly urged that the annual report of the
Minister of Mines should be supplemented by bulletins issued at
least quarterly. In the absence of such official documents it
can only be stated generally that the mining industry has pro- ANNUAL  REPORT. I9
gressed steadily during the past six months, and that it is expected the output during 1900 will result in a substantial
increase.
Smelters. The investment of much capital in the estab
lishment of smelters in British  Columbia supports
the belief that the permanency of the mining industry is beyond
question.    Two new plants are almost ready to "blow in," one
at Grand Forks and the other at Greenwood, in the Boundary
Creek country.    The first named, erected by the Granby Smelting Co., is practically   an adjunct to the Old  Ironsides, Knob
Hill and  City of  Paris  mines,   in   the first two of which it is
claimed that nearly a million and a half tons of ore are in sight
above tunnels.    The B. C. Copper Co., which has erected the
smelter at  Greenwood, also own mineral claims.    Their plant
has been constructed to treat   250  tons   per day, to start with,
and will   be extended  later   as   may  be   required.    The Trail
smelter is the largest in Canada, the total capacity being about
' 1,000 tons per day.    The main construction is for the treatment
of copper-gold ores, but there are also lead stacks and it is intended to add a lead refinery.    A copper refinery forms part of
the existing  plant.    The   Hall   Mines   smelter   at   Nelson can
treat 300 tons of ore daily and has both copper-gold and lead-
silver plants.    The  Pilot  Bay   smelter   can   handle  only  lead-
silver ores.    The Van Anda  smelter,  a copper-gold plant, is
not so large as those  mentioned,   but  meets the coast requirements where the mines are not extensively developed.
Concentrators.       The  principal   mines  in Slocan are equipped
  with   concentrators   or    are    conveniently    near
customs plants.
Salmon The   salmon   pack   of   1899  was  the   second
FlShTs.     ^rgest  since  the  industry  was established,   the
———*     figures being :
_,        _,.   480,383
Fraser River   "*    S °
'' Cohoes (estimated)     30,000
_.    108,026
Skeena River	
Rivers Inlet     -71'079
     42,949
Other places         H '^y
Total cases  732,437
__££_U£-a_-Li^i^£---ek_&*s£ 20 BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD  OF  TRADE.
Shipments to Australia, 41,518 cases, were larger than in
any previous year. In eastern Canada, too, the consumption
was above the average. Prices for the entire pack were well
maintained, and stocks are reported as small.
For some years past this Board has repeatedly urged the
necessity of establishing additional fish hatcheries on the Fraser
River and that hatcheries should also be erected on the Skeena
and Naas Rivers and at Rivers Inlet. The Department of
Marine and Fisheries recently deputed Mr. W. W. Stumbles to
visit this Province and in his report to the Dominion Government he has recommended the additional hatcheries asked for.
There is no apparent reason why these important works have
been so long delayed.
The following figures are taken from the Auditor-General's
report for the year ending June 30th, 1899 :
Fisheries Revenue, British Columbia—
3,675 Salmon Licenses @ $10. $36,750 00
All other receipts ,     9.051 75
 $45,8oi 75
Fisheries Expenditures, British Columbia :
Salaries,  etc $ 8,459 47
Fraser River Hatchery     3>736 14
     12,195 61
Unexpended balance in favor of British Columbia. .$33,606 14
Fisheries Revenue—
Total collections in Canada outside British Columbia.. .$ 39,701 10
Expenditure in Maritime Provinces alone are—
On account of fishing bounty $150,459 00
Cost of distributing same       5,°34 73
 $155,493 73
British Columbia is clearly entitled to a much larger expenditure by the Dominion Government.
Trap fishing in Puget Sound continues much to the detriment of British Columbia salmon fisheries.
Several changes were made last season in the rules and
regulations governing salmon fishing and others will come into
force this year. ANNUAL  REPORT.
21
The canners on the Fraser River have formed an association amongst themselves for regulating the disposal of the pack
and governing the prices to be paid for fish. The fishermen
have also combined for the protection of their interests.
Deep Sea There is not much change to report in the deep
Fisheries. sea fisheries. The shipments of fresh halibut have
continued and on a larger scale than previously
but the deep sea fisheries are practically undeveloped. There
is no lack of excellent food fish on this coast, and if markets
could be provided another important industry would flourish in
British Columbia.
It is thought that considerable trade could be done on the
west coast of Central and South America if a direct steamship
service was provided. The Dominion Government was asked
to subsidize such a line two years ago, but without result.
On account of high  tariff the  United  States  market is
closed.
Sealing. The sealing catch of 1899 was larger than in
either of the two previous years. Twenty-six
schooners were engaged and secured 35,471 skins. It is estimated that Indians in canoes took 1,000 additional. At the
October sales, made in Victoria, 11,000 skins realized $11.00
each, but the London sales, in December last and in March of
this year, netted $14.00 per skin. This advance induced owners
to fit out additional schooners this year and the spring catch
was 17,480 skins, against only 10,472 in 1899. Prices so far
have been maintained and the European demand, especially in
France, continuing strong no great change is expected. Thirty-
seven schooners have fitted out and left for Behring Sea.
Although these figures are encouraging they show a very
serious falling compared with 1894, when the catch totalled
97,474 skins.
Lumber. The lumber industry shows steady growth as
will be seen from the following table : 22 BRITISH  COLUMBIA  BOARD  OF TRADE.
1897.
Cuts on Crown lands   61,961,647 feet.
1     timber leaseholds   39,014,010   j
I     private property     4,963,740   |
105,939,397 feet.
1898.
(11 MONTHS ONLY.)
Cuts on Crown lands  70,755,866 feet.
"     timber leaseholds  42,192,178   |
"     private property    11,598,614   j
124,546,658 feet.
1899.
Cuts on Crown lands  89,258,757 feet.
i     timber leaseholds  49,526,306   "
"     private property  23,115,400   "
161,900,463 feet.
These figures do not include lumber cut on Dominion and
the Esquimalt and Nanaimo railway lands. During the past
six months exports have increased, notwithstanding the scarcity
of vessels on the spot and consequent higher freights. Prices
have materially increased. Particulars of cargoes and destinations of the lumber fleet will be found in the appendices.
The annual cut of lumber is scarcely appreciable when the
entire forest wealth of British Columbia is considered.
Agriculture. Good average crops of hay, roots and grain
were raised during 1899, but rains at harvest time
impaired the quality of the wheat and oats and caused discoloration. For this reason the importations of wheat from Alberta
were larger than in the previous year. Importations of American flour were greatly reduced, the provincial mills having correspondingly increased their production. Remunerative prices
were realized for all agricultural products and stocks are low.
Fruit crops, with the exception of the stone varieties, were
fair. Shipments to eastern Canada as far as Winnipeg continued, and the remainder was readily disposed of at good prices
for immediate local  consumption  and  preserving.    Fruit pre- ANNUAL  REPORT.
23
serving is a growing industry.    The aims of the canners are a
high standard of quality and the product is in good demand.
Both agricultural and fruit crops this year are exceptionally
All that is wanted is suitable harvest weather.
good
Butter making is keeping pace with the local demand. The
progress made during the past few years by the creameries is
most encouraging. The creameries were established on the
most improved methods of dairying with the result that the output is taken in preference to imported butter and higher prices
paid for it.
This Board is indebted to the Honourable J. D. Prentice,
Minister of Agriculture, for the following information :
"Among the numerous resources of this Province of the
Dominion, agriculture has to take about a fourth place. Mining, of course, has precedence, while lumbering and fishing
come in as second and third. This industry is handicapped in
having the almost boundless prairies of the Territories on the
eastern border in competition with the heavily timbered areas
west of the Cascade Mountains. Prospective settlers, seeing
the prairie country when most attractive, do not take into consideration the important item of climate, and therefore in nine
cases out of ten, prefer the open rather than encounter the
heavy forest lands of the mainland coast and Vancouver Island.
Especially is this the case with European immigrants. For the
above reasons, among others that might be mentioned, our agricultural population is not, at present, increasing in the same
ratio as the mining, mechanical, laboring, &c, &c.
" It cannot be too forcibly impressed upon agricultural
communities in the other Provinces and other countries that
the general and far-reaching mining activity of British Columbia
is ensuring home markets at good prices for all the farm produce that can be raised in scores of localities where, only a few
years ago, the cost of freight to the uncertain markets of the
few towns and cities amounted to all or more than could be
realized for it. 24
BRITISH  COLUMBIA  BOARD  OF TRADE.
I Generally speaking, so far as the mainland is concerned,
the major portion of the most desirable land is taken up ; but
there are numerous outlying valleys, more or less timbered,
tributary to the Kootenays, Okanagan, West Yale and even
New Westminster where, in view of the grand future in
store for the Pacific Province, locations worth having can
yet be obtained from both the Dominion and Provincial Governments at a mere nominal price. Comparatively, there is more
government land available on Vancouver Island, the whole of
which may be included in the southern zone, than on the mainland. It must be borne in mind, however, that both island and
coast mainland valleys are mostly covered with timber, often of
gigantic proportions ; but usually those valleys are interspersed
with grassy swamps and alder bottoms, of greater or lesser
extent, and this is the kind of land settlers are looking after and
locating upon.
"The great central zone ofthe Province, in which are the
Peace, Blackwater, Nechaco, Bulkeley, lower Skeena and
lower Naas, including Queen Charlotte Islands, has scarcely
been touched by the incoming wave of settlement. Here may
be found large areas of ideal stock ranges, particularly in the
Bulkeley and Nechaco valleys. In many localities throughout
this extensive region mixed farming also could be successfully
carried on; and thus, when means of communication are
established, help to supply the almost neighbouring mining
communities of Atlin and the upper Yukon with most of the
necessaries of life.
"In the Atlin District, which so far is the best known
portion of the northern zone, there are partially open stretches
of country that might be profitably utilized for stock raising;
and many sheltered valleys where hardy vegetables and grain
could be produced. In view of the well established and permanent character ofthe rich placer and hydraulic deposits, as well
as immense bodies of smelting ores, copper included, the population of Atlin is bound to increase as other localities have done
under similar circumstances. The development, therefore, of
the farming and grazing lands within easy reach of the camps ANNUAL  REPORT. 25
and towns which are springing up will benefit equally both the
producer and consumer, and it will be difficult to say whether
the successful miner or the fortunate occupant of the soil will
secure the most profit. Some of the ranches in the Kettle
River District are already perfect bonanzas to the owners, and
it is quite possible that the same thing may happen in Atlin if
the right sort of vegetable and poultry raising, farming and
cattle grazing settlers take up and cultivate the land available
for occupation.
"The labor market stringency of a few years ago has
entirely disappeared, and supply now is not in excess of
demand in nearly all skilled and unskilled lines. There is a
constantly growing demand for experienced miners in gold,
silver, lead, copper, iron and other ores. Coal miners also
are required, together with underground and above ground
workers ; especially since the recent decision of Hon. James
Dunsmuir,. head of the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway and
Colliery syndicate, and- now Premier of the Provincial Government, to substitute white for Oriental labor in all his collieries
This decision, of course, affects the other collieries, so that
experienced coal cutters desirous of coming to British Columbia
can depend upon getting employment at good wages with little
or no loss of time. Ship and other carpenters are likewise in
demand at present, both in the coast cities and on the navigable
waters of the northern mines.
I A large amount of British Columbia printed matter continues to be issued from the Immigration Office in reply to
correspondents seeking information relating to the Province ;
the letters, of course, are answered in detail. These enquiries,
as between the United States and Canada, are about equally
divided, while many are from the British Islands and the continent of Europe, Germany mostly. South American republics
are also well represented. Scandinavian correspondence for
some time past has been nearly discontinued."
-The Provincial Government is entitled to credit for their
efforts in assisting in agricultural development. By the organization   of    Farmer's    Institutes,    the    creation   and   main- 26
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
tenance of the Board of Horticulture and the assistance
to Agricultural Associations, a better spirit has been
developed and better methods set in operation. The advancement during the past ten years, though gradual, has been most
marked' and substantial. There is a good deal yet to do that
will now undoubtedly receive consideration. Owing to the
varying conditions which exist the necessity of local experimental farms, on a small scale, has become apparent, the
Dominion station at Agassiz being too isolated and too general
in results to be of much benefit to the Province at large.
Assistance and co-operation in a cold storage system in the
interior for the range beef would be of great benefit. These
two are among the most important, but there are other
matters requiring attention, such as the encouragement of
cheaper and better methods of clearing land, and the improving
of communication in the remote districts.
Education. British Columbia affords excellent educational
opportunities, the schools' being free and undenominational. In 1899 there were 244 common, 32 graded, and
four high schools, under the supervision of trustees elected by
the ratepayers, at a cost to the Provincial Government of
$268,653.46. New school districts can be created by the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council as soon as there are fifteen
children between six and sixteen years of age within the limits
prescribed. For outlying agricultural districts and mining
camps this arrangement is very advantageous.
A movement has been initiated in the east ursine* the
Dominion Government to establish technical schools throusfh-
out Canada. This Board is in hearty sympathy with "the
recommendation, and has endorsed the memorial to His
Excellency the Governor-General in Council.
Forestry. The subject of Forestry may be referred to as
of increasing importance. Not only is the preservation of forests of vital moment, but reforestration and
diversificMon are possible, and would augment and perpetuate
one of the chief of our natural resources. ANNUAL  REPORT.
27
Wood Pulp. In eastern Canada the manufacture of wood
pulp has made rapid strides, and there are now 35
mills   in   operation,   with  between  fifteen  and  twenty million
dollars of capital invested.    In 1899 the United States imported
from Canada pulp to the value of one and a half million dollars.
This is  an industry which should prosper in British Columbia.
At  the north  end of Vancouver Island and  on  the mainland
there is considerable spruce.    The Douglas fir, which is stated
to be a good pulp wood, abounds all over the Province.    Hemlock, also a good pulp tree, is plentiful on the northern coasts.
An important factor in the profitable manufacture of wood pulp
is water power, and no doubt there are numbers of mill sites in
British Columbia conveniently near the forests, where all the
natural advantages exist for generating as much power as may
be desired.
Opportunities       Besides the manufacture of wood pulp, atten-
for Invest-    tion is directed to British Columbia as offering a
 7™     good field for the establishment of a wool factory,
2—       a s-love and mitt factory, cold storage in the in-
terior and sheep farming.
The demand for woollen goods has greatly increased, due
to the requirements of the northern gold fields trade. Gloves
and mitts are now brought in large quantities from eastern
Canada for the same trade. The Council have recently looked
into this last matter, and the information gathered is available
upon request. The establishment of cold storage in the interior
should be a profitable investment for the promoters as well as a
benefit to the Province. In the selection of sites the cattle
trade should be considered. Sheep raising should be conducted
on a far more extensive scale. During the twelve months ending 30th June, 1899. 37,545 sheep were imported, upon which
$1.00 per head duty was collected, which does not include the
imports from the Northwest Territory.
Attention is directed to the frequent complaints which have
reached this Board in  regard to the difficulty in finding the.
Provincial Agent General's office in London,  and the lack of
information available there.    These complaints were commum- 28
BRITISH  COLUMBIA  BOARD  OF  TRADE.
cated to the late Government, but, so far as known, without
result. Such conditions should not be allowed to continue.
Several of the mainland Boards of Trade are also desirous of
securing proper Provincial representation in London, and no
time should be lost in organizing another joint request for the
much needed change in location of the office, and that it be
furnished with ample reliable information upon all British
Columbia matters.
Railways. The railway between Robson and Midway, in
the Boundary country was opened for traffic in
September last. Short branches to the principal mines have
also been constructed.
About 16 miles of the Kootenay Lake and Arrowhead railway have been graded. The object of this line is to connect
Lardo, on Kootenay Lake, with the C. P. R. system at Arrowhead.
The Kaslo and Lardo-Duncan railway, a branch of the
Kootenay Railway and Navigation Company's system, will extend up the Duncan River to the mining camps at Hall Creek
and West Fork, where many promising mineral properties exist.
Twelve miles is graded between Argenta, on Kootenay Lake,
and Howser (lately known as Duncan City), and a bridge 2,000
feet in length, at the foot of Howser Lake, is almost completed.
It is probable that this line and also the Kootenay Lake and
Arrowhead railway would have been open for traffic ere this but
for the disturbed conditions experienced in consequence of the
differences between the mine owners and miners.
Too much stress can hardly be laid upon the importance of
opening up the Province with additional railways. .A direct line
from the coast into Kootenay is urgently needed, as such a railway would reduce the distance by about one-half of the present
circuitous route. A railway to the north end of Vancouver
Island would not only develop the country through which it
would pass, but would be of great importance in securing the
trade of the northern gold fields. Cariboo should be connected
with the coast by a railway.    The great cost of getting hy- ANNUAL  REPORT.
29
draulic plants into that country is a serious obstacle to proper
development. These three lines may be considered the most
pressing and immediate requirements of British Columbia, and
there is no doubt, had the Province received from the Dominion
Government the aid which is justly due in return for the very
large annual contributions in the form of customs and other
taxations, these railways would to-day be well advanced
towards completion. It is recommended that the in-coming
Council should organize further joint representations by the
Provincial Government and Boards of Trade throughout British
Columbia, and that such representations should not cease until
the Province secures a fair measure of justice in the matter of
railway subsidies. The benefits which would result from such
railway construction would extend throughout Canada in consequence of the greatly increased demand for goods which cannot be produced in British Columbia. As a matter of fact, the
building of the Crow's Nest Pass railway, with terminus in
Kootenay, has been of the greatest advantage to eastern Canada. Eastern merchants have to-day an advantage in freight
rates in supplying many of the mining centres in Kootenay. If
the greatest advantage is to accrue to British Columbia from
the opening up of the interior of the Province the railways and
waggon roads must start from the coast.
Public Works. The usual repairs to roads and bridges throughout British Columbia have been carried out by the
Provincial Government. Some additional school houses have
been erected. The court house at Victoria is undergoing extensive alterations, and a court house at Rossland to cost
$38,500 is partly constructed. A land registry office has been
provided at Nelson. Tf|ese constitute the most important public works by the Provincial Government.
The Province has suffered a loss in the destruction by fire
of Government House, at Victoria. It is expected that during
the approaching session of the legislature the funds will be
voted for the erection of a building which will be a credit to the
Province.
The Dominion Government have continued improvements at
the William's Head quarantine  station.    The drill hall at Van- 3°
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD  OF TRADE.
couver and public building at New Westminster are in course
of construction and public buildings are to be. erected at Nelson
and Rossland.
Harbour improvements have been carried on at Nanaimo
and dredging in Victoria inner harbour has been resumed.
Telegraphs. A matter of importance, since the previous
annual report, is the operation of the telegraph
line from the head of Lynn Canal to Dawson. At present telegrams are sent by ocean steamers to Skagway, but the sum of
$130,000 has been placed in the Dominion supplementary estimates for the establishment of a line through this Province to
connect with the Dawson system, and as soon as this is accomplished a saving of some days will be effected in getting messages to the northern country.
British Columbia is served by two strong telegraph companies, the Canadian Pacific Railway and Great Northwestern
systems.
The line between Alberni and Cape Beale has been open for
several months, but there have been interruptions in the service
The old line between Victoria and the Cape is kept up, but complaints have been made of difficulties in reporting shipping.
The Dominion Government are taking action which it is hoped
will secure a more satisfactory service hereafter.
The weather forecasts have been continued regularly twice
daily.
Ocean Trade. There is not much change in the ocean trade.
The Canadian Pacific Railway " Empress " steamships engaged in the China-Japan trade continue their regular
service every three weeks in the summer and monthly during
the winter, and it has been found necessary to put additional
steamships on the route occasionally. The Northern Pacific
Steamship Company have four vessels and the Japan Mail
Steamship Company, running in connection with the Great
Northern railway, three engaged in the same trade. All
these call at Victoria on both inward and outward voyasres. ANNUAL  REPORT.
31
The Canadian Pacific Railway Company have three steamships on the Australasian route, giving a monthly service, and
calling at Honolulu, Brisbane (Queensland) and Sydney (New
South Wales).
Navigation. The lighthouses at Dryad Point, Milbank Sound
and at Pointer Island were first operated in October and November, 1899. The contract for a lighthouse at
the Ballinac Islands has been awarded. Beacons have been established at Trincomalie Channel, Gabriola, Shute and Atkins
Reefs. New buoys have been placed on Celia Reef, West Rock
and in Clayoquot Sound. Repairs and improvements to the
aids to navrgation previously established were carried out.
Alaska A matter of great importance, not only to Brit-
Boundary. ish Columbia but to the whole of Canada, is the
unsettled Alaska boundary. The loss of trade
can already be counted in millions of dollars and it is imperative that an all-Canadian route to the Atlin and Yukon gold
fields be provided. If this cannot be secured by the recognition
of the Canadian contention in regard to the disputed territory,
a railway must be built starting from the coast at a point south
of Lynn Canal. Mr. Robert Ward, who represented this Board
at the Fourth Congress of Chambers of Commerce of the Empire, was requested to urge upon that assembly the importance
of getting the Alaska boundary question settled without further
delav. but there has not been sufficient time to receive a report
from Mr. Ward.
Trade and While the trade and commerce of the province
Commerce, have increased during the past twelve months, it
——— is generally conceded that commercial prosperity
equal to that experienced in eastern Canada has not been enjoyed. Disturbing influences have been felt, notably the now
settled differences between the mine owners and miners. It is
worthy of note, however, as evidence of the firm basis upon
which that industry is established, that the mineral output
should have increased while many of the shipping properties
were closed. 32 BRITISH  COLUMBIA  BOARD  OF  TRADE.
Nor should it be forgotten, that much of the vast natural
resources of the Province is inaccessible. The Dominion Government must share the responsibility for this in withholding
from British Columbia the reasonable railway subsidies annually
asked for and which the provincial contribution to the federal
exchequer amply warrants. Subsidies aggregating about three
and a half million dollars have just been voted of which only
$96,000 is for British Columbia.
The following collections have been made in British Columbia during the past twelve months for Dominion customs and
inland revenue :
Victoriaand Bennett Duty   $1,203,731 88
Vancouver  " 911,81107
Nelson  | 188,19885
Rossland  " 164,835 11
New Westminster  '* I35>659 80
Nanaimo  " 88,108 78
Kaslo  I 29,400 50
$2,721,745 99
Vancouver (all outports in B. C. except
Vancouver Is.) Inland Rev  323,486 25
Victoria (Vancouver Is. only) Inland Rev. 182,954 83
$3,228,187 07
The Province also contributed large sums through the
fisheries and other federal departments.
Trade with the northern gold fields, largely controlled by
United States merchants during the Klondike rush, has been
diverted and during 1899 British vessels carried 87^ % of the
freights between Victoria and Skagway. In 1897 Victoria's
share of that trade amounted to only $273,000, but in 1899 it
exceeded two million dollars. The vexatious United States
customs regulations at Skagway have been removed and proper
bonding facilities now exist. United States operators in the
Yukon find it to their advantage to purchase supplies in
Canada.
Capital has been fairly plentiful, but for a time was withheld.    Recent activity on the part of capitalists seeking invest- ANNUAL  REPORT.
*S53it
ments may be taken as an indication that confidence is being
restored and is a hopeful sign for the future.
Attention is again directed to the openings for investment
in the manufacture of wood pulp, a wool factory, gloves and
mitts manufacture and cold storage in the interior.
The provincial and civic bonds and debentures have maintained their high standing in financial centres.
The statistical information appended hereto, as far as possible, has been brought down to date.
It is gratifying to record that the business of the Board has
continued to receive due attention, the attendances at both
council and general meetings having been well maintained. The
field of the Board's usefulness is enlarging annually, and increased vigilance and activity will be required to keep pace with
the demands which will result from the expansion of the provincial trade and commerce which is confidently anticipated.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
W. A.  WARD, President.
L.  G.  McQUADE,   Vice-President.
F. ELWORTHY, Secretary.
Victoria, B. C,
July 13th, 1900. 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA BOARD OF TRADE. APPENDICES.
Lieutenant-Governor's Address in Reply to the
Foregoing Report.
! Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Victoria Board of Trade:
11 feel certain that you understand that I take a deep interest in the proceedings, as well as in everything that is connected with the welfare aad prosperity in
the future of British Columbia. I have now been listening as well as I could to
the report that has been read, and it appears to me altogether of a most satisfactory and encouraging nature.
"When the Yukon gold fields were opened first, I, as well as every Canadian
who took an interest in the prosperity of the country, could not help deploring the
fact that we derived so little benefit from it. It appeared to me from what I read
in the papers at one time that nearly all the goods that were sent there did not
come from Canadian sources. The ships that carried the goods were not Canadian ships; and altogether I felt anxious for the moment to know whether Canada
—and British Columbia especially—would assert itself, and derive from the discovery of these new gold fields the advantage to which it appeared to be entitled.
But I have just heard now that the amount of goods shipped from Victoria to the
Yukon district amounted, if I remember right, to nearly two millions of dollars
this year, while in 1897 they did not exceed a quarter of a million—that is, eight
times as much in less than two years—and I think that should be a great satisfaction to you. Furthermore, as to the carrying of these goods, it must be a great
satisfaction for you and all British Columbians to see that how such a considerable
proportion of these goods—more than 87 per cent.—are carried in Canadian ships
instead of American. I think this is as it ought to be. I think that Canadians
ought to reap as much as possible of the advantages that they can derive from the
bountiful supply of raw material the province has given them in every way.
" Now, for instance, speaking of the pulp industry, which I see you are taking up, I hope that the hemlock and the Douglas fir will be found as favorable for
the manufacture of pulp as we find the spruce in the Eastern provinces. We have
not the Douglas fir in the East, but there is an abundance of hemlock.    I do not BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD  OF  TRADE.
think it has been decided so far whether the hemlock is quite as advantageous in
the production of pulp as the white spruce.
"There is one thing, however, which I want to take the liberty of drawing
your attention to. I think when we see so many hundreds and thousands of our
young men—especially in the East—leaving Canada and going to our neighbors
to beg work, and when we think how nature has given us such bountiful materials
by which we can give them the means of earning their living, and keeping them
here—to raise their families here—I think we ought by all means to understand it
is our duty to profit by what Providence has done for us. When you think of the
hundreds of thousands of cords of wood that are sent from our Eastern provinces
into the United States to be manufactured into pulp; when you think that each of
those cords of pulp leaves only about $3 or $3.50 in Canada to the man who has
gone into the woods, who has cut down and sawn that wood, who has carted it
to the wharf from which it was sent to the United States; when you think it leaves
in our country only about $3.50, and the same kind of pulp manufactured in one
of our pulp mills in Canada leaves $16 dollars of work—I do not mean $16 profit
to the owner of the pulp mill—I mean to say that the work of building the pulp
mill and the labor of the men who work in the pulp mill—the whole thing together—leaves $16 in Canada, instead of $3.50. I hppe this will be understood
here as well as it ought to be in the other provinces. I am glad to say they are
beginning to understand it in the other provinces, and there are two ways which
they have adopted there which I think will concentrate the manufacture of pulp in
Canada. I must tell you that in the Eastern provinces nearly all the timber is
manufactured in Crown mills; the quantity manufactured in private mills is so
small it is not worth mentioning. All logs produced on Crown lands in Ontario
must be manufactured in that province. So far as pulp wood is concerned in
Quebec, an end should soon be put to the waste in sending hundreds of thousands
of cords of wood away. When the pulp is manufactured in the Province of
Quebec it pays, if I remember right, $40 a cord, while when it is exported it pays
$ 1.90 for exportation. In other words, it is a complete prohibition of the exportation of pulp-wood. I do not know whether it is $1.90, but I know the difference
is so enormous that it is bound to put an end to the exportation of pulp-wood.
There is no doubt, especially if it is found that the hemlock and the Douglas fir
can be utilized for the successful manufacture of pulp-wood, you will have an
enormous source of prosperity in the province of British Columbia.
I Now, of course, I am not in a position to say anything about your great
industries, about mining, which is the first one, except to express the pleasure with
which I hear that, notwithstanding the difficulties which have arisen, nevertheless
the yield of the mines, and the results of the mining industry for this year, have
been in advance of last year.
'Neither am I in a position to give my opinion about the fisheries, but when
I look at that fish in the glass case, it shows me that you have certainly got the
materials to make an abundant harvest, which, I hope, will reward all those who
are engaged in it, whether fishermen or cannerymen. APPENDICES.
37
& Now, there is another branch in which I, as well as everybody I could
point to, take a great deal of interest in agriculture. Of course, with such an
enormous mining wealth as you have got in this country, you cannot expect that
every inch of ground will be fit for agriculture, but nevertheless, I have been informed that there are a number of valleys with rich alluvial soil. There is one
branch which 1 have taken a great deal of interest in, namely, the growing and
manufacture of tobacco. The Kelowna Union, I think, have found a means of
raising an excellent tobacco. There is no doubt there is something both in your
soil and climate that is more beneficial to the growing of tobacco than in the East,
for in the raw state it seems to be more carefully cured and nearer perfect than
the tobacco that we grow back in Quebec. But we have not made much progress
in home-grown tobacco, and that is the reason I have come to the conclusion that
it should be a great source of revenue to Canada in the future.
"As for the dairying industry, I am glad to hear that the provincial government is doing what they ean in that direction. I suppose in British Columbia
you are too modest to think of your agricultural facilities, but let me tell you that
a few years ago I found a market in Quebec flooded with the most beautiful butter, on which was written the letters " B. C." I was much astonished to think
that such a quantity of butter should be sent from British Columbia, three thousand miles, all the way to Quebec. It was utterly beyond all the ideas I conceived of the dairying facilities of British Columbia. A few days afterwards I
went to visit a butter factory in the neighborhood of Quebec, when I found that
the butter came from the Bay of Chaleur, all butter (laughter) coming from that
district being marked with the letters " B. C." Still, I hope by and by we will
see the day when we can get British Columbia butter in Quebec ; but if not in
Quebec, that all the butter used in Rjjitsh Columbia will be produced here.
" The secretary spoke of technical education. There is a branch of technical
education in which I took a good deal of interest during the four years which I
was connected with the inland revenue department. I have just placed myself in
communication with those in England who are trying to introduce the metric
system. I have also placed myself in communication with the treasury department at Washington and others who are doing their best to introduce the metric
system there. It is a new thing, but nevertheless, I think it my duty to prepare
the people of Canada for the speedy introduction of the metric system, and I will
tell you why. In England a special committee of the House of Commons, as far
back as 1895, recommended its compulsory introduction in two years. They do
not proceed quite as fast in England, and so far they have not made it compulsory,
but have legalized it, and now all inspectdrs of weights and measures in England
are familiar with the weights and measures ofthe metric system, so as to be able to
inspect all their measures according to that system. They are doing exactly the
same at Washington and have introduced a bill to make it compulsory as soon as
possible. Well, it is our duty in Canada to try and make ourselves acquainted
with that system, so that when the United States and England have adopted it
we will be ready to adopt it too; and I consider it my duty now, having once
begun that work to corj&ue it.    I have written  to Ottawa to get a collection of 3«
BRITISH  COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF   TRADE.
all the systems of weights and measures for your hall, Mr. President, and some
day if you can stand a short conference with me I will do myself the pleasure of
showing how simple it is.
" I thank you, Mr. President and gentlemen, for having been so patient."
(Loud applause.)
POST  OFFICE, VICTORIA,   B. C. APPENDICES.
Mining Statistics.
Report of Minister of Mines, December 31st, 1899.
39
TABLE I.
Total Production for all Years up to and including 1899.
Gold, placer $ 61,305,719
Gold, lode  9>359>479
Silver  11,340,609
Lead  4,928,069
Copper  2,747,294
Coal and Coke  44,396,387
Building stone, bricks, etc  1,700,000
Other   metals  32,900
Total $ 135,810,457
TABLE II.
Production for each Year from 1890 to 1899 (inclusive.)
Year. Amount.
1890 $ 2,608,803
1891  3,521,102
1892  2,978,530
1893  3,588,413
1894  4,225,717
1895   5-643.042
1896  7>S°7,9S6
1897  10,455,268
1898  10,906,861
1899  12,393,131
Table III gives a statement in detail of the amount and value of the different
mineral products for the years 1897, 1898 and 1899. As it has been impossible
as yet to collect accurate statistics regarding building stone, lime, bricks, tiles,
etc., these are estimated. 40
BRITISH  COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
TABLE III.
Amount and Value of Mineral Products for 1898 and 1899.
Customary
Measure.
1898.
1899.
Quantity.
Value.
Quantity.
Value.
Ounces	
Tons, 2,240 lbs..
32.167
110,061
4,292,401
7,271,678
3r.693.S59
B135,065
35'°°°
$     643,346
2,201,217
2,375.841
874,78'
1,077,581
3.407.595
175,000
i5r.5oo
67,245
I3o,315
2,939,413
7,722,591
21,862,436
1,306,324
34-251
$ 1,344,900
2>857>573
1,663,708
Coal	
Coke	
i.3Sx»4S3
878,870
3,918,972
I7I>255
206,400
$10,906,861
$12,393. J3T
TABLE IV.
Production of Metals by Districts and Divisions.
Name.
Divisions.
Districts.
1898.
1899.
1898.
1899.
$     389,360
$
38l,900
$       94,500
37,000
•28,000
214,860
11,000
•s
180,000
193.300
8,600
Quesnellemouth       "      	
Omineca {Land Recording" Div.)
107,300
133.368
6,042,975
819,380
66,294
6,187,859
Kootenay, West	
694,880
2,619,852
2,470,811
97*631
297,930
879,185
1.740.372
3,229,086
41,286
Lillooet 	
47,814
432,512
69.55-3
364.112
7»56o
60,840
234,167
6,609
75.089
19.437
Other Districts 	
1
$
255.648
$ 7.172.766
8,096,504
Placer Gold.
Table V continues the yearly production of placer gold to date, as determined
by the returns, sent in by the banks and express companies, of gold transmitted
by them to the mints, and from returns sent in by the Gold Commissioners and
Mining Recorders. To these yearly amounts, one-third was added up to the
year 1878, and from then to 1895 and for  1898 and 1899,  one-fifth,  which pro- APPENDICES.
41
portions are considered to represent, approximately, the amount of gold sold of
which there is no record. This placer gold contains from 10 to 25 per cent,
silver, but the silver value has not been separated from the totals, as it would be
insignificant.
TABLE V.
Yield of Placer Gold per Year to Date.
1858 $ 705,000
1859  1,615,070
i860  2,228,543
1861  2,666,118
1862  2,656,903
1863  3.9'3,563
1864  3.735.8SO
1865  3,491,205
1866  2,662,106
1867  2,480,868
1868  3.372,972
1869  1.774,978
1870  i,336,956
1871  1,799.440
1872  1,610,972
1873----  1.305,749
1874  1,844,618
1875  2,474,004
1876  1,786,648
1877  1,608,182
1878  1,275,204
1879
1880.
1881.
1882.
1883.
1884.
1885.
1886.
1887.
1888.
1889.
1890.
1891.
1892.
1893-
1894.
1895.
1896.
1897.
1898.
1899.
Total.
1,290,058
1,013,827
1,046,737
954,085
794,252
736,165
713,738
903,6^
693,709
616,731
588,923
490,435
429,811
399,526
356,131
405,516
481,683
544,026
513,520
643,346
1,344,900
51,305.719
TABLE VI.
The information as to production in the earlier years  is obtained from the
Mineral Statistics and Mines for 1896," Geological Survey of Canada.
Production of Lode Mines.
ti
Gold.
Silver.
Lead.
Copper.
Total
Values.
<
>
Oz.
Value.
Oz.
Value.
$
*7.33*-
75,000
47.873
73,948
4,000
66,935
195,000
470,219
977.229
2,100,685
3,272,836
2.375.841
1.663,708
:$ii,34o,6o9
Pounds.
Value.
Pounds.
Value.
1887
$
17,690
79,780
53.!92
70.427
4.5°°
77.l6°
227,000
746.379
1,496.522
3.135.343
5,472,971
4,292,401
2.939.413
204,800
674,500
165,100
Nil.
Nil.
808,420
2,135,023
5,662,523
'6,475,464
24,199,977
38,841,135
31,693,559
21,862,436
$
9.216
29,813
6,498
Nil.
Nil.
33.064
78,996
169,875
532.255
721,384
1,390.5*7
1.077,581
878.870
$
26,547
1888
1889
1890
1891
1892
1893
1894
1895
1896
1897
1898
1899
104,813
54.371
73.948
4,000
99.999
1,170
6,252
39.264
62,259
106,141
110,061
138,315
463,462
23.404
125,014
785.27*■
1,244,180
2,122,820
2,201,217
r.   a.r,   r^i,
2,057,573
297,400
781,342
2.342,397
4.257. J79
7,052,431
6,529,420
6,751,604
324,680
952,840
3.818,556
5,325,180
7,271,678
7.722,591
16,234
47,642
190,926
266,258
874,781
1,351.453
S 9,359.479
18,612,778
142,722,937
$4,928,069
25,415.525
$2,747,294
$28,375,451 42
BRITISH  COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
TABLE VII.
Production in Detail of the Metalliferous
c
rt
I
1
Gold—Placer.
Gold—Lode.
District.
Tons.
Ounces.
Value.
Ounces.
Value.
$
$
1898
1899
1898
1899
1898
1899
• 59.500
180,000
214,860
193.300
15,000
8,600
      io.743
       9.665
          75o
          430
1898
1899
1898
1899
75.000
800,000
32,300
19.380
40,000
1,615
1898
1899
1899
    	
*i7,ooo
*io,ooo
716
18
500
.898
1899
1898
1899
1898
1899
1898
1899
1898
1899
1.738
3.760
52,762
58.302
30,691
21,507
111,282
172,665
91
3.823
16,569
60
14
87.343
102,976
346
118
i,888
Nelson            "         i	
76,459
342,308
1,194
284
1,746,861
2,127,482
6,923
2,439
11,040
6,000
(Revelstoke, Trout Lake, Lar-
deau.)
294                 300
1898
1899
9OO
J»557
2,130
2,135
42,614
42,700
260
1,300
5.208
26,850
Osoyoos Division i	
(Grand Forks, Kettle River.)
1898
1899
1898
1899
1898
1899
14,820
13,084
1
538
382
180
378
33°
3.042
3>736
7.632
3,600
7.560
6,600
60,840
74.720
17,824
11,086
356,480
229,028
(Vernon.)
2
45
Coast and Other Districts	
(Nanaimo, Alberni, West Coast
1898
1899
1898
1899
1898
"899
*.*59
14,901
405
6.159
V. I., Victoria.)
127,241
(Building: stone, brick, etc., other
metals, etc.)
32.167
67.245
215.944
287,343
$   643,346
Jl344,900
110,061
$ 2,201,217
2.857,573
! Estimated.       f 100 oz. Platinur
3 = Ipi ,500. APPENDICES.
43
Mines for 1898 and 1899.
Silver.
Copper.
Lead.
Totals for
Divisions.
Totals for
Districts.
Ounces.
Value.
Pounds.
Value.
Pounds.
Value.
1898.
$
1899,
1898.
1899.
1
$
$
$       j
$
389.360
$
381,900
159.500
180,000
214,860
193,300
15,000
8,600
107,300
819,380
75.000
800,000
19.380
32,300
133.368
66,294
69,780
33.5!6
1,627
38,623
l8,970
92 X
2,286,603
881,167
22,6^3
77.745
35.423
911
133.368
69
64.393
1,901
397
6,042,975
6,187,859
167,147
268,165
692,367
483.659
3,068,648
1,891,025
170,804
185,818
1
 1
24
1,978,297
3.588,577
67,262
144,261
159,801
151,781
297.930
879,185
t <■**•■* ^8-.
235.196
239.840
629,411
996.431
196
694,880
2,619,852
2,470,811
273.751  L370.5I3
1,070,320	
94.539 5.232.011
"^.m  5.693,889
67.256	
579.245
27.063,595
16,660,910
23,286
920,162
669.768
3,229,086
365,064
129,884
12,412
5.221
97.63*
48,46;-
41,286
*7>43"
47,814
69,558
47,814
69,558
432,512
31.5,865
364,112
1.539
9
234,167
6,609
2,719
7.560
16
60,84c
27
1,187
13.787
75.009
47
84,381
654.972
10,15c
114,62c
19.437
19,437
255.648
2,145
24.358
25S.648
206,400
150,00c
150,00c
206,400
4,292,401
* 2,375.84
1,663,70:
7,271,67'
$.$ 874.78
3---»693'559: I»°77»58i
7,322,76*
>	
$8,302,904
$7,322,761
$8,302,904
2,939-4I3
5 7.722.59
I>351,45.
1
1
** Building stone, etc., $200,000; Platinum, 55 oz., $825; Iron ore, 2,071 tons, $5,575. BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
TABLE VIII.
Coal and Coke Production per Year to Date.
COAL.
(Tons 2,240 lbs.)
10,000 $
25,396.
1,989.
14,246.
13,774
l8,Il8.
45-
21
,j
28,632.
32,819.
25.115-
31,239.
44,005.
35,802
29,843.
2-3       i48,549-
8i,547-
110,145.
139,192.
154,052.
170,846.
241,301.
267,595.
228,357.
282,139.
213,299
imi
265,596.
326,636.
413,360.
489,301.
579,830-
678,140.
1,029,097.
826
978,294.
I,OI2,953
939,654-
896,222.
882,854.
1,135,865.
1,306,324,
Total   14,523,876 tons.
COKE.
(Tons 2,240 lbs.)
1,565   ....
I7,83L
35,000	
34,251	
88,647 tons.
Value.
40,000
101,592
7,956
56,988
55,096
72,472
85,38o
115,528
131,276
100,460
124,956
176,020
143,208
"9,372
493,836
244,641
330,435
417,576
462,156
512,538
723,903
802,785
685,071
846,417
639,897
I,l82,2I0
796,788
979,908
1,240,080
1,467,903
1,739,490
2,034,420
3,087,291
2,479,005
2,934,882
3,038,859
2,818.962
2,688,666
2,648,562
3-407,595
3,9i8,972
$43
,953,152
Value.
$
7,825
89,155
175,000
171,255
$ 443,23.5 appendices. 45
Table Showing Source of California's Coal Supply, 1896-1899.
The principal foreign markets for Vancouver Island coal are San Francisco
and southern ports of California, the Hawaiian Islands, and ports in Alaska.
The China and Australian steamships are also large consumers of fuel.
The sources of supply of coal for the State of California, from 1896 to 1899,
are shown in the following; table :
British Columbia	
Australia	
English and Welsh	
Scotch	
Eastern Cumberland and Anthracite
Seattle, Washington	
Tacoma, " 	
Mount Diablo, Coos Bay and Tesla.
Japan and Rocky Mountain (by rail)
Totals	
1896.
Tons.
551,852
273,851
156,368
8,356
17,907
128,919
255,923
110,237
2,247
,505,660
1897.
Tons.
558,372
281,666
107,969
4,081
21,335
220,175
286,205
115,15°
6,587
1,601,540
1898.
Tons.
651,208
201,931
75,H5
5,056
37,56°
283,963
348,474
172,506
26,560
1,802,373
Tons.
623,133
139,333
93,263
None.
38,951
271,694
355,756
189,507
28,390
1,740,027
The proportion of the above coal that was delivered in 1899 by water at the
southern ports of California, viz., Los Angeles and San Diego, amounted to
184,747 tons, largely derived from British Columbia.
Coke.
During the past year, the coke ovens at Union only turned out 5,000 tons of
coke, which was sold on the coast and in San Francisco, where it met with a favorable reception. The Kootenay coke market being so much nearer Crow's Nest
will, of course, be supplied by that colliery, so that Vancouver Island coke will
have to find a market elsewhere. The coke imported into California in 1899
amounted to 31,091 tons, and as the ovens at Union are to be run to their full
capacity, a large proportion of this trade may, in 1900, be expected for British
Columbia. BRITISH  COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE. APPENDICES.
47 48
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE. APPENDICES.
49 50 BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
British  Columbia  Sealing  Catch,  1899.
Schooners.
Ainoko	
Arietis	
Beatrice	
Borealis	
City of San Diego	
Diana	
Dora Siewerd	
Emma Louisa	
Enterprise	
Favorite	
Geneva	
Hatzic	
Ida Etta	
Libbie	
Mary Taylor	
Mermaid	
Minnie	
Ocean Belle	
Otto	
Penelope ,
Teresa	
Umbrina	
Victoria	
Viva	
Walter L. Rich	
Zillah May	
Indian canoes (estimated).
Spring.
449
392
310
200
776
319
601
271
1,582
393
162
1,318
236
705
725
613
441
442
537
1,000
Total sealskins II     11 472
Behring
Sea.
Total.
1,123
1,572
1,214
1,606
768
1,078
602
802
930
930
776
1,234
ItS_3
913
913
1,208
1,809
1.148
1,419
871
2,453
927
1,320
1,189
1,189
779
779
54
216
817
976
756
980
612
1,021
1,782
M°3
1,267
5i3
912
23,999
2>l3S
1,212
1,461
1.705
1,225
1,021
2,223
1,403
1,709
513
1.449
1,000
55,471
The Sealing Catch for the Past Eleven Years has Been :
1889     35,3io
1890  43,325
1891   52,365
1892  49,743
1893  70,592
1894  97,474
1895  74-124
1896   55,677
1897   5°>4io
1898  28,552
1899  35,47i APPENDICES.
Exports  from   British Columbia.
utside  of Canada  of Products  of Agricult
s, for Three Years  Ending  30th  June,  flf
(The Exports to the other  Provinces  of the Dominion are not included.)
To  Countries  Outside  of Canada  of Products of Agriculture and  its
Branches, for Three Years  Ending  30th  June,  1899.
Live Stock.
Horses head
Horned Cattle    "
Swine    "
Poultry and other animals.   "
Meats, Etc.
Hides, horns & skins (not fur).'
Bacon lbs
Beef   I
Hams ....  "
Pork   I
Sheep pelts No.
Wool lbs
Grain, Seeds, Breadstuffs
and Products of.
Bran cwt.
Barley bush.
Oats     I
Peas     I
Wheat     I
Flour bbls.
Biscuits and Bread   cwt.
Oatmeal and all other    . .bbls.
Fruits and Vegetables.
Apples (green) bbls.
Fruits (canned) lbs.
Other fruit   "
Potatoes bush.
All other vegetables	
Dairy Products.
 lbs.
Butter	
Cheese     "
Eggs doz.
Hay tons
Trees and bushes     	
Hops lbs.
Bones cwt.
Tallow lbs.
Honey    ''
Other articles	
Total.
Year ending- June
30th, 1897.
Quantity.
97
1
86,385
984
i,4i9
38,347
166,111
7i
63.471
19,880
m
1
516
4
254
211
442
3,J72
6,845
29
4
15.264
98
37,92o
22
Value.
$
4-395
3o
260
86,385
118
253
12,958
I5,56i
20
34
23,97o
76,548
1,140
7
956
4
254
151
442
979
969
13
25
161
1,924
20
824
6
Year ending- June Year ending June
30th, 1898.
30th,
228,407
Quantity.
Value.
104
4,67:
290
85,556
1,741 271
2,062 148
1,989 286
457|        39
32,005   12,314
3,886       224
6
769
4,380
9,391
24
n
J
I-i I
6
390
264
7,732
6,532
280
130
82,193
2
22,146
4,966
52,449
17
421
77
208
56
177
1,869
918
39
2,394
37
11,762
665
180,404
Quantity.
63
4
1
Value
6,466
I,8oo
200!
6,800
61,819
2 399
3,306
60
1,211
6,856
I
56
159
2,531
2,300
l6o
IO
5,147
126,199
58l
91
21
378
14,885
240
1,415
21
1.805
14,874
7,095
8
70,450
688
28,195
3
309
881
70
1,706
1,106
586
2,524
1,009
93
6
22,690
1,101
6,816
220,348 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE. APPENDICES.
53 BRITISH  COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE. APPENDICES.
55 56
BRITISH  COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF TRADE. APPENDICES.
57 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
Imports  into the  Province   of British   Columbia for Twenty-Nine Years
ending June 30th,  1900.
Value of
Total
Imports.
To 30th June, 1872  $1,790,352
From Canada  22,215
To 30th June, 1873  2,191,011
From Canada  75,604
To 30th June, 1874  2,085,560
from Canada .... 66 104
To 30th June, 1875  2.543,552
From Canada  117,054
To 30th June, 1876  2,997,597
From Canada  129,735
To 30th June, 1877  2,220,968
From Canada  163,142
To 30th June, 1878  2,244,503
From Canada  144,754
To 30th June, 1879  2,440,781
From Canada  184,951
To 30th June, 1880  1,698,394
From Canada  208,072
To 30th June, 1881  2,489,643
From Canada  387,111
To 30th June, 1882  2,899,223
From Canada  449,768
To 30th June, 1883  3,937,536
From Canada  624,207
To 30th June, 1884  4,142,486
From Canada   789,287
To 30th June, 1885  4,089,492
From Canada  927,054
To 30th June, 1886  3,953,299
To 30th June, 1887  3,547,852
To 30th June, 1888  3,509,951
To 30th June, 1889  3,763,127
To 30th June, 1890  4,379,272
To 30th June, 1891  5,478,883
To 30th June, 1892  6,495,598
To 30th June, 1893  3,934,066
To 30th June, 1894  5,320,615
To 30th June, 1895  4,403,976
To 30th June, 1896  5,563,095
To 30th June, 1897  7,130 381
To 30th June, 1898  8,548,375
To 30th June, 1899  8,714,733
To 30th June, 1900  1,255,697
Goods Entered for Home Consumption.
Dutiahle Free Duty
Goods. Goods. Total. Collected.
$1,600,361 §  166,707 $1,767,068 §  342,400 48
  22,215 22,215
1,569,112 507,364 2,076,476 302,147 65
  75,604 75,604
1,676,792 377,544 2,048,336 336,494 47
  66,104 66,104
1,924,482 566,111 2,490,593 413,921 50
  117,054 117,054
2,237,072 707,906 2,944,978 488,384 52
  129,735 ' 129,735
1,820,391- 346,318 2,166,709 403,520 20
  163,142 163,142
1,905,201 367,926 2,273,127 426,125 14
  144,754 144,754
1,997,125 320,326 2,317,454 484,704 04
  184,951 184,951
1,614,165 122,451 2,457,116 450,175 43
  208,072 208,072
2,214,153 242,963 1,736,616 589,403 62
  387,111 387,111
2,472,174 404,287 2,875,461 678,104 53
  449,768 449,768
3,331,023 550,833 3,866,855 907,655 54
  624,207 624,207
3,337,642 702,693 4,040,335 884,076 21
  789,287 789,287
3,458,529 564,923 4,023,452 966,143 54
  927,054 .  927,054
2,851,379 1,060,347 4,011,726 880,266 65
3,065,791 560,348 3,626,139 883,421 53
2,674,941 729,266 3,401,207 861,465 14
2.002.646 807,140 3,809,786 974,675 69
3,357,111 1,030,375 4,287,486 1,075,215 20
4,261,207 1,074,983 5,336,190 1,346,059 42
4,423,414 1,803,005 6,226,419 1,412,878 00
3,662,673 1,255,495 5,918,168 1,366,250 32
3,582,333 1,738,282 5,336,961 1,308,63123
3,131,490 1,236,935 4,368,425 1,137,727 49
3,963,650 1,532,840 5,526,490 1,406,931 91
5,048,755 2,028,653 7,087,048 1,701,507 16
6,493,123 2,024,749 8,517,872 2,064,527 76
7.063.647 1,612,998 8,376,645 2,350,738 87
8,684,590 2,513,631 11,198,221 2,721,745 99 APPENDICES.
59
Exports the  Produce of Canada, from the Province of British  Columbia
for Twenty-Nine Years ending June 30th, 1900.
Animals
and their
Agric'l
Miscel-
Year.
The Mine.    F
isheries.
Forest.
Produce.
Products.
aneous.
Total.
1872...
. $ 1,389,585    $
37,707
$214,377
$214,700
$     142    $
1,540    $ 1,858,050
1873...
1,224,362
43,361
211,026
259,292
2,885
1197
1,742,123
1874...
.     1,351,145
114,118
260,116
320,625
5,296
443
2,051,743
1875..-.
.     1,929,294
133,986
292,468  -
411,810
9,727
2,777,285
1876...
2,032,139
71,338
273,430
329,027
3,080
68
2,709,082
1877...
.     1,708,848
105,603
287,042
230,893
3,083
1,500
2,346,969
1878...
.     1,759,171
423,840
327,360
257,314
462
2,768,147
1879...
.     1,530,812
633,493
273,366
268,271
2,505
57
2,708,848
1880..
.     1,664,626
317,410
258,804
339,218
3,843
100
2,584,001
1881..
.     1,317,079
400,984
172,647
350,474
248
22
2,231,554
1882..
.     1,437,072
976,903
362,875
300,429
946
2,616
3,080,841
1883..
.     1,309,646
1,332,385
407,624
287,394
6,791
443
3,345,263
1884..
.     1,441,052
899,371
458,365
271,796
1,745
1,413
3,100,404
1885..
..   * 1,759,512
727,672
262,071
414,364
2,324
5,948
3,172,391
1886..
..     1,720,335
643,052
194,488
329,248
1,907
2,811
2,891,811
1887..
..     1,832,827
910,559
235,913
380,126
10,265
1,911
3,371,601
1888
..     1,889,805
1,164,019
441,957
318,839
27,631
85,826
3,928,077
1889..
..     2,377,052
993,623
449,026
397,685
14,831
102,089
4,334,306
1890..
..     2,375,770
2,374,717
325,881
346,159
9,823
113,271
5,545,621
1891..
..     2,030,229
2,274,686
374,996
294,646
5,017
20,434
6,257,158
1892..
..     2,979,470
2,351,083
425,278
390,584
25,018
31,976
6,574,989
1893.
..     2,898,947
1,501,831
454,994
310,621
30,173
446,231
5,642,797
1894.
..     3,521,543
3,541,305
411,623
149,269
23,323
196,895
7,843,958
1895.
..     4,615,452
3,264,501
500,080
457,373
21,774
261,918
9,121,098
1896.
..     5,763,253
3,288,776
685,746
437,864
61,414.
338,471
10,576,524
1897.
...     8,909,592
3,567 815
742,173
307,845
104,744
552,539
14,017,568
1898.
...   11,973,671
3,846,951
425,751
285,007
78,977
262,834
19,919,717
1899
1900.
...    10,467,502
...   11,946,815
2,740,124
3,442,997
527,820
710,883
355,323
484,027
61,239
77,116
420,689
40,653
14,748,025
17,843,906 60
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
Exports for Each Year from 1872 to 1900, Inclusive.
Scale—$1,COO,000.00 = \ inch.
1872-$ 1,858,050 ■
1873— 1,742,123 ■
1874— 2,051,743 ■
1875—
2,777,285
1876—
2,709,082 ■
1877 —
2,346,969
1878—
2,768,147 <
1879-
2,708,848
1880-
2,584,001
1881—
2,231,554
1882—
3,080,841
1883-
3,345,236
1884—
3,100 404
1885-
3,172,391
1886—
2,891,811
1887—
3,371,601
1888—
3,928,077
1889—
4,334,306
1890-
5,545,621
1891—
6,257,158
1892—
6,574,989
1893—
5,642,797
1894-
7,843,958
1895—
9,121,098
1896—
10,576,524
1897—
14,017,568
1898—
16,919,717
1899—
14,748,025
1900—
17,843,906
-i APPENDICES.
Shipping.
6r
This Board is indebted to the courtesy and kindness of the Collectors of Customs at the ports mentioned, for the following information :
Vessels employed in the coasting trade of the Dominion of Canada, arrived at
and departed from the undermentioned Ports during the year ending 30th June,
1900.
Vessels Arrived. Vessels Departed.
■ A £ 1 I ^ — — I
No.                                       No. No. No.
Vessels. Tonnage. Crew. Vessels. Tonnage. Crew.
Victoria    1,545 533,849 36. "9 L557 548,725 36,280
Vancouver    2,266 474,715 31,877 2,266 499,209 33,726
Nanaimo   1,072 265,360 12,457 1,095 265,714 12,528
New Westminster     573 116,124         6,699 584 116,246 6,735
Vessels entered inwards from sea during year ending June 30th, 1900.
With Cargo. In Ballast.
i 1 I I 1 ->
' No. No. No. No.
Vessels.       Tonnage. Crew. Vessels. Tonnage. Crew.
Victoria      725       S4L97I 31,325 347 364,660 17,576
Vancouver          354       306.SSS 18,263 223 138,091 6,646
Nanaimo         35          52,347 854 212 249,922 5,453
New Westminster     131           5>I27 522 105         14-73° 56o
Vessels entered outwards for sea during the year ending June 30th, 1900.
With Cargo. In Ballast.	
^nI | N^     '   N°* „No"
Vessels.       Tonnage. Crew. Vessels.       Tonnage. Crew.
Victoria  526 439,993 24,076 537 449,7°7 24,519
Vancouver  447 412,966 21,408 164 ,64,793 3,513
Nanaimo  241 308,074 6,853 3° 4,3°4 436
New Westminster 40 14,788 394 '98 4,839 5»7
Number and tonnage of vessels built and registered during year ending June
3°th' I9°°- Built. Registered.
 ,  , A -.
r No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.
Victoria m  79 T_„ H
o 422 24             107,994
Vancouver         y n _
2 9
Nanaimo  *' ' . (.~f.
„c <? fiio Xl                 2,070
New Westminster     28 2,032 . 62
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE. APPENDICES.
63 64 BRITISH  COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
Inland   Revenue,  Canada,   Divisions   No.   37   and   38,
Entered for Consumption July 1st, 1899, to June 30th, 1900.
No. 37, No. 38,
* Victoria, B. C. t Vancouver, B. C.
Spirits proofgalls.       58>833-35 102,337.50
Spirits, exported          "                   1,911.21 447-74
Malt lbs.   1,407,221 2,395,330
Manufactured Tobacco   |       145,111^ 239,047
I                "      exported    "           4,790)4 369
Raw Leaf Tobacco   |         33,429 68,723
I        I         I    exported    "          5,H9 3,061
Cigars, ex-warehouse No.     256,475 480,300
I     ex-factory   1    1,258,475 3-330,477
Malt Liquor galls.     514,475 994,122
Petroleum     "            Nil. 11,480
Total receipts    $182,954.83 $323,486.25
* Vancouver Island only.
t All outports in British Columbia except Vancouver Island.
This Board is indebted  to the kindness and  courtesy of the Collectors of
Inland Revenue at Victoria and Vancouver for the above information.
Area of British Columbia.
Land *   382,300 square miles.
Water        1,000     " "
Total       383.300     1 I
Wood area, estimated   285,554     I ■
Statement Showing the Timber Cut during 1899,
Not including that from the Dominion and the Esquimalt and Nanaiftio Railway
lands.
FEET.
On Crown lands     89,258,757
On timber leaseholds     49,526,306
On private property     23,115,400
$161,900,463 APPENDICES. 6**,
Postal Statistics.
Statement showing'the accounting offices in operation, the gross postal
revenue; the number and amount of money orders issued and paid; the amount
of commission thereon, during the year ending 30th June, 1899 !
Name of Office.
Vancouver	
Victoria	
Rossland	
Nelson   	
New Westminster
Nanaimo	
Kaslo 	
Other offices
Total, 1899..
Total, 1898..
Gross
Postal
Revenue.
$
49,767 20
47,804 42
13,828 6;
13,190 55
10,298 75
7,103 85
3,828 48
96,513 29
242
19
247,282 17
Number
of
Money
Orders
Issued.
12,054
13,655
4,501
3,793
4,761
6,381
1,230
51,387
Total Amount
of Money
Orders Issued.
$
190,440 49
162,259 90
68,473 °°
70,013 75
63,043 54
91,764 58
17,212 92
969,935 68
97,762 1,633,143 86
90.674 1,396,604 69 11,839 13
Total
Commission
Received
from
Public.
63^
612
1,845 6l
1,720 24
85
76
571 70
845 42
149 43
7,269 59
Total
Amount of
Money
Orders
Paid.
184,940 48
182,748 04
28,507  09
32,920 05
74,
62
13,648 60
35>001 75
9.292 18
206,586 41
754,329 62
705,468 40
Table showing the number of post offices in operation, estimated number of
letters and other articles of mail matter posted in British Columbia during the
years ending June 30th, 1897, 1898 and 1899:
1897. 1898. 1896
Number of offices in operation on ist July.. 293 311 343
Estimated number of letters and other articles
of mail matter posted in British Columbia
during the years ending 30th June, 1897,
1898 and 1899:
Letters    4,850,000    6,700,000    7,650,000
PostCards        505,000        525>000        520,000
Registered Letters        142,000        165,000        210,000
Free Letters        148,500        156,000        170,000
Number of transient Newspapers arid Periodicals, Packets, Circulars, Samples, Patterns,
etc        400,000        625,000        835,000
Number of packages of Printers' Copy, Photographs, Deeds, Insurance Policies, etc..       100,000        145,000        205,000
Number of packets of Fifth Class Matter,
Ordinary Merchandise, open to examination  46,500 48,000 85,000
Number of Closed Parcels for  the  United
Kingdom and other countries  1,850 2,900 2,200 66
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE. APPENDICES.
67
Climate.
No general description will serve the purpose in speaking of the climate of
British Columbia. On the coast it varies considerably, while in the interior the
variations are yet more plainly marked.
Dr. Bryce, in "The Climate and Health Resorts of Canada," says : "In
all this country," from the south of Vancouver Island to the Queen Charlotte
Islands, "the fruits of temperate climates grow well, and farm animals live out
doors the year round. The rich bottoms of the Fraser delta have long been
famous for their great hay crops and pasture lands; but here the extreme of rainfall is met, the mean for six years being 59.66 inches at New Westminster. The
climate of the great Island of Vancouver, running north-west across two degrees of
longitude and two degrees of latitude, presents every variety from that at the sea
coast, with as at Esquimalt, a very low daily range, and no annual extremes—the
lowest temperature in two years being 8 degrees F., the lowest monthly average
being 20 degs. F., and the highest in summer being 82 degs. F.—to that as above
Alberni on the west coast, where the Vancouver range rises first into a plateau to
4,000 feet, and even to 7,500 feet in Victoria Peak."
I Apart from the mineral wealth of Vancouver Island, its climate, with every
variation possible, becomes most attractive. Its seashore climate is milder than
many parts of England, with less rain and less seasonal variations."
Attention is directed to the following tables :
CITY HALL, VICTORIA, B. C.
.•■...-■ tiLi^iiJyJ*: 68 BRITISH  COLUMBIA  BOARD  OF TRADE.
AVERAGE MONTHLY AND ANNUAL RAINFALL AND SNOWFALL
In inches at ten principal stations in British Columbia, derived from a
group of years.
O  1
g
£)     1
O
|
rr.
■*-*!
<
<
■4
Upper Mainland — A
■d
1
o
o
o
o
Lower Mainland  . ■ • B
North-West Coast... O
+3
73
"co
tH
O
Pi
o
bo
G0.3
§73
CD
4>
_
Vancouver Island ... D
p
a
33
GO
8m
CD
CD
Gulf Islands B
c
<D
2
S
,0
CO
SB
o
u
4?
cS
H
1
gg
rH
<j
i
m
1896
r^i
pq
T                 / Rainfall
4.21
8.55
4.50
8.11
5.13
5.22
0.72
0.38
0.66
0.34
January    jSnowfan
12.9
31.4
16.0
15 3
7.8
20.7
4.8
9.2
9.7
26.2
2.87
4.50
219
7.27
3.76
5.42
0.20
0.00
0.05
0.17
February  \ §£,--£,u
10.7
2.0
9.6
18.5
9.4
12.6
6.5
13 0
5.4
24.3
in-      _         (Rainfall
2.72
2.28
3.24
5.86
5.22
5.16
0.89
0.01
0.63
0.08
March        {snowfall
1.1
6.0
0.7
6.3
2.1
31
0.6
1.0
3.0
18.1
.     .,           1 Rainfall
298
1.68
1.15
8.5
5.31
5.45
0.50
0.50
0.94
0.51
APrU (Snowfall
0.1
0.2
5.8
0.1
0.4
2.1
16.3
M„_            / Rainfall
May \ Snowfall
Lc4
1.64
2.60
4.57
4.38
4.85
lib
1.52
1.64
222
0.1
2.3
t,^_           i Rainfall
June t Snowfall
1.19
0.88
1.37
4.56
3.96
3.97
6.74
0.93
1.32
3.13
0.3
Tniv           JHainfall
Julv    1 Snowfall
0.35
0.27
0.80
5.20
1.29
1.35
0.36
0.22
1.02
2.76
.         j.      / Rainfall
0.52
0.17
0.44
7.79
1.33
1.62
0.40
0.51
1.05
3.02
August....-}gnowfall
a    j.     v „  / Rainfall
2.50
1.23
2.76
10.02
5.12
5 25
0.88
0.15
1.92
3.18
September { SnowtM
1.3
October... {»£■*&
3.03
0.6
2.56
2.46
12.71
5.50
6.56
0.68
6.65
0.62
0.4
1.45
9.7
November.^^
6 95
6.06
4.62
13.61
7.81
8.24
0.51
6.37
0.96
1.01
32
9.7
6.6
1.7
2.8
4.5
83
11.5
12.2
25.9
December. {J™**
8.20
8.41
5.20
10.90
7.51
8.67
0.44
0.28
0.59
0 07
2.4
1   3.0
3.8
15.4
6.4
7.6
8.60
25.0
7.2
36.8
Ypar          /Raiufall
37.47
38.23
31.46
96.28
56.32
61.96
6.87
5.52
11.30
17.94
31.0
52.1
36 9
60.00
1 28.6
48.9
! 28.8
59.7
40.00
161.2
COMPARATIVE TABLE OF THE AVERAGE RAINFALL
In inches at ten principal stations in British Columbia in the months April to
September, derived from a group of years.
Upper Mainland A
Lower Mainland ... B
North-West Coast...C
"Vancouver Island... D
Gulf Islands E
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
2.98
1.94
1.19
0.36
0.52
2.50
1.68
1.64
0.88
0.27
0.17
1.23
O
1.15
2.60
1.37
0.80
0.44
2.76
Q
D.G8
4.57
4.56
5.20
7.79
10.03
PQ
rO
i
5.31
4.38
3.96
1.29
1.33
5.12
_
tit
i
5.45
4.85
3.97
1.55
1.62
5.25
bt,
—
cn
0.50
1.10
0.74
0.36
0.40
0.88
<
i
|
s
a"
CB
o
T-
*-' ed
r*
2>
H3
CD
tH
O
cc
M
k
o
e3
ffl
0.48
0.94
0.51
1.57
1.64
2.12
0.89
1.32
3.13
0.38
1.02
2.76
0.48
1.05
3.02
1.51
1.95
3.18 APPENDICES.
69
-***,
KH
PQ
r<
0
t-i
O
O
hH
t-H
cn
>
Z
cd
O
«-H
3
H
V)
<!
d
H
T3
Ol
cj
n
Iz*
W
4-
O
O
H
H-(
>-.
ci
I
§
-t"J
I
3
pi
wT
i
^,
W
j^
!>
_
!—<
Ix}
33
J_;
cd
O
'0
Pi
O
O
P-H
s
f—1
c*
W
T3
I
_
c/>
""a
t-H
g
w
O
1
___(
i
1
0
t-H
O
O
1
•O
QS
O
W
|
■*
»C3
-^
^
•r*<
_^
Ca
CO
a
*pn_tsi jradna;
°oo
0
00
tr*^
CO   ~ *rf
Oi -cr_
p-
1
>*,
•r
00
^
i-H       -cfi
1—1     -t-
0
>c*>
c3
i
00
0
OS
-ft
Ha
CO
ca
1
•O
c5
C3
ca
0
•-jaiui sj-aATU
>o    •*■*
oq   00
_*-
ca
»o
cq _. *o
CO " irf
CO       i-H
s
t^
©
>o
OS
rH
*****H
1-1    Oi
l-H        O
0
«
0
'ft
_r-
1
■""■
O
g
t5
<!
CO
CD
"TH
00
CM
_s>
ca
<N
V
•uwy uouqisg
*CS      CO
IO
O
eo
10 _oq
CO "" t—
i-H   - ^
•4-^
CD
tj
©
*«
TH      OS
CM
I
■^H
•?5
CO
©
0
c8
P
,
1
CQ
i-s
!_;
^
>-j
-*
T-H
t_
OS
CO
CO
CM
CO
rH
rH
CM
CO       .-I
W5
CO    ^ T-i
V
•9I981S ?-i°_;
***.   °c*
ca    O
CD
1
S'S
ca =;   .
CO
©
CQ
CO
a
CO
0
i
t-H
B
H
CO
O
ca
rH
rH
O
_°
CO
V
'-ten's A norsstpi
C*-l           •
r4   °_S
I*---
CO
-**H
g =5
-(J
ft
©
CQ
P
1-5
(M
0
JZi.
rH
ft
<
1—,
t-
CO
£2
ca
T-i
Cl
oq
a
•8JaTJll8Z_IJ
cs
CO
06
T«    _0
ca =°5
CO      Oi
•*-3
r**
fH
<0
00
°oo
1
CM      tH
i-H      rH
©
O
1-0
O
i
1
h^
co
■O
»o
O
00
IM
CO
tH
ca
CO
(M
oq
JO-
0
•uosdtntg ^jo<j
<M    0Oa
CO
°_
»Cl   _ rH
lO   "i-H
S   "O
p.
06
|
>
_,-
>,
1-*
°oo
t-H       t-
iH      l>-
©
CQ
O
Pi
hi
Jt>>
00
-cn
w
r_|
O
—H
i-H
CM
^>
V
■anps.J85lJ'Ba
;     0
°-***ri
0
oi ~ od
•^ ~o
+2
0
0
»
•8
a
0
00
CO
CO
i-H
ca
©
rH.
s
pj
CO
1
rH
CQ
Hj
CQ
!§
ca
00
OS
_>-
ws
ca
r-l
V
aSpt ja s.oouadg
O       ^
0
CO
ca ^th
CO *~c^
c3
CO z0-
CO      0
CO
0
"ft
0
c3
CO
>=
ca
1—1
7
O
i
z
_>
00
T-H
ca
c^
ca
^N
^
0
0
CO
CO   _. 1—<
>=H   -°J
S>
W5
a
•pjo-fscioqqv
'.   0S»
CO
CO
CO   *" ^
iH       >0
S "c>
i-h    ca
c
"p,
0
eg
s
lo
0
i
z
i-S
Jt-
CO
00
i-H
<3
T—l
tH
ca
cq
O
a
•zxss'bSy
<M           .
oi
oq
1—1   - £—
ca    S
CO  r^
ca    »o
rH       CO
©
CQ
"Pi
0
z
c.
0
CO
t*-
00
^
ca
«5
<r
00
C-1
rH
0
0
0
rH
i-" _ t—
co ■" ^*
b,
1/
f»
S5
a
•3(aaa:o rjoaajj
■   °5Q
00
06
J**-^
rH      CO
CO   " CO
rH       ***
O
c3
O
p
61
0
CO
CO
t—
iO
rH
•**
t—
t-H
0
a
•jl'ouimbsiH;
OO           •
(M    "CO
CO
r—
co "cd
i-H       CO
O- =°5
>0      rH
rH      *nH
C
'ft
O
£
P
1
0
O
^
r5
1-5
© :
1      .
O     •
s   *
u   ;       ;
*> ti .
K   *     co
CO
<H 0)    .
0 .
-+J   .     0
0/
<;
BOQH
_-JJ   .
l^'Si :
CD 0    .
EL :
0 •
©  *.
H   '
P
+3
8 :   2
& :   .5
<*-
0
r*   "H      !
h •
cd .
H   !       rt
fl      ti
CD   .    .
g
©   •     •"
i       rH  O
© t
© .
+*      ■           * .
cS
•c
c
c
Mainland	
-West Coast...
iuver Island ...
tion above sea
ist temperatur
iring the year.
||
Hid
.8 M
CQ *-
S :
© ^
Is ^
daily range of
iring the year.
!all during yeai
ber of days of r
ant of snowfall
0
c
i
•4-
'M
0
a
i
cc
fe
c
CD
w
*        (H
0
s
©
+3
c
f
Lower
North
Vance
Gulf I
F
■£    *—'    'r-
ibs
O
-9
Mean
di
Raini
1
0
i  ■<
4k
5
r*
i   1
CO
c.
4      H?
ot
i
|
1
i     H
i
a
» 1
I 7°
BRITISH  COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
Education.
The Province of British Columbia possesses a free, non-sectarian system of
public schools, which is admirably suited to meet the needs of a sparsely settled
country. Any settlement containing not less than twenty children of school age
(between 6 and 16 years of age) may be created a school district by the Council of
Public Instruction. A commodious building for school purposes, together with
the salary of a teacher, is provided from the Provincial treasury. In smaller
settlements, where an enrollment of ten pupils of school age is assured, a teacher
is supplied by the Government on condition that the parents of the locality provide a suitable school-room.
The total number of pupils under instruction in British Columbia during 1899
was 19,185, and the number of schools in operation, 280. The total expenditure
for education was $268,653, distributed as follows :
Amount paid for teachers' salaries $184,337 57
" "       incidental expenses :      14,126 35
"       per capita grants to cities     56,692 12
Education office      13,497 42
There was, moreover, expended by the Lands and Works Department for the
construction of school houses, furniture and repairs, $67,362.84, making the total
cost to the Provincial Government during the fiscal year 1898-99, for all purposes
of education, $336,06.30.
The amount expended from the Provincial treasury for education in British
Columbia is larger in proportion to population than that expended in any other
Province of the Dominion. The average cost per pupil enrolled for 1899 was
$14.00, or $21.83 if based on the actual daily attendance.
BOABD OF TEADE BUILDING, VICTORIA, B. C. APPENDICES.
71
SCALE OF COMMERCIAL CHARGES.
Whenever no special agreement exists, the following shall be collectible :
On the purchase of stoqks, bonds, and all kinds of securities,
including the drawing of bills for the payment of the same..2^ per cent.
On sale of stocks, bonds,  and all kinds of securities, including
remittances in bills and guarantee 2%     ''
On purchase and sale of specie, gold dust and bullion 1 "
On sale of bills of exchange with endorsement 2)4     "
On sale of bills of exchange without endorsement 1 "
For endorsing bills of exchange when desired 2%     "
On sale of produce, etc., from foreign ports, with guarantee... .7^     I
On goods received on consignment and afterwards withdrawn.. 2 *4     "   '
On goods received on consignment and afterwards returned by
the consignee No charge.
On purchase and shipment of merchandise, with funds on hand,
on cost and charges 5    per cent.
On purchase and shipment of merchandise,  without funds, on
cost and charges jsl, 7)4
For collecting and remitting delayed or litigated accounts 10
For collecting freight by vessels from foreign Ports, on amount
collected 5
For collecting general claims 5
For collecting general average on the first $20,000.00, or any
smaller amount 5
For collecting general average, on any excess over $20,000.00..2^
On purchase and sale of vessplp 5
For " Port Agency" to vessels with cargo or passengers trom
foreign Ports, as under :
On vessels under 200 tons register $ 50 00
" of 200 to 300 tons register    IOO 00
I        of 300 to 500       I     15000
I over 500 tons        "    200 00
For disbursements of vessels by consignees with funds on hand.2>_
For disbursements of vessels by consignees without funds on
hand • • • 5
For procuring freight or passengers    5
For chartering vessels on amount of freight, actual or estimated,
to be  considered. as  due when  the " charter parlies,"  or
memorandum of their conditions, etc., are signed 5
On giving bonds for vessels under attachment iMitigated cases,
on amount of the liability 2/£
For landing and re-shipping goods from vessels in distress on
invoice value, or in its absence, on market value  5
25.    For receiving and forwarding goods on invoice amount 2>_
11
12
14
IS
16
17
19.
20.
21.
22.
24. 72
BRITISH  COLUMBIA  BOARD  OF  TRADE.
26. For advancing on freight to be earned 5    Per cent-
27. For effecting marine insurance, on the amount insured  J5_
28. The foregoing commissions to be exclusive of brokerage, and
every charge actually incurred.
29. Vessels to pay clerk hire and the labour on wharf, sorting and
delivering cargo.
30. The receipt of bills of lading to be considered  equivalent to
receipt of goods.
31. Guarantee or security for contracts or liabilities 5
32. Acting as Trustee on assignments 5
33. On investments made on mortgage or otherwise 1
N. B.—Auctioneer's commission and brokerage to be charged
when incurred.
34. Land  agents for commission  on sale and purchase   of real
estate   5 "
35. Interest on advances for duty, freight and lighterage, and on
accounts current, per annum, 1 per cent, over current bank
overdraft rates.
RATES ON STORAGE OF MERCHANDISE.
STORAGE  PER   MONTH.
On measurement goods, 50 cents per ton of forty cubic feet (40 c. ft.) On
heavy goods, 50 cents per ton of 2,240 pounds. Or iii either case, the amount
actually paid, if more. The consignee to have the option of charging by measurement or weight.    Any fraction of a month to be charged as a month.
REGULATIONS.
(a.) Concerning the delivery of merchandise, payment of freight, etc.: When
no express stipulation exists per bill of lading, goods are to be considered as
deliverable on shore.
(..) Freight on all goods to be paid, or secured to the satisfaction of the
captain or consignee of the vessel, prior to the delivery of the goods.
(c.) After delivery to the purchaser of the goods sold, no claims for damage,
deficiency or other cause shall be admissable after goods sold and delivered have
once left the city.
(d.) When foreign bills of lading expressly stipulate that the freights shall be
paid in a specific coin, then the same must be procured if required, or its equivalent given, the rate to be determined by the current value at the time at the
banks.
The foregoing scale of Commercial Charges and Rules and Regulations were
approved at the Quarterly General Meeting of the British Columbia Board of
Trade, held October 21st, 1898. APPENDICES.
73
Mining   Regulations.
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The mining laws of British Columbia provide, with respect to coal mining,
that a prospector for coal or petroleum on leased Crown lands in which the minerals are reserved, before obtaining a license, shall place a post at one angle of
the land with his name and the initials of the angle, and pall post a notice of his
application on the land and on the government office of the district for thirty
days, and shall advertise it in the British Columbia Gazette and some local newspaper for thirty days.
Security for damages must be given if the Crown lands in question have been
leased or are covered by a timber license.
After the expiration of thirty days, and within two months from the application in the Gazette, an application in duplicate (with a plan and a fee of $50 for
• each and every license) must be sent to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands and
, Works for a prospecting license for not more than one year, when the Chief Com-
* missioner may grant the license. Such lands must be in one rectangular block
with the sides running north, south, east and west, and of era not exceeding 640
acres.
The license shall cease at its expiration, and a new license may be granted to
a new applicant.
On proving that he has bona fide explored for coal during the year he shall be
entitled to an extension for a second year on payment of $50, and a further extension for a third year may be granted. License holders of adjoining lands, not
exceeding ten, may work in partnership, when they need not prospect separately,
provided the Chief Commissioner is satisfied with the prospecting done on the land
of one of them.
The licensee may use the .timber and stone on the land for the purpose of
buildings on the land. Dispute as to the right of title shall be decided in the
county court. No transfer for a prospecting license may be made without written
notice to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works.
The Lieutenant-Governor in Council may grant to a prospecting licensee a
lease for five years at a rent of ten cents on proof that he has discovered coa on
the land ; and if during this term, or three months hereafter he can show that he
has continuously and vigorously carried on coal-mining he shall be entitled to purchase the land at $5 an acre, in one payment at time of sale.
Before the lease is issued, a survey must have been made by the applicant
Besides the ten cents rent a royalty of five cents a ton on coal and one cent abarrel
L pet oleum must be paid.    The lessee must carry on coal mining continuously
Anytumber of persons, not exceeding ten, may work in partnership on adjoining 74
BRITISH  COLUMBIA   BOARD  OF  TRADE.
lands when it shall not be necessary to work each leasehold separately, provided
work on one is done to the satisfaction of the Chief Commissioner.
(Cons. Act, 1888, chap. 83, and amending acts; 1890, chap. 32; 1892, chap.
31 j 1895, chap. 37, and acts of 1897, 1898 and 1899.
Proprietors of coal mines may acquire such portion of any Crown lands, or
lands held under pre-emption or Crown grants, or lease or license, as may be
necessary for a right of way to the sea shore, a river or public highway, together
with a block not exceeding five acres on the shore, river or highway. Minerals
are not to be conferred by the conveyance without the consent of the grantor.
Compensation shall be paid by agreement or arbitration. (Cons. Acts, 1888, chap.
8^, amendment Act, 1890, chap. 32, and chap. 137, Acts of 1897.)
Regulations of coal mines.—No boy under twelve, no woman or girl of any
age, and no Chinaman or Japanese shall be employed underground in coal mines.
Boys from thirteen to fourteen shall only be employed under ground in exceptional circumstances to be allowed by the Minister of Mines.
There are various other regulations as to the employment of young persons.
No wages shall be paid to employees of a coal mine in a public house or contiguous office or place.
Coal getters must be paid by weight, unless exception is allowed by the
Minister of Mines * and a check weigher may be appointed by them.
There are a number of regulations to secure safety. (Cons. Acts, 1888, chap.
84; amending acts, 1890, chap. 33; 1894, chap. 5; 1895, chap. 38; and in
1897, chap. 138.)
Mining, other than coal.—Persons over 18 years of age and joint stock companies may become "Free Miners" on taking out certificates (which are not
transferable) for one year in case of joint stock companies, and for one or more
years in case of individual miners.
Every person or joint stock company mining (except for coal) must take out
a free miner's ceiwScate under a penalty of $25. Owners and contractors shall
pay the free miner's fees of their employees, deducting amount from them and
giving a list to the Mining Recorder, under a penalty of $100.
No person, unless he has an unexpired free miner's certificate, can hold any
mineral claim, minerals or mining property.
Free miners may prospect and mine (except for coal) upon any Crown lands
or lands where minerals are reserved to the Crown, provided they may not locate
or mine on land uncovered by hydraulic mining works for six months, and provided they must give security for damages to any occupier. APPENDICES.
75
FEES.
For every free miner's certificate issued to an individual... .$   5 oo
For every free miner's certificate issued to a joint stock
company-—
(a.) Having a nominal capital of $100,000 or less      50 00
(b.) Having a nominal capital exceeding $100,000    100 00
Free miners may cut timber necessary for their mining upon Crown lands,
even if covered by timber lease or reserved, and they may kill game for their own
use at any time.
A free miner may locate a mineral claim measuring 1,50c feet square as nearly
rectangular as possible, marking it by two posts, 1 and 2, on the line of the vein
not more than 1,500 feet apart, or a fractional mineral claim can also be marked
out. On No. 1 post of a mineral claim shall be written the names of the locator
and the claim, the date, the compass bearing of No. 2 post and the number of
feet (of the 1,500) lying to the right and left respectively of this line; these particulars are to be furnished also to the Mining Recorder. He must mark the line
by blazing trees or post planting, and place a post where he found rock "in place,"
and as near as possible to four corners of the claim. He is entitled to all the minerals within the claim. The claim is not to be recorded without an affidavit that
mineral has been found "in place" on the claim, that the legal notes and posts
have been put up, that ground is unoccupied, etc. A location made on Sunday or
a holiday is not invalid. Where, from the nature of the ground the location cannot be thus mariied, posts may be set as near as possible, and the direction and
distance recorded. The free miner shall record his claim with the Mining Recorder within 15 days, if his office is within 10 miles, with an additional day for
every additional 10 miles. A claim recorded by error in the wrong district may
be recorded anew in the right district with the original date. If left in the Recorder's absence, the applicant is entitled to a record of that date. The claim may
be held from year to year on a certificate by the Gold Commissioner, or Mining
Recorder that work has been done on it to the value of $100. Assessment work
to be counted in certificate. A free miner or partners having adjoining claims
may work them together, and may obtain certificates for all the claims for sufficient
work done on one. A free miner may, in lieu of work, pay $100 to the Mining
Recorder.    Disputes as to titles are determined by priority.
No free miner can hold (except by purchase) more than one claim on the
same vein or lode, but he may hold by location a claim on any separate vein or
lode. He may aDandon his claim by notice in writing to the Recorder and may
remove his machinery and extracted ore ; he cannot re-locate the same claim (or
one which he has not recorded in time) without written permission from the Gold
Commissioner.
Lodes discovered in a tunnel to develop a lode may be marked out as a mineral claim and recorded by the owner. The interest of a free miner in his claim
is deemed a chattel interest. 76
BRITISH  COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
The lawful owner of a mineral claim is entitled to a Crown grant on payment
of $500 to the Government in lieu of expenditure (assessment work to be considered a part of $500) and after having obtained a certificate of improvements from
the Gold Commissioner. With a certificate of improvement the owner need not
take out a free miner's certificate, or work on the claim to hold it.
With a certificate of improvement the owner of a claim .outside the railway
belt is entitled to a Crown grant, and inside the railway belt on payment of $5 an
acre to the Mining Recorder.
The claim for the grant must be made within three months. The issue of the
grant does not invalidate any previous lien. The grant covers all minerals except
coal.
Conveyances, mortgages, etc., of mineral claims shall be recorded or shall
not be good against third parties, and transfers must be in writing. A free miner's
claim shall not be open for location during his last illness, nor for twelve months
after his death. The Gold Commissioner and official administrator administer
miners' estates.
A mill site may be located by a free miner, not over five acres in extent, on
unoccupied and unreserved Crown lands not known to contain minerals. He may
obtain a lease for one year, during its continuance, on proof of having expended
$500 on machinery, and shall be entitled to a Crown grant for $5 an acre. This
applies to former leases also.    Minerals are not included in the grant.
Tunnels or drains may be run for a free miner to work his claim by license
from the Gold Commissioner. Water rights may be granted to him by the Gold
Commissioner, and must be recorded, rights of miners working on the streams
being safe. He may not sell the water, and the grant shall cease when the mine
is no longer worked. Work must be begun within 60 days; and there must be no
waste of water, and an outlet must be provided for superfluous water.
Mining partnerships and limited liability companies are regulated by a number of clauses.
The duties of Mining Recorders and Gold Commissioners are fully laid down.
Free miners may elect by a two-thirds vote a Recorder, where there is none.
County Courts have mining jurisdiction which is fully provided for.
Any person contravening the Act or refusing to obey the lawful order of a
Gold Commissioner or Judge is liable to a fine of $250 or three months'
imprisonment.
.An annual tax of 25 cents an acre is payable on every claim held under Crown
grant. The tax shall be remitted on proof that the sum of $200 has been
expended on the claim within the year.
Mines and moneys invested in them are not exempt from provincial taxation.
The Lieutenant-Governor in Council may make orders to carry out the Act. APPENDICES.
77
(Cons. Act, 1888, ohap. 82, and amending Acts, 1889, chap. 16 (repealed) ;
1890, chap. 31 (repealed); 1891, chap. 25; 1892, chap. 32; 1893, chap. 29;
1894, chap. 32, and 1895, chap. 39 ; 1896, chap. 34; 1897, chap. 45 ; and Acts
of 1898.)
Placer Mining Act.—Every free miner holding a certificate may mine for
gold or other precious metals on any land, except Government reserves for town-
sites, lands occupied by buildings, curtilages and orchards, or for placer mining
on Indian reserves.    He must give security for damages.
He may locate a placer claim on each separate creek, ravine or hill, but not
more than two in the same locality, and only one a creek claim, but he may hold
any number for purchase. A creek claim shall be 100 feet long, and in width from
base to base of the hills; a bar diggings claim shall be a strip 100 feet long, and
in width, from high water mark to the lowest water level; a dry diggings claim
shall be 100 feet square, and the same for bench diggings and hill diggings. Discoverers of new mines shall be allowed : If one, a claim 300 feet long; if a party
of two, 600 feet; if three, 800 feet; if four, 1000 feet; if more than four, ordinary
claims.
Placer claims shall be as nearly rectangular as possible. Posts shall be placed
at the corners, and the initial post shall bear names and description. Locations
on Sundays and holidays shall not be invalid. Placer claims must be recorded
with the Mining Recorder. The removal of posts entails forfeiture. Records
of placer claims may be renewed on payment of the fees, $2.50 a year.
A placer claim gives no right to a vein or lode unless the ground is located
and recorded as a mineral claim.
A placer claim must be worked continuously by the holder or his employee,
and shall be held abandoned and forfeited if unworked for 72 hours, except for
reasonable cause, satisfying the Gold Commissioner. A years' leave of absence
may be given if the sum of $1000 has been expended without reasonable return, or
if all holders of the set of claims sign the application.
Provisions as to the tunnels and drains, water rights (see 1879, cap. 45)
partnerships, mining recorders, gold commissioners, county courts, penalties, paying free miner's fees for employees, are much the same as those regarding mineral
claims.
Provisions are made for " bed rock flumes."
Free miners may obtain a lease of placer mining ground for 20 years, as follows -—Before application for lease, legal posts to be placed, with names and descriptions, and plans, etc., to be deposited with Mining Recorder; creek diggings,
or abandoned or unworked creeks, half a mile in length; any other placer mining
grounds, 80 acres; precious stone diggings, 10 acres. The lease may be renewed.
The ground must be already occupied (without consent of occupiers) nor immediately available for agricultural purposes ; and only placer-mining must be carried /<
BRITISH  COLUMBIA  BOARD  OF TRADE.
on.    Consolidation of holdings into one not to exceed 640 acres is provided for by
Act of 1898, amending the Placer-mining Act, 1891.
Water may be granted by the Gold Commissioner for hydraulic workings on
bench lands.
Leases may be granted for twenty years of the bed of the river for dredging
for a distance not over five miles.
(Act, 1891, Chap. 26, and amending Acts, 1894, chap. 33, and 1895, chap.
40; 1896, chap. 35; 1897, chap. 29; 1897, chap. 45.)
A Bill intituled "An Act to repeal an Act to aid the Development of Quart-
Mines," and amending Act has been passed (1896, chap. 36.) An Act to amend
the Placer-Mines Act (1891) was passed in the session of 1898.
Counting the consolidated Acts of 1888 and subsequent amending Acts to
1898, there have been twenty-four British Columbia Acts relating to mining, without reckoning several special Acts concerning hydraulic mining companies.
The Mineral Act, 1896, chap. 34, as amended by 1897, chap. 29, has been
consolidated for convenience only.
The Placer-mining Acts have been also consolidated.
A Bureau of Mines was established in 1895, under the Minister of Mines,
with a Provincial Mineralogist, whose duty it is to collect information relating to
the mining industry and publish it. Besides a museum, there are to be lecture
rooms, an assay office and laboratory, where assets and tests may be made according to a schedule of fees. Arrangements may be made for giving instructions to
prospectors and others, and societies of arts and other societies may affiliate with
the Mining Bureau for the instruction and examination of students.
An Act intituled the "Inspection of Metaliferous Mines Act, 1897," amended
in 1899, provides for the appointment of an Inspector, and contains rules and
regulations for the safe working of mines other than coal.
DOMINION.
COAL.
The Dominion Government have provided regulations for the disposal of coal
lands the property of the Dominion in Manitoba and the North-west Territories.
These regulations provide that locations of an area not exceeding 320 acres, may
be reserved for an applicant for a period of sixty days to prospect for coal, on payment of a fee of $10 and an expenditure in prospecting of $2 a day. A location
may be sold at the rate of $10 per acre (cash) unless the coal is anthracite, in
which case the price is $20 per acre. H-_-___i_1_____^_^|
__j_8_^ii^_-^_^jii
APPENDICES.
79
Settlers at a distance from coal mines worked by purchasers may secure permits authorizing them to mine for domestic purposes, on payment of a royalty ot
20 cents for anthracite, and 15 cents for bituminous, and 10 cents for lignite coal.
The regulations provide that the location shall be marked on the ground, that the
frontage shall not exceed three chains, and the length ten chains ; that the appli- •
cant shall within thirty days after marking his location, file application with the
agent, who is to issue a permit at the rate of $5 an acre or fraction of an acre per
annum.
In the Yukon Territory all applications for coal lands are to be made to the
Crown Timber and Land Agent, who is empowered to sell such lands at $40 an
acre (cash) if the coal is anthracite, and $20 for any other coal.
GOLD  QUARTZ  CLAIMS.
Persons of 18 years and over, and joint stock companies holding a free
miner's certificate may obtain entry for a mining location.
A free miner's certificate (non-transferable) is granted for one year. The fee
for an individual is $10, and to a joint stock company $50 to $100, according to
capital.
The holder of a free miner's certificate who has discovered mineral in place,
may locate a claim 1,500 feet by 1,500 feet, by marking it with two legal posts,
one at each end, on the line of the lode or vein, and marking out the line between.
Upon each post shall be marked the name of the claim, the person locating and
date, and the number of feet lying to the right and left of line.
The claim shall be recorded with the Mining Recorder of the district within
15 days, if located within 10 miles of the office; one additional day allowed for
every additional 10 miles or fraction. If a claim is more than 100 miles from a
recorder's office, and situated where other claims are being located, five free
miner's may appoint a Free Miner's Recorder ; but if the latter fails within three
months to notify the nearest Government Mining Recorder of his appointment, the
claims will not hold good.    Fee for recording a claim is $5.
At least $100 per year must be expended on the claim, or paid to the Mining
Recorder in lieu. When $500 has been expended or paid, the locator may upon
having a survey made and upon complying with certain other requirements, purchase the land at $5 per acre, cash, but if the surface rights have already been
disposed of, at $2 an acre.
A location for'mining iron and mica not exceeding 160 acres may be granted,
but if therein other valuable mineral is discovered the miner's right is limited to
the area prescribed for other minerals, the remainder reverting to the Crown.
The§linisterofthe Interior may also grant 160 acres for copper mining in he
Yukon Territory.
The patent for a mining location reserves forever whatever royalty may hereafter be imposed on the sales, such royalty to be collected on sales made prior to
issue of patent. BRITISH  COLUMBIA  BOARD  OF  TRADE.
PLACER MINING—YUKON TERRITORY.
Claims are creek, gulch, river and hill claims. Two hundred and fifty feet
in length in the general direction of the creek or river, and from ioo to 2,000 feet
wide, according to ground.
Claims are marked by two legal posts, one at each end. Entry must be
obtained within ten days if within ten miles of Mining Recorder's office. One
extra day allowed for every additional ten or fraction. If the claims exceeds
100 miles from a Recorder's office, the same rule applies as in the quartz mining.
The person or company must hold a Free Miner's certificate.
Every alternate ten claims is reserved to the Crown.
The discoverer of a claim is entitled to 500 feet in length. If the party
consists of two, 1,000 feet; the rest ordinary claims only.
Entry fee, $15. A royalty of 10 per cent, on the gross output of the gold
mined. The sum of $5,000 will be deducted from the gross annual output of the
claim. The holder of a creek, gulch or river claim may within 60 days after staking, obtain entry for a hill claim, adjoining it for the sum of $100. This permission is also given to the holder of a creek, gulch or river claim who prior to January, 1898, obtained an entry therefor, provided the hill claim is available when an
application is made. No miner shall receive a grant of more than one mining
claim in a mining district, the boundaries of which shall be defined by the Mining
Recorder; but the same miner may also hold a hill claim and any number of
claims by purchase, and miners may unite to work their claims in common.
A claim shall be deemed to be abandoned when the same shall have remained
unworked for three consecutive working days of 24 hours each, unless sickness or
other reasonable cause be shown to the satisfaction of the Mining Recorder.
It shall not only be necessary for a person or company working a quartz or
placer claim to hold a Free Miner's certificate, but every person in his or its
employment shall have a Free Miner's certificate unexpired.
The regulations in force for dredging in Manitoba and the North-west Territories provide that a free miner can obtain two leases of five miles each for a term
of 20 years, renewable. The lessees right is confined to the submerged beds or
bars of the river below water mark. The rental is $10 per annum for each mile
leased. The royalty to be paid is 2% per cent, on the output after it exceeds
$10,000.
In the Yukon Territory a free miner can obtain a lease of five miles of a river,
but not more than six such leases can be given to one person or company. The
rental is $100 per annum for each mile of river leased. The royalty to be paid*is
10 per cent, on the output in excess of $15,000 for each five miles of river leased.
Other regulations are similar to those of the other Territories and Manitoba. APPENDICES.
8l
Provincial Government Lands.
I
Crown lands in British Columbia are classified as either surveyed or unsurveyed lands, and may be acquired by entry at the Government Lands Office, preemption or purchase.
The following persons may pre-empt Crown lands : Any person being the
head of a family, a widow, or a single man over eighteen years of age, being a
British subject, may record surveyed or unsurveyed Crown lands, which are unoccupied, or unreserved, and unrecorded (that is unreserved for Indians or others,
or unrecorded in the name of any other applicant).
Aliens may also record such surveyed or unsurveyed land on making a
declaration of intention to become a British subject.
The quantity of land that may be recorded or pre-empted is not to exceed
320 acres northward and eastward of the Cascade or Coast Mountains, or 160
acres in the rest of the province.
No person can hold more than one pre-emption claim at a time. Prior record
or pre-emption of one claim, and all rights under it, are forfeited by subsequent
record or pre-emption of another claim.
Land recorded or pre-empted cannot be transferred or conveyed till after a
Crown grant has been issued.
Such land, until the Crown grant is issued, is held by occupation. Such
occupation must be a bona-fide personal residence of the settler or his family.
The settler must enter into occupation of the land within thirty days after recording, and must continue to occupy it.
Continuous absence for a longer period than two months consecutively of the
settler or family is deemed cessation of occupation; but leave of absence may be
granted not exceeding six months in any one year, inclusive of two months'
absence.
Land is considered abandoned if unoccupied for more than two nonths consecutively.
If so abandoned the land becomes waste lands of the Crown.
The fee on recording is two dollars (8s.)
The settler shall have the land surveyed at his own instance (subject to the
rectification of the boundaries) within five years from date of record.
After survey has been made, upon proof, in declaration in writing of himself
and two other persons, of occupation for two years from date of pre-emption, and 82
BRITISH  COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
of having made permanent improvement on the land to the value of two dollars
and fifty cents per acre, the settler on producing the pre-emption certificate,
obtains a certificate of improvement.
After obtaining the certificate of improvement and paying for the land the
settler is entitled to a Crown grant in fee simple.    He pays five dollars therefor.
The price of Crown lands, pre-empted is one dollar (four shillings) per acre,
which must be paid in four equal instalments, as follows:
First instalment two years from date of record or pre-emption, and yearly
thereafter, but the last instalment is not payable till after the survey, if the land is
unsurveyed.
Two, three or four settlers may enter into partnership with pre-emptions of
160 acres each, and reside on one homestead. Improvements amounting to $2.50
per acre made on some portion thereof will secure Crown grant for the whole.
The Crown grant reserves to the Crown a royalty of five cents per ton on
every ton of merchantable coal raised or gotten from the land, not including dross
or fine slack, and fifty cents per M. on timber. All coal and petroleum Crown
lands are now reserved under Land Act Amendment, 1899.
No Crown grant can be issued to an alien who may have recorded or preempted by virtue of his declaring his intention to become a British subject, unless
he has become naturalized.
The heirs of devisees of the settler are entitled to the Crown grant on his
decease.
Crown lands may be purchased to the extent of 640 acres. Minimum price
of first class land, $5 per acre; second class, $2.50 per acre ; third class, $1 per
acre. No settlement duties are required on such land unless a second purchase is
contemplated. In such a case the first purchase must be improved to the extent
of $5 per acre for first class ; $2.50, second class ; and $1.00, third class.
Leases of Crown lands in lots not exceeding 20 acres may be obtained ; and
if requisite improvements are made at the expiration of lease, Crown grants are
issued.
Leases are also granted for hay lands for terms not exceeding ten years, and
for any purpose whatsoever, except cutting hay, for a term not exceeding 21 years.
Twenty-one years' timber leases are now subject to public competition, and
the highest cash bonus is accepted, subject to the 50 cents per M. royalty above
mentioned and an annual rental, in advance, of 15 cents per acre. The holder
must put up a sawmill capable of cutting not less than 1,000 feet of lumber per
day of 12 hours for every 400 acres of land in such lease ; and such mill shall be
kept running for at least six months in every year. APPENDICES.
83
Pre-emptors of Crown lands who, at the time of the coming into force of this
Act, are in arrear in the payments of instalments of purchase money required to
be paid by section 24 of the " Land Act " shall, on conforming with the provisions of the " Land Act," except as hereby altered, be entitled to obtain Crown
grants of their pre-emptions upon payment of twenty-five per cent, of such instalments in arrear on or before the 31st day of Decerpber, 1900, twenty-five per cent,
on or before the 30th day of June, 1901, and twenty-five per cent, on or before
the 31st day of December, 1901, and without any further payment of interest or
arrears of interest, upon such instalments in arrear, and upon payment in full, according to the terms of the " Land Act," of the instalments not in arrear at the
coming into force of this Act; or on payment in full of all instalments of unpaid
purchase money, whether in arrear or not in arrear at the coming into force of this
Act, but without any further payment of interest, or arrears of interest, if such
payments be made after said 31st day of December, 1901, but on or before tha
30th day of June, 1902.
•m-  jt'.:: "
ITISH  COLUMBIA SALMON  TROUT.
J
_X±l_Ek<la«!_S  VICTORIA,
PAST
AND 
PRESENT.

Something about the advantages
which the City offers, viewed from
business, residential and tourist
standpoints. 

Published  at  the   Instance  of the  Corporation by the British.
Columbia Board of Trade, Victoria, B.  C HIS   WORSHIP  THE   MAYOR  AND   BOARD
OF ALDERMEN.
5
■^
VICTORIA,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA,
1900. An Old View of Victoria.
Victoria, Past and Present.
Pioneer SS. Beauer.
■■HE   foundations  of the
present  City   of   Victoria were laid in 1843.
It  was  June   of   that
year when the  " Beaver "   landed
Early       a small force
History.     and the Hudson's Bay Co.
fort   was   erected.     In
1846,   Colonel   Hollo-
way   reported,   " Fort
Victoria is situated at the southern  end of Vancouver
Island.    The fort is a square enclosure of one hundred
yards,   surrounded   by   cedar  pickets  twenty   feet  in
height,    having  two   octagonal   bastions,   each
Old Hudson's Bay     containing   six   six-pounder  iron   guns,   at  the
Co. Fort. north-east and south-west angles.    This is the
best built of the company's forts." From an-
other source it is learned : "The building is even now (1846)
though plain to a fault, imposing from its mass and extent, while
the bastions or towers   diminish   the  tameness which its regular
 (3)	 >«Ss_
Bastion,  Victoria Fort.
outline would otherwise produce. The interior is occupied by
the officers' houses,
or apartments they
should rather be called,
stores, and a trading
house in which smaller
bargains are concluded, tools and agricultural implements,
beads, shawls, blankets, and all the multifarious products of
Sheffield, Birmingham, Manchester and Leeds are offered for sale."
In 1852 Victoria was laid out in streets, then bounded on the
west  by'the harbour, on   the   east   by   the  present   Government
Street, on the south by the old   fort  and on the north by Johnson
Street.    Beyond   these   boundaries  were   fields,
As It Was in the    all under cultivation.   Outside the fort there were
Fifties. but twelve houses within the city limit.    In 1853
some two hundred additional colonists arrived
and at the close of that year it is estimated that there were in Victoria and the vicinity three hundred whites.
In 1861 the population   had  grown  to  3,500 whites, English
and Americans predominating.     During the next
Population Forty    two  following  years considerable progress was
Years Ago.        made, as early in 1863 the population is reported
at 6,000.    The buildings numbered 1,500, including substantial warehouses, stores, commodious hotels, a " theatre,
a hospital, five churches and five banking-houses."
James Bay, Victoria Harbour. SS. Islander—Victoria and Vancouver.
The sudden growth was the result of the discovery of gold on
the Fraser River in 1858.  Victoria was the first and last place of call
for the miners, who arrived from California and else-
Effect of Cold     where in thousands.    Of this   floating  population
Mining. no   notice   has   been   taken   in   the   figures   given,
but it may be stated in passing that 30,000 has
been estimated as the number camping at one time at Victoria
en route to the Fraser River.
From the foregoing it will
be seen that the importance of
Victoria as a commercial centre was recognized from the
first.
Incorporation   was  effected
in 1862, the city  being divided
into  three wards.    The population    was    then
A City of     about  5,000.    To-
Wealth.       day   the  residents
are more than five
times that number   and   it  is
safe to assert that considered
per    capita    Victoria    is   the
wealthiest city on the Pacific
Coast.
From mercantile and trade
reports  it  will   be  seen  that
nowhere   is   busi-
Business       ness conducted on
Conditions.      a more sound and
profitable basis.
The volume, too, ranks high.
For comparison it may be
stated that the shipping of
Victoria is the fourth largest
in the Dominion of Canada.
SS. Victorian—Victoria and Seattle.
tmxmi.
Mi
SS. Empress—Victoria and Orient.
The question will arise,   "What can 25,000 people do with so
much merchandise in addition to  what is produced on Vancouver
Island?"    The answer is   easy,  "They consume
No Fear of the      what they need and distribute the remainder."   As
Future. Victoria was the distributing centre par excellence
fifty years ago, so to-day she is the chief distributing
(5)
..' .!..'.t''tti- *-***--iiiMiyriir'rinii-i I .V: point for the whole of British Columbia. Victoria merchants
supply goods to every part of the Province, including the northern
2-old fields of Atlin and the Yukon beyond.
Although transcontinental  railway cars do not enter the city,
Victoria is under no disadvantage, for first class steamers meet the
trains at the mainland termini  every day and   bring
A Terminal     freight  and  passengers  from  eastern  Canada  and
Point. United States points, the rates being the same as if
destined for railway terminals on the mainland.*
At the   close of the   salmon   canning  season, fishermen and
others come to Victoria and spend their earnings.   It
A Spending     is  in  the  fall  of the  year  that  the  population  is
Point. increased   largely,  by   the   return   of wage   earners
who   have    been   out   in   all   directions   and   who
then come home to live in comfort during the winter months.
Local industries,  such as iron  works,  flour and feed mills,
chemical,   soap   and  paint factories,   lumber   mills
An Industrial     and  several others, furnish  employment for many
Centre. hands. The proportion of factory hands and artizans
is unusually large for a city of the size of Victoria.
It is impossible to state whether the fur traders of the early
forties selected Victoria's situation for other than geographical
reasons, but it is certain  that a more ideal site for a large city
could  hardly   be  found.    Its   natural  beauty  and
A Beautiffl|   adaptability to the purposes of commerce and resi-
Natural Site.     dence, are remarkable.   The land undulating slightly
gives easy grades to the streets and admits perfect
drainage and sewerage. Within certain limits only stone or brick
buildings can be erected, and the numerous recent additions of
such structures furnish indications of confidence which the owners
have in the future of the city.
In one respect Victoria differs very materially from most cities
inasmuch as the business blocks  and  dwelling houses are nearly
all owned by residents.    These are rented as freely
Owned by Its    as elsewhere, but the rents go into the pockets of
Citizens. the inhabitants, and it is certainly a great-advantage
to business men to pay to residents, instead of to
some outside capitalists, as such rents return  again either directly
or indirectly in trade.
•Arrangements are now completed whereby the cars of the Canadian  Pacific and Great
Northern Railways will come to Victoria.
(6) Jefrta
jiJiiir~*riiWii
0 CITY* HfJ*U>
r$\ doVeiRNMehti'
vS1 &UfSUDI/VG-
($) J)Uff$MDIR
®JSTCffOOU .
K3J    ^ omee-.
Public Buildings and a Residence, ViettMi, B. 0. Some Churches and Schools, Victoria, B. i The city corporation has
borrowed money for improvements,   such as   waterworks,
sewerage, electric
Public lighting, etc., but
Works.     here it will be found
that the assets of the
city are largely in excess of
the liabilities. Taxation is
very light compared with
other cities in Canada or the
United States.
Excellent  free and   non-
sectarian educational facilities
exist  for  children   six   years
and upwards, nor
Educational     is  there  any  charge   for advanced education in the
Facilities.       High School.    These schools are controlled by trustees, of both sexes, elected by the ratepayers.  Besides
the  public schools   there are   excellent  private   schools, day and
boarding, including kindergartens.
The liberality of the citizens, assisted   by the Provincial   Government and city corporation, has provided a hospital of fifty-six
beds known as the
Provincial Royal Jubilee Hospital. This
was erected in 1890
in commemoration of
Her Mai-
.Provincial Boyal Jubilee Hospital.
Hospital      esty's Ju-
Accommo-     bilee, and
dation.       it  ranks
high    in
every branch of medical   and   surgical
science.    The private
rooms, which are, of
course,  paid  for, are
frequently   occupied
by persons from all   parts of the   Province and neighboring State
of Washington, who come to Victoria for the greater skill than is
found nearer their homes.    The poor of the city are treated free.
(9)
The Gorge on Queen's Birthday.
,.l>A-ii_sjMaJs«^-g>Vy_V_ Climate is an important consideration when deciding upon a
place of residence or a pleasure trip. The rain fall at Victoria is
light   compared   with   other   parts   of   the    Province.     Snow   is
an infrequent visitor and  even then seldom lies on the
Perfect ground more than forty-eight hours.    So it is easy to
Climate. understand  why four dollars per hour is charged for
sleighing, which but at best is an apology for an
eastern sleigh ride. Skating can be rarely indulged in and when
possible is carried into the small hours of the morning, as those
who enjoy skating must make the best of their opportunities.
The prevailing winds in the summer are from the south-west,
and passing over the snow-capped Olympians and the Straits of
Fuca are comfortably tempered upon reaching the  south end of
Vancouver Island.     Dr. Bryce in "The Climate and
As a Health      Health Resorts of Canada " says of Victoria :   "The
Resort. fruits of temperate  climates   grow   well   and   farm
animals live outdoors the year round. The climate
is milder than in many parts of England, with less rain and less
seasonal variations." Instead of spending holidays far from home
in search of health many Victorians camp out on sea beaches near
the city for some months each year.
It is the common remark of visitors from  the United  States
that Victorians have mastered the art of combining business with
pleasure.     It would, indeed, be surprising if such  were  not the
case, for no  one acquainted with Victoria and
Paradise for surroundings would gainsay that there is not
Pleasure Seekers.     another spot on the  Pacific Coast where nature
has so   abundantly  provided   for  the   pleasure
seeker.   Victoria has unequalled natural advantages in picturesque
location and climate, and for commercial and  industrial purposes
is not less favorably situated.     It would   be   beyond   the scope of
this article to attempt to describe the beauties of Beacon Hill park
and the residential portion of Victoria.   A feature of the residences
is the spacious grounds in which they  are set.    The ordinary size
of the Victoria lot is 60 by 120 feet, but the better class
Beautiful      of suburban houses stand in  lovely grounds measured
Homes.       by acres.     In  many cases only  a peep here and there
can be obtained  from  the highways, trees and shrubs
affording the privacy which seems so much desired.     It is not difficult, however, to outline beautiful homes with tennis courts, well-
kept lawns, trained ornamental trees and cosy arbors of evergreens.
Many such residences command a view of the  Straits of Fuca,
(10)
I-  about seventeen miles wide, and the snow-capped Olympics beyond.    The entire  jhanges of scene,  for instance, on  Rockland
Avenue are very remarkable, a little turn in the
Panoramic and    road bringing to view numbers of islands instead
Picturesque.      of the unbroken expanse of water.    Ships being
towed to the lumber mills, steamers speeding to
all points of the coast and to the  Orient  and  to  Australia, and
pleasureyachts
flitting    hither
and thither, give
life and peculiar
interest   to the
scene.    The   brush
of no   artist   could
depict the beauties
of    such     scenery
under the ever changing lights.
Victoria is the seat of the Provincial Government and the
home of the Lieutenant-Governor, and in addition to the merchants
and business men of Victoria there are a number of wealthy residents whose business interests lie in other parts of the Province,
but who elect to live there in order to enjoy the social and  other
'TmB&ttM
Deadmans River. advantages   of  the  capital.     The
Social Garrison
Advantages. and Naval
forces add
a pleasant feature co
Victoria society not elsewhere possessed on this
In
Drydoch.
T
Esquimalt Harbour.
Victoria Harbour
side of the continent. There are
three social clubs
in flourishing
condition.
Among the amateur    organizations    for   purposes   of   entertainment it is dif-
ficult   to   say
which takes the
lead, but the  Arion Club,  a musical  society of some fifty male
voices, is perhaps the best known and longest established.    There
are    also   local   theatrical    and    orchestral   so-
A Music Loving      cieties,   and  amateur   theatricals   and concerts
People. 'n a'd of charities and other objects are numerous,
and their success is best judged by the invariably
large audiences which they attract. There is a first class cornet
band in connection with the local militia organization and during
the winter months there is a weekly promenade concert in the Drill
Hall and in the summer two or three open air concerts are given
every week in the park and adjacent resorts.
(13) There   are  excellent  golf  links.    Tennis,   cricket, yachting,
lacrosse,    football,     boating    and     canoeing     are
Athletics and   among    the   fa-
Sport,        vorite   summer
amusements. Bicyclists   and   amateur   photographers—
their name
is legion.
There are so many attractive spots in the neighborhood of
Victoria that it is really difficult to decide among them for superlative merit.    If boating be selected a trip up the Gorge will   probably be chosen.    This is a stretch of about four miles
Points of      °f tidal  water, varying in width from thirty  feet at
Attraction.    tiie Gorge bridge to   about a quarter of a mile.    On
either bank near the city are beautiful residences, with
ample grounds and picturesque boat houses.   Then come stretches
of fir trees and   rocks and  further  on   cultivated  fields.     Picnic
(1-)
_ In the Park.
il
parties revel in the shade of the firs and there are as well many
ideal open spaces for those who desire to use them.
If we take the electric car to Oak Bay, three miles from the
centre of the city—and by the way, to Victoria belongs the honour
of being among the first cities on the continent to adopt electric
cars—we shall find a well appointed summer hotel, and
Oak Bay      sheltered beaches where children  may find delight in
Resort.        sunning themselves after paddling in the sea.    Boats
for hire are available and the surroundings generally are
such as are sought by tourists.
There are many residences at
Oak Bay and along the route
of the car line, and in addition to the resident population
there is in the season a constant stream of visitors by car,
carriage and bicycle. Frequent
band concerts enliven the evenings there. One of the golf links
and an enclosed park for lacrosse matches and bicycle
races, for which a cinder path is
provided, are located at this
resort. Oak Bay is also
reached by the Dallas Road,
Near Macaulay Point. The
Gorge.
Oak
Bay.
a fine thoroughfare which skirts the sea all the way from the
Outer Wharf, passing through Beacon  Hill  park and along the
golf links.    There is probably not another road on the
Beautiful      Pacific   Coast  possessing   equal   charms   for  driving
Drives.       or    wheeling.    It   is   good   at   all    seasons   of   the
year and the rare scenic effects are ever present
and striking*.
It would require the pages of a pretentious book to do justice
to all the numerous drives within twenty miles of Victoria. These
are always well kept and afford equal facilities for all popular
modes of locomotion.
(16) H
Esquimalt, Her Majesty's naval station on the Pacific, is four
miles from the post office, and is connected by electric cars which
leave every fifteen minutes. The men-of-war, dry
Her Majesty's dock, naval yard and canteen grounds are the
Naval Station.      principal attractions, but the scenery all along the
car line and at the village of Esquimalt itself
possesses a singular charm which never fails to make a lasting
impression. Naptha launches and row boats can be hired and a
visit made to the naval hospital, passing the marine railway en
route.    The water in the harbor is never rough.
(17) Macaulay
Point
Barracks.
The barracks at Macaulay Point are situated
a   short    distance   from
the Esquimalt
road. Visitors
are    not   allowed inside the fort, but
the scenery from the vicinity, embracing the entrance to Esquimalt harbor, the straits and  the
Olympias, is very beautiful indeed.
Sealing Fleet.
Two railways terminate at Victoria. The Victoria and Sidney
runs to the end ofthe Saanich peninsula, distance seventeen miles,
and is of value to the farmers of that  district in  marketing their
products, and for tourist purposes.    Sidney
Railway and should be visited, as it is a very pretty spot
Steamboat Connection.     and some idea can be formed en route of
the agricultural possibilities of the island.
Hops, barley and fruit do remarkably well in this section. An
hotel is situated near the railway terminus.     Steamer connection
(18) On the Beach, Dallas Road.
is made between the railway and the gulf islands and points on
Vancouver Island as far north as Nanaimo. The sea is rarely
rough and the grand and everchanging panorama of view as the
steamer winds its way in and out among the numerous islands
must be witnessed to be fully appreciated.
Camp on Cowichan River. SiBaaHBKWiPSS^'
E. & N. Railway Views.
The Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway at present has its terminus at Wellington, though its extension to the north end of Vancouver Island is contemplated in the very near future. It serves the
finest collieries on the Pacific Coast. At
Along the E. & N.      Chemainus there is one of the largest and best
Railway. appointed saw  mills in British Columbia from
which is marketed  about  half of the lumber
exported   from  the entire   province.    Not far  from  Chemainus
copper mines on Mt. Sicker are being opened up from which ore
is being shipped.    Large iron deposits  are also being developed.
(20) Near Chemainus, too, is the new town of Ladysmith, at which
place are erected the coal bunkers for the output of the big extension coal mine at Alexandria, and where many of the miners
have their residence. A railway to haul .the logs to the Chemainus
mill has been built in this section and a tramway runs from the
Mt. Sicker mine to Osborne Bay.
Mineral deposits of copper and  gold  have   been   located at
other points on the southern end of the island and
Farming and      development work is  progressing with satisfactory
Mining.
results.
Large    stretches   of   farming   lands   are already under
c u 1 tivati'on
and much
more remain
to be opened
up. All these
important industries are
tributary to
Victoria, the
head office of
most of the
collieries and
railways and
mining and
lumber interests being
«J established
there*.     The
very beautiful
scenery along the  E. & N. Railway   attracts   many   excursionists
from Victoria.    Sportsmen in  quest of game and fish drop off at
different places all along the line for miles, and
The Sportsman,    this is   in   season   one  of the   favorite   Saturday
afternoon  recreations.    The steeplechase track at
Colwood is distant eight miles.
Hunting at
Shawnigan
Lake.
(22)  jgiif
A Corner of the Prouincial Museum.
Goldstream on the line is another favorite resort. There
occasional band concerts amuse those who do not care for sport,
and a well appointed hotel furnishes refreshments
Coldstream,     and   accommodation   for   visitors.    A   trip  to   the
waterpower works should be made while here.
This power generates the electricity for Victoria's car service,
private lighting and commercial purposes.
Shawnigan, farther on, is  a   popular  camping  place, and is
visited  by numerous   excursion   parties.    There are
Shawnigan     two good hotels, and small summer cottages can be
Lake. rented.    The   lake   furnishes   good   fishing  and   the
surroundings are an entire change from the coast.
It is a common practise to leave the train at Shawnigan and
wheel to Duncan, fourteen miles further on.    The road is shaded
and parklike in places, with easy grades all the way.
Duncan Numerous well kept farms adjoin on both sides, and
Station,     that portion which passes through the Indian reservation
has especial interest. There are two hotels at Duncan
close to the railway station, and it, too, is a very popular resort
and the headquarters for many sportsmen. The river affords
excellent fishing and of deer and birds there is an abundance.
(24) The trip to
Cowichan Lake
from here should
not be missed. The
distance
Cowichan     is about
Lake.        20 miles
and the
journey is made by
stage. The attractions are hunting,
fishing and scenery.
The west COaSt Cowichan Riuer Bridge.
of Vancouver Island
is reached by rail to Nanaimo and thence by stage across to !
Alberni, or by steamers which leave Victoria ,
regularly at frequent intervals. All the south j
and west coast of Vancouver Island is rich in i
minerals—gold, copper, silver and iron.
West Coast of the
Island.
One of the objects of great interest to all visitors to Victoria ;
are the beautiful   new   parliament  buildings, in which the people j
of British Columbia take a special pride, and conspic- *
Provincial uous among the attractions afforded by a visit to :
Museum.       these buildings is the   Provincial   Museum, which has j
the distinction of being the best exposition of local |
fauna and flora to be found anywhere on the continent.
Suburban Camping.
In the parliament
buildings there is a
Bureau of Provincial
Information, also a
complete collection of
specimens of British
Columbia minerals. *
With so many important tributary resources the future of ■
Victoria is assured.
Its present growth is
steady,   a  fact  which Prosperity.
affords  greater satisfaction than
if a  "boom"   was   experienced.
Besides   its   com-
The Basis of    mercial growth the
A
Day's
Catch.
number who come
here   to   reside   is
steadily   increasing,   and   it   will
undoubtedly    become    the   residential metropolis of the coast and
especially   of   British   Columbia.
The tourist travel   is  a very important  factor in the   prosperity
enjoyed   by Victorians,   and   deservedly so. This may be divided
into  two   classes,
namely,
The      those who
Tourist    visit   the
Travel,     city   regularly every
year, of whom there
is a large number,
and    those    whose
visits are irregular
and occasional!'   Of
the   latter,   passengers   on   the   Australasian   and   Oriental   steamers   inwards   and   outwards,   and   visitors   from   eastern   Canada   and
eastern parts  of the  United   States  swell   the  aggregate travel,
which is yearly growing larger in volume.
The object of this article is to interest the stranger in search
of a good business, a desirable place of residence or an attractive
tourist   resort,   and   incidentally   to   refresh   the
Why This Little    memory of persons acquainted with Victoria, but
Book ? who   are   now   living   elsewhere.     Victoria,   the
Capital   city   of  British   Columbia, can supply all
the requirements  of visitors,  and   any  information  of a specific
character will be cheerfully imparted by
F.  ELWORTHY, Secretary,
Board of Trade Building, British Columbia Board of Trade.
Victoria, B. C.
(26) Victoria Directory.
POINTS OF INTEREST.
Board of Trade, Bastion Square.
Bureau of Provincial Information*, in the Parliament Buildings.
City Hall, cor. Douglas Street and Pandora Avenue.
Customs House, cor. Government and Courtenay Streets.   '
Free Library, in City Hall.
General Post Office, cor. Government and Courtenay Streets.
Legislative Library, in the Parliament Buildings.
Museum, in the Parliament Buildings.
Parliament Buildings, Belleville Street, James Bay.
EXPRESS OFFICES.
Dominion Express Co., 26 Fort Street.
Great Northern Express Co., 75 Government Street.
Northern Pacific Express Co., 104^ Government Street.
NAVIGATION OFFICES.
Alaska Steamship Co., 100 Government Street.
Canadian Pacific Navigation Co., 64 Wharf Street.
Nippon Yusen Kaisha, 75 Government Street.
Northern Pacific Steamship Co., 64 Government Street.
Pacific Coast Steamship Co., 61 Wharf Street.
Puget Sound Steamship Co., 100 Government Street.
RAILWAY OFFICES.
Canadian Pacific Railway Co., cor. Government and Fort Streets.
Great Northern Railway Co., 75 Government Street.
Northern Pacific Railway Co., 104 >£ Government Street.
White Pass and Yukon Railway Co., 102 Government Street.
RAILWAY TERMINI.
Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway, Depot and Offices, Store Street.
Victoria and Sidney Railway, Depot and Offices, Hillside Avenue.
TELEGRAPH OFFICES.
Canadian Pacific Telegraph Office, 81 Government Street.
Western Union Telegraph Office, 74 Government Street. NEWSPAPER OFFICES.
Colonist Printing and Publishing Co , Broad Street, opp. Trounce.
Times Printing and Publishing Co., Broad Street, opp. View.
CHURCHES.
BAPTIST.
Baptist Church, Mary Street, Victoria West.
Calvary Church, Herald Street.
Emanuel Church, cor. North Chatham and Fern wood Road.
CHURCH OF ENGLAND.
Christ Church Cathedral, cor. Blanchard and Burdette Avenue.
St. Barnabas' Church, cor. Caledonia Avenue and Cook Street.
St. James' Church, cor. Quebec and St. John's Streets.
St. John's Church, cor. Douglas and Fisguard Streets.
1
St. Mark's Church, Boleskin Road.
St. Paul's Church, Esquimalt.
St. Saviour's Church, Henry Street, Victoria West.
CONGREGATIONAL.
First Congregational Church, 47 Pandora Avenue.
EPISCOPAL.
>
Reformed, cor. Maclure and Humboldt Streets.
METHODIST.
Centennial, Gorge Road.
James Bay, cor. Menzies and Michigan.
Metropolitan, cor. Pandora Avenue and Quadra Street.
Methodist Church, Esquimalt Street, Victoria West.
PRESBYTERIAN.
First, cor. Pandora Avenue and Blanchard Street.
Knox, Stanley Avenue.
St. Andrew's, cor. Douglas and Broughton Streets.
St. Columbia, cor. Hullon and Oak Bay Avenue.
St. Paul's, Victoria West, Henry Street.
ROMAN CATHOLIC.
St. Andrew's Cathedral, cor. Blanchard and View Streets.
PUBLIC SCHOOLS.
Central and High Schools, cor. School and Yates Streets.
North Ward School, Douglas Street.
South Park School, cor. St. Catherines and Michigan Streets.
Spring Ridge School, cor. Chambers and North Chatham Streets.
Victoria West School, Front Street.
(28)
fch-. VICTORIA CLUBS.
Alexandria (Women's) Club, Broad Street.
Badminton Club, 5 Gordon Street.
James Bay Athletic Association, Belleville Street.
Pacific Club, 45^ Fort Street.
Union Club, cor. Douglas and Courtney Streets.
HOSPITALS.
Provincial Royal Jubilee, cor. Richmond and Cadboro Bay Roads.
St. Joseph's, Collinson Street.
CONSULS.
French Consul, H. M. Grahame, 41 Government Street.
Imperial German Consul, Carl Loewenberg, 83 Wharf Street.
Norwegian Consul, W. A. Ward, Bastion Street.
Swedish Consul, W. A. Ward, Bastion Street.
United States Consul, Abraham E. Smith, 43^ Government Street.
CAB    RATES.
Driving by the hour $1 5°
To any place within one mile of postoffice from stand or stable—
One or two persons  5°
Each additional person  25
To or from steamers or trains, each person (not including special orders)  50
To and from balls and parties, calling at one house only, when hour of return is
after midnight, per carriage  2 5°
Two and from theatres, one or two persons  2 00
To and from theatres, three or four persons  2 5°
To weddings, each carriage
4 00
To funerals, when the time does not exceed three hours      3 °° 

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcbooks.1-0222250/manifest

Comment

Related Items