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BC Historical Books

Thirteenth annual report of the British Columbia Board of Trade, together with various appendices, list… Victoria (B.C.). Board of Trade 1892

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Array  In Memory of
Dena Lipson THIRTEENTH
ANNUAL REPORT
British Columbia
' -|::. JBoarb of XErabe, ;|. ■
Together with Various Appendices. List of Members.
Office Bearers, Bye-Laws, Etc.
OFFICE:  BANK OF B. C. BUILDING, VICTORIA, B. C.
JTJLT,    1892.
incorporated  October  23th,   1878.
Victoria, B. C.
The Colonist Printing and Publishing Company.
1892. I IN* ID IE ixe
List of Officers, 1892-93       3
List of Past Officers from 1863...      4
Membership Roll       5
In Memoriam  10
ANNUAL   REPORT.
Membership  11
Obituary    12
Meetings  13
Harbor  13
S. S. Service with the Orient.... 14
S. S San Pedro  14
Aids to Navigation  16
Shipwrecked Crews  16
Telegraphs  16
Northern Mail Service  17
Salmon  17
Mines and Minerals  19
The Late Hon. John Robson ... 20
Crofter Colonization •  21
Industrial Establishments  22
Fur Seal Fisheries  23
Railways  24
Insolvency Law  25
Surveys  25
Sugar Beet  26
Board of Trade Building  27
Exhibit for World's Fair  27
Second Congress of the Chambers
of Commerce of the Empire. 28
Census  28
Immigration  29
Finance  30
Library  31
General Trade and Outlook  31
Sec'y-Treas. Account Current.... 34
Financial Statement  35
Audit Report  36
APPENDICES.
List of Additions to the Library,
with Names of Donors  	
Report of Robert Ward, Esq.,
Delegate from the British Columbia Board of Trade to the
Second Congress of Chambers
of Commerce of the Empire.
Report of Committee on Northern
Mail Service	
Resolutions of Condolence	
List of Assays obtained from East
Kootenay Ores in 1891	
Meteorological Register for the
Year 1891, Esquimalt Station.
Land Regulations	
Rate of Wages paid in the various
Trades in British Columbia..
Relative Values of Pacific Coast
Fuels	
Annual Production of Coal in B.C.
Imports into British Columbia....
B. C. Salmon Pack, 1891	
B. C. Salmon Fleet, 1891-2	
Fur Seal Fisheries, 1891	
Sealing Fleet, 1892	
Vancouver Sealing Fleet, 1892. . .
Shipping  	
Exports from B. C. for 21 years..
Imports into B. C. for 21 years...
Customs Statistics    	
Bye-laws	
Scale of Commercial Charges....
Rates on Storage of Merchandise.
Port Charges, Victoria & Esquimalt
Esquimalt Graving Dock, Scale of
Charges   	
39
46
46
47
48
5-*
53
54
58
58
59
61
62
63
66
67
68
70
74
75
76 OFFICEES.
1892-3.
THOMAS B. HALL, Esq.,      ... -      President
A. C. FLUMERFELT, Esq., - -   Vice-President
F. ELWORTHY, Esq., - - -      Secretary
COUNCIL   AND   ARBITRATION   BOARD.
A. B. GRAY, Esq. C. E. RENOUF, Esq.
FRED'K H. WORLOCK, Esq. HON. D. W. HIGGINS.
D. R. KER, Esq. W. F. BULLEN, Esq., J. P.
H. F. HEISTERMAN, Esq. E. A. McQUADE, Esq.
E. G. PRIOR, Esq., M. P. HENRY CROFT, Esq., M. P. P.
W. H. ELLIS, Esq., GEO. BYRNES, Esq.
STANDING COMMITTEES.
FISHERIES.
Robt. Ward. W. H. Ellis. M. T. Johnston. J. G. Cox.
A. J. McLellan.
MANUFACTURES.
W. P. Sayward. Tas. Hutcheson. W. F. Bullen.
C. E. Renouf. D. R. Ker.
HARBORS   AND   NAVIGATION.
Jno. Irving. T. R. Smith. Robt. Ward. R. P. Rithet.
Wm. Templeman.
PUBLIC   WORKS   AND   RAILWAYS.
A. B. Gray.      J. H. Todd.      J. Davies.      J. Hunter.       J. Holland.
FINANCE. STATISTICS. MINING AND PROPERTY.
E. A. McQuade. W. H. Ellis. Wm. Wilson.
A. B. Gray. Fred. J. Claxton. C. T. Dupont.
Robt. Ward. Wm. Templeman. Geo. Byrnes. OFFICERS OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
FROM 1863 TO DATE OF INCORPORATION, OCT. 28TH, 1878.
YEAR.
1863
1864
1865
1866
1867
1868
1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
PRESIDENT.
VICE-PRESIDENT.
SECRETARY.
R. Burnaby
C. W. Wallace.
Jules David....
James Lowe ...
Henry Rhodes .
Henry Rhodes .
Henry Rhodes .
Henry Rhodes .
Henry Rhodes .
Henry Rhodes .
Henry Rhodes .
Henry Rhodes .
Henry Rhodes .
Henry Rhodes .
Henry Rhodes .
Henry Rhodes .
Jules David  A. F. Main	
Jules David  A. F. Main	
James Lowe  A. F. Main	
Henry Rhodes ; A. F. Main	
Gustav Sutro  Robert Plummer.
Guslav Sutro  Robert Plummer.
Gustav Sutro  Robert Plummer.
Gustav Sutro  Robert Plummer.
Gustav Sutro	
E. Grancini	
T. L. Stahlschmidt .
T. L. Stahlschmidt
T. L. Stahlschmidt
T. L. Stahlschmidt
T. L. Stahlschmidt
T. L. Stahlschmidt
Robert Plummer.
Robert Plummer.
Robert Plummer.
Robert Plummer.
Robert Plummer.
Robert Plummer.
Robert Plummer.
Robert Plummer,
OFFICERS OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA BOARD OF TRADE
From Date of Incorporation,October 28,1878,to July 8,1892-3.
YEAR.
Oct. 28,1878,
to July 3,
1880."
1880-1
l88l-2
1882-3
18834
1884-5
1885-6
1886-7
1887-8
1S88-9
1889-0
1890-1
1891-2
PRESIDENT.
P.
Rithet,
Rithet,
Rithet,
Rithet,
Rithtt,
Rithet,
Jacob Hunter Toe
Jacob Hunter T<
Robert Ward, J.
Robert Ward, J.
Robert Ward, J.
Robert Ward, j.
Thomas B. Hall
VICE-PRESIDENT.
William Charles. ..
William Charles. ..
William Charles. ..
Roderick Finlayson
Roderick Finlayson
Matthew T. Johnst
Edgar Crow Baker.
Thomas Earle. .   .
T. R. Smith	
Thomas Earle	
Thomas B. Hall. ..
Thomas B. Hall. ..
A. C. Flumerfelt ..
SECRETARY.
E. Crow Baker
E. Crow Baker
E. Crow Baker
E. Crow Baker
E. Crow Baker
E. Crow Baker
William Monte
William Monte
William Monte
William Monte
William Monte
F. El worthy . .
F. Elworthy . . MEMBERSHIP  ROLL,
JULY  8th,   1892.
NAME* FIRM. BUSINESS.
Barnard, F. S., M.P. . Victoria Transfer Company. President.
Bullen, F. W., J. P... Albion Iron Works Manager and Secretary.
Burns, Gavin H Bank British North America Manager.
Byrnes, George Auctioneer and Com. Mer.
Baker, Hon. Col. Jas., M. P. P Capitalist.
Bechtel, A. J Ship Owner.
Boggs, B Insurance and Gen. Agent.
Braden, John Plumber and Gas Fitter.
Bone, W. H T. N. Hibben & Co Booksellers and Stationers.
Blackwood, E. E Northern Pacific R'y Co... Agent.
Beeton, H. C   (London, England) Merchant.
Bodwell, Ernest V,... Bodwell & Irving Barristers-at-Law.
Belyea, A. L Belyea & Gregory Barristers-at-Law.
Broderick, Richard Contractor.
Brownlee, J. H    Insurance Agent.
Caton, T. A. T J. A  T. Caton & Co Merchants.
Clarke, Capt. Wm. R Auctioneer and Com. Mer.
Croasdaile, H. E., J. P. H. E. Croasdaile & Co... . Financial and Ins. Agents.
Cowan, M. H Cowan & Wilson Wholesale Grocers.
Croft, Henry, M.P.P Land Agent.
Crane, J. E  Insurance and Gen. Agent.
C.laxton, Fred J Dalby & Claxton Land Agents.
Carmichael, H Brit. Col. Paper Mf g Co... Secretary.
Cox, Capt. J. G E. B. Marvin & Co Ship Chandlers.
Coigdarippe, J Boucherat & Co Wine Merchants.
Crease, Lindley Barrister-at-Law.
Cowper, Jesse M Ship Owner.
Davie, Hon. Theo , Q.C, M.P.P Premier.   ?
Dunsmuir, James Union Collieries President.
Dunsmuir, Alexander. Esquimalt & Nanaimo R'y.. President.
Davies, Joshua J. P. Davies & Co Auctioneers and Com. Mer. BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
NAME.
Dupont, Major C. T.
Dunlevy, P. C	
Davidge, F. C	
FIRM. BUSINESS.
 Capitalist.
 Merchant.
Davidge & Co Shipping Agents.
Ellis, W. H Ellis & Co Printers and Publishers.
Earle, Thos., M.P Merchant.
Eberts, D. M., M.P.P. Eberts & Taylor Barristers-at-Law.
Erb, Louis E Loewen & Erb Brewers.
Ewen, Alexander Ewen & Co., (New Westminster). .Canners.
Erskine, R Sehl, Hastie & Erskine Furniture Co., Ltd.
Elworthy, F Brit. Col. Board of Trade.. Secretary.
Flumerfelt, A. C Ames, Holden & Co. (L'd). Managing Director.
Foster, F. W (Clinton, B. C.)    Merchant.
Flint, A. St. G Flint & JYilliams Insurance and Gen. Agents.
Fairall, H. S Fairall & Barry Brewers.
Futcher, Thos. S.....' Japanese Wares.
L
G
Grant, John, M. P. P     Merchant.
Grant, Capt. Wm     Ship Owner.
Gray, Alex. B'.air A. B. Gray & Co Merchants.
Goodacre, Lawrence.. Queen's Market Butcher.
Galletly, A. J. C Bank of Montreal (Victoria). Manager.
Green, Chas Real Estate Agent.
H
Heisterman, H. F Heisterman & Co Financial and Ins, Agents.
Higgins, Hon. D. W., M.P.P., Vic. Elec. Tram .. President.
Harris, D. R Lowenberg & Harris Financial Brokers.
Hayward, Chas Contractor and Builder.
Hall, Thos. B Hall, Ross & Co Victoria Flour & Rice Mills.
Holland, Joshua Insurance Agent.
Hutcheson, James .... Hutcheson & Co Dry Goods
Hunter, Joseph Esquimalt & Nanaimo R'y . General Superintendent.
Haywood, Wm. C Land Agent.
Helmcken, Hon. J. S., M.D Physician.
Hall, R. H., M.P.P.. Hudson's Bay Co In charge.
Helmcken, H. Dallas. DrakeJackson&Helmcken. Barristers-at-Law. MEMBERSHIP   ROLL.
/
Irving, Capt. John.... Can. Pacific Navigation Co. Manager.
Irving, P. JE Bodwell & Irving Barristers-at-Law.
Irving, Robert Land Agent.
Johnson, E. M Financial Agent.
Johnston, Matthew T.. Findlay, Durham & Brodie. Merchants.
Jackson, Robt. E Drake, J ackson& Helmcken. Barristers-at-Law.
Jones, A. W., Capt... Jones & Bridgman Insurance Agents.
Jamieson, Robert Books, Stationery, Pianos.
Jensen, William Hotel Dallas Proprietor.
Jones, C. F Dun, Wiman & Co. (Victoria). .Agent.
K
Ker, D. R Biackman & Ker Oatmeal Mills.
Keefer, G. A  Keefer & Smith Civil Engineers.
Langley, A. J., J.P... Langley & Co Druggists.
Laidlaw, Jas. A New Westminster Cannery Proprietor.
Loewen, Joseph Loewen & Erb Victoria Brewery.
Leiser, Simeon Wholesale Grocer.
Lubbe, T Furs and Skins.
Leiser, Gustave Lenz & Leiser   Wholesale Dry Goods.
Luxton, A. P Barrister-at-Law.
M
Marvin Edward B E. B. Marvin & Co Ship Chandlers.
Mason, Henry S Brit. Col. Land and Investment Co., Ltd., Director.
Miller, Monroe Printer and Bookbinder.
Monteith, Wm  Insurance Agent.
Mara, J. A., M.P (Kamloops) Merchant.
Munn, D. J (Fraser River) Cannery Proprietor.
Macauley, W. J...... Victoria Lumber & Mf*g Co. (Ltd). .Vice-President.
McQuade, E. A P. McQuade & Sons Ship Chandlers.
McAlister, John Harrison & McAlister Wine and Spirit Merchants.
McLellan, A. J Cannery Proprietor.
Munsie, W Carne & Munsie Grocers.
Milne, G.  L., M.P.P. Milne & Watt Physicians and Surgeons.
Mallette, Chas. E Land Agent.
Moss, Morris. ; Fur Dealer.
Milligan, Thos. S Insurance Agent.
McLennan, Robt. P .. McLennan & McFeely Cornice Manufacturers. 8
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
NAME. FIRM. BUSINESS.
Mitchell Jas  Manufacturers' Agent.
McCandless, A. G Gilmore & McCandless  Clothiers.
Macgurn, Foster Heisterman & Co  Insurance Agents.
Mason, C. Dubois    Solicitor.
McMicking, R. B., f.P  Electrician.
Muir, A. Maxwell  Architect.
Morley, C  Mineral Water Manf'r.
N
Nelson, Hon. Hugh, J. P. Lieut-Governor of British Columbia.
Nicholles, Major John. Nicholles & Renouf Hardware and Ag'l Impts.
Pooley, Hon. C.E., Q.C, M.P.P Barrister-at-Law.
Prior, Lt.-Col., E. G., M.P., E. G. Prior & Co.(L'd) Hardware and Implements.
Pendray, Wm. J Pendray & Co Soap Manufacturers.
Pearson, Ed., J.P .... Clark & Pearson Hardware.
Pemberton, J. D J. D. Pemberton & Son.... Financial Agents.
Pither, Luke Boucherat & Co Wine Merchants.
Penny, John L Ship Owner.
Robins, S. M Vancouver Coal Co. (Nanaimo). .Superintendent.
Redon, L Redon & Hartnagel Hotel Proprietors.
Rithet, R. P , J. P.... R. P. Rithet & Co. (L'd)...[Merchants & ShippingAgts.
Richards, F. G., jun Insurance Agent.
Redfern, Chas. E Manufacturing Jeweller.
Renouf, C. E Nicholles & Renouf Hardware and Ag'l Impt's.
Spring, Chas , Ship Owner.
Strouss, Morris C. Strouss & Co twh°lesale Dry Goods.
Saunders, Henry Grocer.
Sayward, Wm. P Capitalist.
Shotbolt, Thos., J. P Druggist.
.Sears, Joseph "^Contractor.
Smith, Thos. R Capitalist.
Sehl, Jacob  Sehl, Hastie & Erskine Furniture Co., Lt'd.
Spencer, C David Spencer Dry Goods.
Snowden, N. P Lowenberg, Harris & Co... Financial Agents.
Swinerton, R. H Land Agent.
Sargison, A. G Ellis & Co Printers and Publishers.
Scott, H. J Hamilton Powder Works .. .Manager.
.1 MEMBERSHIP   ROLL.
NAME. FIRM. BUSINESS.
Turner, Hon. J. H.,M.P.P., Turner, Beeton & Co. Merchants.
Tye, Thomas H Matthews, Richards & Tye. Hardware, Iron and Steel.
Todd, Jacob H J. H. Todd & Son Wholesale Grocers.
Templeman, Wm....   Times Printing Co Managing Editor.
Teague, John, sen Architect.
Tugwell, Thomas Colonial Hotel Proprietor.
V
Van Volkenburgh, B Retired.
w
Williams, Robert T Blank Book Manufacturer.
Ward, Wm. C Bank of British Columbia.. Manager.
Ward, Robt., J.P Robert Ward & Co. (Lt'd).. Merchants and Shippers.
Wilson, Chas (New Westminster) Barrister-at-Law.
Wilson, Wm W. & J. Wilson Clothiers.
Weiler, John Retired Furniture Manufacturers.
Warren, Jas. D., Capt General Agent.
Willianjs, B Flint & Williams Land Agents.
Waitt, M. W Waitt & Co Booksellers and Stationers.
Wilson, W. Ridgway Architect.
Worlock, Fred H .... Green, Worlock & Co Bankers.
Wooton, E. E McPhillips, Wooton & Barnard, Barristers-at-Law.
Walker, Walter Coal Merchant.
Memo.—All members of the Board, unless otherwise herein shown, reside at
Victoria, B. C. Jn /Iftemonam.
flames of DQembefs caho have Deeeased fpom
July 4tb, 1891, to July 8th, 1892.
EDGAR A. MARVIN,
Born at New York, U. S. A.,
Died at Victoria, B. C.,
July 15TH,  1891,
Aged 67.
ALEX. A. GREEN,
Born at Ixworth, Suffolk, England,
Died at Victoria, B. C,
September 2ist, 1891.
Aged 58.
GEO. MORISON,
Born at St. John, New Brunswick,
Died at Victoria, B. C,
February 19TH,  1892.
Aged 72.
JAS. C. BALES,
Born at Great Yarmouth, England,
Died at Victoria, B. C,
March iith,  1892.
Aged 65. THIRTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT
British Colunjbia Board of Trade,
(July 4th,   1891, to July 8th,   1892.)
To the Members of the British Columbia Board of Trade:
Gentlemen,—Your Committee, consisting' of the President,
Vice-President and Secretary, appointed by the Council, beg
to append herewith.the Thirteenth Annual Report of the Board,
which is submitted for the consideration of members.
Membership. At the date of the last Annual  Report the
number of active members stood at    124
New Members admitted during the year     37
Together    161
From which have to be deducted—
Resignations—F. Bourchier     *\
Wm. Gordon    j-    3
Thos. C. Sorby;
Deaths—J. C. Bales
A. A. Green
Edgar Marvin   j   ^
George Morison J
—       7
Leaving the present number of active members at    154 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
The following named new members were elected during the
period under review, viz. :
NAME. FIRM BUSINESS.
Broderick, Richard Contractor.
Brownlee, J. H Insurance Agent.
Cox, Capt. J. G   E. B. Marvin & Co Ship Chandlers.
Coigdarippe, J Boucherat & Co Wine Merchants.
Crease, Lindley    Barrister-at-Law.
Cowper, Jesse M Ship Owner.
Dunlevy, P. C Merchant.
Davidge, F. C   Davidge & Co  Shipping Agents.
Fairall, H. S Fairall & Barry Brewers.
Futcher, Thos. S Japanese Wares.
Galletly, A. J. C Bank of Montreal (Victoria). Manager.
Green, Chas     Real Estate Agent.
Helmcken, Hon. J. D , M. D Physician.
Hall, R  H., M.P.P.. Hudson's Bay Co In charge.
Helmcken, H. Dallas. Drake, Jackson & Helmcken. Barristers-at-Law.
Jones, C. F  Dun, Wiman & Co., (Victoria). .Agent.
Keefer, G. A Keefer & Smith Civil Engineers.
Losee, W. E Shingle Mill Owner.
Luxton, A.  1' ' Barrister-at-Law.
Mitchell, Jas Manufacturers' Agent.
McCandless, A. G Gilmore & McCandless.... Clothiers.
Macgurn, Foster Heisterman & Co Insurance Agents.
Mason, C. Dubois Solicitor.
McMicking, R. B., J.P Electrician.
Muir, A. Maxwell Architect.
Morley, C 1111111 -Mineral Water Manfr.
Pearson, Ed., J. P Clarke & Pearson Hardware.
Pemberton, J. D J. D. Pemberton & Son... . Financial Agents.
Pither, Luke Boucherat & Co Wine Merchants.
Penny, John L Ship Owner.
Richardson, P. F ,.. Manufacturers' Agent.
Scott, H. J Hamilton Powder Co      ..    Manager.
Tugwell, Thos Colonial Hotel     Proprietor.
Wilson, W. Ridgway Architect.
Worlock, Fred'k H... Green, Worlock & Co Bankers.
Wooton, E. E McPhillips, Wooton & Barnard. .Barristers-at-Law.
Walker, Walter Coal Merchant.
Obituary. Death   has been very busy during the period
under review and has taken from amongst us four
of our fellow members, namely :—A.  A.   Green, Geo. Morison,
Edgar Marvin and J.  C. Bales.    Resolutions of the Board in
reference thereto will be found in the Appendices. ANNUAL  REPORT. 13
Meetings. Since the previous Annual Report four Quarter
ly General and three Special General Meetings have
been held. Your Council have met twenty-two times. Special
Committees held nine meetings, and much matter has been
dealt with by the Standing Committees. Compared with last
year the increase is, one General Meeting and five meetings of
the Council. The first Standing Committees were appointed
October 21st, 1891, and have greatly assisted the Council in its
deliberations. The average attendance at all meetings has been
well sustained and unmistakably indicates, as predicted a year
ago, the increasing active interest in the business of the Board.
Harbor. Private enterprise  has continued throughout the
year under review, excepting a short interval, the improvement at the outer wharf at Victoria. A temporary suspension .of the works was the result of unfavorable weather,
coupled with the apparent disinclination of the Canadian Pacific
Railway Company to make use of the improved facilities for
docking their ships, which they had asked for, and which in a
great measure were provided some months ago. The approaches
to and alongside of the wharves have been dredged to a uniform depth of water, at low tide about thirty feet ; and during
the Springs this is increased by from eight to ten feet, and during the Neaps from four to eight feet. The approach to the
wharves is being widened by the Dominion Government, an
appropriation having been granted for such purpose. The new
wharf is about 1,200 feet long, and when completed there will
be at the outer harbor facilities for docking simultaneously from
eight to ten ocean ships.
The breakwater from Holland Point to Brotchie Ledge, continuously recommended for some years past by the Board, has
not yet been undertaken. This is a matter of regret, as such
breakwater when completed would make the harbor of Victoria
alike the most commodious and the most convenient on the
coast. The attention of the incoming Council is commended to
this important project.
Improvements at the inner harbor at Victoria continue,
vessels having a draught of water 14 feet can enter at lowest i4
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
Orient.
tides ; and the docking accommodation is  about equal to requirements.
Steamship There are at present three lines of steamships
Service with the engaged in the China-Japan trade, which make
Victoria the last Port of call outward and the first
inward. The Upton Company, mentioned in the
previous Annual Report, have continued their service, averaging
about one ship per month.
On the 16th June ultimo, the steamship "Phra Nang"
reached Victoria from Hong Kong, en route to Tacoma, Washington, U. S. A., being the first ship of a Company which has
established a line to connect with the Northern Pacific Company's transcontinental railway system, and it is understood
that the steamships '' Parthia " and " Batavia " have been chartered by the Company, and that a regular and efficient service
will be established as soon as the steamers can be got ready.
Mails and passengers are now taken from, and placed on,
the Canadian Pacific Railway Company's steamers at Victoria,
thus admitting of advices being received at this City about 10
hours earlier than at Vancouver, and with the advantage of permitting 10 hours later dispatches by out-going steamers.
The fast increasing trade with the Orient calls for strict
attention to the Quarantine Rules and Regulations ,* and the
urgency of placing the Quarantine Station at Albert Head, near
Victoria, in a more efficient state than at present, should be
brought prominently before the Dominion Government.
S. S. San Pedro. The S. S. San Pedro from Nanaimo to San
Francisco was wrecked on Brotchie's Ledge, in
Victoria Pilotage District, when in charge of a Nanaimo Pilot
An enquiry was instituted by the Nanaimo Pilotage Board, and
resulted in the Pilot being found guilty of gross carelessness,
and his license being suspended.
Your Council deemed it advisable that an official enquiry
should be held by the Department of Marine, and their action
thereanent led up to a commission being appointed by the De- ANNUAL   REPORT. Ig
partment, at the sittings of which Mr. Robt. Ward was deputed
to represent this Board. Mr. Ward's report of evidence taken by
the commission deals very fully with the existing Pilotage regulations and directs special attention to the anomalies which prevail in consequence of the Province being divided into three
different Pilotage Districts. The commission elicited the fact
that the majority of the Pilots licensed by the three separate
Boards within the Province reside at Victoria. Mr. Ward's
report was submitted to the Council, and it was recognized that
a system whereby a Pilot licensed by one District Board can
wreck a vessel in the adjoining District and not be accountable
to the Board in authority over the District in which the vessel is
wrecked, is obviously disadvantageous, and should be remedied ;
and it was recommended that a Pilot vessel, either a steamer or
a schooner, should be maintained some distance out in the
straits when Pilots could be furnished to vessels coming in, and
taken off vessels going out, the expenses of maintenance of said
Pilot vessel to be divided between the different authorities. The
Minister of Marine approved of this suggestion and has addressed a communication to each of the three Pilotage Boards,
directing attention to the great assistance to shipping frequenting British Columbia which would result if the recommendations
are acted upon. It is to be hoped that sectional interests will
be set aside in the interests of the safety of the shipping of the
Province, and that the recommendations of this Board and of
the Minister of Marine will at no distant period be carried out.
Acting upon the suggestions of the Board, the Dominion
Government has decided to place on Brotchie's Ledge a stone
beacon with electric light.
Resulting from the " San Pedro" disaster was the seizure
ot the American tug " Collis." A fine of S400 was imposed on
the owners for proceeding to the wrecked vessel with passengers and returning with stores after clearing from Victoria
for another Port. The Canadian laws governing all Ports within the Province were entirely disregarded by the " Collis "; and
in view of the treatment meted out to vessels from British
Columbia when seized in American waters, the fine imposed in
this instance was not excessive.     It is, however, much to be
. i6
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF TRADE.
regretted that some measure of wreckage reciprocity does not
exist between Canada and the United States.
Aids to A year ago the Dominion Government ap-
Navigation. peared to have become impressed with the urgency
of improving the aids to navigation on the
Northern section of the coast line of the Province. At the
request of the Minister of Marine the Board submitted a list of
lights, beacons and buoys, numbering altogether eighteen,
required to form a safeguard to navigation (extending from
Victoria to Port Simpson), and an engineer from the Department was sent out to report ; it is, therefore, very unsatisfactory to find that the most important of the recommended works
have not yet been commenced ; in fact, excepting the placing of
a few new buoys, nothing has been done during the past year.
The need of a more perfect hydrographic survey is amply
demonstrated by the wrecking of the Dominion Government
steamer "Quadra" at the entrance of Rose Harbor, on the
coast of Queen Charlotte Island—on a rock which is not indicated on the official chart. These matters will require the best
attention of the incoming Council.
Your Committee are confirmed in the opinion that a vessel
more suitable for the service required of the " Quadra" could
have been built in the Province.
Shipwrecked The  attention   of your   Council   has   been
Crews. directed to the hardships experienced by ship
wrecked crews on the West coast ; they being
dependent on the local Indians for sustenance. A communication on the subject was addressed to our City Members of Parliament at Ottawa, and through their instrumentality the
Dominion Government, acting upon the Board's suggestions,
has forwarded instructions to the local agent of the Marine
Department to act upon his own discretion in making use of
the Dominion Government steamer, whenever available, for the
relief of shipwrecked crews.
Tejegraphs. With  the  expansion of Vancouver Island
trade the urgency of an alternative line to connect with the United  States telegraph systems becomes more ANNUAL   REPORT.
1
apparent.    Until such line is in operation the demands  of our
merchants and business men cannot be satisfied.
The line to Bonilla Point, at the entrance of the Straits, has
been transferred by the Dominion Government to the C. P. R.
Company. Shipping and weather reports from the Point have
been posted on the Company's bulletin board twice daily, and
have proved of great value to our shippers and merchants, who
are indebted to the Company for this courtesy.
^ortheniMail The attention of your Council having been
Service. directed to the unsatisfactory state of the Northern Mail service, a report thereon was presented
to the Postmaster-General by the City Members of Parliament.
The Postmaster-General has not dealt with the matter in a manner commensurate with the growth of the industries at the
points referred to ; a copy of the report will be found in the
Appendices.
Salmon. The season of 1891 was what is generally
known as an " off season " on the Fraser River, which
means that owing to the small run of salmon, the pack on that
river was something under one-half of that of a good year. On
the Northern Rivers and Inlets the pack was an average one, with
the exception of Alert Bay and Naas River, at which points the
run of fish was so small as to make the season almost a failure.
The total pack of the season in British Columbia was 314,893
cases, which is 94,571 cases less than in 1890. The pack was
disposed of as follows, viz.:
To England 220,761 cases.
" Canada   60,950     "
" Australia   23>534     "
Local and Sundries     9,648      "
Total 314,893 cases.
The prices realized were not satisfactory to the canners,
owing to the supply in all the large consuming countries being
in excess of the demand, and for all except first-class quality,
very low prices had to be accepted ; so low in many instances
as to cause a serious loss to the canners. 18 BRITISH  COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF TRADE.
Realizing the absolute necessity of reducing the supply, the
Alaska canners have formed a combination to reduce the pack
in 1892, in Alaska waters, to one half of what it was in 1891, or
from 800,000 cases to 400,000 cases. Similar action was soon
after taken by the canners in British Columbia, to reduce the
pack on the Fraser River 50%, and on Northern Rivers and
Inlets 25% of their estimated capacity. The result of this action
has been the means of bringing the supply within the demand,
and causing a uniform advance in prices sufficient to cover a
small margin of profit on the coming season's pack, the bulk of
which has already been disposed of at prices ranging from 21s.
to 22s. 6d. per case, c. f. i. The business of salmon canning is
an important industry to this Province, and is well worthy of
all the encouragement the Government can extend to it.
As intimated in the Board's previous report, a Commission
was appointed to enquire into the condition of the salmon fishing
business with a view of recommending to the Government such
changes in the regulations as might'be considered necessary to the
permanent benefit of the industry. The Commission comprised
Mr. Wilmot, of the Fisheries Department, Ottawa, Hon. D. W.
Higgins, of Victoria, and Sheriff W. J. Armstrong, of New
Westminster. The first sitting of the Commission was held at
New Westminster, and after being in session there, they met at
the Board of Trade Rooms, Victoria. From the early sittings
of the Commission it was apparent that the Government had
made a serious mistake in ignoring the protest of the Canners'
Association against the appointment of Mr. Wilmot, for he
would hear no evidence except such as was in accordance with
his previous erroneous report, made after his visit of something-
o
under two days on the Fraser River. Not only was the time of
the year unfortunate (inasmuch as the Local Legislature was in
session, which necessitated the presence at the Legislative Assembly of Mr. Speaker Higgins, one of the Commissioners, and
his consequent frequent absence from the sittings of the Commission) but the rulings of the .Chairman, Mr. Wilmot, were so
unusual that much valuable evidence was refused. The Commission may, therefore, be considered as most unsatisfactory,
and as having failed in the accomplishment of its object, chiefly ANNUAL  REPORT. 19
through the action of Mr. Wilmot, with the support of Mr.
Armstrong. The disagreement on many important points caused
Hon. D. W. Higgins to make a Minority Report, containing
many valuable suggestions, which we trust the Government wiU
carefully consider and act upon. So far as known, the result of
the Commission has been to impose the further hardship upon
this struggling industry of extending the weekly close season
from 6 a. m. Saturday to 6 a. m. Monday ; increasing the expense in disposing of the offal; limiting the number of boats to
the canneries ; and increasing the license fee to Northern canneries to $20, making it the same as on the Fraser River. It
is to be presumed that the Government intend to give the
Northern canneries some advantages by establishing hatcheries
at different points, and otherwise appropriating the surplus,,
which must be considerable, to the permanent benefit of the industry.
Your Committee, with the experience of the Commission referred to, are more than ever convinced that the only way for the
Government to arrive at a proper understanding in regard to regulations for the guidance of this industry, is to appoint a Board
of Local Commissioners.
Full statistical information from the commencement of this
industry will be found in the Appendices.
Mi**esand The   collieries   of Vancouver Island   are
Minerals, yearly growing in importance, and give employment to 3,194 hands. The output of coal for
1890, was 678,140 tons; and for 1891, 1,029,097 tons. The exports for 1890 and 1891 were 508,270 tons, and 806,479 tons
respectively. The quality of this coal is not equalled on the
coast, and is much appreciated in California, to which State
641,011 tons were exported in 1891. Estimates of the comparative value of this and other fuels for steam raising purposes, by
the War Department of the United States, will be found in the
Appendices, together with a statement showing the annual output of coal on Vancouver Island since mining commenced.
The exports of gold continue to show a falling off, and in
1891 amounted to $358,176.00.    Placer mining now has not its 20
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
former attraction, and railway communications into the gold
mining Districts must be provided, to admit cheap transportation of machinery and supplies, before great developments may
be expected in quartz and hydraulic workings.
The Kootenay Districts continue the principal attraction to
mining men. Galena ore was first discovered there (at Hendryx
camp) in 1825, but the Districts generally, did not become prominent until 1886 ; since the latter date prospectors have yearly
increased, many claims of exceptionally high grade silver bearing ores have been recorded, and the immense richness of this
mountainous portion of the Province is proved beyond a doubt.
Capital is now coming in more freely, and assessment and developing works in the claims and mines are progressing with
greater energy than hitherto. Although great progress has
been made during the past five years, many improvements in
these Districts have been retarded from the want of railway
communications, and is referred to in this report under the head
of Railways. Two other serious obstacles to the rapid development of the mines, are the want of a local market for the silver
lead ores, which constitute a large proportion of the mines in
West Kootenay ; and the duty of $30 per ton on such ores when
entering the United States. A smelting and refining plant, for
the treatment of all kinds of ores, of 100 tons per day capacity,
is in course of erection at a convenient point on the Kootenay
Lake.
The near future promises to see in the Kootenay District
mines in successful operation, which for extent and richness
will rival any on the Pacific coast, and will undoubtedly result in
a large mining population being settled in this section of the
country. Attention is directed to recent assays shown iii the
Appendices.
The late Ho*]. The death on 29th June ultimo, of the fore-
John, Robson, most statesman and Premier of the Province, the
Premier of late Honorable John Robson, in London, England, where he had gone to confer with the Imperial authorities in connection with the Crofter
scheme, calls for more than a passing notice, not only as a tribute of recognition of his marked ability and of an almost life
British Columbia ANNUAL   REPORT. 21
service devoted to British Columbia, but as exemplifying through
the circumstances attendant upon his death, the great and increasing sympathy which exists between the Mother Country and
the dependencies of the British Empire. The Queen of England
sent with condolence a wreath to be placed on the coffin of
British Columbia's statesman ; and the funeral services were
solemnized at St. Margaret's, Westminster, the House of Commons Church, and were attended by the Imperial representatives
and by leading representatives of the Home and Colonial Empire. The Second Congress of Chambers of Commerce of the
Empire, then assembled in Great Britain's capital, also passed
a resolution of sympathy in the loss sustained by this Province through the death of its chief executive officer, and
instructed the delegates from the several Boards of Trade in
the Province to convey such expression to their members.
Such a kindly and sym*«athetic act of honor by Her Most
Gracious Majesty to the memory of the late Premier of the Province, while specially esteemed by the relatives of the deceased,
has yet a Provincial emotion, and in this distant Province of the
Dominion tends to bind still more closely the ties of attachment-
to Great Britain and Britain's Queen, while the resolutions of
the Second Congress of Chambers of Commerce of the Empire
prove the existence of a chord of consanguinity between the
Mother Country and the several Provinces and Colonies of the
Empire upon which the sun never sets.
Crofter The   Crofter  project for colonizing certain
Colonization, lands on the Sea Coasts and Islands of British
Columbia has been advanced by the passage of
two Acts during the last session of the Provincial Legislature.
The first is known as the " Colonization Act, 1892," which enables the Local Government to make arrangements with Her
Majesty's Imperial Government for bringing a number of colonists (not to exceed 1,250 families) from the United Kingdom
and to settle them at the points named, also to pledge the credit
of the Province to secure the repayment of sums aggregating
-£150,000 which Her Majesty's Imperial Government will grant
as a loan under certain conditions. 22 BRITISH  COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
The second is entitled "Deep Sea Fisheries Act, 1892,"
whereby the Government of British Columbia is empowered to
enter into an agreement with a Commercial Company, having
a capital of not less than ^1,000,000, which is to be formed for
permanently establishing fishing and other industries within the
Province. When proper guarantees are furnished, the Provincial Government will grant to the Commercial Company 500,000
acres of land and certain other privileges. The scheme is bold
and comprehensive and bids fair to open up large new industries
and to settle an industrious population on hitherto unsettled
portions of the Province. It is to be hoped that the details of
the plan will subserve the interests and independence of the immigrant settlers and locate them as owners of the soil, while
due protection is given those who are investing their capital in
the Commercial Company. With the knowledge of the markets and the influence and capital which the Company have at
their command, large development of our sea-wealth will be secured, and a new era in British Columbia fisheries will be inaugurated.
The untimely death of the late Premier, Hon. John Robson,
who was largely instrumental in furthering the Crofter scheme,
is a matter of universal regret, but the scheme itself was so
advanced by Legislative enactments that it will not likely be
seriously interfered with by his deplored decease.
Industrial
The value of the various Industrial establish-
Establishments. ments within the Province, approximates four
- m;ii;on c*0narS) ancj gjve work to about 12,000
employees ; in the fish canneries alone nearly one-half of this
number is employed, but one-third of the capital is invested in
sawmills and sash and door factories. The Industrial establishments have increased nearly 300 per cent, since 1881, and in
proportion to the population, British Columbia now takes first
place as the Manufacturing Province of the Dominion. The
recent establishment of good modern oatmeal and other mills,
has stimulated the local production of cereals, and further
developments in this line may be expected as soon as connections are improved. Fruit growing and canning is making-
rapid progress, and there is every prospect of this new industry ANNUAL   REPORT. 23'
very soon being of great importance to the Province. The Government appear to have recognized this and the establishment
of a Board of Horticulture is a move in the right direction.
With this year commences a new era in the Breweries of
the Proiiince ; lager beer hitherto imported is now being produced in quantities for exportation. The Paper mill at Alberni
will commence operations very soon under favorable auspices.
Although the sealing fleet has more than trebled in number
since 1888, few of the schooners have been built here, they having been principally purchased in Nova Scotia. -This is to be
regretted, as the timber of this coast is especially favorable to
the building of ships, and the cost would be the same as that
paid for schooners sailed from Halifax to Victoria. Our shipbuilding industry might be promoted if a tonnage bonus were
granted by the Government. The building of the steamer
"Joan" this year for the E. & N. Railway Company is good
evidence of what can be done here in shipbuilding.
Fur Seal The Fur Seal Fisheries is an industry which
Fisheries. is yearly becoming of greater importance to the
Province. In the year 1888, twenty schooners
were engaged in seal hunting, giving employment to 378 men,
whites and Indians. During the present year, sixty-three
schooners have cleared from Victoria for the hunting grounds,
having on board 1,331 men. The value of the vessels and
stores represents a capital of $750,000.00 ; and with an average
catch, unhampered by the restrictions of the " modus vivendi,"
about $800,000.00 would annually be put in circulation within
the Province. The skins being sold abroad, whilst much of the
stores and all the labor are of local production, it will readily be
seen that the sealing industry, when unrestricted, is of* great
value to the Province.
Previous to 1891, from a half to three quarters of the yearly total catch of seals were taken in the Behring Sea; with
these hunting grounds closed it is hardly possible that the operations of this year can result other than in serious loss to the
majority of those who have their capital invested in this industry.    The action of the Imperial Government in renewing the 24
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
I
" modus vivendi" this year, after the majority of the sealing
schooners had cleared for the Behring Sea, is a matter of regret,
as the extra loss thus entailed upon our sealers could have been
obviated by earlier action of the authorities. The effect upon
the majority of the owners will be more severe by following so
closely the heavy losses sustained last year, which have not yet
been recompensed. A commission has been engaged in making
local enquiries into the losses occasioned by the sudden stoppage
of sealing last year, but the official report is not yet available.
In the interval between 1886 and 1890 nineteen schooners from
British Columbia were seized or ordered out of Behring Sea by
United States Revenue cutters.
Railways. The " Mission Branch of the Canadian Pacific
Railway" and the "New Westminster & Southern"
are two lines recently opened, connecting at the Boundary with
the American Railway system ; they are important trade outlets, but would be of greater value to the Province if bonding
privileges were in force. The "Shuswap & Okanagan Railway,"
referred to in previous reports has been completed and taken
over by the " Canadian Pacific Railway Co." At the arm of
Okanagan Lake, the South terminus of this line, a steamer connects with Penticton. The Okanagan District is being settled
very rapidly ; cereals and fruit are the principal productions.
The "Columbia & Kootenay Railway,"a short line from Nelson to Robson, connecting with steamers on the Columbia
River, is of utility only while the river is open for navigation,
Which is about eight months in the year.
An all rail route connecting the Kootenay mining region
with the transcontinental railways which would be operative all
the year round is of the very first importance in hastening the
development of its rich resources. Such a road will the "Nelson
& Fort Sheppard Railway" be when constructed, and this Board
enters its strong protest against the action of the Dominion
Government in refusing a charter for its construction, thereby
impeding and delaying the prosperity anticipated, not only for
the Kootenay District in the profitable working of its mines
but the general advantage to the whole Province of the attrac- ANNUAL   REPORT. 2C
tion and investment of capital in mining that would follow successful operations. It is understood that the refusal of a charter for the construction of the "Nelson & Fort Sheppard" road at
the present session of the Dominion- Parliament is not a final
refusal but rather a postponement until such time as the "Canadian Pacific Railway Company" are in a position to better compete with this road. As much as it is to be desired that the C.
P. R. afford adequate railway facilities to this region, it is a
palpable wrong and injustice that the development of the Province should be retarded in the interest of this particular corporation.
Insolvency Law. The urgency of a suitable measure to pro
vide for the equal distribution of the assets of
Insolvent Estates has received the most careful attention of your
Council, and in February last the City representatives at Ottawa
were asked to give this matter prominence at the next meeting
of Parliament. Later a draft of an Insolvency Bill, suggested by
the Montreal Board of Trade, was taken under consideration
and was endorsed by your Council, who approved of the general principles of the Bill and relied upon any objectional clauses
to be amended by the Committee of the House of Commons.
There appears to be a strong disinclination on the part of
the Federal Government to enact a measure dealing with Insolvent Estates, and it is therefore desirable that this Board, in
conjunction with the Boards of Trade at Nanaimo and the
Mainland, should draft some form of procedure, which, within
legal limits, would when enforced by the Local Legislature, as
near as possible meet Provincial requirements.
Surveys. An  exploration  party was  engaged during
the summer of 1891 in the Northern portion of
the Province known as New Caledonia, and about one million
acres of farming land and a'million and a half acres of grazing
lands were located. These lands are scattered and about three-
fourths of the farming lands are wooded. The climate from the
coast to the Cascade range is damp and rainy, and the snowfall
light. After crossing the mountains the climate becomes drier,
and the higher benches are exposed to summer frosts.    The 26 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
timber found is not considered of great commercial importance.
Undoubted evidence was discovered of the existence of gold in
many places ; and silver bearing galena, iron and coal were
found in abundance. A very pure vein of copper and two small
veins of cinnabar ore were also located. This important portion of the Province must remain undeveloped until easy modes
of communication are afforded to prospectors and settlers.
Another survey party located about one hundred thousand
acres of land, suitable in equal proportions for farming and
grazing, in Rupert District, North end ot Vancouver Island.
The pasture land is well watered, easy of access from the coast,
and a small expenditure would render it fit for immediate occupation. The warm Japan current has a beneficial influence upon
the temperature of this District, and the snowfall is less than at
more southerly portions of the Island.
During the year 1891 the Provincial Government had lithographed for general distribution 20,000 copies of maps showing
five different portions of the Province and one townsite. A
complete map of the Province, giving all recent information,
will shortly be ready for distribution. It cannot be too strongly
urged upon the Government to support this good work by
improving existing roads and other communications.
There are at present eleven parties in different portions of
the Province engaged in making surveys of Crown lands. The
report of the exploration party seeking an alternative route to
open up the rich Yukon country, will be looked forward to with
much interest.
In the Appendices will be found information as to the cost
and procedure necessary, in order to acquire Government lands.
Also, a statement showing the quantity, value, and duties paid on
agricultural products and animals, which could be raised in this
Province.
Sugar Beet. The Province having attracted the attention
of parties for the establishment of sugar beet
factories, it may be stated that on the rich alluvial lands of the
delta of the Fraser River, the sugar beet grown for experimental ANNUAL   REPORT. 27
purposes, has given highly satisfactory results ; and there are
•doubtless other Districts within the Province, equally favorable
to the enterprise. Last year the duty on sugar was abolished,
and to encourage the beet root sugar industry within the
Dominion, until the ist of July, 1893, a bounty equal to one cent
per pound " may be paid to the producer of any raw beet sugar
produced in  Canada, wholly from beets grown therein	
and in addition thereto three and one-third cents per 100 lbs. for
each degree or fraction of a degree of test by polariscope over
seventy degrees." The consumption of sugar within the Province for 1891 may be taken as 9,000,000 pounds.
Board of Trade Upon recommendation of the Committee ap-
Building. pointed to report upon a building scheme, an
association (Capital Stock, $100,000.00) was incorporated under the Companies Act, 1890, to take over the
lots on Bastion Street acquired by the Board, and to erect
thereon a suitable Board of Trade building. Competitive plans
upon lines indicated by the Committee were invited from Provincial architects, and in response thereto nine sets were submitted ; the plans of Mr. A. Maxwell Muir were recommended
and afterwards adopted at a general meeting of the Board.
The contract for construction was signed June 14th ultimo,
and the building will be ready for occupation within six months
from that date. The building when completed will be an ornament to the city ; and special merit attaches to those who were
most prominent in securing its construction. The Board is to
be congratulated on the prospect of shortly attaining most desirable offices ; and it is to be hoped, increased activity and usefulness will ensue from the changed conditions.
The incorporation of the Board, as suggested in the previous
report, has not yet been carried out, but your Council recommend their successors in office to keep the matter in view.
Exhibit An exceptional  opportunity will be offered
•for World's Fair. next year at the World's Fair at Chicago, formak-
"————— ;ngr known to the world at large the vast fields
within this Province for the investment of capital. Great prominence   has   hitherto   been   given   to  our minerals, lumber and 28
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF   TRADE.
fisheries, but every year as surveys progress, immense tracts of
land are found suitable for agriculture and grazing. Fruit
growing has already passed the experimental stage, and rapid
developments may be looked for. Barley grown in the Okanagan District has been pronounced for malting purposes equal to
the best English production. The Provincial Government has
made an appropriation towards an official exhibit at the World's
Fair, and it cannot be too strongly urged upon private enterprise to support this action with liberal representative exhibits
of fruit and agricultural products as well as minerals, lumber,
fish and other Provincial industries. This matter is commended
to the incoming Council for devising concerted action of all interests.
Second The appointment of a delegate to the Second
Congress of     Congress of Chambers of Commerce of the Em-
al     l pire was referred to your Council and resulted in
, - ■ .    ,. f^g seiection of Mr.   Robt.   Ward.    The dates
of Commerce of
■ named tor the meetings of the Congress were J une
the Empire. 2gthj 29thj 3oth and July ist; the time, therefore,
has been too short to receive a report of the proceedings. The
primary subject for discussion was to be " Commercial relations
of the Mother Country with her Colonies and possessions, with
special regard to the renewal of European treaties, and recent
commercial legislation in the United States." . Its treatment by
an influential body of essentially commercial men assembled
from all parts of the British Empire cannot fail to excite great
. interest. Issues pregnant with importance to Great Britain's
closer alliance with her Colonies and dependencies will doubtless evolve from the Anglo-Colonial gathering and an increased
mutual interest will ensue between the Mother Country and
the " Greater Britain."
Census. Inasmuch as the Capitation Grant payable to
the Province by the Dominion Government is
governed by the extent of the population, your Committee deem
it proper to give prominence to errors made in the Dominion
census of the Province. From calculations based on data received from reliable sources, the Provincial Government has arrived at the following conclusions :—Total population of British ANNUAL   REPORT.
29
Columbia, including Indians and other nationalities, (A) 111,-
434 ; (B) 117,019 ; (C) 135,600. By taking the mean of these
three estimates we have within the Province a total population
°f I2I>35I> which may be taken as approximately correct. . The
Dominion census results show the increase in population of the
Province for the past decade ending May, 1891, to be 87.56 per
cent., but from the same data it appears that the rural population of the Province, other than Indians, has decreased nearly
eight per cent, in the same period. Another unaccountable inaccuracy places the population of Victoria at 16,841 ; whereas
a recount, by the Corporation, a few months later, proved the
number of inhabitants to be 23,153. In a new country, covering such a large area as this Province does, the difficulties in
obtaining a correct census are undoubtedly very great, but with
the improved facilities of late years the inaccuracies referred to
appear to be inexcusable. In a communication addressed, in
January last, to the Lieut.-Governor of the Province by the
Under Secretary of State, it was promised that the matter
should receive attention, but your Committee are not aware of
any further action taken.
Immigration. The influx of  immigrants from Eastern
Provinces, and from Europe to British Columbia
during the past year, has been fully equal to, if not in excess of
the absorbing capabilities of the settled portions of the Province.
Inclination to gain a foothold in cities, rather than enounter the
isolation and inconveniences incident to settling on unoccupied
lands in the interior, continues to be very strong among new
arrivals, many of whom are from villages and cities elsewhere.
The supply of all classes of labor is quite equal to the
demand, and while the general scale of wages is higher than in
most countries, still mechanics and laborers who are doing anything like reasonably well where they are, should not break
up their homes for British Columbia at present. Parties
engaged in mercantile lines of all descriptions, office seekers
and office helpers, unless provided with capital, would do
well not to increase the army of " Micawbers " at present in
the country, waiting for "something to turn up."
j 3°
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
However, there has been great improvement in the older
portions of farming districts on Vancouver Island, and a large
area of new country has been covered by pre-emptions during the
year. Frontier settlements are extending out into the comparatively unknown interior ofthe Island, not only from the Eastern
and Northern seaboard, but also from the West Coast.
Surveys undertaken by the Provincial Government in 1890-
91, and again this season, have done much to extend settlement
and create an interest in the desirable and numerous valleys of
Vancouver and contiguous Islands, on many of which the timber is not heavy, while here and there alder bottom and grassy
swamps predominate.
The Valdez group of islands, including Reid, Carter and
others of smaller area, are being settled upon, and much attention is now being directed to that portion of Vancouver Island
lying opposite them.
The rich mining district of Kootenay attracted a considerable rush of fortune seekers this Spring. When the smelter
works are completed, they will do much to sustaining a large
and permanent mining population Meantime, what Kootenay
wants are prospectors with capital to further unfold her wealth,
and additional carriers and smelters to reduce the treasure into
a commercial commodity. Laboring men, without means, are
at present only in very limited request at the mines.
Female domestic servants are much in demand, and suitable
parties of this class could secure good homes and good wages
in the leading cities of the Province.
A scale of wages for skilled and unskilled labor will be
found in the Appendices.
ffoance. The report of the Audit Committee, attached
hereto, shows the Institution to have assets
amounting to $6,509.58. Of this sum $5,000 has been invested
in the Board of Trade building, and there is also a credit balance at the Bank of British Columbia, $1,065.58. The net gain
during the past twelve months has been $1,636.64. Your
Committee   recommend that another $1,000  of the available ANNUAL   REPORT.
31
funds should be invested in the building now being constructed
for the Board.
Library. Several   additions  have  been made to the
Board's Library during the year ; a list of the
books with the names of the donors will be found in the Appendices.
General Trade The short pack of salmon, followed by ex-
and Outlook, ceptionally low prices ; the peremptory closing
of sealing in Behring Sea in the middle of the
hunting season of 1891 ; the collapse of the South American
lumber markets, and the slackness of the California coal trade,
have all combined to injuriously effect the trade of the year
under review. However, notwithstanding such adverse conditions it is satisfactory to find that the Customs returns for the
Province exceed those of the previous year, which were the
most favorable on record. The action of the Federal Government in disregarding the almost unanimous desire of the people
to open up other railway communications with the South, for
the expansion of trade in its natural channels, can hardly be too
severely criticised, because, as the capabilities of the Province
become better and more widely known, its attractions to capitalists seeking legitimate investments increase, and the material
interests of the country are thereby advanced.
Your Committee submit that the time has arrived when the
Board should firmly discountenance speculative operations in
real estate, referred to in the Board's previous annual report,
especially sales made on the instalment plan which divert capital from legitimate enterprises. Another matter deserving attention is the easy credit and open account system prevailing
amongst the wholesale merchants and retailers throughout the
Province, and your Committee suggest that a stricter mode
of collections should be enforced and that accounts should
be more generally closed by notes, meantime a great advantage
is given to Eastern merchants who supply goods to retailers in
this Province, and it too frequently happens that drafts drawn
against their invoices are protected at maturity to the exclusion
of local creditors whose claims are more justly due. 32 BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
The outlook for continued prosperity within the Province is
encouraging, especially in the Kootenay mining Districts, but
although some years must elapse before the mines can be fully
developed the marvelous wealth of the country is already assured. The preliminary survey of the "Canada Western Railway" is a matter worthy of notice ; if the project is carried out
this line will open up vast tracts of rich grazing, agricultural
and mining lands which are at present inaccessible. The
enterprise will require immense capital, skill and ability,
anjl its importance to Vancouver Island can hardly be overestimated.
The incoming Council are recommended to press upon the
Dominion Government the just claims of Victoria to better
Custom House and Post Office accommodation, and we regret
to record continued neglect by the Federal authorities in this
connection. The Custom House was built in the year 1875,
when the business of the Port amounted to $390,441.12, against
$1,033,691.13 for the past twelve months. The Post Office was
completed and occupied in 1874, the gross revenue for that year
being under $8,000; for the year ending 30th ultimo the receipts were about $45,000. No further evidence should be
necessary to impress upon the Dominion Government the
urgency for replacing the existing accommodation with
modern buildings, suitable for the increased and growing
trade, and commensurate with the large revenue derived from
this Port.
The usual statistical information has been brought down to
date, and other new and interesting data will be found in the
Appendices.
The Board is to be congratulated upon its marked prosperity during the past year ; increasing interest in its work being
unmistakably manifested by the recent large accession of new
members. The commodious premises, now under construction,
will facilitate the business which year by year is entailing
greater labors upon the Council, and when completed, the new
Board room will furnish a resort where members can   conven-:
>*3 __ ANNUAL  REPORT. 33
iently assemble and thus result in increased usefulness of the
Institution.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Signed on behalf of the members of the British Columbia
Board of Trade.
THOS.  B.   HALL, President.
A. C. FLUMERFELT,   Vice-President.
F.   ELWORTHY,  Secretary.
Victoria, B. C, July 8th, 1892. |9 ANNUAL  REPORT.
British Columbia Board of Trade.
STATEM ENT
Showing  Financial.  Position  as on  30th  June,   1892.
35
ASSETS.
June 30, 1892.
Cash in Bank of British Columbia $1,065 58
"    Savings Bank  3 03
'*'    hand as per account  current  5 27
  $1,073 88
Funds Invested :
British Columbia Board of Trade Building Ass'n, L'd
L'y, 50 shares of Capital Stock @ $100.00  $5,000 o
Dues not Collected (good)  159 00
Rent    " " (Fisheries Commission)  20 co
Furniture in Board Room per last account $  280 00
"        added this year  5 25
$285 25
Less 10% allowance for depreciation, say         28 85
        256 70
$6,509 58
Total Assets, June 30th, 1891  4.872 94
Net gain for the year  $1,636 64
LIABILITIES.
Nil.
F. ELWORTHY,
Secretary- Treasurer.
Examined and found correct.
Matthew T. Johnston, \Audit Committee.
E. A. McQuade, /
Victoria, B. C, June 30th, 1892. 36 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
AUDIT REPORT.
To the President and Members of the British Columbia Board of
Trade :
Gentlemen,—We, the undersigned, appointed by your
Board to examine the accounts of the Secretary-Treasurer, beg
to report that we have examined the books, accounts, bank
books and securities, and we found the same true and correct.
The assets of the Board are follows :—
Cash in Bank of British Columbia. .... .$1,065 58
Cash in Savings Bank  3 03
Cash in Secretary's hands  5 27
Funds Invested :—
B. C. Board of Trade Building Assoc'n. 5,000 00
Dues not collected (Good)  159 00
Rent not collected (Fisheries Commiss'n) 20 00
Furniture  256 70
$6,5°9 58
Total assets, 30th June, 1891    4,872 94
Showing a gain of $1,636 64
The Liabilities are nil.
E. A.  McQUADE, \    Audit
MATTHEW T. JOHNSTON, I Committee.
w?
ft-
■»n     .1 APPENDICES.
List of Additions to the Library, with the Names of
the Donors (30th June, 1892).»
Merchants' Exchange,   St. Louis,
Chamber of Commerce, Hong Kong
" Yokohama
Annual Statement, 1890.
Report,
Board    of   Trade,
Napier, N. Z., " "
Dunedin, " "
Cooktown,        " "
St. Paul, U.S.A. £
Melbourne,    Annual     ''
Maryborough,   " "
Falmouth, " "
Trinidad, "
Vancouver, " "
Brandon, " "
" £        N.Westminster," "
" I Toronto, "
Chamber of Commerce, Edinburgh, "
" " Louisville, " "
" " Auckland, " "
" £ Geelong, "
" Adelaide, " "
" " Natal, " "
" " San Francisco, U.S.A.  "
Board    of   Trade,     Winnipeg,     Annual       "
" " London, Notice to Mariners, June and March,
" " Japan, Consular Reports, 1890-1891.
Thomas Earle, M.P Dominion Parliament Blue Books,
Public Accounts,
Preliminary Abstract, Can. Life Ins. Cos.,
Abstract of Statements, Ins. Cos., Can.,
Department of the Interior,
Indian Affairs, with map,
Inland Revenue, I, II, III,
1891.
1891-1892.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1891..
1891-1892.
1891.
1891-
1891.
1891-1892.
1891-1892.
1892.
1892.
1892.
1892.
1892.
1892.
1892.
1891
1891
1891
1891
1891
J 3«
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF TRADE.
Thomas Earle, M.P.
Col. E. G. Prior, M.P.,
E. Baynes Reed	
Sydney C. D. Roper....
R. T. Williams	
Thomas Allsop, London
Provincial Government.
<( it
H. C. Beeton	
H. C. Beeton.
Minister of Public Works,
Geological Survey Department,
Postmaster-General,
Minister of Justice,
List of Shareholders, Chartered Banks,
Minister of Agriculture,
Dept. of Fisheries with Supplement,
Board of Civil Service Examiners,
Mortuary Statistics,
Dept. of Railways and Canals,
Canal Statistics,
Secretary of State,
High Commissioner for Canada,
Department of Marine,
Militia and Defence,
Auditor-General,
Estimates,
Agriculture and Colonization,
Civil Service List of Canada,.
Public Printing and Stationery,
Chartered Banks, Dividends Unpaid, &c,
Railway Statistics,
Trade and Navigation,
Experimental Farms,
North-West Mounted Police Force,
Canadian Archives,
Votes and Proceedings, H. of Commons,
Senate of Canada,
House of Commons Debates,
Statistical Year Book of Canada,
B. C. Directory,
, History of Co-operation, 2 vols.
Statutes of British Columbia, 1891-
Journal of Legislative Assembly,
. London Board of Trade Journals, July,
to June, 1892.
. London Chamber of Commerce Journals,
1891, to June, 1892.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1893-
1891.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1891.
1892.
1892.
1892.
1891.
1890.
1892.
1892.
1892.
1891,
July, APPENDICES.
39
Report of Robt. Ward, Esq., Delegate from the British
Columbia Board of Trade to the Second Congress
of Chambers of Commerce of the Empire.
London, 9th July, 1892.
The President and Council British Columbia Board of Trade,
Victoria, B.  C. :
Gentlemen,—In pursuance of my appointment as your delegate to the
Second Congress of Chambers of Commerce of the Empire, I have the honor
to report that I duly attended the meetings of Congress held in the hall of the
Merchant Taylors' Company, Threadneedle Street, London, on the 28th, 29th
and 30th June, and July 1st, under the presidency of the Right Hon. Sir John
Lubbock, Bart., President ofthe London Chamber of Commerce.
Under the auspices of this large and influential body at the world's metropo
lis, the various commercial Chambers and  Boards throughout  the Empire were
first brought together by their delegates six years since ; the Congress just closed
being the second of its class, though foremost in general importance as compared
with the meeting held in 1886.
A glance at the list herewith, of Boards and Chambers represented, will show
the wide interest taken in the Congress by the commercial bodies of the United
Kingdom, India, Canada (which had the largest Colonial delegation) Australasia,
West Indies, Africa, China (Hong Kong) Singapore, with representation from the
British Chamber of Commerce in Paris, while delegates from several foreign trade
organisations were present as guests.
Through the generosity of the Master and Wardens of the Merchant Taylors'
Company, their magnificent hall was placed at the disposal of the Congress, and
the proceedings of nearly 300 delegates were thereby rendered more convenient
and agreeable throughout, besides affording ample accommodation to visitors and
press representatives.
The United Kingdom delegates were placed on either side of the great hall,
while Canada, Australasia and the other Colonies represented, were placed in sections between, according to their relative importance.
It is doubtless already known to the Board that public attention has been
lately almost entirely devoted to the general election now in progress throughout
the United Kingdom, and the Congress has lost thereby much valued interest
which it otherwise would have commanded. It can be readily understood that
commercial questions involving serious political points, might be dangerous for
parliamentary candidates and their friends to touch upon at this juncture, but as a
matter of fact, trade questions that have been debated in the late Congress are of
such importance to the Empire, that the government of the day, be it Liberal or
Conservative, is bound to take up and deal with them in the not distant future. 4-0
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
Commercial Relations between the Mother Country and her
Colonies.
The Resolution of the London Chamber of Commerce (The Right Honourable Lord Brassey, K.C.B.):
"That in the opinion of this Congress it is expedient that arrangements
should be devised to secure closer commercial union between the Mother Country
and her Colonies and Dependencies."
Passed unanimously, and another resolution of the London Chamber of Commerce (Mr. Nevile Lubbock.) :
" That a commercial union with the British Empire on the basis of free trade
would tend to promote its permanence and prosperity."
led to a lively debate, but an amendment suggested by Sir Chas. Tupper, to strike
out the word " free," and insert "freer," was accepted by the Congress.
The following resolution by the London Chamber of Commerce (Mr. G. W.
Medley) :
" That in the opinion of this Congress any fiscal union between the Mother
Country and her Colonies, and Dependencies, by means of preferential duties,
being based on Protection, would be politically dangerous, and economically disastrous ; and that the arrangement which, more than any other, would conduce to
an intimate commercial union, would be by our self-governing Colonies adopting,
as closely as circumstances will permit, the non-protective policy of the Mother
Country."
led to a long and spirited debate, and as its passage, which was apparent, would
have practically shelved resolutions from several of the Canadian Boards, it was
agreed to lay it over ; and eventually Sir Charles Tupper moved in amendment,
what had been intended as a motion by the Montreal Board of Trade, viz. :
" That in order to extend the exchange and consumption of the home staple
products in every part of the British Empire, a slight differential duty, not exceeding five per cent., should be adopted by the Imperial and Colonial Governments
in favor of certain home productions, against the imported foreign articles." '
The debate on this question lasted nearly two days, the Canadian side being
strongly led*by Sir Charles Tupper and the Montreal and Toronto delegates, while
the Free Traders ofthe Cobden school ridiculed the suggested revival of an imposition on food products,
I do not propose here to deal fully with the discussion that took place, as the
Board will be in a position to read the verbatim reports of the speeches and proceedings of Congress, which will shortly be ready. It is, however, significant to
note that Free Trade, Fair Frade, and Protection commanded the deepest interest,
nor is the fact to be ignored, that manufacturers from Birmingham, Manchester,
\ APPENDICES. 41
Barnsley, Sheffield, and other points, argued most strongly in favor of protecting
o a reasonable extent the industries'of their different sections in Great Britain.
It was pointed out by the President, that Parliament does not legislate for
any particular class of trade or manufacture, but for the greatest number to be
benefitted thereby ; but the Protectionists argued that their industries and the
thousands of men, women and children employed in them, were constantly being
forced out by unrestricted imports from foreign countries, that close their markets
by prohibitive duties to British manufactures.
In the result, upon a vote by Chambers, the amendmant was lost by a vote of
Noes   55
Ayes   33
Majority against    22
Mr. Medley's resolution being carried on a vote by Chambers by a majority
of only 13.
It will be interesting to note, when the proceedings of Congress are published
the feeling on this question, as expressed by votes, in the different parts of the
Empire.
The Colonies and European Treaty Clauses.
The following resolution from the Birmingham Chamber of Commerce :
" That this Congress is of opinion that every effort should be made by Her
Majesty's Government to promote closer commercial relations between the United
Kingdom and her Colonies and Dependencies, and to this end desires the abrogation of the European Treaty Clauses which at present hinder the same."
•was agreed to by the Congress without much discussion.
Boards of Conciliation for Labour Disputes.
On this important resolution, most interesting speeches will be found in the
proceedings of Congress, chiefly those of Mr. S. B. Boulton, Chairman of the
London Conciliation Boaid, and the Hon. Mr. Dibbs, Premier of New South
Wales, and the following resolution was passed :
London Chamber of Commerce (Mr. S. B. Boulton, Chairman of the London Conciliation Board) :
" That the frequent recurrence of labor disputes has caused and is causing
great damage to the commercial and manufacturing interests of the Empire. That
it is extremely desirable, in the best interests both of employers and employed,
that the re-adjustment of the rates and conditions of labour, which from time to
time are inevitable, should be brought about without the wasteful and calamitous
Tesults proceeding from strikes and lock-outs. And, that this Congress strongly
recommends the formation of properly constituted Boards of Labour Conciliation
L 42
BRITISH  COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
and Arbitration in all important centres of industry and commerce throughout the
Empire."
The Codification of the Commercial Law of the Empire.
Aberdeen Chamber of Commerce (Professor Dove Wilson, LL.D.) moved :
"That the Bills of Exchange Act of 1882 and the Partnerships Act of 1890
having established the practicability and benefits of codifying British Commercial
Law, it is highly expedient that the commercial law of the whole British Empire
should now be embodied in a code ; and that therefore Government be memoral-
ised by the Congress to initiate the steps necessary in order to the appointment
for the purpose of drafting such a code, of a Commission, on which the United
Kingdom, and all the Colonies and countries embraced in the Empire, should be
duly represented."
and after a short debate, the resolution was adopted.
Imperial Registration of Trade Marks, and the Adoption throughout the Empire of the Merchandise Marks Act.
Sheffield Chamber of Commerce moved :
" That in the opinion of this Congress, the general interests of the trade of the
Empire render it eminently desirable that the provisions ofthe Merchandise Marks
Act should be adopted, and actively carried out in all British Colonies and Dependencies in the same manner as has produced such beneficial results in the Mother
Country."
and although a difference of opinion was apparent, the resolution eventually carried by a large majority.
Bills of Lading Reform.
A long and interesting debate (in which your delegate took part) brought out
strong opposition from representatives of ship owners to any legislative interference
with their affairs being tolerated,.and they strongly recommended conferences between merchants and ship owners, to adjust questions of differences on the question of Bills of Lading conditions, but it was apparent that the merchants look
upon the owners as a large and powerful body, with distrust, and the following
resolution was eventually carried by a large majority :
"That this Congress desires to urge upon Her Majesty's Government, Home
and Colonial, the desirability of effecting by legislation : That any ship, carriers
by rail, or ships carrying goods or merchandise, where a through Bill of Lading
has been given, shall each or any of them be deemed to be contracting parties
under said Bill of Lading, and be made responsible to the consignee for any loss
or damage that may arise during the transmission of said goods to final port of
destination." 1
appendices. 43
Commercial Education, including the Scheme Initiated by the
London Chamber of Commerce.
This matter I consider is one that might be profitably brought to the attention
of the educational authorities in British Columbia. The proper qualification for
a commercial career, is one that ought to be acquired in our public schools, upon
which such liberal appropriations are annually made by the Legislature.
The resolution passed by Congress was introduced by the London Chamber
of Commerce (Sir Philip Magnus) :
" That this Congress, having before it the scheme for junior and higher commercial education, promoted by the London Chamber of Commerce, and believing
that systematic education of those destined for a commercial career is essential as
a means of meeting foreign competition both in the Mother Country and her Colonies and Possessions, as well as for providing efficient British clerks, and assistants in commercial houses;
Resolves :
{a). " That it be a recommendation from this Congress to the participating associations to take all possible steps to secure the adoption in their
respective localities of a course of commercial education best suited to local
requirements ;
(5). " That in order to encourage both schoolmasters and pupils, members of these Associations should, as far as possible, give a preference, in
employing youths, to those possessing commercial certificates ;
{c). " That these recommendations be forwarded by the London Chamber of Commerce, in the name of the Congress, to the whole ofthe supporting
Associations, together with documents relative to that Chamber's scheme, for
their information and guidance."
I took the opportunity, however, at Richmond, on the 2nd inst. (where I
had the honor ot proposing the toast of the London Chamber of Commerce, at one
of the magnificent banquets given to some 400 delegates and their friends) of
pointing out the general ignorance obtaining on this side with respect to geographical knowledge of the Colonies ; and I trust a few of the incidents which have
come within my own personal experience, and which I related, will do no harm.
The following resolutions were also taken up and passed by Congress, as
follows, viz. :
Emigration and Colonization.
London Chamber of Commerce (Sir Frederick Young, K.C.M.G.):
" That colonization, while equally desirable as an outlet for our congested
population and for the development of the Colonies, can be carried out most successfully by individual energy and enterprise, and private agencies supplemented
by State aid."
J I
44 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
The Necessity of an Imperial System of Decimal Currency,
Weights and Measures.
London Chamber of Commerce (Mr. Samuel Montagu, M.P.) :
"That the introduction of a Decimal System of Weights Measures and
Money is urgently needed, in order to increase our foreign trade, facilitate commerce, and render elementary education more effective and less expensive.
A System of Imperial Penny Postage.
Bradford Chamber of Commerce (Mr. E. P. Arnold Forster) :
" That in the opinion of this Congress the establishment of a uniform penny
rate of postage between the Mother Country and her Colonies and Dependencies
would not only tend to promote trade and freedom of intercourse throughout Her
Majesty's Dominions, but would, in an eminent degree, foster and extend the
cordial relations which at present exist between the various parts of the Empire.
This Congress therefore respectfully urges Her Majesty's Government to take
steps to secure, as speedily as may be, the establishment of a system of uniform
penny postage throughout the whole of the British Empire."
Light Railways.
North Shields Chamber of Commerce :
" That in the interests ofthe community at large, this Congress expresses its
■opinion that the construction of Light Railways should be carried out wherever
necessary and practicable."
Abolition of the Light Dues.
Montreal Board of Trade (Sir Donald E. Smith, K.C.M.G.):
" Whereas the system of maintaining the lighthouse service of a country by a
tonnage tax on shipping entering its ports is inequitable and does not now
■generally prevail; and
" Whereas the continuance of this system in Great Britain has provoked a
retaliatory tax on the shipping of this country by the United States, which is not
imposed upon ships from countries enjoying a free lighthouse service, British shipowners being thereby placed at a disadvantage with their German competitors ;
and
Whereas Canada, which maintains a free lighthouse service on its extensive
coast line, suffers by reason of Canadian ship-owners-(when engaged in American
trade) being compelled to pay, in addition to their share of the Canadian taxation,
the dues in British ports and the retaliatory tax in the United States •
Therefore resolved—That this Congress take steps towards procuring such
change in the system of maintaining the lighthouse service of Great Britain as will
relieve shipping from any direct charge therefor and the shipping of the Empire
■from liability to retaliatory taxation by foreign countries." appendices. 45
Treaties with Native Tribes and Territorial Delimitation.
Lagos Chamber of Commerce (Mr. John D. Fairley) :
" That in the opinion of this Congress the interests of British trade are certain
to suffer so long as the Government of this country does not, before, arranging or
•concluding treaties with native tribes, before recognising those made by other
nations, or before settling questions of delimitation of territory with other powers,
put itself in communication with British merchants trading in or with the places
in question, or with Chambers of Commerce, possessed of information as to the
interests involved."
" That a copy of this resolution be forwarded to the Prime Minister and the
the Secretary of State for the Colonies."
Several other questions of an important character had to be left over in con-
.sequence of no further time being available for discussing them, but the impression
generally prevailed that much good' might be expected as the result of the discus"
sions by Congress, the interchange of views of the delegates from so many
different parts of the Empire, and tbe personal intercourse between the public
■men, ship owners, merchants, and others connected with British commerce from
all parts of her Majesty's Dominions.
The late Hon. John Robson, as you are aware, had been appointed delegate
from Vancouver Board of Trade, but his unfortunate accident and subsequent
illness prevented his attendance. I took occasion to mention this after his decease,
-and on referring to the painful incident, the Right Honourable the President, Sir
John Lubbock, charged the British Columbia delegates to convey to our respective
Boards the deepest sympathy felt by the Congress at the untimely loss of Mr.
Robson.
I will only add that the London Chamber of Commerce by inaugurating
these commercial Congresses, has done so in the most thorough and hearty manner. Its organisations have been most skilfully planned and carried out by some
of the most prominent men of the day, men having the interests of Great Britain's
■commerce and greatness at heart; all working with a sincere desire to maintain
and extend that greatness, and moreover, to strengthen the unity of the Empire
itself.
The hospitality of London is proverbial, but nothing could excel the attention
■and generosity of the London Chamber of Commerce, in furnishing a continuous
•.series of magnificent entertainments to the delegates and their friends, by whom
they were most thoroughly appreciated. In addition to the hospitalities of the
London Chamber, Lord Brassey, Sir John Lubbock, Sir Whittaker Ellis, Colonel
^North and others, vied with each other in the same direction, and I am confident
ifhe delegates will not soon forget the uniform courtesy which met them on all sides.
I have the honor to be, Gentlemen,
Your obedient servant,
ROBT. WARD. 46 BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
Report of Committee on Northern Mail Service.
Victoria, Jan. 18th, 1892.
To the Council of the Board of Trade,  Victoria :
Sirs,—Agreeably to the request from the Secretary, we furnish below the
information desired respecting the mail service on the Northern route.
1. In the opinion of your Committee, the service should be fortnightly to the
following points, viz. :
Alert Bay, China Hat, Port Essington, Fort Simpson,
Rivers Inlet,     Lowe Inlet,        Inverness, Naas.
Bella Bella,       Irving, Metlakathla,
2. And to Skidegate monthly, and fortnightly or monthly to such other convenient points en route as may be established hereafter, when there is sufficient
business to warrant the steamer having the mail contract calling at such points.
Your Committee take this opportunity of directing attention to the great
injustice which has been done to the Northern sections of this Province, reached
by water communication, by the withdrawal of the mail service during several
months past, and urgently request the Board to press immediate action in the
matter.
As showing the importance of the district referred to, we beg to point out
that about 140,000 cases of salmon, are packed each season, at the different points
on this route, representing a large value, which is almost wholly expended in
labor and supplies. The district is also the source thiough which large supplies
are sent for interior trading points, and in many of the places settlers are increasing
rapidly.    With regular steamer communication, this district will rapidly develop.
Respectfully submitted,
J. H. TURNER,
Chairman of Committee.
Resolutions of Condolence.
Resolution ofthe British Columbia Board of Trade, passed October gth, 1S01 :
" That this Board desires to place on record its deep sense ofthe loss it has
sustained by the death of two of its members, Mr. Edgar Marvin, Sen., and
Alex. A. Green.    The former was one of the first elected members of the British
if — APPENDICES.
47
Columbia Chamber of Commerce, and a member of this Board' since incorporation ; Mr. Green having been an original member of the Board, and for many
years an active and valuable member of the Council."
Resolution ofthe British Columbia Board of Trade, passed April ist, 1892 :
Whereas, since the previous Quarterly General Meeting, two members of the
Board have passed over to the great majority; Mr. Jas. C. Bales having been
connected with the Institution since incorporation, and Mr. George Morison
having joined in 1880 ; Therefore, be it resolved, that the deaths be recorded on
the minutes, and votes of condolence be forwarded to the bereaved relatives."
List of Assays obtained from East Kootenay Ores
in 1891.
Date.
1891
Sept'r,
June..
Locality.
Mineral.     '    Assays to the Ton (2,000 lbs.)
June.
May.
Nov*r
McMurdo Creek Quartz .Gold $326.70.
" "            " Gold 15.43 oz.
"           " '    Gold $546.30.
"            " Gold $34.35.
"      Galena Silver 41.45 oz.
...      " Silver 177.29 oz.
...      " Silver 102.9 oz-> 'ead 69%.
Vermont Creek C*rey Copper. Silver 1169.33 oz-
"        "       I Silver 242.39 oz, gold $5.38.
"        "(average of.Galena and~|
18 samples from sur-   antimonial [-Silver 86 01 oz.
face of various leads)   copper . .. j
Crystal Creek   Silver 50.05 oz.
July . .   Copper Creek.
lead 79%.
lead 74°
lead 41-83%.
ISilver 1, in
Bugaboo Creek Silver 249.66 oz.
" a Silver 61.97 oz., gold nil.
Jubilee Mountain Copper ores. .Silver 129.91 oz., gold nil.
HowsePass Copper   12.7%,  silver  38.:
gold 19 dwt.
Windermere   Lead 46.7%, silver 38.75 oz.
$23-
Ottertail   Silveri9.25oz.,gold$3.25,lead60%
East Kootenay Silver 111.28 oz., gold $35.15.
" " Silver 107.79 oz., gold $1.25.
North-west of Golden. Antimo'l cp'r.iSilver 72.01 oz., gold $14 62.
East Kootenay.
Windermere.
Lost Creek..
ISkookum Chuck.
Grey copper
Silver 80 oz., gold $50.
Silver 43.99 oz., gold $i.co.
Silver 71.16 oz., gold $46.60.
Silver 610.58 oz., gold $7.
Silver 800.18 oz., gold $19.62.
Atinmo'l ore.jSilver 523.52 oz.
iHughes' Range-. !    (Silver 44.50 oz., gold $l.co
North-west of Donald. Copper ore . .Silver 243.85 oz. 48
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE
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Land Regulations.
Any person, being the head of a family, a widow or single man over 18 years
of age, being a British subject, or alien purposing to become a British subject, can
pre-empt 160 acres at $t.oo per acre ; but no Crown grant can issue until the pre-
emptor or his family shall have bona-fide occupied the pre-emption not less than
two years ; and further, in the case of an alien, until he has become a British subject. Two months leave of absence under the Land Act, and an additional four
months for sufficient cause, when applied for to the Chief Commissioner, can be
had in each year till Crown grant is obtained. A certificate of improvement,
showing that the claim has been improved to the extent of $2.50 per acre, is
necessary before Crown grant can be issued.
Timber and hay lands can be leased from the Government, the former for not
more than twenty-one and the latter for not more than five years. Timber lands
pay a yearly rental of ten cents per acre, and a royalty of 50 cents per 1,000 feet
on all logs cut. Leases of land for other purposes may also be granted by the
Lieutenant-Governor-in-Councij.
Rate of Wages paid in the various Trades in British
Columbia.
Per Day. Working Hours.
Bricklayers $5 00 9 hours
Stone Masons    5 00   9     "
Stone Cutters , '....   450 8     "
Plasterers    4 50 to $5 00 9     "
Hod Carriers    2 25 to    250 9     *'
Carpenters and Joiners      3 00 to    3 25.. . .9
Tinsmiths and Cornice Workers    3 00 9
Plumbers    3 00 to $4 00 9     "
Ship Carpenters and Caulkers, new work    4 5° 9
" " " old work    500 9     "
Cabinet Makers and Upholsterers    3 00 IO     "
Painters    3 00 to $3.25 9     "
Tailors Average wages $2 50—mostly piece work
Tailoresses      " "       ' 5°
Bakers—with board '...$65 to $ 75 per month
Butchers    75 to    I0°
Printers Piece work, 45c. and 50c. per 1,000 ems; time work, $21 per week
Wagon Makers $3 00 to $3 50 per day, 9% hours
Pattern Makers    3 00 to    350     "        10
Machinists, Boiler Makers and Blacksmiths..   3 00 to   325     "       10 V|
52 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
Steamboat Firemen $50 per month and Board
Stationary        "     $2 50 per day
'Longshoremen 45c- to 5°c per hour
Deck Hands $45 Per month and board
Laborers $2 per day
Machine Hands in Sash and Door Factories $3 25 to $4 00 per day
Farm Laborers $1 50 to $1 75 per day
" "      with board $3opermonth
Boot Makers   $2 00 to $3 00 per day
Steamboat Engineers $75 to $125 per month and board
Female Domestics $15 to $25 per month
With the exception of Domestic Servants, the supply of labor is greater than
. the demand.
Relative Values of Pacific Coast Fuels.
As an impartial estimate showing the superiority of the Vancouver Island
coals, the following table establishes the comparative value of these and other
fuels for steam-raising purposes, as found by the War Department of the United
States.
One cord' (8 feet by 4 feet by 4 feet) of merchantable oak wood is there said
to be equal to :
Pounds.
Nanaimo Coal (Vancouver Island)    1,800
BeUingham Bay Coal (Washington)   2,200
Seattle Coal (Washington)   2,400
Rocky Mountain Coal (Wyoming, etc)   2,500
Coos Bay Coal (Oregon)   2,600
Mount Diablo Coal (California)   2,600
The following statement of the weights of steam, obtained as the result of
working tests from a cubic foot each of various fuels, at a slow rate of combustion,
may also be referred to. The water to be evaporated had first been raised to a
temperature of 2120 F. The experiments were made by the Chief Engineer of
the U. S. Navy Yard at Mare Island :
Pounds
of Steam.
Nanaimo Coal   372.64
Rocky Mountain, Monte Diablo, Coos Bay and Seatt'e. 319.98 APPENDICES.
53
Table Showing the Annual Production of Coal in
British Columbia.
Tons.
Coal mined at Suquash by H. B. Co. at variqus times
between 1836 and 1852, say  10,000
Total Coal shipped from Nanaimo, October, 1852, to
November, 1859  25,398
1859 (two months) *  1,989
i860  14,247
1861  13,774
1862  18,118
l863  21,345
1864  28,632
1865  32,819
1866  25,115
1867  3i,239
1868  44,005
1869  35,802
1870  29,843
1871 (Exclusive of Wellington Mines)... .35,643  *\
1872 I        *'     " ....46,468 I g
1873 I       i     " ■•■-45,731 f 4 '4S9
(Wellington Mines, 1871-73 (21,182) J
1874  81,547
' 1875  110,145
1876 •  139,192
1877  I54.052
1878  170,846
1879  241,301
1880  267,595
1881  228,357
1882  282,139
1883  213,299
1884  394,070
1885  365,596
1886  326,636
1887  413,360
1888  489,301
1889  579,830
1890  678,140
1891 1,029,097 54.
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
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Ph •< <!      cioCJC •56
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
I
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cllSJI^
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> Ph ft, d, 0>0 2 APPENDICES.
57
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ta 58 BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
British Columbia Salmon  Pack, Season   1891.
Fraser River—
Ewen & Co   -.   	
Bon Accord Fishery Co	
"       " ** " (Sea Island)
Anglo   British Columbia   Packing*
*   Co., comprising-:
B. C, P. Co	
Phoenix	
B.A. P. Co	
Canoe Pass	
Wadhams	
Garry Point	
Dumfries	
Britannia *
Annandale ,
25-°45
9.49°
10,000
British Columbia Canning' Co.
Wellington Packing Co	
Delta Canning Co	
Laidlau* & Co	
Harlock Packing Co	
Beaver Canning Co	
Richmond Canning-Co	
Lulu Island Canning Co	
Total	
Alert Bay—
Alert Bay Canning Co	
Total	
River's Inlet—
British Col. Canning Co. (L'd)....
Wanuck Packing Co	
Total	
Gardiner's Inlet—
Price & Co. (L'd)	
Total	
Lowe Inlet—
Cunningham & Son	
Total	
Skeena River—
Inverness Canning Co .........
Anglo British Col. Packing Co. :
North Pacific -	
B.A. P. Co	
Standard Packing Co	
Skeena Packing Co	
Balmoral Canning Co	
British Columbia Cannery Co. (L'd)
Total.
Naas River— cases.
A. J. McLellan      5.473
Cascade Packing Co      2.77°
British Columbia Canning Co. (L'd)     2,080
56,025
7,126
9,200
9,180
12,116
5.684
12,985
".095
10,000
178,954
650
650
14,001
9.914
11,009
34.924
3.87°
3.876
10,717
25.>49
10,978
".793
9,914
9.584
78,135
Total.
10.323
Grand total 3*4.893
TOTALS FOR DIFFERENT LOCALITIES.
1890.
Fraser River 241,889
Alert Bay  7.280
River's Inlet  32,961
Gardiner's Inlet  3,7 '9
Lowe Inlet  6,087
Skeena River  90,995
Naas River  23,906
Bute Inlet  2,627
I78.954
650
34.924
3,876
8,031
78,i35
10,323
Total number of cases. .409,464   314,893
SHIPMENTS FOR   1891.
United Kingdom   ... ,# 220,761
Canada (Eastern Provinces)  60,950.
Australia  23,534
China        100
India        100
Singapore  50
United States        350
Local sales and stock on hand    8,948
Total	
DETAIL
TO  UNITED KINGDOM.
■314.893
London (direct) 122,850
Liverpool   "       93.417
I "   via Hong Kong     1.300
'• "   via C. P. Railway     3.194
Total 220,761
THE ANNUAL PACK.
(Since the beginning of the Industry.)
1876   9.847
•877   67,387
1878  113,601
1879  6l,093
1880  61,849
l88l  177,276
l882  255,Cl6l
1883  196,292
1884  141,242
l885  108,517
l886  161.264
1887  204,083
1888  184,040
If89 4I4»294
109° 409,464
l89f 314.893
British Columbia Salmon Fleet,   1891-2.
NAME.
. bark Serica	
.bark Callao	
. bark Lebu	
. bark Rothesay Bay.
. bark Wanlock	
. barkTitania	
■ bark City of Carlisle
FROM.
SAILED.
Victoria...
Victoria...
Victoria...
Westminster,
Victoria...
Westminster.
Victoria...
Sept. 29..
Oct. 6.. .
Nov. 19..
Nov. 18 A
Nov. 18..
Jan. 15 .B
FOR.
London ..
London ..
Liverpool
Liverpool
Liverpool
London ..
London .
CASES.
ARRIVED.
A-Sailed from this port Nov. «,    B-From Vancouver with part cargo of lumber
38,623 Feb. 23.
41,640 March 17.
30,811 April 6.
32,690 April 5.
29,916 April 19.
22,366; Mar.   16.
20,22l|july 3, APPENDICES.
Catch of Sealing Schooners, 1891,
59
The Board is indebted to the courtesy and kindness of Mr. A. R. Milne, Collector of Customs, for the following information re Sealing Fleet.
Vessel.
Tons.   Boats.
"W. P. Sayward  59
Sierra  35
Let tia  28
Annie C. Moore  113
Minnie I 46
Ocean Belle  83
Mattie Dyer  100
Sapphire  124
Triumph  98
Maggie Mac  71
Walter A. Earle  68
Am. City of San Diego. 48
Mary Taylor  43
Sea Lion  50
Geneva I 92
Rosie Olsen  3^
Pioneer  86
Aurora  42
Beatrice I 66
Thistle (steamer) I 147
E. B. Marvin  117
Oscar &Hattie  81
; Wanderer  25
Mascot    40
Mountain Chief.  23
Mary Ellen  59
Penelope  7°
Kate  58
Favorite  80
Winnifred  13
Canoes  35
Maud S  97
Walter L.  Rich  79
Carlotta G  Cox  76
Katharine  81
Umbrina  9°
Carmolite  99
May Belle  58
Teresa  63
C. II. Tupper  99
Ainoko j 75
Viva,  92
Labrador  25
Borealis I 37
Annie E. Paint [! 82
13
6
6
7
12
7
7
8
7
7
6
5
5
6
6
9
6
11
12
7
7
5
6
2
6
18
7
9
16
7
7
6
9
7
7
5
7
7
12
6
5
13
6
White
Crews.!
CATCH.
Lower
i      Coast.
6
23
24
20
23
24
20
17
iS
19
21
5
5
26
23
29
4
5
12
12
20
5
6
2
24
22
20
5
23
23
19
23
24
5
23
11
5
21
12
12
16
20
20
8
30
187
886
4
46
308
170
62
3°
176
137
198
96
54
354
3
40
162
53
59
9
276
54
7
7
21
21
229
404
Upper
Coast.
974
666
548
848
418
445
584
224
176
712
340
136
294
462
409
200
609
410
337
Behring
Sea.
394
519
5'7
.191
405
75i
701
307
235
406
1261
374
473
734
801
442
373
568
1588
22
1170
2435
171
3
1021
641
264
82
267
52
1484
47
876
82
1062
330
79
65
691
1100
2381
1030
21
1519
1224
504
1639
241
985
374
73i
216
1547
154
J 60 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
CATCH   OF  SEALING   SCHOONERS—Continued.
I
II
Tons.
1
Boats.
i
White    t
Crews.   -S
CATCH.
Vessel.
Lower
Coast.
Upper
Coast.
Behring
Sea.
19
91
48
85
I
15
5 •
6 14
7 16
4       20
7        6
61
1082
659
48
Otto
49 Vessels	
16 Canoes	
...i
Additi
3342
384
696   I356
4127
17443
28847
1 Catch
onal In
off Ku!
dian Ci
rile Islands
itch  b oug 1
 ICAO
399
1549
ht byTr
aders.
'"j |""| i APPENDICES.
Sealing Fleet, Season   1892.
61
The Board is indebted to the courtesy and kindness of Mr. A. R. Milne, Collector of Customs, for the following information re Sealing Fleet.
Name of Vessel.
CREW.
Maggie Mac...
Sea Lion.
Laura.
Teresa	
W. P. Sayward	
Annie E. Paint	
Walter A. Earle	
E. B. Marvin	
Minnie	
Umbrina	
Labrador	
Mascot	
Ocean Belle	
Oscar and Hattie. . .
Carlotta G. Cox
C. H. Tupper	
Carmolite	
Rosie Olsen	
Maud S	
Geneva	
Beatrice	
Mary Taylor	
Anioko	
Thistle (steamer)....
Aurora	
Pioneer 	
Viva    	
Borealis	
Penelope	
Annie C Moore....
Katharine	
Triumph	
May Belle	
Venture	
Ariel	
Kate	
Mischief (steamer)..
Sapphire	
Sadie Turpel	
Wanderer	
Victoria	
Winifred	
Favorite	
*Wrecked, 1892.
24
6
16
5
1
6
5
5
6
6
2
6
4
4
6
6
6
6
6
20
2
6
7
20
2
4
24
2
6
20
2
5
6
20
2
5
6
J-4
20
16
28
24
20
32
12
24
«      o
Date of Clearance.
January
Feb
9th,
[892.
12th,
"
fl2th,
tt
14th,
"
14th,
"
19th,
"
19th,
"
19th,
cc
2ISt,
"
22nd,
cc
27th,
cc
23rd,
cc
23rd,
tt
28th,
It
28th,
"
28th,
"
28th,
"
ISt,
cc
ist,
cc
2nd,
"
2nd,
cc
4th,
cc
5th,
"
6th,
cc
6th,
cc
8tb,
"
8th,
lL
8th,
il
8th,
cc
'3lh»
(C
13th.
cc
15th,
cc
18th,
cc
18th,
CC
18th,
cc
19th,
c c
19th,
"
19th,
19th,
cc
20th,
cc
20th,
cc
20th,
cc
22nd,
" 62
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
SEALING   FLEET,   1892—Continued.
Name of Vessel.
Walter L. Rich  76
Minnie   46
Mary Ellen  63
Henrietta  31
Fawn  59
Brenda  100
Mermaid  73
Mountain Chief.  23
Agnes McDonald... 107
Lottie  19
C. D. Rand  51
Otto  86
Arietas  86
Maria  94
Dora Sieward  94
Enterprise  69
Walter P. Hall  99
Willie McGowan... 115
'Libbie :... 93
Ariel  74
Total
4419
(American   " City
San Diego"
of
46
CREW.
19
4
5
4
6
26
19
4
24
4
6
7
24
21
25
23
24
20
28
10
20
4
12
16
Date of clearance.
10
14
5
10
Feb'y
March
April
939       488
18
•44
22nd,189
23rd,
26th,
12th,
26th,
28th,
3ist,
12th,
12th,
13th.
13th,
23rd,
25th,
26th,
30th,
nth,
13th,
14th,
i4th,
14th,
February 6th, 1892
May
VANCOUVER
SEALING   FLEET,   1892.
Tons.
Vancouver Belle...
C. D. Rand	
Beatrice	
SS. Eliza Edwards.
Labrador	
MaudM	
Crew.
..  24
52
49
37
16
47
L SHIPPING.
The Board is indebted to the courtesy and tyndpess of Mr. A. R. Milne,
Collector of Customs, for the following Shipping information :
PORT  OF VICTORIA,  B. C.'
Statement of Vessels, British and Foreign, employed in the coasting trade of
the Dominion of Canada, which arrived at or departed from this Port, during the
fiscal year ending 30th June, 1892 :
Vessels Arrived, British. Vessels Departed, British.
Description of No. Crew No. Crew
Vessels. Vessels.  Tonnage.      No. Vessels.  Tonnage.      No.
Steamers :
Screw  1058 399095 19615 1066 384741 19091
Paddle  275 222799 11824 275 206872 11680
Stern Wheel  63 '43218 1890 62 42532 i860
Total Steamers  1396 665112 33329 1403 634145 32631
Sailing Vessels :
Ships  1 750 14 3 2,793 68
Barques  2 2.048 33 7 6,209 98
Schooners  11 347 34 13 502 39
Sloops  89 461 194 95 492 210
Total Sailing Vessels... 103 3606 275 118 9996 415
Grand Total      1499     668718     33604             1521     644141 33046
recapitulation.
No.           Tonnage. Crew.
Arrived, British     H99         668718 336°4
Departed, British     1521         644141 33°46
Grand Total, Arrived and Departed  3,020    1,312,859 66,650
PORT  OF VICTORIA, B.  C.
Annual Return, shewing the description, number and tonnage of vessels
built and registered at this Port during the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1892 :
Class of Vessel. Built. Registered.
No.   Tonnage., No.   Tonnage.
Steamers :
Screw     7       J33 2 77
Sailing Vessels :
Sloops     6       270 2 84
Barges, etc   J3       828
Total Sailing Vessels      19     i°98 84
Grand Total   26      1231 4 161 64 BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
PORT OF VICTORIA, B.  C.
Statement of Vessels, British, Canadian and Foreign,  entered outwards
(for sea) at this Port during the year ending 30th Tune, 1892 :
With Cargoes.
Quantity
of Freight.
Countries to which No. of Tons Tons Crew
Cleared. Vessels.     Register. Weight. No.
British -.
United Kingdom  3 2636 3613 58
United States  I 864 15 35
Japan  10 17278 289 570
Total       14 20778 3917 663
Canadian :
United States         1 48 25 7
Foreign :
United States     491 447249 14868 28233
In Ballast.
British :
United States       18 23849   684
Canadian :
United Gtates       35 8994 .... 505
To Sea Fisheries       68 4817 .... 1024
Foreign :
United States     386 355280   18527
To Sea fisheries         1 46 .... 18
recapitulation.'
With Cargoes.
British       14 20778 3917 663
Canadian.:         1 48 25 7
Foreign     491 447249 14868 28233
Total _    506 46S075 18810 28903
In Ballast.
British       18 23849 .... 684
Canadian     103 13811   1529
Foreign     387 355326 .... 18545
Total     508 392986 20758
Grand Total    1014 861061 18810 49661 APPENDICES. 65
PORT  OF  VICTORIA,  B.   C.
Statement of Vessels,  British, Canadian and Foreign, entered inwards
(from sea) at this Port, during thed&cal year ending 30tfcjune, 1892 :
With Cargoes. In Ballast.
Quantity
ofFkeighx.
No. of     Tons           Tons         No. No.         Tons     No.
Whence Arrived.. .          Vessels. Register.     Freight.    Crew. Vessels. Register. Crew.
British :
United Kingdom      13      10763      14832        259      	
United States       I        1660 2 46      	
Japan       7      12295        I556       422      	
Sandwich Islands         ....          1       978       21
Total     21     24718      16390       727 1       978       21
Canadian :
United States       4         381          370         35 31      6845      456
Siam        I 904        1000 22      	
Peru  I      1371        17
Brazil  2     3119       40
From S. Fisheries     48        3617 260       771      	
Total      53        4902      1630       828 34    11335      513
Foreign :
United States  690   630951     28924   37853 194 172169   8567
Chili  1       622       13
Total  690   630951      28924   37853 195 172791    8580
Grand Total   764   660571      46944    39408 230 185104    9114
recapitulation.
British     21     24718     16390       727 1       978       21
Canadian     53       49°2       1630       828 34    11335     513
Foreign    690    630951      2892437853 195 172791    8580
Total   764   660571      46944    39408        230 185104   9114
Grand Total 994   845675     48522 66 BRITISH COLUMBIA BOARD OF TRADE.
PORT OF VICTORIA, B. C.
Statement showing the number of Vessels, with their tonnage and crews,
which arrived at and departed from this Port during the fiscal year ending 30th
June, 1892, distinguishing the countries to which they belong :
Arrived. Departed.
Under what Flag.               No.       Tons.          Crew. No. Tons.        Crew.
British     109     41933       2089 136 58486       2883
United States     880    798838     46331 878 802575      46778
Norwegian and Swedish..        2        1734           29 .... ....         ....
Nicaraguan         2        2548           60                ....         ....
Chilian         1          622            13 	
Total     994    845675     48522 1014 861061      49661
recapitulation.
Birtish Steamers           39      21069         944 59 47376        1690
British Sailing Vessels ...      70     20864        1145 77 HIJO        1193
Total British     109     41933        2089 136 58486        2883
Foreign Steamers     852    800568     46289 857 801889     46690
Foreign Sailing Vessels...      33       3174         144 21 686           88
Total Foreign     885    803742      46433 878 802575      46778
Total British and Foreign.    994   845675      48522 1014 861061      49661
Exports the Produce of Canada, from the Province o^
British Columbia, for 21 Years ending June
30th,   1892:
Animals and
Agric'l
Miscel
Year.
The Mine.
Fisheries.
Forest.
their Produce.
Products.
laneous.
Total.
1872
$1,389,585
$    37.707
$214,377
$214,700
$     142
$   1.540
$,1858,051
1873
1.224,362
43.36i'
211,026
259,29a
2,885
1.197
1,742,123
.874
1.351. '45
114,118
260,116
320,625
5.296
443
2.051,743
'87s
1,929,294
J33.986
292,468
411,810
9,727
2.777.285
1876
2.032.139
7*>338
273.43°
329,027
3,080
68
2,709,082
1877
1,708,848
105,603
287,042
230,693
3.083
1,500
2,346,969
1878
*.759'17-
423,840
327.36o
257.3*4
462
2,768,147
1879
i,53°.8i2
6.33.493
273,366
268,671
2.505
2,7081848
1S80
1,664,626
317,410
258,804
339.218
3.843
100
2,584tOOZ
1881
1,317,079
400,984
172,647
350.474
248
22
2t23I»5S4
1882
M37.073
976,903
362,875
300,429
946
2,616
3,080,841
1883
1.309.646
J.332.385
407,624
287.394
6,791
443
3,345,263
1S84
1,441,052
899.37'
458.365
271,796
1.745
!>4i3
3,100,404
1885
I.1S9.S1*
727,672
262,071
4*4.364
2,324
5i948
3.i72»39i
1886
'•'7Z°,33S
643,052
194,488
329,248
'•go?
2,811
2,891,811
1S87
1,832,827
910,559
.235>9'3
380,126
10,265
1,911
3,371,601
18S8
1,889,805
1,164,019
44L957
318,839
27.631
85,826
3,928,077
1S89
2.377.052
993.623
449,026
397.68s
14.831
102,089
4.334.3°6
1890
2.374>7'7
325.881
346,159
9.823
113,271
5'545*6zi
1891
2,930,229
2,274,686
374.996
294,646
5,016
20,434
6,257.158
l8g2
2.979.47o
2,351,083
425.278
390,854
25,018
31.976
6»574-989 APPENDICES.
67
Imports into the Province of British Columbia for
21 Years ending 30th June, 1892.
Value of
Total
Imports.
Goods F
NTERED FOR
Home Consumption.
Dutiable
Goods.
Free
Goods.
Total.
Dutv
Collected.
To 30th June, 1872	
$'•790,352
$1,600,361
S   166,707
$1,767,068
$342,400 40
From Canada	
22,215
22,215
22,215
To 30th June, 1873	
2,191,011
1,569,112
507.364
2,076,476
302,147 65
From Canada	
75.604
75.604
75.604
To 30th June, 1874	
2,085,560
1,676,792
371.544
2,048,336
336,494 47
From Canada	
66,104
66,104
66,104
To 30th June, 1875	
2,543.552
1,924,482
566,111
2,490.593
413,921 50
From Canada	
117.054
"7.054
117.054
To 30th June, 1876	
2.997.597
2,237,072
707,906
2.944.978
488,384 52
From Canada	
129,735
129.735
129.735
To 30th June, 1877	
2,220,968
1,820,391
346,318
2,166,709
403.520 21
From Canada	
163,143
163,142
163,142
To 30th June, 1878	
2,244,503
1,905,201
367.926
2,273,127
426,125 14
From Canada	
144.754
'44.754
'44.754
To 30th June, 1879	
2,440,781
1,997,125
320,326
2,317.454
484,704 04
From Canada	
184,951
184.951
184,951
To 30th June, liSo	
1,689,394
1,614,165
122,451
2,457,116
45o,i75 43
From Canada	
208,072
208,072
208,072
To 30th June, 1881	
2,489,643
2,214,153
242,963
1,736,616
589.403 62
From Canada	
387.-*-
387,111
387,'"
To 30th June, 1882	
2,899.223
2.472.174
404.287
2,875,461
678,104 53
From Canada.......
449,768
449,768
449.768
To 30th June, 1883	
3.937.536
3,331,023
550.833
3,866,856
907.655 54
From Canada	
624,207
624,207
624,207
To 30th June, 1884	
4,142,286
3.337.642
702,693
4.040.335
884,076 21
From Canada	
789,287
789.287
789,287
To 30th June, 1885	
4,089,492
3.458.529 ■
564,923
4.023,452
966,143 64
From Canada	
927.054
927.o54
927,054
To 30th June, 1886	
3.953.299
2.951.379
1,060,347
4,011,726
880,226 65
To 30th June, 1887	
3.547.852
3,065,791
560,348
3,626,139
883,42- 53
To 30th June, 1888	
To 30th June, 1889	
3.509.95'
• 3.763.*27
2,674,941
2,002,646
729,266
807,140
3,401,207
3,809,786
861,465 14
974.675 69
To 30th June, 1890	
To 30th June, 1891	
4.379.272
5,478,883
3.357."'
4,261,207
1,030,375
1,074,983
4,287,486
5,336,190
1,075,215 20
1,346,059 42
To 30th June, 1892	
6,495.589
4,423,414
1,803,005
6,226,419
1,412,878 00 68
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
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c
rt BYE-LAWS
British Columbia Board of Trade
AS   AMENDED   TO   JULY   8th,   1892.
MEETINGS.
I. The Annual General Meeting of members of the " British Columbia
Board of Trade " shall be held on the first Friday in July, at 3 p. m. The Regular
Quarterly General Meetings of the Board shall be held at the same hour on the
first Friday of the months of January, April, July and October, each year, and at
the time prescribed for the Annual General Meeting. Should the day of meeting,
either Annual or Quarterly, fall on a legal holiday, the meeting shall be held the
following day.
QUORUM.
II. At any General Meeting fifteen members present in person shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business. Should a quorum not be formed
by 3.30 p.m. on any occasion, the meeting shall stand adjourned for one week.
At Council Meetings, five shall form a quorum (including the President, Vice-
President, or member elected to act as chairman).
PLACE  OF  MEETING.
III. The place of meeting shall be arranged from time to time by the
Council, and mentioned in the notices calling eich meeting, until such time as a
regular place of meeting shall have been determined by the Council.
ORDER  OF   BUSINESS.
IV. Reading Minutes of last Meeting.
Reports and Communications.
Elections to fill Vacancies.
Unfinished Business.
Miscellaneous Business.
Nomination and Election of New Members. BYE-LAWS. J i
AUDIT.
V. At the Regular Quarterly General Meeting held in April of each year,
the President shall appoint a committee of three to audit the books and accounts
of the Secretary-Treasurer for presentation at the Annual General Meeting.
VI. (a) All motions, except those for previous questions, postponement or
adjournment, shall be made in writing ; and no debate shall be permitted except
on a motion regularly moved and seconded ; every motion made in writing shall
be read by the proposer in his place previous to offering it to the President.
{b) Unless with the consent of two-thirds of the meeting, no subjects shall be
introduced for discussion at any General Meeting of which notice has not been
given in writing, either at a previous meeting or to the Secretary ten days prior to
the holding of such General Meeting, and the subject for discussion shall be stated
by the Secretary in his notice of the meeting.
{c) No member shall speak twice on the same subject, except by permission
or by way of explanation.
(d) A member may call for a division on any motion, should any doubt exist
as to the ruling of the President or chairman of the meeting.
ALTERATION  OF  BYE-LAWS.
VII. Notice to amend any Bye-Law, or to introduce a new one, shall be
made in writing at the Regular Quarterly General Meeting next previous to the
one at which it is intended to be considered. Any such notice as aforesaid, must
contain in full the wording of the proposed amendment or addition.
ENTRANCE  FEE AND  SUBSCRIPTIONS.
VIII. (a) After the Annual General Meeting to be held in July, 1891, any
. person desirous of joining the Board of Trade, shall pay an entrance fee of Thirty
Dollars ($30.00), in addition to his annual subscription.
(b) The annual subscription of members shall be Twelve dollars, payable by
quarterly instalments of Three dollars, the first instalment thereof payable in
advance to the Secretary, at the office of the Council of the Board of Trade.
(c) Managers or Agents of all Incorporated Financial, Commercial or Manufacturing Institutions in the Province, who are members in good standing of this
Board, and who are desirous of leaving the Province or resigning their respective
positions, may by and with the consent of said Board, transfer their certificates of
membership to their respective successors in office, which successor on being duly
proposed and elected as a member of the Board, shall be entitled while holding
such office to all the rights and privileges of his predecessor without the usual fee
of $30.00 for membership. 72 BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
(d) Members in arrears for three months shall be deemed delinquent, and their
names may be posted up in the office of the Board for one month, and the Secretary shall notify them to that effect. After thirty days from the date of such
notice and posting, their names shall be liable to be removed from the " Roll of
Members."
(e) A list of delinquent members (if any), if called for by any member, shall
be read at each Quarterly General Meeting, and their names duly entered on the
minutes of said meeting.
ARBITRATION.
IX. (i) Before any arbitration can be entered upon, the parties shall execute
a bond of submission as provided by Statute.
(2) In case of arbitration, the Arbitrators shall be selected from the "Board
of Arbitration," as follows:—Each party shall choose one Arbitrator, and the
third Arbitrator shall be drawn by lot from the remainder of said Board by the
Secretary of the Board, in the presence of the parties, unless a third shall have
been agreed upon or chosen by the Arbitrators within three clays after the submission of the parties.
(3) The decision of the majority of the Arbitrators shall be final and binding
on both parties.
(4) The fee for each Arbitrator shall be as follows :
(a) For every meeting where the cause is proceeded with, but an
enlargement or postponement is made at the request of either party,
for each Arbitrator, not less than   $ 5 00
Nor more than   10 00
{b) For each day's sitting to consist of not less than five hours, for
each Arbitrator    15 00
(c) For every sitting not extending to five hours (fractional parts
of hours being excluded) where the arbitration is actually proceeded
with, for each hour occupied in such proceedings, for each Arbitrator,
at the rate of   3 00
(d) Preparing forms of submission bond and forms of oath (to
litigants not being members of the Board) $5.00 per set, said fee to be
applied to the funds of the Beard.
5. If any Arbitrator who has been duly selected in manner aforesaid to act,
refuses or neglects to attend such arbitration, he shall be liable to pay to the Secretary of the said Board a fine of $5.00 for each and every day on which he
neglects to attend such arbitration, unless relieved by the Council. All fines
inflicted as aforesaid, to form part of the revenue of the Board of Trade. BYE-LAWS.
VOTING AND EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS OF COUNCIL.
73
X. (i) At all meetings of the Board, no member shall be entitled to vote
who has not paid all dues payable by him.
(2) Officers, Council and Arbitration Board shall be elected by ballot.
(3) P^t Presidents and Vice-Presidents in office one year and upwards, shall
be ex-officio members of the Council until retiring from the Board.
EXPULSION  OF  MEMBERS.
XI. Wilful violation of the Constitution or Bye-laws, breach of verbal or
written contract, or other dishonorable conduct in business on the part of any
member, shall, when reported in writing to the Council by any member pf the
Board, be taken into consideration ; and if, after the party charged therewith has
had an opportunity of defending himself, the Council shall be of opinion that he
is guilty of misconduct, it shall suspend him from membership until the next
Quarterly Meeting when the question shall be submitted and dealt with accordingly • or should the Council consider the case one calling for expulsion of the
member, it shall pass a resolution to that effect, and submit the question to the
next General Meeting of the Board ; a vote to expel shall be by ballot, and must
be carried by at Jeast two-thirds of all the members present at such meeting. In
the event of the expulsion of a member, all fees due by him to the Board shall be
recoverable under the Statute. The names of members who may have left the
City of Victoria or the Province under dishonorable circumstances, may be removed from the "roll of members " by the Council.
STANDING COMMITTEES.
XII. {a) At the first Council Meeting after the passing of this Bye-law, and
thereafter at the first Council Meeting following each annual election, the President or Vice-President shall have power to appoint standing Committees, who shall
consider and report to the Council upon any subjects submitted for their action.
(b) Each Committee shall appoint its own chairman, and shall notify the
Secretary of the Board accordingly, and such notification shall be entered upon
the records and read to the Board at its next regular meeting.
(c) The Standing Committees shall be as follows :
Fisheries t0 consist of five.
Manufactures  nve-
Harbors and Navigation  five.
Statistics  " three-
Mining and Property  three.
Public Works and Railways  five.
Finance  " three- SCALE   OF   COMMERCIAL   CHARGES
ADOPTED  BY  THE
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE
JULY,   1891.
Whenever no special agreement exist, the following shall be collectable :
On the purchase of stocks, bonds and all kinds of securities, including the drawing of bills for payment of the same 2^ per cent.
On sale of stocks, bonds and all kinds of securities, including
remittances in bills and guarantee 2^4
On purchase and sale of specie, gold dust and bullion 1
On sale of bills of exchange with endorsement 3J^
On sale of bills of exchange without endorsement 1
For endorsing bills of exchange when desired 2^
On sale of produce, etc., from California, Oregon, Washington
State, Sandwich Island Ports and other Pacific Coast Ports,
with guarantee
14-
16.
17-
18.
 iH
On sale of merchandise from other ports with guarantee 10
On goods received on consignment and afterwards withdrawn..3^
On purchase and shipment of merchandise, with funds on hand,
on cost and charges 5
On purchase and shipment of merchandise, without funds,  on
cost and charges 7^
For collecting and remitting delayed or litigated accounts 10
For collecting freight by vessels from foreign ports, on amount
collected 5
For collecting general claims 5
For collecting general average, on the first $20,coo, or any
smaller amount     c
For collecting general average, on any excess over $20,000.. . .2 5^
On purchase or sale of vessels 5
For "Port Agency" to vessels with cargo or passengers from
foreign ports, as under :
On vessels under 200 tons register $ 50 00
of 200 to 300 tons register    100
of 300 to 500    "        "      ...
over 500 tons	
00
150 00
200 00
19. For disbursements of vessels by consignees with funds on hand.2 W 1
SCALE   OF   COMMERCIAL' CHARGES. 75
20. For disbursements of vessels by consignees without funds on hand. 5       per cent.
21. For procuring freight or passengers 5 "
22. For chartering vessels, on amount of freight, actual or estimated,
to be considered as due when the " charter parties," or memorandum of their conditions, etc., are signed 5 "
23. On giving bonds for vessels under attachment in litigated cases,
on amount of the liability 2 V,        "
24. For landing and re-shipping goods from vessels in distress on
invoice value, or in its absence, on market value 5 "
25. For receiving and forwarding goods on invoice amount 1% "
26. For advancing on freight to be earned 5 "
27. For effecting marine insurance, on the amount insured   ^ "
28. The foregoing commissions to be exslusive of brokerage, and
every charge actually incurred.
29. Vessels to pay clerk hire and the labor on wharf, sorting and
delivering cargo.
30. The receipt of Bills of Lading to be considered equivalent to
receipt of the goods.
31. Guarantee or security for contracts or liabilities 5 "
32. Acting as Trustee on assignments 5 "
33. On investments made on mortgage or otherwise 1 "
N.B.—Auctioneers' commission and brokerage to be charged when incurred.
34. Land agents for commission on sale and purchase of real estate.5 per cent.
35. Interest on advances for duty, freight and lighterage, and on
accounts current, per annum .•. 1 per cent, over current bank overdraft rates.
RATES   ON   STORAGE-  OF   MERCHANDISE.
STORAGE  PER   MONTH.
On measurement goods 50 cents per ton of forty cubic feet (40 c. ft ) On
heavy goods 50 cents per ton of 2240 lbs. Or in either case the amount actually,
paid if more. The consignee to have the option of charging by measurement or
weight.    Any fraction of a month to be charged as a month.
REGULATIONS.
(a) Concerning the delivery of merchandise, payment of freight, etc.: When
no express stipulation exists per bill of lading, goods are to be considered as deliverable on shore.
(b) Freight on all goods to be paid, or secured to the satisfaction of the
captain or consignee of the vessel, prior to the delivery of the goods.
(c) After delivery to the purchaser of goods sold, no claims for damage,
^deficiency, or other cause, shall be admissable after goods sold and delivered have
once left the city. 76 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
(d) When foreign bills of lading expressly stipulate that the freight shall be
paid in a specific coin, then the same must be procured if required, or its equivalent given, the rate to be determined by the current value at the time at the banks.
WHARVES.
(1) The proprietor or occupant of the adjoining property may "overlap" by-
using the outer berth, or may use the inner berth if not required.
(2) Not more than two vessels shall be allowed to lie abreast of any wharf
at the same time, unless they can do so without occupying a greater depth (or
space) than 60 feet from the water front.
The foregoing Bye-laws, Rules and Regulations, were submitted to the members present at the Annual General Meeting of the British Columbia Board of
Trade, held July 3rd, 1891.
Approved, July 8th, 1892.
PORT   CHARGES.
PORTS  OF  VICTORIA  AND  ESQUIMALT,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA.
Vessels bound to other Ports, coming to an anchor in Royal Roads, Pilotage
free, except services of Pilot are employed, when Pilotage according to the following graduated scale shall be payable :
Inside or North of Race Rocks to Royal Bay $0 75 per foot.
Beachy Head to Royal Bay   1 50     "
Pillar Point to Royal Bay   3 00     "
Cape Flattery to Royal Bay   6 00     "
Vessels entering into or clearing from undermentioned Ports :
Victoria and Esquimalt Harbors (under sail) $3 00 per foot.
"     (under steam or in tow)   2 00     "
" "     (steamers)    1 50     "
Half of said rates when vessel is spoken and services declined.
$10.00 for removal in either harbor.
Foreign Tugs over 80 tons pay lA pilotage outwards, whether spoken or not.
Vessels proceeding from Victoria to Esquimalt, and vice-versa, and having
discharged or received a portion of their cargo in either harbor, and having paid
full pilotage into either harbor, if proceeding with the assistance of steam shall
pay $1.50 per foot.
Towage from Royal Roads or Esquimalt to Victoria Harbor, from $50.00 to-
$75.00. SCALE   OF  COMMERCIAL  CHARGES. 77
Towage from Victoria, Esquimalt Harbor, or Royal Roads, to Sea, outside
Cape Flattery, from $100 to $150.
Towage from Victoria and  Esquimalt Harbor, or Royal Roads, to Burrard
Inlet or Nanaimo and back :
For Vessels 400 tons and up to 500 tons $350 00
500 600   "      400 00
600        " 700   "      42500
700        " 800   "      45000
800        " 900   "      475 00
" 900        " 1000   "      52500
" 1000       " 1100   "      S5000
" 1100       " 1200   "      575 oo-
Over 1200 tons  600 00.
SIGNALS.
One Whistle, Trim Yards.
Two     "        Set Fore and Aft Sails.
Three   "        Square Sails.
Four     "       Let go Hawser.
Ships to supply their own Hawser.
Ballast—(Shingle)—From $1.00 to $1.25 per ton.
Fresh Water (at Esquimalt)—60 cents per 1,000 gallons.
" (at Victoria)—   60 cents per 1,000 gallons.
Wharfage Free.
Hospital Dues—Two cents per ton register. Sick Mariners are provided with
medical attendance and board free of charge, at the Government Marine
Hospital, Victoria.
Stevedore Charges—For Stowing Salmon, 50 cents per ton weiget of 2,240 fts.
For Stowing Lumber, from $1.15 to $1.50 per thousand feet.
For Discharging General Cargo, 50 cents per ton of 2,240 lbs.
Ballast to be discharged in not less than 20 fathoms of water.    This applies
also to the harbors of Nanaimo and Burrard Inlet, B. C. If
78 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
Esquimalt  Graving Dock.
1. Length of Dock on blocks 430 feet, can be made 480 feel.
2. Width of Gates   65 feet.
3. Depth of Water, varying from 27 ft. to 29 ft. 6 inches at springs, according to
season of year.
SCALE  OF  CHARGES   FOR   USE  OF  DOCK.
The use of the Dock will be subject to the following tariff, viz. :
For each follow-
For the ing- day
first day of        including the
Gross Tonnage of Vessel. docking.        undocking day.
TONS. PER TON.
For all vessels up to 1000 $400 00 10 cents
From 1000 to 2000    500 00 8 cents
''     2000 to 3000    600 00 6 cents
1'     3000 to 6000    700 00 5 cents
All fractional parts of 50 tons to be counted and paid for as 50 tons. Cargoes
lo be charged at the same rates as tonnage, and no charge for ballast. Each day
to be counted from 7 a.m. to 7 a.m., and each fractional part of a day will be
•charged as one day.
No reduction will be allowed for Sundays and holidays.
N. B.—No vessel will be admitted into the Dock until she has been duly
entered in accordance with rule and regulation No. 1, on the entry books in the
Dock Master's office, nor until after the sum of two hundred dollars ($200.00)
shall have been paid to the Dock Master as an entrance fee.
W ADVERTISEMENTS.
79
DODWELL, CARL1LL & Co'y
Shipping # Commission.
GENERAL   AGENTS-
Wm Pacific stmsi
W^W
-TO
JAPANS CHINA
Through Bills of Lading granted on shipments to
and* from usual Pacific Coast Points.
Also, Common Overland Points.
OFFICES at Victoria, B. O.; Tacoma, "Wash.; Yokohama
and Kobe, Japan; Hong Kong, Shanghai, Foochow, China;
London, England.
For Passage and Freight Rates, apply to
DODWELL, CARLILL & CO.,
TROUNCE AVENUE, VICTORIA, B. C. iC
80 ADVERTISEMENTS.
BEAUMONT BOGGS & CO.,
FINANCIAL"
Estate, insurance Brokers
GENERAL   COMMISSION   AGENTS.
DEALERS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA BONDS, DEBEN-
TURES AND REAL ESTATE.
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
Investments for Non-residents made with the
greatest care.
Money loaned for absentees on first mortgage,
unquestionable security at 8% interest.
Estates and Accounts adjusted.
Valuations made in confidence.
ffire, %\U anft Hccifrent 3nsurance iSffecteb.
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
INFORMATION  CHEERFULLY FURNISHED   ON  APPLICATION  TO
BEAUMONT BOGGS & CO.,
Notary Public for British Columbia, and Commissioner for the Province
of Nova Scotia.
p. o. box 126.     yiCTORIH, B. C.
Office—BROAD ST.    Cable Address-BEAU. ADVERTISEMENTS. 81
BANK  OF  MONTREAL.
ESTABLISHED   IN   1817.
INCORPORATED BY ACT OF PARLIAMENT.
CAPITAL (all paid up) $12,000,000
RESERVE FUND -       6,000,000
PIE-A-I")   OFFICE,        -       OVIIOISrT'IElEi.A---..
Sir D. A. Smith, K. C. M. G , -       -       - President.
Hon. G. A. Drummond, -       - Vice-President.
E. S.  Clouston, ______ General Manager.
Alexander Lang, _ Asst. Gen. Manager.
A. Macnider,    - Chief Inspector.
VICTORIA BRANCH:
CORNER OF GOVERNMENT AND BASTION STS.
Drafts and Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world, and
Telegraphic Transfers made.
Collections made at lowest rates and promptly remitted for.
EVERY  DESCRJPTIOJ-I  OF B/\NKI^C BUSINESS Ti-|ANS/\CTED.
Savings  Bank   Department.—Deposits of $4.00 and upwards
received, and interest allowed at the highest current rates.
A. J. C. GALLETLY, Manager.
BEAIvTC-IES:
Almonte,   Ont.        Guelph, Ont. Nelson, B. C. Sarnia, Ont.
Belleville,    " Halifax, N.S. New York, N.Y. Stratford, Ont.
Brantford,    " Hamilton, Ont. N. Westminster,B.C. St. John, N.B.
Brockville,   " Kingston,    " Ottawa,      Ont. St. Marys, Ont.
Calgary, Alberta.     Lindsay,      "    . Perth, Toronto,      "
Chicago, III. London,      " Peterboro,     " Vancouver, B. C.
Chatham, N. B.       London, Eng. Picton, " Victoria,        "
Chatham, Ont. Moncton, N.B. Quebec, Que. Wrillaceburg, Ont.
Cornwall,    " Montreal, Que. Regina, Assna. Winnipeg, Man.
Fort William, Ont.
Correspondents in all the leading cities of the world. 82
ADVERTISEMENTS.
The Colonial Metropole
27, 29, 31, 33, 35, 37 JOHNSON ST., VICTORIA, B.C. ADVERTISEMENTS. 83
ROBERT WARD er- CO. (Ltd. Lty.) Represented in London by
VICTORIA. Messrs. LT. J. GARDINER 6* Co.,
Royal Swedish and Norwegian 1 Gresham Buildings,
Consulate. Basinghall, E. C.
ROBERT WARD & Co.
(LIMITED LIABILITY.)
"\T I O T O IR I _A_ ,   IB.   O.
ERCHANTS I IMPORTERS
Execute Indents for every description of British and Foreign Merchandise,
Lumber, Timber, Spars, Fish, and other products of British Columbia.
Shipping and Insurance Agents.   Charters Effected.
Managers-.agents BRITISH CO LU M BIA CO R PO RATION, L'd.
MORTGAGES,   DEBENTURES, TRUSTS,  ic.
<®—G-IEHSTrEZR-AJL,   AGENTS—-®
ROYAL INSURANCE COMPANY.
LONDON k LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO.
STANDARD LIFE ASSURANCE CO.
LONDON & PROVINCIAL MARINE INSURANCE CO., Ltd.
LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION, (MARINE).
WESTERN ASSURANCE CO.
RlsT_s Accepted, Policies Issued and Losses Promptly Adjusted in Victoria.
©•—SOLE!   ^_.<3-_±!_SrTS—-©
Curtis's & Harvey's Sporting and Blasting Powder.
J. & W. Stuart's Patent Double-Knotted IVJesl] Fishing Nets, Twines, &c.
Importers Of HAYANA CIGARS, OILMEN'S STORES, TIN PLATES, R
Agents for the following brands of British Columbia Salmon:
Ewen & Co., "Lion ;" Bon Accord Fishery Company, "Bon Accord ;" The
'• Consul's "Brands; A. J. McLellan's "Express" Brand.
Canadian Pacific Packing Co.
EOBEBT WARD & CO., (Limited Liability), 76 WHARF STREET, VICTORIA, B. C.
Cable Address: " ROBERTUS,"  Vancouver Island. ADVERTISEMENT S.
TLhe Colonist   j
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING CO., LT'D. j
VICTORIA,   B.  C.
*»■«!■■•"■**■-* _**■_."»*
*
AAA
Newspaper,
Lithographing,
Book,   Job and
Label Printing.
—I
m^JK^n^M.m-m^m^Kj^K.
i ffbe 2>aU\) Colonist, established iasa.
\
The Leading Paper of British Columbia.
Subscription Price, $10.00 per Year.
Advertising Rates on application.
Zbe Meekly Colonist,
Price $2.00 per year, mailed to any address in
Canada or United States.   Sample copies free.
@-—ADDRESS :—©
THE COLONIST, Victoria, B. C. ADVERTISEMENTS.
85
IM Hotel-.Victoria
ON AMERICAN and EUROPEAN PLAN.
Artistically Furnished
Exclusively First-Class.
The  Finest Sample Rooms in the Dominion for
Commercial Men.
CORNER GOVERNMENT
AND JOHNSON STS.,
VICTORIA, B. O
I G. BAVID6E & GQ
Shipping Agents, Commission Mercliants Ig Importers.
 AGENTS    FOR	
The UPTON  LINE OF STEAMSHIPS
TO   CHINA   AND   JAPAN.
SAMUEL   SAMUEL   &   CO.,  JAPAN,   RICE,  SILK AND
MERCHANDISE.
THE TOKIO LEATHER PAPER MILLS, JAPAN.
THE CANVAS MILLS OF KOBE, JAPAN.
CHAS.  CAMMELL & Co.,  LIMITED.
<CYCLOP'S   STEEL  AND   IRON   WORKS, SHEFFIELD,
WORKINGTON, Etc.,  ENGLAND.
COMPANIA GENERALE DE TABACOS DE FILIPINA.
JE>. O. BO^ 318,   VICTORIA,  B. C. 86 ADVERTISEMENTS.
Bapl^ of British Columbia
INCORPORATED    BY    ROYAL   CHARTER,   1862.
0_=_F>IT_=_L_,      - $3,000,000
(WITH   POWER   TO   INCREASE.)
RESERVE    I=UND,    -    $1,300,000
LONDON  OFFICE—60  LOMBARD STREET,   LONDON.
Branches at San Francisco, Cal.: Portland, Or ; Victoria, B.C ; New Westminster, B. C; Vancouver, B. C; Nanaimo, B. C; Kamloops, B, O.;
Nelson, B. C.; Tacoma ana Seattle, Wash.
AGENTS AND CORRESPONDENTS:
In Canada—Bank of Montreal and branches and Canadian Bank of Commerce, who will
undertake remittances, telegraphic or otherwise, and any banking* business with Br. Columbia.
In U. S.—Agents Bank of Montreal, 59 Wall St., New York; Bank of Montreal, Chicago.
United Kingdom—Bank of British Columbia, 60 Lombard St., London ; National Provincial Bank of England, North and South Wales Bank, British Linen Co.'s Bank, Bank of
Ireland.
India, China, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Hong: Kong* and Shanghai Bank Corporation; Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; English, Scottish and Australian
Chartered Bank; Bank of Australasia; Commercial Bank Co. of Sydney. Mexico and South
America—London Bank of Mexico and South America.
Telegraphic transfers and remittances to and from all points can be made through this
bank at current rates. Collections carefully attended to and every description of banking*
business transacted.   -
The Brackman & Ker Milling Co.,
(LIMITE 3_>)
 MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN	
FLOUR,® BRAN      I   -
■*riV>T- ? . ■
®        HAY, j GRAIN
MEALS.SPLIT PEAS, &c.
Highest Cash Price Paid for Good Milling Oats.  ^"soiISted61109'
Mills at Ocean Dock.    Office and Warehouse, Government St., Victoria. ADVERTISEMENTS.
BANK OF BRITISH NORTH AMERICA
ESTABLISHED   IN   1836.
INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER IN 1840.
PAID   UP   CAPITAL,      -      -       -      -       -£1,000,000
RESERVE   FUND, -      -      -      -      -     £265,QOO
LONDON OFFICE:—3 Clements Lar*-e, Lombard Street.
. BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA:
VICTORIA—C. H. Burqs, Manager.   VANCOUVER   W. Godfrey, Manager.
The Bank has also Branches and Agencies in New York, San Francisco, U.S.; London,
Brantford, Paris, Woodstock, Hamilton, Toronto, Kingston and Ottawa, Ont.; Brandon and
-Winnipeg, Man.; Montreal and Quebec, Que.; Fredericton and St. John, N.B.; Halifax, N.S.
Agents in Great Britain:—Bank of Liverpool, National Bank of Scotland, L'td and
Branches; Provincial Bank of Ireland, L'td and Branches; and National Bank, L'td and
Branches.
Remittances made to and from all points by Draft, Letter of Credit, and Telegraphic
Transfer through the Bank's London Office, Branches, Agents and Correspondents. . Collections made on favorable terms and promptly remitted for.
THE   LEADING   HOTEL   IN   THE   CITY 88 ADVERTISEMENTS.
P  O. Box:—301.       Cables and Telegrams :—Chanett.      Telephone:    27.
J. E. CRANE & CO.
(successors to crane, mcgrcgor & boggs),
30 BROAD STREET, VICTORIA, B. C.
# II, BOW LANE, CHEAPSIDE, LONDON, E. O.
1Real )£state, insurance anft y*f
(3eneral (Lommiesion £le»ent6,
IP
/lljercbanta, jBrofcers, Etc
INSURANCE &c, DEPARTMENT.
SUN Life Insurance Company, of N[or-treal. ]
EASTERN Fire Insurance Company. -J.   E.    CR/\NE
Victoria Hydraulic Mining Co. I ~
MERCANTILE DEPARTMENT.
Dr. Jaeger's Sanitary Woollen ClothingCo., (London, Eng.)
Wiggins, Teape & Co., Lt'd, BanK Papers, (London, Eng.)
Marcus & Co., Washable Cashmeres, (Bradford, Eqg.)
Scott & Co., Special Scotch Whiskies, (Glasgow, Scot.)
JOHJJ BENNETT-]      Miller et Cie, Cigars, (Crai-d Canary Islands.)
Ceylon Tea Plantation Co., Ceylon and English Breakfast
Teas, (London, Eng.)
Whight & Co., Tl-e "Prim,a Donna" Sewing Machines, (London,
England,) &c, &c, &c.
REAL  ESTATE &c,   DEPARTMENT.
Real Estate. Mining Properties. *i
Stocks and Scares. Bor-ds a^d Debentures. I    n   a   PIIUMIMPUAM
•     Timber Limits. Coal Larjds. f   "■ «- bUWWIWUHAM
Arbitrations and Valuations. J
Money Loaned on First Mortgage on unquestionable security.
Investments for non-residents made with the greatest care and handled with the closest
attention.
Estates managed for Absentees. ADVERTISEMENTS. 89
GREEN, WORLOCK & Co.,
(Successors to GARESCHE, GREEN & GO.)
^•B-K- N • IO E- R• S-fc
GOVERNMENT STREET,    -    VICTORIA, B. C.
DEPOSITS RECEIVED ON LIBERAL RATES OF INTEREST.
DRAFTS, ORDERS, TELEGRAPH TRANSFERS, AND LETTERS
OF CREDIT ISSUED DIRECT ON OVER 10,000 CITIES IN
THE U. S., CANADA, EUROPE, MEXICO and CHINA.
COLLECTIONS MADE AT EVERY POINT.
GOLD  DUST PURCHASED AT HIGHEST MARKET RATES.
AGENTS FOR WELLS, FARGO & CO.
THOMAS EARLE,
WHOLESALE  GROCER
AND  IMPORTER.
PIONEER STEAM COFFEE  AND SPICE MILLS,
VICTOEIA,   IB-   O-
-.A-GHE-STT }?OE-
f\\ert Bay Qappii^ ^ompapy, /.lert Bay. g0 ADVERTISEMENTS.
R. T. WILLIAMS,
;     ;     PUBLISHER,    :     :
BlankBookMANUFA CTURER
:   And PAPER RULER.    :
28 Broad St.,   -  Victoria* B. C.
IDictoria:: Steam:: JSaker^
OFFICE :
57 FORT STREET.
FACTORY :
91 NIAGARA STREET,
<*\K R SMITH & CO.N
Manufacturers of Every Description of
PLAIN AND FANCY CAKES AND BISCUITS.
Sold by all Leading Crocers.    Orders Promptly Attended to.
P. O. 289.   TBLBPONB 121.
iik l  

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