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BC Historical Books

Twenty-second annual report of the British Columbia Board of Trade, together with various appendices,… Victoria (B.C.). Board of Trade 1901

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Full Text

 TWENTY-SECOND
ANNUAL REPORT
-OF the-
British Columbia
Board of Trade,
Together with Various Appendices, List of Members,
Office Bearers, Commercial Charges, Etc.
OFFICE: BOARD OF TRADE BUILDING, VICTORIA, B. C.
OCTOBER,   1901
DBER    28TH,     1878 CONTENTS.
t of Past Officers from i.
Lumber and Ti
Fri
ish Colun
hh S
almon Pac
ealing Cat
h Columb
ti Columbi
,   Imports
1900....
1900...
Bri
ish Colun
toms  Sta
biaS
Briti
Britis
thju
Brib
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Co.
Im,
sh   Colum
for 30
Ex
years end
ing J
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and Sno
13 Statio
nate of V
sus Popu
dway Sta
me Protec
bia, 1898
nand Ste
ier and P
de of Con
es on Sto
ling Regi
athly
rf_U.
Table
al Re
nsin
and Annu
al
Rainfall
Cor
Me
of Annua
R
ainfall..
|
, B. C....
Ra
Ga
Hon)
British Cc
Vet of Bri
_
"elm-
des..
jIpF.
Sc<
Ra
Mi
Pr
al Charge
ofMercha
ment Land
!
*£? BRITISH COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
L. G. McQUADE,
C. F. TODD,    .
F. ELWOETHY,
OFFICERS J90M902.
J. G. Cox,
Thomas Earle
D. R. Ker,
J. A. Masa,
John Piercy,
E. V. Bodweli
F. C. Davidge.
H. M. Graham
D. R. Ker,
COUNCIL-
Lindley Crease
A. B. Frasee,
Henry Croft,
H. M. Grahame,
Simon Leiser, C. H. Lugrin,
A.'G. McCandless, T. W. Paterson
E. G. Prior, R. Seabrook.
BOARD OF ARBITRATION!
Gavin H. Burns, J. G. Cox,
Thomas Earle, a. B. Fraser,
Richard Hall, H. D. Helmcken,
G. A. Kirk, A. G. McCandless.
STANDING COMMITTEES.
FISHERIES i
'Ggs, G. A. Kirk, B. C. Mess
Walter Morris, W. A. Ward.
MANUFACTURES i
l, D. R. Ker, W. J. Pendra*s
J. A. Sayward, H. J. Scott.
HARBOURS AND NAVIGATION i
Clarke, J. G. Cox,
N. Hardie, J. W. Trc
PUBLIC WORKS AND RAILWAYS!
l, H. F. Bullen,
T. W. Paterson,
FINANCE!
Wm
B. W.
W.
'. Oli
MINING AND PROPERTY!
AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY,
AUDITORS s
B. S. Heisterm; of Commerce of Victoria, Vancouver 1
TEAK.
PRESENT.
VXCE-PRESIDENT.
SECRETE
R Burnab
A. F. Main
1864
C. W. Wallace	
Jules David	
A. F. Main
1865
Jules David	
A. F. Main
1866
Henry Rhodes	
A. F. Main
1867
Henry Rhodes	
Gustav Sutro	
Robert Plummer.
1868
Henry Rhodes	
Gustav Sutro	
Robert Plummer.
1869
Henry Rhodes	
Gustav Sutro	
Robert Plummer.
1870
Henry Rhodes	
Gustav Sutro	
Robert Plummer.
1871
Henry Rhodes	
Gustav Sutro	
Robert Plummer.
1872
Henry Rhodes	
E. Grancini	
Robert Plummer.
1873
Henry Rhodes	
T. L. Stahlschmidt'.
Robert Plummer.
1874
Henry Rhodes	
T. L. Stahlschmidt.
Robert Plummer.
Henry Rhodes	
T. L. Stahlschmidt.
Robert Plummer.
1876
Henry Rhodes	
T. L. Stahlschmidt.
Robert Plummer.
1877
Henry Rhodes	
T. L. Stahlschmidt.
Robert Plummer.
1878
Henry Rhodes	
T. L. Stahlschmidt.
Robert Plummer.
Officers of tlie Britisli
Board of Trade,
YEAR.
PRESIDENT.             1         VTCE-PRESmENT.
Oct. 28th,
■ R. P. Rithet, J.P..
1878, tp
William Charles ...
E. Crow Baker.
1880-1..
.  R. P. Rithet, J.P..
William Charles ...
E. Crow Baker.
1881-2..
. R. P. Rithet, J.P..
William Charles ...
E. Crow Baker.
1882-3..
.  R. P. Rithet, J.P..
Roderick Finlayson.
E. Crow Baker.
1883-4..
.  R. P. Rithet, J.P..
Roderick Finlayson.
E. Crow Baker.
1884-5..
.  R. P. Rithet, J.P..
Mat. T. Johnston...
E. Crow Baker.
1885-6..
.Jacob H.Todd, J.P.
Edgar Crow Baker..
Wm. Monteith.
1886-7..
.Jacob H.Todd, J.P.
Thos. Earle	
Wm. Monteith.
1887-8..
.  Robert Ward, J.P..
.  Robert Ward, J.P..
T. R. Smith	
1888-9..
Thos. Earle	
Wm. Monteith.
1889-90.
.  Robert Ward, J.P..
Thomas B. Hall....
F. Elworthy.
1890-1..
.  Robert Ward, J.P..
Thomas B. Hall...
F. Elworthy.
1891-2..
.  Thomas B. Hall...
A. C. Flumerfelt...
F. Elworthy.
1892-3..
. Thomas B. Hall ...
A. C. Flumerfelt..
1893^..
.  A. C. Flumerfelt...
C. E. Renouf	
F. Elworthy.
1894-5..
.  A. C. Flumerfelt...
C. E. Renouf	
F. Elworthy.
1895-6..
. D. R. Ker	
Gus Leiser	
F. Elworthy.
F. Elworthy.
1896-7..
.  D. R. Ker	
G. Leiser, G. A. Kirk
1897-8..
.  G. A. Kirk	
W. A. Ward	
1898-9..
.  G.A. Kirk	
W. A. Ward .......
F. Elworthy.
1899-19C
: W. A. Ward	
L. G. McQuade	
F. Elworthy.
1900-01.
.   W. A. Ward	
L. G. McQuade	
F. Elworthy. MEMBERSHIP ROLL.
.  Drake, Jackson
.  Paints and Van-
Baker, M	
Barnard, F. S
Barnard, G. II.
Baxter, C. S	
Beckwith, J. L	
Beeton, H. C   33 Finsbui
Bell, H. P	
R. Baker & Son	
B. C. Elec  Ry. Co., Ld .
McPhiUips, Wootton & B.
Bethune, J. T	
Billinghurst, E. E....
Blackwood, E. E	
Bodwell, Ernest V ...
Boggs, Beaumont	
Bone, W. H	
Boorman, W. W	
Brenchley, A	
Brown, George McL
. White Horse, Y. T	
. B. C. Development Co....
.  Alaska S. S. Co	
. Bodwell & Duff	
.  T, N. Hibben & Co	
.  Victoria Print'g & Pub. Co.
.  F. R. Stewart & Co    	
n Pacific Ry	
1, P. R   The Coloni
James   Victoria Truck & Dray Co.
n, John   Albion Iron Works	
. H. F   B. C. Marine Ry. Co	
, W. F., J. P   Esquimalt Marine Ry	
GavinH	
Hay and Grain.
Managing Director.
Barrister-at-Law.
Customs Broker.
Commission Agent.
Civil Engineer.
Mining Broker.
Agent.
Barrister-at-Law.
Insur. and Gen. Agt.
Bookseller and Statn'
President.
Executive Agent.
Manager.
Managing Director.
ShipE
Cassidy, Robert   Barrister-at-Law
Challoner, W. L   Challoner, Mitchell & Co.. Jeweler.
Christie, Wm   C. P. R. Telegraph Co   Manager.
Clarke, Chas. E '....  Harbour Master
Claxton, Fred. J    Land Agent.
Cohen, H. Hirschell   Cassiar Central Ry   Man. Director.
Coigdarippe, J         Retired. ARD   OF   TRADE.
Courtney, Geo. L   Esq.
Cox, Capt. J. G   E. E
Crease, Lindley Crease & Crease   Barrister-at-Law.
Croft, Henry, J. P   Consulting Engineer.
Cusack, Thos. R   Printer and Publisher.
Davidge, F. C	
Day, Robert S	
Dewdney, Hon. Edga
Duff, L. P	
' Dunsmuir, James, M. E. P..  Union Collieries   Presidei
Dupont, Major C. T   Retired.
Davidge & Co., Ltd  Shipping Agent.
   Architect.
Bodwell & Duff   Barrister.
Earsm
.  Ears
man & Co
...  Commissi
Ebert
, Hon. D.M., M.P.I
. Ebe
rts & Taylor	
...  Barrister-
Elwor
hy, F	
.  B. C
. Board of Trade..
..  Secretary
Erskir
e, R	
.  Ersk
ine, Wall & Co....
.    Grocer.
Ewen
Alexander	
.  Ewe
n & Co.  (Westmins
er) Canner.
ester, J. L     Paints, etc.
er, F. W., J. P (Ashcroft, B. C)   Merchant.
er, A. B   Walter S. Fraser Co., Ltd.. Merchant.
Goodacre, Lawrer
Gordon, B  	
Gosnell, R. E....
Goward, Albert T
Gowen, C. N....
Grahame, H. M..
Grant, Capt. Wm
Greer, B. W	
B. C. Electric I
.  Manager,
ver.) Manager
.  Supt. of B. C BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OP   TRADE.
Hall, R. H., J. P      Hudson's Bay Co  In charge.
Hall, Richard, M. P. P...  Hall & Goepel  General Agent.
Hall, John A   Victoria Chemical Works. . Managing Director.
Hardie, Norman   Dodwell, Carlill & Co  Agent.
Hayward, Charles  Contractor and Builder
Heisterman, B. S    Heisterman & Co    Insurance and Finance.
Helmcken, H. D., M.P.P.. Drake, Jackson & H  Barrister-at-Law.
Henderson, A  Vic. Transfer Co., Ltd.... Superintendent.
Henderson, Wm   Henderson Bros  Druggist.
Higgins, Hon. D. W	
Hinton, John A     Hinton Electric Co., Ltd.. Electrician.
Holland, C. A    B. C. Land & Invt. Agcy.. Managing Director.
Hunter, Joseph, M. P. P..  E. & N. Railway  Gen. Supt.
Jamieson, Robert
Jensen, William.
Johnson, E. M ..
Johnston, M. T.
Tones, Stephen .
,  Findlay, Durham &B..
Ker, D. R	
   Brackman
Ker Mill Co
, Ltd., Man'gDirec
King, Chas. R ...
...  Manfg. Agent.
Kirk, G. A	
 Turner, B
neton&Co..
....  Merchant.
Langley, W. H   Martin & Langley  Barrister-at-Law.
Leiser, Simon    S. Leiser & Co  Wholesale Grocer.
Lenz, M   Lenz & Leiser  Wholesale Dry Goods.
Lindsay, Jas. A   R. Dunsmuir & Son  Auditor.
Loewen, Joseph  Vic. Brew. & Ice Co., Ltd. Director.
Lubbe, T  Furs and Skins.
Lugrin, C. H   Daily Colonist  Editor.
Luxton, A. P     Davie, Pooley & Luxton... Barrister-at-Law. BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
Macaulay, H. C...
Macaulay, Norman .
MaclureJ. C	
Mara, J. A	
Marvin, E. B  	
Mason, C. Dubois..
McAlister, John ...
McCandless, A. G..
McQuade, L. G....
Mess, Bernhard C.
Milne, G. L	
Mitchell, James  ...
More, A. W	
Morris, Walter	
Munn.D J	
Munsie, W	
.  Robt. Ward & Co.
E. B. Marvin & Co
. (San Jose, Cal.) ...
.  A. W. Mor
.  (New Westi
,  Merchant.
Merchant.
Merchant.
.  Ship Chandler.
rister-at-Law.
. Clothier.
Ship Chandler.
Oliver, W. T..
Vic. Lum. and Mfg. Co., Ltd. (Chemainus), Mgr
Piercy, J	
Pike, M. Warburton..
Pither, Luke	
Pitts, S.J	
Pooley, Hon. C. E., J
Prior, Lt.-Col. Hon. 1
.  Clarke & Pearson .
.  Pemberton & Son
.  Pendray & Co	
.  Tupper & Peters ...
OK
   Barrister-at-Law.
    Wholesale Dry Goods.
   Explorer.
    Wine Merchant.
   Barrister-at-Law.
ir&Co., Ltd., Hardware, etc. [ COLUMBIA BOARD OF TRADE.
Redfern, Chas. E	
.   Manufac
uring Tewele
Rithet, R. P	
.... R.
P. Rid
et & Co., Ltd.
.  Mer. and
Shipping Ag
Robertson, Arthur  ...
...  Ma
tin &
Robertson ....
.  Com mis.
ion Agent.
Robertson, A. Stuart .
... Glo
be Can
& Mill Co...
.  Manager
Robins, S. M	
..    Van
. Coal
Co. (Nanaimo)
.  Superint
endent.
Ross, Harrie G	
.   ..  Dix
ieH.
Ross& Co....
.  Grocer.
Sehl, Jacob...
Shallcross, J. J
Shotbolt, Thon
Simon, James,
nith, H
;, J. P. .
Lumber Merchar,
.  Manager.
Vice-President.
.  Shallcross, Macaulay & Co.  Merchant.
   Druggist.
Can. Bank of Commerce.. Manager.
M. R. Smith & Co  Biscuit Manufacturer.
Smith, Thos. R   Robt. Ward & Co., Ltd.. . 'Merchant and Shipper.
Spencer, C   David Spencer  Dry Goods.
Spratt, C. J. V    Victoria Machinery Depot.. Proprietor.
Stemler, Louis   Stemler & Earle  Coffee and Spice Mills.
Swinerton, R. H   Swinerton & Oddy  Land Agent.
Taylor, E. A   Royal Bank of Canada .... Manager.
Temple, Ernest   Hickman Tye Co., Ltd .... Manager.
Templeman, Hon. Wm  Times Printing Co., Ltd... Managing Editc
Thomson, Jas   Hudson's Bay Co  Manager.
Todd, C. F     J. H. Todd | Son  Wholesale Groc
Troup, Jas. W      Can. Pacific Nav. Co  Manager.
Turner, Hon. J. H  Turner, Beeton & Co  Merchant.
Ward, W. A
Ward, Robt .
>n, E. C. .   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
Wan
. D.,
apt..
Weiler, Otto  Weiler Bros .
Welsh, E. E    B. C. Market
Wey, W. G  Bradstreet Co
Wilkinson, C. H  9, New Broac
Williams, Robert T	
Wilson, William   W. & J. Wilsc
. London.
. Publisher.
.  Clothier. TWENTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT
The British Columbia Board of Trade
JULY 1st, 1900, TO JUNE 30th, 1901.
To the Members of the British Columbia Board of Trade :
Gentlemen,—Following the annual custom, adopted by retiring officers during the past twenty-one years, it is our privilege
to submit for your consideration a brief review of the conditions
and leading commercial events of the Province, and in order
that you may readily judge the progress made during the past
twelve months, it is proposed to deal with the various subjects
in the order with which you are familiar.
Mining. Lode  mining
development, for
output of such mines in 1894 -
lion dollars.     During the tweb
1900, the output was a little over 1
of nearly 50% compared with produ.
The number of shipping mines inc
output resulted principally froi
:   still   in   the   initial   stage  ol
will be remembered that the
s only three quarters of a mil-
months ending 31st December,
' ten million dollars, an increase
uring the previous year,
to 99, but the increased
ted shipments froi
the
oldei
ind fun
; bodies.
shes evidence of the  permanence  of the 12 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
Trail Creek. In the Trail Creek division two mines shipped
200,609 t°ns of ore during 1900 and the shipments
from seven others aggregated 17,017 tons additional. Extensive development works proceeded on many other properties.
On one of them 113 men were constantly employed, although
there were no shipments of ore. From the number of certificates of work issued in 1900, it appears that there are 520 claims
for which it is desired to obtain Crown grants. Shipments from
Trail Creek have greatly increased lately and during the first
six months of this year are about equal to those made in the
twelve months of 1900. The ore produced by these mines contains gold, silver and copper, which is extracted by smelting.
Boundary Creek. The country to the west of Trail Creek, embracing Grand Forks and Kettle River, is known
as the Boundary Creek District. The ores are "copper-gold "
somewhat similar to that mentioned ; though richer in copper
and lower in gold so far as discovered. For this reason and in
consequence of the cost of transportation to smelters the mines
only recently commenced shipping. During 1900 the shipments
totaled 97,000 tons. Between ist January and 30th April this
year over 100,000 tons were shipped. The underground explorations in this division exceed twelve miles and the successful
operation of the shipping mines, based on smelter returns, have
stimulated increased activity in development works.
Nelson. In the Nelson division there has been a marked
improvement in development work, although not
much change in output. Additional, stamp-mills have been
recently installed and larger returns may be looked for. The
future of Nelson is .very promising, for only a few of the properties being worked have marketed their product. Work was
done on over 1700 mines and claims.
Slocan. There are 40 shipping mines in the Slocan divi
sion. The output in 1900 was 35,000 tons and
the shipments this year to the middle of May exceed 10,000 tons.
The mines of this division, producing silver and lead principally,
have been dependent on the United States for a market. The
ore is mostly high grade, still, in consequence of the fluctuations ANNUAL  REPORT. ' 13
in the price of the metals it contains, there have been times
when some of it would barely return a profit after paying United
States duty and transportation to the far distant smelters. It
has become apparent, as a means to establish silver-lead mining
on a proper basis, that refineries must be established in Canada
and the Dominion Government has agreed to bonus the manufacture of pig-lead from Canadian lead ore in Canadian territory
as follows :—$5 per.ton for every ton of refined lead produced
during 1902, $4 per ton during 1903, $3 per ton during 1904,
$2 per ton during 1905 and $1 per ton during 1906. This bonus
is considered a sufficient inducement to encourage the home
manufacture of pig lead, instead of exporting the crude ore, as
is now done, and the Dominion Government may be congratu- -
lated upon the wisdom of granting the petition of the mine
owners at the proper time. The richness of the Slocan division
is proved beyond question and with the establishment of lead
refineries its possibilities, so far as can be seen, are practically
unlimited.
In the Lardeau and Trout Lake division there
coveries under develop-
silver-lead with gold, and
there is also free milling gold quartz. There was considerable
excitement lately in consequence of a "strike" of free milling
ore on Incommappleux river. Incommappleux riv
by steamer from Arrowhead, distant about 7 miles
Lardeau and
Trout   Lake.
any important
The ores com
; reached
East Kootenay.       Fort Steele mining divisior
has  shown marked improver
in East Kootena-
value  was $2,210,151  in  1900,  as  against $64,393  in   l899-
Three mines contributed largely—due  to  recent   railway con
struction, a fact which it is desired to emphasize.    One of these
mines shipped 16,000 tons of ore averaging 50 to 55% lead and
20 to 25 ozs. silver.    In the Fort Steele division 105 properties
are held under Crown  grants  or certificates  of improvement.
Work  was certified to  have been done on 704 others and 470
new locations were recorded in 1900.
In   the Golden and Windermere   divisions   there   was   an
increase of output but the total  is  not   important.    One of the 3IA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
n Toby creek, Windermere, shipped 500 tons of ore
eraging 50% lead and 50 ozs. silver at a cost of $7.85 for
nsportation between the shaft mouth and steamer on Colum-
t river, distant only 17 miles.
mining operations are entirely dif-
reviewed.    Although bodies of rich
pper-gold and silver-lead ores have been located, lack of proper
s retarding development  and   the  search  for
similar deposits is deferred.    Placer mining on the creeks continues but the output of such gold is not large.    Large sums of
money have been invested in  installing hydraulic plants, which
just beginning to  be productive.    Shafts  have been
sunk in the dry beds of former rivers and tunnelling is being
continued   with encouraging results.    The output of gold  in
1900 from the hydraulic operations and dry diggings was equal
to the combined output of the previous two years.
neca. Omineca mining division, adjoining Cariboo on
the north, is more difficult to reach, and many mineral claims which would be considered rich if provided with
easy communications remain undeveloped. Some placer claims
are being worked and hydraulic plants have lately been installed.
It is expected that they are in operation this season.
Atlin. Experience has  shown   that  the gold-bearing
grounds of Atlin can be more advantageously
worked by hydraulicing than by the usual placer process of
saving the gold. The plants installed by several companies in
1900 arrived too late to be of much benefit to their owners last
season, but the work done in locating pay gravel will permit
done this year. Latest advices report six
hydraulic plants in operation and others nearly ready to commence. At the close of 1900 there were 182 hydraulic leases in
force. It is too early to forecast the result. Royalty was paid
on 11,490 ozs. of gold product in Atlin during 1900, but probably does not represent the total output. Atlin has an advantage of being more accessible than the adjoining country to the
south and during the summer can   be   reached   by train   and ANNUAL   REPORT. 15
steamer within 24 hours of leaving the ocean steamships. The
cost of living is moderate. There has been considerable prospecting for quartz, and some properties under development are
producing satisfactory results. Samples of quartz have been
found showing free gold to the naked eye. A mill test of
274 tons of ore from one of the properties yielded $8 per ton.
Quartz mining does not usually receive so much attention in a
country like Atlin so rich in gold-bearing gravel deposits. With
this knowledge and when considering how very recently the
discoveries were made it is possible to more duly appreciate the
progress made.
Bennett. The Bennett division,   and all the country be
tween Atlin and the territory in dispute on the seaboard, is mineralized and is receiving the attention of prospectors. Some quartz claims are being developed, but frequent
rushes of the miners to creeks with gold bearing beds is interfering with systematic or extensive operations.
Stikine, Liard The Cassiar Central Railway Co. has done
and Skeena. considerable prospecting'since date of incorpora-
""" tion in 1897, and last year installed a complete
hydraulic plant on Thibert creek, in the Cassiar division, where
a gold-bearing gravel deposit 200 feet in width, 60 feet high and
10,500 feet in length is located. The gravel is said to yield 50
cents per cubic yard. It was expected that hydraulicing would
commence last month. Copper properties are also being opened
up. The Company is confident that these claims are in one of
the most promising mineral belts in British Columbia. Prospecting and development works by individuals and other companies are progressing, but shipments of ore have not
commenced.
means of communication is the great drawback  which  is  retarding extensive development of many loca-
r division.    A railway from Kitamaat
e interior would give a great impetus to mining develop-
i that vicinity which no doubt is highly mineralized.
Lack of better
;k   which  is  ret;
tions  in  the  Skeen 16 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
Mainland, Coast      All along the coast of the mainland to the south
and Yale.      anc* eastward to adjoin the country covered in the
foregoing remarks there are many properties being
developed and some are shipping ore.    It is beyond the scope of
this review, however, to do more than mention the fact.
Texada. Of the smaller islands Texada takes the lead
in mining. The output of one company's properties in 1900 exceeded 7000 tons. There was in addition a considerable amount of work done on a great number of mineral
claims and in many places fine bodies of ore have been found.
There was recorded 36 new claims. The ores contain copper,
silver and gold. These developments are building up two small
but prosperous  towns  and  the latest reports from the island
Vancouver On  the west coast of Vancouver Island the
Island. development work in progress is very encouraging.
On one of the properties situated on Alberni
canal there is already completed over one thousand feet of shafts
and tunnels. The ore in sight exceeds 100,000 tons, more than
half being good grade. This good grade ore, if treated at the
Puget Sound smelters, would return a profit of $9.60 per ton.
If matted near the mine in sufficient quantities the profit, on the
basis of present prices, would be increased 50%. On another
property over 3,000 feet of development work has been accomplished. There was an average of 20 men employed all last
year. There are several other properties being developed. One
of them is connected by an aerial double rope tramway, with
bunkers on deep sea water, distant from the mine only 2,200
feet. A shipment of ore from this property, after paying all
charges, returned a profit of about $14 per ton. The ores in the
vicinity of Alberni canal are principally copper, silver and gold,
but free milling gold quartz is also under development. On
Barclay Sound and the numerous inlets to the north, ore bodies
have been located, but development is not so far advanced as in
the eastern mining divisions and Alberni, although, so far as can
be seen, they are equally rich in minerals. Gold-bearing sands
occur at various places and at Wreck bay have recently received
attention.    The output in a few months of 1900 was about 700 ANNUAL   REPORT. 17
ounces valued at $10,639. Additional gold saving machines are
being operated this year and larger returns may be looked for.
On the south of Vancouver Island and near Victoria to the north
there are several properties being worked. On the 18th May
some members of the Board visited the Lenora and Tyee properties, on Mount Sicker. Some of the party left the train at
Duncans and the others went on to the next Esquimalt and
Nanaimo Railway station, Westholme, from whence the mines
were reached by waggon roads, 9 and 7 miles respectively. The
ore is taken from the Lenora mine through tunnels and up to
23rd March 11,867 tons had returned $175,831.42 as per smelter
returns. Between that date and date of the visit about 2,500
tons additional had been shipped, said to be similar in value.
There was besides a quantity of ore probably equal to that
shipped, which will pay to concentrate or ship to a smelter if
erected near the mine. The Company has constructed and
operates a railway to connect at Westholme with the Esquimalt
and Nanaimo Railway. The ore being smelted on Puget Sound
requires too frequent handling and it is intended to continue the
mine railway to some suitable point on the coast, where it is contemplated to erect a smelter. A great saving in transportation
charges would then be effected. Improvements on the Tyee
mine have cost about $100,000. The shaft is sunk 200 feet on
an extension of the Lenora ore bodies and only 125 feet from .
the Lenora boundary. The company do not intend to ship ore
until the various bodies are blocked out and there is a considerable tonnage in sight. The equipment consists of two 50 h. p.
boilers, air compressor and the usual gear found in a mine
worked under intelligent management. From the developments
now being undertaken on Mount Sicker and vicinity it is pro-
portant mines will result. Mining can be con-
paratively low cost and the ore is near a railway
les visited are situated about 1,400
was very refreshing after a tedious
up-hill drive to have the little hive of industry suddenly come
into view. The Lenora mine was specially inviting. The saw
mill, general mine buildings and numerous small dwellings
created a favourable impression. A hotel was nearly completed,
and a school will soon be opened.    These facts although not
bable that
ducted at a
and deep sea water.    The
feet above sea level and 18 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
important in themselves are useful in estimating the value of the
mining industry throughout British Columbia, for similar conditions obtain in all the camps where systematic work is being
done.
At a risk of becoming tiresome the principal mining divisions have been reviewed singly, although the net result of the
mineral output could have been conveyed in a few words. For
instance; output in 1899,$6,751,604; output in 1900,$10,069,757.
From such figures, however, no estimate could be formed of the
vast area which is mineralized. It will be further observed that
these minerals are widely and evenly distributed, no portion of
the Province having much advantage in this respect. Changes
in the output occur from other causes; such as increased output
in East Kootenay, due to railway construction, and increased
output in the Boundary country, due to the operation of smelters
there. It will be remembered that lode mining started near the
navigable lake waters of Kootenay, and it will be found that
development is principally in the country which has been opened
up by railways. Seventeen mines operated by incorporated
companies have already paid dividends. The returns of properties worked by individuals are not made public. The facts
afford gratification for what has been accomplished and warrant
a renewal of the expectations that British Columbia will some
day rank amongst the mineral producing countries of the world.
The openings in British Columbia for such investments are
practically unlimited and varied to an extent seldom met with.
The mining laws are liberal. Any person can stake a claim
1,500 feet by 1,500 feet, about 50 acres, and hold it by improving to the value of only $100 per annum. After five such annual
improvements, the survey being reckoned an improvement worth
$100, a Crown grant can be obtained.
Coal and Col^e. The output of coal from the Vancouver Island
collieries was 1,383,374 tons during 1900, and
exceeded any previous year. About half of this quantity was
exported to California. ■ Other shipments were made to Alaska
and elsewhere. The consumption of Vancouver Island coal in
California is increasing yearly while, Welsh, English and Australian coals are in less'demand.    This coal is also used by the ANNUAL   REPORT. I9
United States navy in preference to that mined in that territory.
No better evidence could be produced in favour of Vancouver
Island coal. The output of coke is also increasing. It finds a
ready sale in California, where it comes in competition with coke
from England. Several members of the Board visited the
mines in the fall of 1900. Employment is given to 3,700
hands. The average earnings of the miners is $3 to $4
per day and there was evidence of prosperity generally.
All the coke ovens were not working, but the demands were
being met. The output of both coal and coke can be further
increased as the various markets may warrant.
The output ofthe Crow's Nest Pass collieries was slightly
under 200,000 tons and nearly half was used in making coke.
As soon as markets are extended the output will be increased,
for the quality of the coke and coal is excellent and there is
practically no limit to the supply. These mines give employment to 395 hands and the average earnings of the miners was
$3 per day.
Coal has been located in many other parts of British Columbia, notably on Vancouver, Queen Charlotte and some
smaller islands, in the northern portions of the mainland and in
the Yale district. It is not probable that very extensive developments will take place immediately, but as the fuel supply
diminishes in more populous parts of the world the coal fields of
British Columbia will be operated and as a natural resource may
now be accepted as an asset of great value.
Other Minerals. Iron has been located in many places but so far
has been mostly used as a flux. The home
market for iron is limited and that to the south is protected by
a tariff. It is expected, however, that the high grade of the
iron ore will induce capitalists to work the British Columbia
deposits in the near future.
Other minerals waiting development are, gypsum, mica,
plumbago, quicksilver and asbestos. Of excellent building stone
there is a choice favourably situated for handling, and asphaltum
has been located on Queen Charlotte island. 20 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
Much of the foregoing information has been culled from the
very excellent report just issued by the Honourable the Minister
of Mines. Space in this review forbids anything like a description which will do the mineral resources of British Columbia
justice, and it is requested that those wishing additional information will obtain a copy of the Honourable Minister's report.
Smelters. The smelting industry has been augmented by
the successful operation of plants at Granby and
at Greenwood, both in the Boundary country. The Granby
smelter was "blown in" last August and to 30th April this
year had treated 136,443 tons of ore. The Greenwood plant,
between 18th February and 30th April last, that is in ten weeks,
treated 24,857 tons of ore. The Trail smelter has a total capacity of 1,000 tons per day. The Hall Mines smelter, at Nelson,
can treat 300 tons of ore daily. These two last mentioned can
treat both copper-gold and silver-lead ores. The Pilot Bay
smelter can handle silver-lead ores only. The smelter plant at
Texada island has been added to and the capacity is now 125
tons daily. The establishment of additional smelter plants may
be looked for very soon, the development of mines on the mainland coast and islands rendering them a necessity. The bounty
offered by the Dominion Government will doubtless result in the
operation of lead refineries. The Board's Committee on Mines
has made enquiries regarding state owned smelting works in
other countries, but reported adversely upon adopting similar
measures here, being of opinion that such a course would interfere with private enterprise.
n Fishing.      The salmon pack of 585,413 cases in 1900, -
less than expected.    The Fraser river pack *
below the average and is partly accounted for by a " strike " of
the fishermen and consequent loss of the month of July pack.
The fish, also, did not "run" up to expectation. There was
abetter "run" on the Skeena river and the pack there was larger
than in previous years.
The shipments were :
To Great Britain, -        -        - 382,978 cases.
"   Eastern Canada, - 7Q, 171      " AL   REPORT.
To Austrs
"   Other
Stocks,
25>9°3 <
56,237
20,309
20,815
The Fraser river fisheries are seriously effected by the
numerous traps operated in contiguous United States waters.
On this side of the boundary line traps are not allowed and fishing is regulated by a weekly close season of 36 hours, and the
length of the nets used, which gives the fish a better chance to
get to their spawning grounds. On the United States side trap
fishing continues all the year round, and under present methods
which intercept the fish reaching the Fraser, threatens to ultimately ruin the industry on that river. In 1897 a Joint Fisheries
Commission was appointed by the Government of Canada and
the United States, and it is much regretted that the recommendations in regard to a common close fishing season in British
Columbia and waters contiguous thereto have not been acted
upon by the United States authorities. The desire in Canada is
to conduct the fisheries in the best interests of the whole Dominion. On the United States side by neglecting to adopt ordinary
precautions for the conservation of the industry and taking
steps for the propagation of salmon it is in a large measure left
to the mercy of the few who happen to have invested in canneries and traps.
Canada is undoubtedly master of the situation; for by the
establishment of traps on the south of Vancouver Island the fish
can be intercepted on entering the Strait de Fuca. Our neighbours would then suffer acutely and would doubtless make
prompt overtures for international regulations for the perpetuation of the fisheries which would be advantageous to all
concerned. The State of Washington authorities have offered
to assist in the establishment of additional fish hatcheries on
the Fraser river. Before the privilege is conceded our neighbours should be required to observe the weekly close time and
other regulations similar to those in force in this Province. At
the recent session of the Legislature there was enacted provisions for local control of some of the British Columbia fisheries
now under the authority  of the Dominion  Government.     It is BOARD   OF  TRADE.
improbable that they will become 1
been decided by the Courts.
It has been shown from annus
Government has received much
Columbia fisheries than has been
twelve months ending 30th June, i
the expenditure by $33,606.14.
exercise future control of the salmo
it is to be hoped more will be don'
industry.
il some questions have
tl returns that the Dominio
larger   revenue   from   Britis
expended upon them.     In th
899,  such  revem
Whichever government may
n fisheries of British Columbia
; towards conservation of the
:ceeded
Deep Sea The deep sea  fisherie
Fisheries,     correspond with the abut
fish offering.    The local
fnited States is protected by a tariff v
5 are not developed to
dance of excellent food
narket is limited and the
hich makes it unprofit
able.
Attention is directed to the halibut fishing in Hecate Strait
in United States vessels. It is reported that the operators
encroach upon Canadian waters. That in consequence of the'
plentiful supply of fish only the finest are selected and the remainder thrown into the sea again when  dead.    The   fishing"
banks must necessarily suffer in consequei
be lost in affording due protection.
and ii
ihould
Sealing.
The
5,548  skir
catch in 1900 •
about equally divided betwee
Behring Sea catches. There were 37 schooners employed. The
sealing schooner owners have since amalgamated and this year's
operations are controlled by an incorporated company. This
industry is very jealously watched from the United States, and
when the Joint Commission met at Quebec and Washington in
1899, one of the points for agreement was its purchase and the
prohibition of future sealing by British Columbians. That Commission failing to agree on some other question the sealing proposals were also dropped. It is probable, however, that another
Joint Commission will be appointed at an early date and that the
sealing industry will again receive attention. This is very
important to the City of Victoria, which is the home port of the ANNUAL   REPORT. 23
p loss of say half a million dollars circulated in
;ar in wages, stores, repairs to schooners, etc.,
us, and this Board should carefully watch any
igs jn this connection and urge that the City of
: quid pro quo before a settlement of the sealing
ummated.
The 1
nber
increase  compare
he following table :
:  during 1900   shows   a  good
with former years, as will be
private property .. 105,939,397 feet,
private property. .. 124,546,658 feet,
private property  . . 161,900,463 feet.
Cut on Crown lands, tim
;, private property. . .223,374,723 feet.
Foreign demand was good and prices were maintained, lately
the mills have not been so busy although freights are lower. The
annual cut of lumber is scarcely appreciable when the immense
forest wealth of British Columbia is considered. This timber
furnished another natural resource, the approximate value of
which it would be difficult to estimate and the value will increase
with the depletion of the forests in more populous countries.
Care must be exercised in keeping it intact as far as possible.
The ravages of fire are serious, and are known to have been
started in some cases by mining prospectors with the object of
rendering their operations less laborious. There has been no
attempt made in reforestration or diversification. Such measures would augment and perpetuate one of the chief natural
resources of British Columbia.
Shipbuilding. The lumber trade is suffering from discrimina
tion in freights, is. 3d. to 2s. 6d. per thousand
feet, compared with Puget Sound ports. This discrimination
could be overcome by building the necessary vessels in British 24 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
Columbia. The vessels being owned here the freights instead
of, as now, being paid to foreign owners would be circulated in
Canada. The men employed in the shipbuilding and as mariners
would become a wage-earning and money circulating medium
and their families would settle in the Province. The benefits to
be derived, directly and indirectly, would be substantial.
It is not easy if at all possible to obtain capital for such an
enterprise under present conditions, hence the necessity for
Dominion Government aid. Vessels of 600 to 1000 tons would
suit the trade and a bonus of say $10 per ton for vessels of 450
tons and upwards built in British Columbia of either iron, steel,
or wood, would be sufficient inducement during the first five
years, afterwards the bonus could be reduced.    The main object
Agriculture. It is desirable that more attention should be
~ given to agriculture and stock raising in British
Columbia. It is too often the case that in speaking of the
natural resources in minerals, timber and fish that the possibilities of development in agriculture and stock raising are not duly
considered. Taken as a whole the country is best adapted for
small mixed farms, but in parts there are large tracts suitable
for cattle raising.
The crops of hay, roots and grain last year were good.
The importations of United States flour have almost ceased and
the output of the local mills is increasing yearly. Remunerative prices were realized for all agricultural products and there
are no stocks.
The fruit crops also were good.    There is much land in the
Province suitable for fruit growing; sheltered valleys with good
soil.    Local grown fruit is preferred  to  that  imported.    After   '
supplying  local   demands   the  surplus   is   shipped   to  Eastern
Canada as far as Winnipeg.    Good prices are always obtained.
The
e thi:
op prospects are good.
The following on agricultural development has  been  taken
from the advance pages of the British Columbia Year Book : ANNUAL   REPORT. 25
" In a general way, agriculture is in a much healthier condition than at the time of the issue of the Year Book of 1897. At
that time it was truly stated that the farmer had struck rock
bottom. At the present time improved methods of soil cultivation are in use to a greater or less extent in all districts, and
"farming" is gradually taking the place of the old plan of
"cropping the land," without any attention to rotation or
return to the soil of plant food. A notable feature of the new
order of things is the demand for improved and pure-bred stock.
In this connection the Dairymen's Association are doing excellent work, with the assistance of the Dominion Live Stock Commissioner, and auction sales of pure-bred animals, chiefly Shorthorns, have been successfully held in various parts of the
Province. The number of creameries in operation has been
doubled, and the older established ones have largely increased
their output. The butter made fetches a higher price than the
best imported article, owing to its superior quality and freshness.
"Fruit-growing in the Okanagan District has proven successful beyond the best hopes of its progenitors, and in the course of
a few years is certain to become a leading item of production.
At the present time orchard extension is retarded by the want of
enterprise of many of the holders of large areas of the land most
suited for the purpose. Sub-division of the land is bound to
come in the near future, and prosperous orchards and gardens
will diversify the face of the country and take the place of wheat
fields, displacing a crop of which the land has grown tired by
constant repetition. In the Fraser Valley fruit-growing has
suffered a set-back of recent years, from the prevalence of
fungous diseases affecting trees and fruit; still many valuable
varieties have demonstrated resistant powers against attack,
and the problem is really one of adaptability. The grading and
packing of fruit sent to market now compares favorably in most
cases with that of California and Oregon, and has ceased to be
a reproach to the growers.
" The cost of clearing land has been materially reduced by
the use of powder for blasting stumps, and improved stumping
machinery, and the addition to the acreage under cultivation in
timbered districts is large in the aggregate.    Irrigation problems 26 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
in the arid districts form the question of the day, and there are
excellent opportunities for the investment of capital in bringing
water from a distance in sufficient quantity to irrigate large
bodies of excellent soil, only requiring water privileges to bring
about their cultivation in valuable crops, such as fruit, hops and
tobacco.
" At no time in the history of the Province has the outlook
been so promising for agricultural interests generally as now.
Assured markets and profitable prices for produce, owing to the
ever-increasing demand, and the reduction of the cost of production, have brought about this satisfactory state of affairs."
Dai
a repc
: Asso
* Mr. Hadwen,  Secretary of the
lowing extract is made :
"The three pioneer creameries of the Province, the Delta,
Cowichan and Eden Bank (Chilliwack), were established in
1894-5, and have steadily increased their output year by year.
This output being respectively last year: Chilliwack 107,615 lbs.;
Delta 75,000 lbs.; and Cowichan 71,000 lbs. The Westminster
turned out 80,000 lbs., and other creameries have been started
in Sumas, Mission, Salt Spring,  and lastly at Victoria, with a
The following ini
Honourable J. D. Pre
may fairly be divided as
tion department, and inflt
so far as  the outside w
British Columbia  there
fields of occupation and
must of necessity be man
as been kind!
ished by the
o ,the best methods of carrying it on.
it of the Government is an immigrates the augmentation of population
•Id  is  concerned.     In a Province like
iiverse   i
-that an
mai
sided.
migration policy
" The present Government, upon assuming office, recognized
that the methods ofthe Immigration Department required careful consideration, and as time and occasion would permit have
endeavoured to develop a policy on more permanent and definite lines. What methods should be adopted are in a measure indicated by the nature of enquiries received respecting the Province
as a whole not only through the Immigration Office but by all
departments, including the office of the Agent General, London,
England. Three things were apparent for effectiveness of effort:
First, improved facilities for acquiring accurate information
respecting the various conditions, resources and industries of
the Province. This suggested the organization of a Bureau of
Information, provision for which had previously been made by
statute. The work of a bureau of statistics or information and
that of an immigration office are so closely allied that several
months prior to the death of the late John Jessop, Immigration
Agent, who requested to be retired, it was decided as soon as
his superannuation took effect, to amalgamate the two offices.
This arrangement was carried out upon Mr. Jessop's death.
The first tangible work of the Bureau will be the publication in
a revised form of the British Columbia Year Book, now in press,
after which publication of information in this and bulletin form
will take place regularly. These publications will be supplied
to enquirers and to all outside agencies of the Province. The
information will be detailed and practical rather than general in
its character. Of course, there are other features of the office at
present in course of organization, but the foregoing is of prin-
" Second, it was very evident that the office of the Agent
General, if it was to serve its highest usefulness, required to be
reorganized on a more comprehensive basis.     It must really be
nized >
i head office of information and immigration for the Prov
:nent and to some extent for the outside
Itv
that the Province
:arry on the work
I now well known, was dec
the general administration
the hands of the new inct
posed that the office shall f
t is possible,   all  the  infor
either give up any effort of the kind
tuch more effective way. The latter,
decided upon. The details as well
ion of the office will, of course, rest
ncumbent, but in a general way it is
in concrete form, as far as
n there is available—maps,
-eports, literature, photographs, etc., etc., together wit
exhibits of products of the Pacific Coast in raw and r
:ured form.
nufac 28 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
"Third, revision of methods in regard to settlement were
necessary. More definite areas of available land and exact locations were  desirable ; conditions  of settlement had to be con-
tion efforts successful. As indicated at the outset, the requirements of a policy were suggested by experience of settlers themselves and by the nature of enquiries received.    This is by far
the most difficult to deal with, and has had the earnest consideration of the Government.    It involves a number of matters—
public
munication, colonizat
lands available for se
etc.    While I am not
sented, I may state t
" Many of the remarks made
for the Board of Trade report are
for farm lands are on the increase
west and from the Western anc
States. One difficulty in dealin|
able Crown lands within easy rea
all our resources of
t the same time utilize
of a large, prosperous
iplicable to this. Enquiries
any of them from the North-
'acific States of the United
ith these is the lack of suit-
of markets.      It is hard to
xpa
lands more d<
ie acq
;sirabl
e.   A
go,
odd
eal
iprov
:ention
part
hasb
■oved,
-acted
to the Okan
iagan
valle)
whi
Ie r
lumei
rous er
iquiri
ies are
made
respecting tl
ist of
V
anc.
DUV
er Is
;land ai
id th
e Maini
and."
Education.
B
ritish
Cc
>lum
ibia
affoi
rds exc
ellen
t educa
tional
oppo
rtunit
,  th
:choo
Is  bein
g fn
:e and
unde-
1.      In
1900
th
ere
we
246 commor
1, 48 g.
aded, and 4 high schools, under the
the ratepayers, at a cost t
$284,909.10. New school dis
tenant-Governor in Council as
supervision of trustees elected by
> the Provincial Government of
xicts can be created by the Lieu-
soon as there are fifteen children
bet
veen six and s
outlying  ag
ingement is v
xteen years of age
icultural district
ry advantageous.
vithir
the li
s presc
-ibed.
this
Pulp and Paper.      For some years past the Board of Trade report
has contained reference to the pulp industry, urg-
: desirability of capital undertaking the manufacture of
pulp in this
form and althou:
inaries have beei
At the recent s
passed  authori:
Matters have recently taken practical
work has not yet actually begun, all prelim-
1 arranged in connection with its establishment.
;ssion of the Provincial Legislature an Act was
ing the Government to enter into agreements
with pulp companies on favourable terms, both as regards areas
of land and royalties, and to reserve areas out of which selections of pulp lands might be made. Under the provisions of this
Act arrangements have been made with the Industrial Power
Co., of Nelson, B. C, and the Pacific Coast Power Co., of Victoria, B. C. These companies have acquired several large
water-powers, and in addition to timber already secured, reserves for their purposes have been placed on a number of
timber areas by the Government. From careful investigation
of the subject it has been found that there are practically inexhaustible areas of pulp woods in the Province in spruce, hemlock, Douglas fir and cotton-wood. It has also been definitely
ascertained that a very large market exists in British Columbia,
the Pacific coast generally, the Orient, and Australia, for paper,
and particularly in Japan for pulp. The natural advantages
possessed by British Columbia together with favourable conditions for carrying on the industry will place British Columbia
manufacturers in a very superior position to command the
greater part of this trade in pulp, and news and wrapping
papers.
Railways. The following railways have been constructed
during the past twelve  months by the  Canadian
Pacific Railway.     Between  Vancouver and North Arm of the 3°
[   COLUMBIA   BOARD   (
Fraser river, six miles. The Arrow Lake and Kootenay Railway,
between Lardo and Trout lake, has been extended ten miles, and
construction ofthe remaining portion, about twenty-six miles, is
proceeding, a subsidy having been granted by the Dominion Government. The Proctor extension ofthe British Columbia Southern, twenty-one miles, is completed. The Canadian Pacific Railway is operating one hundred and fourteen miles of new line of
the Columbia and Western branch of its system, as follows : Robson to Midway, ninety-eight miles ; Phoenix branch, ten miles ;
Mother Lode, six miles, and about five miles of spur lines to
various mines branching therefrom. These lines are all standard
gauge.
The construction of the Crows Nest Pass Southern Railway will be undertaken immediately. This line will connect
the collieries with the Great Northern system at Jennings, distance about 60 miles. It will form an important connection for
the collieries and a largely increased output of coal will
follow.
The Great Northern Railway is being continued from
Marcus to   Republic,   both   in the State   of Washington,  via
:ascade and Carson, in British Columbia.
The distance
niles, but only about 12 miles is within this
5 Province.    N
)f these railways will receive subsidies.
The City of Victoria has voted assistance towards a ferry
service between the terminus of the Victoria and Sydney Railway and the mainland, near Point Roberts, from whence a railway will have to be constructed to Chilliwack, through an
agricultural country, south of the Fraser river. This line will
connect with the Great Northern system and the cars of that
railway will be brought to Victoria. A charter for the mainland
railway has been obtained and the railway must be constructed
and the ferry established within a few months otherwise the
assistance will not be given.
In May last an
ture providing subs
way.    There are fi\
Act *.
s of $4,000 per
* the  Provincial  Legis he neighbourhood of
iwack and Hope to
-nately three hundred
ANNUAL   REPORT.
i. For a railway from the coast in
English Bluff, near Point Roberts, via Cl
Midway, Boundary Creek District, apprc
and thirty miles.
2. For a railway from the present terminus of the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway to the northern end of Vancouver
island, approximately two hundred and forty miles.
3. For a railway from Rock Creek to Vernon to connect
with the Shuswap and Okanagan Railway, approximately one
hundred and twenty-five miles.
>r a railway from the Co,
dmately one hundred mi
st,  at Kitamaat, to Hazel-
railway from  Fort Steele
ldred and fifty miles.
mately
The companies receivin
(a) To pay to the Provi
five years and 3°/0 per annui
the railways.
(b) To give the Provincial Government absolute control 1
freight and passenger rates.
2/0 per annu
gross earnin
(c) To a
ways at a
•aim
Dbede
tent to acquire the r
srmined by arbitrati
It is further provided that any company claiming a subsidy
under the Act must commence work on the railway on or before
ist July, 1902, and prosecute it diligently to the satisfaction of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
The objects and importance of these railways it is not necessary to dwell upon. They are too well known to require
recapitulation. The Provincial Government having recognized
them is sufficient. What is now looked for is a commencement
and assurance that the works will be completed without delay.
The session of the Legislature having closed without anything
definite being known has exercised a very prejudicial influence 32 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
throughout the Province, the effects of which will be felt throughout Canada. Capital for the development of great natural resources is withheld, not from any doubts as to returns from such
investments, but simply on account of the uncertainty as to
when they can be realized. The situation is serious and it will
redound to the credit of those responsible if it is rightly gauged
and treated accordingly. Reference may be made to the agitation for a line from the Coast to Kootenay which shall be independent of the Canadian Pacific Railway. The agitation should
not be taken as undue antagonism to that Company, but to the
which
I of
knowledge of the beneficial effects
wherever railway competition exists. Government
freight and passenger rates is right and proper, but
be no mistaking the public demand for railway cc
between the Coast and Kootenay.
During the last two years the Dominion Government has
granted railway subsidies amounting to about $7,000,000, of
which British Columbia was voted $192,000. During 1899 the
Province contributed to the Dominion treasury $3,208,788, the
expenditure by the Dominion in British Columbia being $1,334,-
618 during the same year. The Provincial per capita contribution was $25.67 against a per capita contribution for all Canada
of only $8.93. Between the year 1872 and 30th ultimo the
Dominion Government will have received from British Columbia
$42,375,349 and expended in the Province during that time
$28,968,091, leaving a balance in favour of British Columbia of
over $13,500,000. These are the figures submitted to the Dominion Government by the Government of British Columbia when
asking for a more liberal  expenditure upon local public works.
Efforts should be made to acquaint eastern manufacturers
with the condition of affairs in this western Province. If they
could only be brought to realize the possibilities of trade expansion within their own Dominion the required assistance in railway construction in British Columbia would be promptly given.
The fact that British Columbia is prepared to pledge its credit
to the extent of about four million dollars to aid the construction of the railways mentioned should be a sufficient guarantee
of their importance and their actual necessity. NUAL   REPORT.
33
Telegraphs. It is expected that a through telegraph service
" will be established with Dawson, Yukon Territory,
early next month. Two parties were in the field last year, one
working from Atlin southward and another from this end worked northward. It only remains to construct a short intervening
distance in order to connect. Messages must now be forwarded
by steamers to Lynn Canal.
ich of this
; has been constructed from Hazelton to
Port Simpsoi
served   by
telegraph
Ocean Trade. There has not been much change in the ocean
trade. The Canadian Pacific Railway "Empress'"
steamships engaged in the China-Japan trade continue their
regular service every three weeks in summer and monthly during the winter, and it has been found necessary to put additional
steamships on the route occasionally. The Northern Pacific
Steamship Company has six vessels, and the Japan Mail Steamship Company, running in connection with the Great Northern
Railway, six engaged in the same trade. All these call at Victoria on both inward and outward voyages.
The Canadian Pacific Rai
ay Coi
lpany have thre
jj a monthly ser
calling at Honolulu, Brisbane (Queensland) and Sydhey (New
South Wales).
Alaska There is nothing to add to the reasons set forth
Boundary.     ln previous reports for the necessity of immedi-
      ately defining the Alaska boundary.    It is merely
mentioned as an assurance that a matter of such importance is
not overlooked. It appears unreasonable on the part of the
United States that it will not submit the question to arbitration.
Trade and No one who will carefully rev
Outlook.      resources of British Columbia cai
- the i
favourably impressed with the great wealth con-
in.    Distributed   over   an  area  of nearly 400,000 34 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
square miles and the population being sparse rapid developm
will be impossible under present conditions. But the situat
can be entirely changed by improving means of communicati
In the early months of this year there was a very buoyant
feeling in business circles engendered by the belief that important railway construction would be commenced immediately.
Disappointment has caused a perceptible reaction. Construction
of the railways provided for in the Act which was passed at the
recent session of the Legislature would give a great impetus to
business throughout Canada. The opening up of Vancouver
Island by a railway to the north end is of the utmost importance.
Unprecedented mining developments may be expected to follow.
There is much land too which could be brought under cultivation. In no part of the Province is there so much timber
wealth. The railway would also pass through lands which will
be utilized in the manufacture of wood pulp. The beneficial
effect of the establishment of such industries in a country at
present practically waste lands would be felt throughout Canada. The proposed railway between Kitamaat and Hazelton
is equally a necessity. It would pass through much agricultural
land and form an outlet for a country rich in minerals which
cannot now be developed on account of the cost of transporting
the requisite plants. It is gratifying to note that surveyors have
gone north to locate this line.
Injury is being done to Canada by delaying construction of
the Coast-Kootenay line. In consequence the trade of the territory in which mining is more advanced than elsewhere in
British Columbia, is made tributary to the United States via
Spokane.
The Yukon trade is undergoing a change inconsequence of
the high freight rates charged by the White Pass and Yukon
Railway. The immense trade of the country is rapidly becoming
the monopoly of large trading and transportation companies in
the United States, who ship from San Francisco and elsewhere
via St. Michaels, and are thereby able to sell goods on the basis
of cost price of similar goods shipped via the railway and realize fit on the difference in the freight.    If the
lad   been provided,  as  was  so   urgently
It is no exaggeration to say that the possibilities of trade
expansion in British Columbia are unequalled in any part of the
British Empire. But if the full benefits are to accrue the situation must be faced boldly.     Prompt, united and vigorous action
Ministers of the Dominion Government and eastern manufacturers, who visit this Province too seldom, have expressed
their astonishment at the resources. They have arrived quite
prepared to believe in their existence, but after personal investigations have admitted them to be far greater than previously
conceived. Their .support is necessary in expanding what is
acknowledged to be the manufacturers' best Canadian market.
The most pressing need is Federal aid towards railway construction which the Provincial contributions to the Federal treasury
amply justify. The sum paid into the Dominion treasury through
the customs and inland revenue departments alone during
unted to approximately $3,250,000,
about one-third of the collections having been made at Victoria,
the capital.
To these  must be added  the amounts  paid  through  the
fisheries, the post office  and other departments  of the Federal
Government.
The confidence  of investors in the Province of British Co
lumbia is shown in the high standing of the provincial and civic
bonds and debentures in financial centres.
The statistical   information   appended   hereto,   as   far  as
possible, has been brought down to date.
In congratulating the Board upon the general prosperity of
the Province, it is desired to  record  the active and  increasing
interest taken by members in the various matters above referred 36 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
to.    At no time in its history was there greater need of'
if its set standard of usefulness is to be maintained.
All of which is respectfully \
ia,  B. C,
July  12th,   1901.
W.   A.  WARD,  President.
L.  G.  McQUADE, .Vice-President.
F.  ELWORTHY,  Secretary. APPENDICES.
; in Reply to the Foregoing Report.
JOLY De LOTBINIERE, Li:
Ms. President and Gentlemen,—I have listened to the report
which your Secretary has just read, with the deepest interest.^;- find
that the resources of British Columbia are vaster than I have ever
thought, but I feel at the same time that it is incumbent'upon the
people of British Columbia to assume their responsibility in developing
these resources. I think it is a great pity to see all these resources—
minerals, timber and so many things which ought to be a source of
prosperity to us here going out of the Province as raw material to te
manufactured abroad. I think it is a great pity that in BritishfColumbia as well as in every other part of the Dominion, our young men aie
obliged to leave their homes—are obliged to goto the United-States and
beg for work upon the very materials which ought to be sources of riches
I see here my t-
who have both got
matter of such deep
By THE HON. J. H. TURNER, Minister op Finance:
Mr. President and Gentlemen,—I thank you for the invitation so
kindly extended to me to be present this afternoon at the annual meeting of the British Columbia Board of Trade, and I presume from that
invitation that I am present here in somewhat of a dual capacity, that
ment of the Province. I am thankful, however, that politics are strictly
prohibited at such a meeting, and it has given me a great deal of plea-
ure to listen to the most useful remarks that have been made by preceding speakers.   But, Mr. President, it is a very difficult matter when BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRA]
ial report to avoid what
that I shall do my best
speaking on the subjects referred to in your
may be termed politics, though I can assure
not to offend in that direction.   I think you are aware of my desire not
to enter upon matters of a political nature at this time.
I have been very much interested in the report just read by tbe
Secretary, and I must take this opportunity of thanking him for his
kindness in sending proof sheets to the members of the Government
this morning. I am sorry to say that I have not had sufficient time in
which to digest it thoroughly, but there are some matters contained in
it upon which I may be able to make a few remarks. I will first deal
with that portion regarding agriculture.
I have only lately returned from an extended trip practically all
over the southern part of the Province, and I may say that almost every
portion visited by me has greatly improved within the past few years.
Agriculture is a matter in which the present government has always
taken very great interest. But in one direction, in particular, a very
great advance has been made, which is most gratifying. I speak in
regard to the creameries. At the present time not only are the old
established ones doing well, but there are several new ones in course of
erection, and one has recently commenced operation on the outskirts of
■ Injthe report your Secretary refers to the amount of butter imported,
which I take it refers to that imported from abroad and not to that from
the east. At the end of 1880 the imports were of a value of $36,000.00,
which in 1899 fell to $16,767.00. Now, I think we may assume that this
decrease arises*from a greater production in tne Province; in fact it is
only a few years since we produced very little, if any; but it is most gratifying to see that now the industry is steadily increasing and should soon
be one of the most important we have. There are large sections of the
Province admirably adapted for butter making, as also cheese, and any
Government in British Columbia must feel deeply interested in this
matter. I may say that I think this increase has arisen to a very large
extent from the attention that has been directed by the Government to
the dairy products of the Province.
Attention
you know
of high cl
car loads hav
ock, as
_ ordered, in respe
, call upon the Go-
Turning to fruit, I may say that this
! Lieut.-Governor is interested, thai
evince.   Now, speakingToKBritish Cc APPENDICES.
39
when we used to give 25 cents for an apple, and when practically- none
were produced here at all. But the production is increasing very
rapidly, so much so, that on one farm at which I was visiting they assured
me that they were alone exporting some 150,000 boxes. The reports on
all hands show that certain classes of fruit from British Columbia is
better in quality, of better flavour, and is better adapted for exportation
than that of the adjoining territories. Everyone knows that our apples
are better than those of the south and east; but the trouble was that the
producers had not got into the way of packing them, and that the
fruit-growers did not co-operate.
There is another matter affecting agriculture oh which I would like
to say a few words, the matter of irrigation, dyking, etc. Not only the
present, but past governments have taken great intersst in the question
of dyking, and it is only reasonable that in the dry sections they would
deal with the matter of irrigation. There is a very large extent of ,
country on which occasionally large crops are raised, and even if a
private company took hold of an irrigation system, which would be an
easy matter, I am informed by engineers, as there is a large supply of
water available, a good system would make many thousands of acres
available for the growing of wheat in British Columbia. I was pointed
out one spot upon which water was taken this year, and was assured
that the crop would not be less than 45 bushels to the acre, and that on
land which was looked upon as practically useless before. If such a
system was carried out over the whole of the dry belt we would be able
to grow at least all the wheat required for home consumption.
We have had an agent visiting various parts of the Province enquiring into the question of freight rates on fruits and vegetables, with a view
to obtaining a reduction of the same, and I am happy to say that very
satisfactory arrangements have been made, whereby fruit will be transported at as low rates as possible. Orders have already been executed
for a considerable amount of fruit. The farm about which I spoke as
having shipped fruit last year, has, I was informed by the manager,
sold all this year's crop in the North-west and Boundary country owing
to the reduced rates.
Regarding assistance to settlers. Settlers are, to a great extent,
short of money for the purpose, of clearing their farms. To meet this,
the Government has made arrangements that they can obtain stumping
powder at about half the price they could before. Of course the Government has taken no risk but simply arranged that the freight be cut
in half, together with reduction of price by buying the powder in large
quantities.
In.the report some allusion w
jre was one difficulty which
s made to the lumber industry.   Now
as pointed out to me by a very clever 40 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
and intelligent lumberman. It was at the time when a subsidy was
proposed for shipbuilders. It was this. He went to the map and put
his finger on the Baltic, and then round south to Australia. He said
that Baltic timber is laid down there for $9.00 per thousand feet for
freight, while on timber from British Columbia there was a charge of
$19.00 for freight. That being the case, they can send any amount from
the Baltic, and you can see large quantities of such timber in the yards
in Glasgow from where it is regularly sold. Investigations have lately
been made and in the report it has been stated that a great deal of that
timber was only 4" x 4", and that it showed bark on its edges. Whilst
British Columbia could only send timber of the very finest quality, the
mills having practically to throw away inferior quality, there being no
home market for it, thus much timber was wasted in British Columbia,
and it has been thought that the only remedy was for all the mills to
combine and secure the cheapest methods of transportation to Australia.
Until this was done, my informant said, they could only sell the highest
grades of timber as is the case at the present time.
Speaking of the fisheries, sir, 1 need hardly say anything. They are
in great trouble just now, but arrangements have been made that the
Province will secure a portion of the revenue derived by the Dominion
at present from license fees. It is admitted that the fish in our rivers
belong to the Province, and we have arranged that we get something
from them.
I understand that'
stated that I was opi
ie charge of the fish
osed t
the
Wh
I i
ere so near the commencement of the fishing season, and th,
i many difficulties in defining the boundary between Domin
rovincial control, I thought it would be better for the Dominio
ct the whole of the revenue this year and hand to the Provb
-oportion which rightfully belonged to it. I expressed no opin
ie Dominion should take entire charge, but said that at any
lould stand up for our rights as far as they go.
Under it a mine-
have his gold assayed and
stamped on the bar. He coi
gold certificate which he con
I hope that this arrangeme
amount of gold, which other-
do not see that anything moi
d a letter in connection with the assay of gold, and
ot proposed will be'of advantage to the Province.
e would go tc
an be done ii 4*
, delicate one, and
lse. In connection
[ways been much
:e great cries from
)le charter to a railway, it ought to be able to step in and regu-
rates for freight and passengers. The Province provides the
r a large part, of the land required to build the road and they
yhav
i the
It
ad 1
offered to
member in the House that tbe Govern
regulate rates, both for freight and pas
ch an arrangement is any hardship at a!
the contractors for which, as is very wel
per centage of their gross receipts to the Government. I
7 seen some of the gentlemen interested in the proposed
they say they do not object to the proposition. The time
-hen railways coming in and having concessions given to
make some return to the Government for the privileges
In a small way, the Dominiori has also met the Province in respect
to subsidies, and I think the Federal authorities will yet give much assistance to projects of this description. In fact, when the subject is
studied, it will be found to be a good thing to give such assistance. It
has been clearly shown that the Province has paid the Dominion for
every cent ever received from it, including the entire construction of
the C.P.R. and its branches in British Columbia. The revenue derived
by the Dominion from this Province is so great that it reaches $25.00
per annum per head. Now, supposing that there were 10,000 men
employed in the construction of railways, at the present time, at this
rate there would be more than enough to pay 4% interest on the subsidy
of $8,000.00 per mile for 1,000 miles of railway, as well as the sinking
fund. It does not matter whether men, women or children, we are paying at the rate of $25.00 per head. This is a fair proposition for the Dominion Government to consider. And from the revenue derived from
this 1,000 miles of railway the Province would receive a certain per
centage.
Something has been said about the credit of the Province. I am
sorry to have to admit that it is not standing so high as some time ago,
but we trust that under the present favourable conditions it will shortly
reach its accustomed high level.   Even now, our securities stand at 42 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
There is one other matter upon which I may be allowed to speak as
a citizen of Victoria, and that is one of the railways out of the multiplicity this one the people of Victoria seem to have lost sight of. I
refer to what I consider the most important railway in the interests of
the whole of British Columbia, and the only one that would largely
build up the City of Victoria, which was agitated for some years ago.
■ I refer to a line crossing British Columbia to the north and approaching
the coast somewhere in the vicinity of Seymour Narrows, thence crossing to the Island. The conditions have entirely altered since the time
the subject was first mooted. At that time our revenue was not half
what it is to-day, and it may be that then it was beyond the power of
the Province to go ahead with the line, but as I just said, conditions are
now altered.   The revenue is now in a position to ask for such a propo-
Let me go back a little, but first I would say that such a
British Columbia would be no use at all to the Province or
Island unless connections were provided with some eastei
Now, when this matter was taken up some years ago there vs
in sight in the way of a connection between us and the A1
there is to-day. This connection is being pushed on from c
and will soon reach the Yellowhead Pass, intending to stri)
Atlin and finally reach the Klondyke. Where will Victorii
dont't wake up ? That line will Capture the whole of th<
interior. We are going to sleep, and this although the wish
nection could be easily obtained.
Only the other day I saw some of the gentlemen conn
that line and also the contractors. I pointed out to them tha
way was to carry it on to Vancouver Island and then soutl
them why I advised it that way. In crossing to Seymour Na
would open up what we know to be a good section, a ste
country.' They would also cross the gold fields of Cariboo ar
into easy connection with the coast. At the coast they coulc
a ferry in perpetual still water, and on the Island the line '
through a settled district having two large towns, Nanaim
toria, that would at once provide very considerable traffic
would be a futun
'We believe in 3
for the line if ca:
our proposition a
e go to a place pi
"ofn
" erable amount of freight
this first in 1898, but now :
It only wants the people of
can insure the building o
the whole of the Island an Annual Report. There can
the importance of this indus
a strict eye upon its progres
—After the remarks made by my
very little left for me to say in
afternoon. I appreciate the hon-
me to make a few remarks with
mbia, and I am very gratified to
ss such a prominent place in your
istion, sir, about your recognizing
undoubtedly shows that you keep
The <
adv<
public :
ng our Province is a most important one
las taken great pains to have distributed to the
-egarding the natural resources of this country.
Within the past few weeks a pamphlet has been published from the
Government printing presses, entitled, " British Columbia, the Mineral
Province of Canada," which has already been widely circulated not
only in this Province, but also in the east and the mother country as
well. From reports already received, I fully believe this publication
will prove of great benefit in bringing our mineral resources before the
investing public.
It is to be regretted that, during the past few years, at times circumstances have arisen which somewhat retarded our progress. I refer
to disputes as between employer and employee; in fact, I was pained
very much this morning to see by the papers that another strike had
been declared in the Rossland camp. But these are matters in which,
unless requested, the Government cannot interfere. On the whole,
however, our showing in point of progress and general development is
most creditable.
The question of transportation plays no unimportant part in connection with our mineral development, and one of the most urgent
problems of the day is the construction of railroads, trails, roads and
bridges, which will bring into prominence the outlying sections of
the Province. Your report dwells particularly on the Coast-Kootenay
proposition, a scheme involving millions of dollars and one which must
be considered with the greatest caution. I cannot help but admire the
outspoken tone of your report this afternoon in this connection,
though, in a measure somewhat critical of the Government's action.
I know that the Premier is only too anxious to serve the best interests
of the country and will spare no effort to that end. In fact, arrangements have already been made for a proper exploration of the Hope
mountains with a view of obtaining a definite knowledge of the facts, for
the information and guidance of the Government and the public as well. 44
BRITISH   COLUMBIA
Then there is the northern country to be considered.   Take, for
reports constantly reach me. Here, again, readier means of transportation must be at once provided in order to allow of the development which
already gives so much promise. The whole railway question must not
be considered from an Island or Mainland point of view, but in the
interests of the Province generally.
It is impossible for me to add to the report just read by the Secretary, which covers the whole ground almost minutely. It shows how
much has been accomplished during the past year. If the Government
can render any assistance by arranging for its distribution at the Expositions, we will only be too glad-to undertake the task.
With respect to the local assay office, I was very glad to see that
arrangements have been made so that gold can be brought here and
sold instead of its being taken away to the City of Seattle. All along it
has been a grievance to the people of British Columbia that all this
wealth should be taken away from the Province. To show the importance of this matter, only yesterday I received the report of the Director
of the United States Mint, by which you will see what a large proportion of our gold went last year to Seattle:
" The assay office at Seattle received during the fiscal year ending
30th June, 1900: 615,648 oz. gold and 157,348 oz. silver from the Yukon,
and 44,720 oz. gold and 11,685 oz. silver from British Columbia	
The total received from the United States was 66,392 oz. of gold and
11,517 oz. of silver besides small quantities of mutilated coins and
jewellery."
This gives
Seattle, and is certainly proof of the justice of the complaints made from
time to time by your public bodies. I am glad to see that there is every
prpspect   of   British Columbia receiving a large   proportion of this
In conclusion I cannot but congratulate your Board on the remark- •
able strides made by the mining industry on Vancouver Island within
the past year.   Not only have the black sands at Wreck Bay turned out
well, but quartz mining at Mount Sicker and the vicinity gives promise 45
Address to Governor-General.
To His E.
Minto
burgh
Knigl
he members of the British Columbia Board o
Your Excellency as Her Majesty's represent
f Trade, desire to
ative our devoted
We I
Your
eg to tender to Your Excellency and to L
lcome to the Capital of this the most wester
, and to assure you of the genuine gratificat
affords us.
idy Minto a most
n Province of the
ith Her Majesty's forces in the North-west,
i integral part of the Dominion.
h Columbia and
t in the foremost
nospftov
articularly gratifying to this Board that You
isit the northern limits of British Columbia
r Excellency pro-
rad to personally
Asth
Atlin and
Yukon country, the urgency of an early a
)undary question is impressed more and moi
opening up of the
ijustment of the
e forcibly on this
mously p
Board observes with pleasure that the impor
lation to the trade of the Dominion was i
of Chambers of Commerce of the Empire 1
and it heartily endorses the resolution w
issed by that Congress, viz.:
tance of this sub-
ecognized at the
leld in London in
"Tha
" Pacific
dedvours   of Her
ge the desirability BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   C
Pending the settlement of the Alaska boundary question,
earnestly, to be desired that an All Canadian route to the Atlin
Yukon Districts be speedily inaugurated and completed.
It is felt that the settlement of the Alaske
pletion of a British Pacific cable would mark
ment of the commercial interests of the Empir
2 the Pa(
I and the com-
ific.
This Board has a lively appreciation of the immense benefits which
will accrue to this Province and the Dominion from an extension of
Canadian trade with South and Central America, Australia, the Pacific
Islands, and the far East, for which British Columbia is the natural outlet.
This Board is sensible of the immediate necessity of finding markets
for our raw materials, as the wealth of this Province in base and precious
metals, and coal, as well as in lumber and fish, is so immense that the
prosperity of the country is dependent on the procurement of markets
for those products, and we anxiously look for further action from the
Dominion Government in this direction.
Although certain influences have affected the mining industry in
British Columbia during the past year and many mines have been closed
down, it is a signal evidence of the immense mineral resources of the
Province, that the output has exceeded that of previous years; and it is
also gratifying to note that the returns of the lumbering and salmon
canning industries show a material increase.
At the sam
butes so largely
ance has not h
opening up that
on both the Isla
In order th
| keenly felt that while this Province contri-
enues of Canada, a fair or proportionate assist-
sen received from the Government towards
ealth which has been so bountifully bestowed
=s Mainland, and in consequence not only the
Dia but the whole Dominion is retarded.
i* hav
a opporti
should so desire of viewing the condition
mercial aspect, we beg leave to tender you herewith a copy
Annual Report of this Board.
In conclusion we would repeat our cordial and respectful wc
to Your Excellency and to Lady Minto, and we trust your v
this portion ofthe Dominion will be remembered with pleasure.
We have the honour to subscribe ourselves,
Your Excellency's most obedient and humble servants
Signed on behalf of the members of the")
y if 3 Mining Statistics.
Report of Mil
uster of Mines, December 31st, 1900
TABLE I.
Total Production
for all Years up to and including
Gold, placer	
Gold, lode	
     12,812
Silver  13,649,809
Lead  7,619,956
Copper  4,362,583
Coal and Coke  49,140,917
Building stone, bricks, etc   1,950,000
Other metals  34,640
Total $152,155,208
TABLE II.
Production for each Year from 1890 to 1900 (inclusive).
1852 to 1899 (inclusive) $ 71,981,634
1890  2,608,803
1891   3,521,102
1892  2,978,530
1893  3,588,413
1894  4,225,717
1895  5,643,042
1896  7,507,956
1897  10,455,268
1898  10,906,861
1899  12,393,131
1900  16,344,751
Total  $152,155,208
Table IH gives a statement in detail of the amount and value of the
lerent mineral products for the years 1898, 1899 and 1900. As it has
en impossible as yet to collect accurate statistics regarding building
me, lime, bricks, tiles, etc., these are estimated. BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF
Amount and Value
>f Mineral 1
Product
for 1898, 1899 a
ND 1900.
Customary
Measure.
1899.                              1900.
t&
Value.
<_£■.
Value.
Gold, placer	
"   lode	
Copper	
Pounds	
67,245
138,315
2,939,413
7,722.591
21,862,436
1,306,324
34,251
? 1,344,901
L663,70S
1,351,453
878,870
3,918,972
20M0C
63,936
167,153
3,958,175
9,997,080
63.358,621
1,439,595
85,149
2^ 309)200
1,615,289
4I318J85
425,745
$12,393,131
$16,344,751
This table shows in det
products for the last two
'      sases made in the vario
into percentages, the fol'
Placer gold in 1900 sh<
Lode gold "
Combined gold    "
Copper
Lead
Coal
Coke
Other materials   "
Total output "
I the amount and value of the mineral
iars,  and  it is interesting to note the
products during this time.    Calculated
ving is what this table shows:
s a  5 per cent, decrease from 1899
TABLE IV.
Production of Mineral by Districts and Divi
Name.
Divisions.
Districts.
1899.
1900.
1899.
1900.
Cariboo District	
Cariboo Mining Division..-	
Cassiar District '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.
Kootenay, East, District	
Kootenay, West, District	
siocan       "   '.v.r'.r'.'.'.r'.
TrailCreek     "      	
LillooetDi^trict.'. '\'.'.\'.'.'.'.'.'.V'..'.'.'
Yale District 	
Osoyoos (Grand Forks-Kettle
River) Division 	
Similkameen Division	
Yale                     '■        	
Coast Districts (Nanaimo, Alberni,
W. Coast V. I.. Victoria)	
'?" 180,666
193,301
'$ " 162;666
510,000
1,358,383
_4,80C
 8UVS80
523,666
6,187,859
'."';  69,558
4,094,903
 467,479
2,855,851
 88493
4,805,153
112,393,131
$16,344,751 y the banks a:
! plac
-old 1
dints, and from returns
-ioners and Mining Recorders. To thi
1 was added up to the year 1878, froi
ad 1899, one-fifth, which proportions are <
rimately, the amount of gold sold of whic
cer gold contains fro
ed fro
the total
1,615,070
2,228,543
2,666,118
2,656,903
3,913,563
3,735,850
3,491,205
2,662,106
1890	
490,435
1891....
429,811
1892....
399,526
1893....
356,131
1894....
405,516
1895....
481,683
1896....
..     .544,026
1897....
513,520
1898....
643,346
1899....
1,344,900
1900....
..   1,278,724
Production of Lode Minei
A
Gold.
Silver.
Le
_D.
COPPER.
Total
X
Oz.      Value.
Oz.
Value.
Pounds.
Value.
Pounds. 1 Value.
$
17,690
79,780
53,192
$
17,331
47)87'
73,948
204.80C
ie_;ioc
Nil.
Nil!
78)996
72L384
$
1888
'sl'ln
1890
1891
"km   M$a
mfm
324,6801      16,234
952,840       47.642
3,818,556     190,926
II)!
$13,649,809
206,081,558
35,412,605|$4,362,583
$38,445,208 RITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
Production in Detai
]■
BB1
Gcco-Loo,
Va.ue.
||
S
$
Cariboo D™
„&;::::::::
o •
. .
$a   »
I
il
--,479
I9oo
-**_
!
....~~
.:::::.
e:§£
Ainsworth Division
J SS
^
iS:f
SI
3°
1
 600
'     'Slooo
iSr?;-«e
|g
8
1
8
1
:g
as
Ipse
-p
§§
YfA%?crX Kamloops.)	
§M'SC(E8u^C„°g0stone, brick, etc.. other
""£1
"«
5S §1
»
§§
||||
$3^
* Estimated.     1 100 oz.  Plati, Mines for 1889
AND  1900.
APPENDICES.
51
Silver.
Copper.
LEAD.
TD^sto^R
Totals  for
Ounces.
Value.
Pounds.
v_»
Pounds.
Value.
1899.
n
~v~rv^
$
$
$
$
$
,80.000
'
162.000
i93.3°o
5.0.000
 8:6o°
8.9,380
"467.479
800.000
45=M79
.9.380
.5.000
....
 69
348
8i!3»
16
l|
I."'.
I.639348
64.393
^l"
2,2.0,,S.
5.409
6,187,859 6,020,783
368.165
■   3^,167
483,659
109,870
273.7S"
64,098
1,070.320
97^
5^*49
I,336^9
"5,693.889
' 239,840
335.435
196
1,485! 89c
'9l56s!743
139,884
363.439
63^
669.768
" 879.185
' 3,229,086
"349.463
787,082
2'!o5;8ls
'67,378
gs
96.4-6
69.558 88,493
69.558
'         : ■«_
88,493
■vsMs V.V^S
mi
 ;o2
%$?&M
BBS
..358.383
KVsS
 297
4,800
, .T?
•
' —
255,648
-•55.648    450.9.4
.:::..:::::::::::•
3&393I   «-S
:,^
$'r'.6r5^
2S..740
->.939.4p!    1.663.708
^'.862,436
,$2,«
'lI,O0O,22i
$8,302,904	
t Iron Ore.   § BuUding Stone. $250,000 ; Iron, $1,740. 52
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD
TABLE VIII.
OF
TRADE.
Coal and Coke Production per Yi
!AR TO  DAI
-E.
COAL.
Years.
(Tons 2,240 lbs.)
1836-52.
           10,000....
. $/      40,000
1852-59.
 ;         25,396	
101,592
1859 (2
months)           1,989....
1860 ..
         14,246....
56,988
1861...
         13,774....
55,096
1862...
         18,118....
72,472
1863...
         21,345....
85,380
1864...
28,632....
115,528
1865...
         32,819....
131,276
1866...
         25,115....
100,460
1867..-.
         31,239....
124,956
1868...
         44,005....
176,020
1869...
         35,802....
143,208
1870...
         29,843....
119,372
1871-2-:
3       148,549....
493,836
1881.
       228,357
         685,071
1882.
       282,139	
         846,417
1883.
       213,299	
         639,897
1884.
      1,182,210
1885.
         796,788
1886.
       326,636.!....!!!!.!!
         979,908
1887.
      1,240,080
1888.
     489,3oi!!!!!!!!	
      1,467,903
1889.
    1,739,490
1890.
!!!..    678,i4o!!!!!.!!!!!!!
      2,034,420
1891.
    1,029,097	
      3,087,291
1892.
      2,479,005
1893.
.!!!!    978,294!!!!!!!!!!!!!
      2,934,882
1894.
    1,012,953	
      3,038,859
1895.
       939,654	
      2,818,962
1896.
      2,688,666
1897.
!!!!!    882354!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 '   2,648,562
1898.
    1,135,865	
      3,407,595
    1,306,324	
      3,918,972
1900.
Total	
    1,439,595	
      4,318,785
  15,963,471 tons.
$48,271,937
COKE.
(Tons 2,240 lbs.)
Value.
1895-
           1,565	
    $       7,825
1897.
         17,831	
1898 i
[estimated)	
         35,000	
         175'000
         34,251	
         171,255
1900!
         85,149..	
         425,745
Total	
       173,796 tons.
$   868,980 [ii
Men Employed in
these Mines.
z
Below.
Above.
Total.
CASAtfin
i
Ifili
8
13
9
4
15
4
288
24
113
281
539
668
26
35
367
85
90
11
45
184
332
243
139
EASFort°sTeeileY.:	
4
3
12
10
17
378
Ainsworth	
Nelson	
Slocan 	
158
505
723
1,000
All other Divisions	
Yale District:
Osoyoos, Grand Forks, Kettle River
38
60
610
224
99
60   1 2,430
1,309
3,739
Tons of 2,240 lbs.
Tons, Coal.  cwt.
Tons, Coal.
cwt.
Sold for consumption in Canada	
"     export to other Countries	
906^215
13
1,183,082
209,965
Used in making Coke	
47,352
162,613
10
10
37,650
a.-!.
1
1,393,048
9,673
9
Difference taken from stock during year.
13
Output of Collieries for year 1900.
1,383,374
16
Coke sold for consumption in Canada.
" " export to United States .
"    stock on hand last of year	
Output of Coke at Comox Mines  1.9,234 tons. mbia board of trade,
of Men Employed.
CHARACTER  OF  L,
HOUR.
NUMBER EMPLOYED.
Total
Ground.
Ground.
Employed.
-
vision and Clerical
es—Miners	
Min^Helpers
40
1,593
480
426
36
123
48
110
35
75
WnTt
1,593
480
127
202
20
3
458
553
Skill'd Labour
238
Japa
Chin
iese	
51
568
2,856
845
3,701
1897.
1898.
1899.
1900.
British Columbia	
Australia	
English and Welsh	
Tons,     j
107^969
4,081
21,335
115|l50
Tons.
651,208
201,931
75,115
5,056
37,560
283,963
348,474
172,506
26,560
Tons.
623,133
139,333
93,263
Tons.
766,917
178,563
54,099
Eastern (Cumberl'd &Anthc'te)
Seattle, Washington	
Tacoma,        "           	
Mt. Diablo, Coos Bay andTesla.
Japan and Rocky Mountains...
38,951
271,694
355,756
189,507
28,390
17,319
250,590
418,052
160,915
42,673
Total	
1,601,540|
1,802,373
1,740,027
1,889,128
Of the above coal there was delivered in 1900 by water at the southern ports of California, viz., Los Angeles and San Diego, 165,965 tons,
principally from British Columbia. During 1900 the State of California
imported 41,741 tons of coke, about 12,000 tons of which are credited to
British Columbia (being the product of the Comox coke ovens), against
about 4,000 tons exported from Comox in 1899. JJ 3
a ._,
P 1
TOOOCOOTOO O^O^OCO.0
#-*00Ot-SD<SrtlNa
°.°*l,ll"*0.t*-.'*',ll:i
5 g   g a a BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE. APPENDICES.
-.«?"*. I   T
_    %%]%;,
J 0>!illl.
W<!Q_1OTJ BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
British Columbia Sealing: Catch, J900.
SCHOONER.
Tons.
B. C. Coast.
Behring
Sea.
Total.
40
75
86
66
37
92
46
76
50
87
93
69
80
92
69
92
43
46
83
55
86
70
56
56
63
99
63
92
60
48
76
66
739
178
523
388
816
295
248
258
517
562
680
408
197
835
546
412
173
604
434
611
328
735
632
611
456
353
708
658
528
428
228
1,147
375
1,079
1,223
1,362
707
Borealis	
Carrie, C. W	
421
862
951
1,173
1,008
735
785
549
655
709
646
427
365
193
928
279
735
1
323
232
44
82
449
591
708
293
809
1,417
1,160
E. B. Marvin	
Favorite	
1,111
1,062
Hatzic	
1,085
621
1,156
Ocean Belle	
333
496
634
607
191
392
632
440
547
558
104
600
417
1,068
Saucy Lass	
SadieTurpel	
474
1,081
1,031
Victoria                   	
Viva	
840
1,401
1,367
Venture
Walter L. Rich	
102
549
1,381
ZillahMay	
Indian catch (canoes)	
966
17,791
17,757
35,548
1889   35,310
1890  43,325
1891  52,365
1892  49,743
1893  70,592
1894  97,474
t Wrecked on voyage to Behring Se
! Twe:
s Been :
4,124
1897  50,410
1898  28,552
1899....  35,471
1900  35,548 APPENDICES.
Exports from British Columbia
iding 30th June, l<
:s of the Dominioi
s Branches,
ncluded.)
Hides, horns & skins (not fur)..
Bacon   lbs.
Beef     "
Hams "
Pork  "
Sheep pelts No.
Wool lbs.
Grain, Seeds, Breadstuffs
Oatmeal and all other...
Fruits and Vegetab
Apples (green)	
Fruits (canned)	
Other fruit	
Potatoes	
All other vegetables	
Dairy Products.
articles .   .
Total..
1,805
28,19s
Quan-
Value.
$
5°
58
S.035
3.223
2,319
4,072
192,905
444
'150
58,212
41,240
404
13
18,179
3,373
416
7,046
34
48
27 464
253
261
3,104
5i
203
674
3i
28
704
424
547
1,387
40
70
236
45
682
M
..!:262
721
307,084 RITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
i
Q
■-< a,oo ,m Tt-               a, N « N o o
r
1
&
1
fi fp|     p|Pf
5^^"
1
*s<
5~2_
|PP
^5^2
1
I
1
a
.«*    a 8
"a !_•
>  1   .
1   §l
1
"^S5
|||P
S             |g|
3 ^w
a .3 g
*
1
»lp; iHI n
o -s _
■1 ft
1^
5
- SS£§    I**st     1
-III
1
6>
Hj
||tP I              jj
1
ei
tr
i
s  ■§
II
£
_£ 1
*_
o m
APPENDICES.
6i
■5, N>OM J? S O, « «SJo«
-   i?pip|rS|
«3  £-
M"^5        £?3-       ""        "*
g
*l
!-<srpgl
O N  •& O mmo,tf O O t-~*£>
O ,£>  l^ultOnmO, MOO  On T
in0,0 w 100,0*000 i-^oo^vo
g^
2^mo«m£m6(S«^5 •I'ph <6 u (2 S o SUS H (2 o BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
i
0
- 1
s^rrIs
1
1U ?*i
Illlpl
&
°* 1
HIP!
•3
l
c
<K     rf^S    oo-t-^j  g*
a
0
U
>
H
6
5:-" tffipf
0
c
8.
l
1 -if iii
1
1
- s-ffc™ 1
J
o< 1
1
c
:;*g
: a 1
1
9
APPENDICES.
&
z
1
1 i
s
-
29,400.50
88,108.78
188,198.85
135,659.80
164,835.11
911,811.07
947,484.15
1 1
8
55,541.80
26,968.87
99,945.28
171,241.38
101,058.64
134,400.67
901,504.53
871,410.97
1t
1
I
j
305,187
140,388
374,233
787,915
622,097
672,209
4,271,666
3,963,743
I j
1
IIP
5,106
2,091
13,353
1,535
27,844
14,226
1 ;
I
94,526
39,050
59,015
138,394
277,567
135,017
925,098
1,092,648
8 rt
1
210,343
101,338
310,112
647,430
331,177
535,657
3,318,724
2,856,869
§ ?
j
|
r*
1
iz
!-
1
1
■5M 64
Imports
RITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
> the Province  of  British Columbia  for Thirty  Yea
June 30th, 1901,
To3oth J
Fron
To3°th J
SSO.833 3.866,855
789.287   789.287 789,28
4.089,492 3,458,529 564.923 4,023.45:
To 30th June, .897..
7,1-50,381 5,048.755
8,548.375        6,493,123 Exports the Produce of Canada, from the Province of British Columbia for
Thirty Years ending June 30th, 1901.
$214,700      $
423,840  327,360
633.493  273,366
1,332,385  407,624  287,394
899,37*   458,365   271,796
380,126    10,265
14,831    102,089
,274.686
374.996
294,646
S,ot7
20,434
6,257,158
,501,83.
454,994
3.0,62.
30, .73
446,23.
5,642,797
,54-.3°5
4...623
149,269
23.323
196.895
7,843.958
,264,50.
500.080
457.373
2.,774
261,9,8
9.121.098
,288,776
685,746
437,864
61.4.4
338.47.
.0,576,524
,567,8.5
742.173
307.84S
104,744
552,539
14,017,568
,846,951
285,007
78.977
262,834
17.239.-77 66                            BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD
OF  TRADE.
Shipping'.
This Board is indebted to the courtesy ai
id kindness of the Customs
Department at Ottawa, for the following info
rmation:
Vessels employed in the coasting trade of the Dominion of Canada,
arrived at and departed from the undermentioned Ports during the year
ending 30th June, 1901.
Vessels Arrived.
Vessels Departed.
No.                                     No.
No.                                    NoP
Vessels.      Tonnage.         Crew.
Vessels.      Tonnage.        Crew.
Nakusp  1  1,030      371,838     21,874
1,030      371,838     21,874
Kaslo  )   1,125      265,237     17,621
1,129      265,448     17,640
Nelson 2,020      917,296     32,984
2,020      917,296     32,984
1,117      284,886     13,548
Nanaimo     1,100      283,118     13,506
New Westminster    548      118,386      6,615
554      118,642       6,614
Vancouver..*..... 2,681      687,592     41,584
2,893      694,690     37,787
Victoria  1,719      575,789     36,111
1,726      565,935     36,088
■ear ending June 30th, 1901.
'   N0.                                     N0.^
' No.              N0e
Vessels.      Tonnage.        Crew.
Vessels.       Tonnage.         Crew.
Nanaimo        31        52,608          680
100      165,150       2,938
New Westminster     108          5,753          559
28          6,973          229
Vancouver      321      290,884     15,581
275      162,694       8,318
Victoria  1,031      596,800     38,513
410      394,956     19,315
Vesssls entered outwards for sea during y
ear ending June 30th, 1901.
With Cargo.
In Ballast.
'   No.                                     No?
'   No.                                 No. I
Nanaimo      146      221,707 !    4,618
4               776             49
New Westminster      27          7,827          260
120          5,805          596
Vancouver      415      419,416     19,935
187        71,548       5,089
Victoria      693      462,502     24.059
758      515.738     29.003
Number and tonnage of vessels built and registered during year
ending June 30th, 1901.
Built.
Registered.
re.                   No.             Tonnage.
Kaslo ,        1              76
4                    1               370
New Westminster      13     -   .     481                 17               363
Nelson        8              75
3                   3               634
Victoria      12            3,035                 10           4,937 APPENDICES.
Inland Revenue, Canada, Divisions No. 37 and 38.
Entered  for Consumption July  ist,   1900,   to  June  30th,   1901.
Vancouver, B. C.
Licenses  $    2,987 50
Spirits    172,451  13
Malt        30,955 47
Tobacco      60,530 40
Raw Leaf        6,975 82
Cigars, ex-Factory        16,806 901
Cigars, ex-Warehouse          1,139 40J
Mythelated Spirits  327 79
Other Receipts  337 40
24,637 68
33,066 30
Climate.
No general description will serve the purpose in speaking of the
climate of British Columbia. On tbe coast it varies considerably, while
in the interior tbe variations are yet more plainly marked.
Dr. Bryce, in "The Climate and Health Resorts of Canada," says:
" In all this country," from the south of Vancouver Island to the Queen
Charlotte Islands, "tbe fruits of temperate climates grow well, and
farm animals live out doors the year round. The rich bottoms of .the
Fraser delta have long been famous for their great hay crops and pasture
lands ; but here the extreme of rainfall is met, tbe mean for six years
being 59.66 inches at New Westminster. The climate of the great Island
of Vancouver, running north-west across two degrees of longitude and
two degrees of latitude, presents every variety from that at the sea
coast, with as at Esquimalt, a very low daily range, and no annual extremes—the lowest temperature in two years being 8 degrees F., the
lowest monthly average being 20 degrees F., and the highest in summer
being 82 degrees F.—to that as above Alberni on tbe west coast, where
the Vancouver range rises first into a plateau to 4,000 feet, and even to
7,500 feet in Victoria Peak."
" Apart from the mineral wealth of Vancouver Island, its climate,
, with every variation possible, becomes most attractive. Its seashore
climate is milder than many parts of England, with less rain and less
variations."
Attention is directed to the following tables: *ISH COLUMBIA BOARD OF TRADE.
; MONTHLY AND ANNUAL RAINFALL
AND SNOWFALL
acipal stations in British Columbia, derived from a
R
k
p
°
PQ
<
<
<j
<
Lower Mainlar
d'.'.'.'.B
1
o
„
0
r|
.
0
%>
Vancouver Island... D
_
6
-<
"
1
I
I
«(
|"
1896
I
1
b_Z!_t"}*
;$,'!,
11
8.55
2^
4.50
16.0
2.19
9.6
8.11
15.3
5.13
7.8
3.76
9.4
5.22
12^
0.72
4.8
6:5
0.38
9.2
0.00
(KOo
5.4
0.34
26.2
0.17
24.3
March {<^
„98
L68
3.24
LIS
6.2a
2.1
oa
5.16
3.1
5.45
0>9
0^
0.01
1.0
0.50
0.63
2^
0.08
May jg,1
■Vwriist       I8*
SS
i
0.17
2.60
1.37
0.80
4.57
_56
'5.20
4.38
3.'96
4.85
'3.97
0.36
6.40
1.52
0.22
'6.51
1.32
1.02
1.05
2.22
2.3
3.13
0.3 '
2.76
jr°
Infall
2.50
1.23
2 76
10.02
5.12
5.25
088
0.15
1.92
3.18
N         be   JE"
Mil
a?
5,56
...ro
12.71
13.61
5.50
6.56
8.'24
6.51
'6.37
'6.62
0.4
0.96
1.3
1.45
9.7
1.01
jiS
tafalf
841
5^0
10'90
?;5i
4.5
8.67
8.3
11.5
12.2
25.9
Decembei. jg_
°rf*n
sr!***
ss'ra
3i;46
9628
5635!
6196
*%%
u;_o
6ar *Sn
owfall
si.u
36.9
60.00
28.6
48.9
28.8
69.*
40.00
161.2
PARATIVE TABL:
AVERAGE RAINFALI
1
H    j   O
\
i
f
%>
1
<
April	
May	
l
il 11
11
||
11
11
il
ti
0.51
il a    -pu U[si .radna
e§ § | s=| i=s|lllll
0      -"loniT sjoaih
s °° °> s s fc
V   . -tn-iy uorapjg
5 *s8 « -? g -^ ** =S5
Jj||||
V         aioo?S W>_.
5- °| 5 3 i =s £ =|
July   6
v-^An0!.!Mj || S | g.3 S=5'j|| J J |
a          ojoniiozi-H
el s 1 a =1 § |!
I   |   |1   J   | j
0     -uosdnng i.ioj I   g  J-   P   _!   !" =3   == =§   *£    >--   >   _;    >>S°
V     ,___.
esill^^gfig-ils
T„,w.„,,«,s| g^3|g=as=gjj||||
a        •p.iojsioqqY       ;'  .S   S   S   S =3   2 =§   «   3.   ?j    _    §   I
3                -iss-sSy
83 "1 S 1 §=1 1=-S | | | | | |
a    -2138^0 qauaail
; °1 S 1 S=l S=5 | | | 5 J 1
a         ii-erambsa
i^fvais^^ji'jil
||1|   j
Amount of snowfall, in inches...
Last frost	
First snow	
Last snow	
Warmest day	
Mean temperature	 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF
CLIMATE OF VICTORIA, B. C.
1 the general healthiness of the various cli
ole of its extensive boundaries, is a point on
of favorable opinion.
natic conditions  throughout the
vhfich there is an universal consen-
Pre-eminent, however, for ils natural beauty and its delightful climate, stands
VICTORIA, the ' ■ Queen City," the capital of the Province and the seat of its Government. Situated at the south-eastern extremity of Vancouver Island, its insular
climate is considered to be the most delightful on the Pacific coast, and has been
compared with that of the south of England.
" It is spoken of as England without its east winds, in reality it is Torquay
" in the Pacific; a mild and even winter with rain, and occasional snow, an early
"spring, a dry and warm summer, and a bright and enjoyable atmosphere;
" thunderstorms are seldom seen here, they can be heard in the interior but are
" ™rely experienced."
The si
by the Island mountain ranges, causes its
: cities of Vancouver and New Westminstei
er portion of the moisture from the ocear
westward side of the Island ranges and j
ompiled from o
July	
October., APPENDICES.
Mean annual temperature   48.6
Average winter temperature (November-February)   40.65
"       summer       " (June-August)   58.12
Average precipitation (rain and snow)   32.5    inches.
The percentage of bright sunshine is 34 (ioo=constant.)
The follo\
ng compans
with British sunshine may be of ii
Torquay 37      \ Stonyhurst 28
Eastbourne 36       York 27
Plymouth 35        London 25
Oxford 32        Edinburgh 25
The rainfall is more seasonal than that of London though greater in
. From May to September is usually a period of small rainfall and bright
t Victoria, while in London the summer and winter rainfall is not very
t, and the percentage of bright sunshine from May to August at Victoria is
rgely in excess of that of London."
BRITISH   COLUMBIA.
The following table gives the average for the Province as a whole :
mperature 45.3
differ,
5rage of highe
lowest
pera
Census Population.
Bn
tish Columbia
Scotja
and
Qu
lized Territories.
The population of Vi<
British Columbia by families,
eas follows	
98,173
190,000
152,506
246,464
321,263
331,093
450,396
459,116
2,114,321
2,167,978
109,078
103,258
1,488,535
1,620,974
66,799
145,000
32,168
75,000
16,841
20,821
13,709
26,196
20,718
39,000
20,016
38,000 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
3    _
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'■ BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF. TRADE.
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• : : : I :T7    :
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At any time''..'.'.'.!! !!!!.!.'
Before October 1st	
At any time	
Before September 1st	
During close season	
mp H :^-a^mm^<5
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mm
SSCOOCQB   Q&
ill; H j j
fills  BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
J a
•1BU0-0IA
"BUO^OIA
g
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s   '■■■■
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1 1 PRINTING AND PRESSWORK.
Wages in the printing trade vary somewhat according to locality.
For machine composition the standard is 50 cents per hour on morning
papers, and from 40 to 45 cents per hour for evening papers and book-
work ; by the week on morning papers, $22.50 to $27, and from $20 to
$24 for evening papers and other work. Time and a half is usually allowed for overtime per hour, 48 hours being the standard weekly time.
For hand composition wages are 50 cents per 1,000 ems on morning
papers, and 40 to 45 cents on evening papers and for bookwork; 50 to 60
cents per hour is paid on morning papers, and 31A to 60 cents on evening
and weekly papers and for book and job work. The high rate is
unusual however, and is only paid at Nelson. The weekly wage on
morning papers is $21 to $22.50, and from $18 to $21 on evening papers
and for other work. The usual time and a half for overtime is allowed.
The hours per week vary from 42 to 54, 53 and 54 being the average.
The foregoing are union wages. In towns not organized the wages
are from $12 to $18 per week.
Pressmen's wages are from $3 to $3.50 per day, $17 to $21 per week,
with 48 to 54 hours per week. Pressmen's assistants receive $2.50 per
day and upwards, from $12 to $18 per week; apprentices, from $4 to $15
INEI
1 WAG
The wages in the Crow's Nest coal mines are: Average daily,
underground miners, $3.50; underground labourers, $2.25; above ground
labourers, $2; mechanics and skilled labour, above ground, $3; boys,
underground, $1; boys, above ground, 75 cents.
White miners in the Nanaimo colliery, $3 to $4.50; labourers,
underground, $2.50 to $3.50; labourers, above ground, $2.50; mechanics
and skilled labour, $3 to $4; boys, $1 to $2, underground; boys, above
ground, $1 to $1.50; Chinese, above ground, $1,124 to $1.25.
The current wages paid in and about metalliferous mines are as follows : Miners, $3 to $3.50 per day (12 to 14 shillings); helpers, $2 to $2.50
per day (8 to 10 shillings); labourers, $2 to $2.50 per day (8 to 10 shil- 78
Asim
steel induf
could be b
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRAD
Iron and Steel.
the case of paper and pulp, the possibilities
itry are shown by the markets which are at j
the United States and the nations of Eu
est supplied from British Columbia, providei
I other condi
hich
veral
Maini;
The pi
SHzS____iE_
38 is levelling
,and
There is every reason to be
advantages of this Coast, proc
h the compensating natural
ible on a competitive basis
ifore, is wanted is the de-
a market for British Columbia iron a
returns of the United States and Gre
the market as a whole. Taking the
Mexico, Guatemala,.San Salvador, _
uld afford
the trade
ication of
i of this
Dlumbia, APPENDICES
iron required to produce the material represented by these values is approximately 130,000 tons, and 470,000 tons for New South Wales and tbe
whole group of the colonies, respectively.
Paper and Pulp Figures.
The accompanying figures are simply given to illustrate the extent
of market which is legitimately open to British Columbia when its paper
and pulp industry is fairly established. With the exception of Japan
and Australia, complete returns of the imports are not yet available,
but tbe imports from the United States and Great Britain afford a good
indication of the market as a whole. Taking the same countries as are
included' in the remarks on the iron industry, namely, the South
American Latin republics, Australasia, etc., the value of paper exported
to them by Great Britain in 1900 amounted to £5,774,162.
Japan alone of books and paper stationery imported $2,630,905
worth; of this amount, $267,560 was for packing paper and $1,426,667
for printing paper. In the year 1900, $227,564 worth of pulp for paper-
making was imported, being practically double the amount in 1898. In
1900 the value of the exports of paper and manufactures of paper from
the United States to the countries, the markets of which will be tributary to British Columbia, was $1,490,635, of which amount $173,825 was
for printing paper and $236,305 for writing paper and envelopes. The
United States exported to the countries in question $36,448 worth of
Scale of Commercial Charges.
Whenever no special agreement exists, the following shall be collectible :
1. On the purchase of stocks, bonds, and all kinds of securities,
including the drawing of bills for the payment of the same 2j£ per cent.
2. On sale of stocks, bonds, and all kinds of securities, including
remittances in bills and guarantee   2}£ "
3. On purchase and sale of specie, gold dust and bullion    1 "
4. On sale of bills of exchange with endorsement   2% "
5. On sale of bills of exchange without endorsement    1 "
6. For endorsing bills of exchange when desired   2^ "
7. On sale of produce, etc., from foreign ports, with guarantee..  7% "
8. On goods received on consignment and afterwards withdrawn. 2^"f "
9. On goods received on consignment and afterwards returned by
the consignee   No charge.
10.    On purchase and  shipment  of merchandise,  with  funds  on
hand, on cost and charges     5     per cent. BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OP   TRADE.
ing gen
For collecting general average on any excess over $20,c
On purchase and sale of vessels	
For " Port Agency "  to vessels with cargo or passenge
foreign ports, as under :
On vessels under 200 tons register 3
"        of 300 to 500        " 	
> of vessels by consignees with funds on han
s of vessels by consignees without funds 0
mated, to be considered as due when the " charter parties,"
On giving bonds for vessels under attachment in litigated cases,
on amount of the liability   2
For landing and re-shipping goods from vessels in distress on
invoice value, or in its absence, market value   5
For receiving and forwarding goods on invoice amount   2
For advancing on freight lo be earned   5
effect
n the ar
exclusii
of brokerage, and APPENDICES.
RATES ON STORAGE OF MERCHANDISE.
On measurement goods, 50 cents per ton of forty cubic feet (40 c. ft.) On
ivy goods, 50 cents per ton of 2,240 pounds. Or in either case, the amount
ually paid, if more. The consignee to have the option of" charging by measure-
nt or weight.    Any fraction of a month to be charged as a month.
:rning the delivery of merchandise, payment of freight, etc.:    When
aulation exists per bill of lading,  goods are  to  be considered as
(b.) Freight on all goods to be paid, or secured to the  satisfaction of the
atain or consignee of the vessel, prior to the delivery of the goods.
0 the purchaser of the goods sold, no claims for damage,
se shall be admissible after goods sold and delivered have
(c.) After deliv.
deficiency or other
once left the city.
(d.) When foreign bills of lading expressly stipulate that the freights shall be
paid in a specific coin, then the same must be procured if required, or its equivalent given, the rate to be determined by the current value at the time at the banks.
The foregoing scale of Commercial Charges and Rules and Regulations were
approved at the Quarterly General Meeting of the British Columbia Board of
Trade, held October 21st, 1898.
Mining Regulations.
BRITISH   COLUMBIA.
The mining laws of British Columbia provide, with respect to coal
that a prospector for coal or petroleum on leased Crown lands in which t
erals are reserved, before obtaining a license, shall place a post at one
the land with his name and the initials of the angle, and shall post a noti
application on the land and on the government office of the district for thi
and shall advertise it in the British Columbia Gazette and some local ne
for thirty days.
Security for damages m
leased or are covered by a ti
t be giv
if the Crown lands in question have been
After th<
on in the  (
: expiration of thirty days, and within two months from tl
Gazette, an application in duplicate (with a plan and a fee
:y license) must be sent to the Assistant Commissioner of L
applica-
f$5o for
.ands and 82 BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF   TRADE,
Works for a prospecting
with ths sides running n
icense.    Such 1
hen the Chief Com-
e rectangular block
a not exceeding 640
The licei
tew applici
: shall 0
On proving that he has bona fide explored for coal during the year he shall be
entitled to an extension for a second year on payment of $50, and a further extension for a third year may be granted. License holders of adjoining lands, not
exceeding ten, may work in partnership, when they need not prospect separately,
provided the Chief Commissioner is satisfied with the prospecting done on the land
of 01
of ther
The licensee may use the timber and stone on the land for the purpose 01
buildings on the land. Dispute as to the right of title shall be decided in the
county court. No transfer for a prospecting license may be made without written
notice to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works.
The Lieutenant-Governor in Council may grant to a prospecting licensee a
lease for five years at a rent of ten cents on proof that he has discovered coal on
the land ; and if during this term, or three months thereafter, he can show that he
has continuously and vigorously carried on coal-mining he shall be entitled to purchase the land at $5 an acre, in one payment at time of sale.
Before the lease is issued, a survey must have been made by the applicant.
Besides the ten cents rent a royalty of five cents a ton on coal and one cent a barrel
on petroleum must be paid. The lessee must carry on coal mining continuously.
Any number of persons, not exceeding ten, may work in partnership on adjoining
lands when it shall not be necessary to work each leasehold separately, provided
work on one is done to the satisfaction of the Chief Comm:
(Cons. Act, 1888, chap. 83, and amending acts; 1890, chap. 32; 1892, chap.
31; 1895, chaP- 37> and acts of l897> l898 and l899-)
Proprietors of coal mines may acquire such portion of any Crown lands, or
lands held under pre-emption or Crown grants, or lease or license, as may be
necessary for a right of way to the sea shore, a river or public highway, together
with a block not exceeding five acres on the shore, river or highway. Minerals
are not to be conferred by the conveyance without the consent of the grantor.
Compensation shall be paid by agreement or arbitration. (Cons. Acts, 1888, chap.
83, amendment Act, 1890, chap. 32, and chap. 137, Acts of 1897.)
Regulations of coal mines.—No boy under twelve, no woi
age, and no Chinaman or Japanese shall be employed under gro
lof a
Boys from thi
There are various other regulations
to fourteen shall only t
be allowed by the Mini
o the employment of young pers No wages shall be paid ti
uous office or place.
ust be paid by weight, unless exception  is  allowed by thi
md a check weigher may be appointed by them.
:cure safety.    (Cons. Acts,
)4, chap. 5 ;   1895, chap. ;
There are a number of regulations
84 ;   amending acts, 1890, chap. 33 ;
.   1897, chap. 138.)
Mining, other than coal.—Persons over 18 years of age and joint stock companies may become "Free Miners" on taking out certificates (which are not
transferable) for one year in case of joint stock companies, and for one or more
Every person or joint stock company mining (except for coal) must take out
. a free miner's certificate under a penalty of $25. Owners and contractors shall
pay the free miner's fees of'their employees, deducting amount from them and
giving a list to the Mining Recorder, under a penalty of $100.
No
, minerals or mining property.
certificate, c
i hold
Free miners may prospect and mine (except for coal) upon any Crown lands
or lands where minerals are reserved to the Crown, provided they may not locate
or mine on land uncovered by hydraulic mining works for six months, and provided they must give security for damages to any occupier.
For every free miner's certificate issued to an individual $    5 00
company—
(a.) Having a nominal capital of $100,000 or less      50 00
(b.) Having a nominal capital exceeding $100,000    100 00
Free miners may cut timber necessary for their mining upon Crown lands,
even if covered by timber lease or reserved, and they may kill game for their own
A free miner may locate a mineral claim measuring 1,500 feet square as nearly
rectangular as possible, marking it by two posts, I and 2, on the line of the vein
not more than 1,500 feet apart, or a fractional mineral claim can also be marked
out. On No. I post of a mineral claim shall be written the names of the locator
and the claim, the date, the compass bearing of No. 2 post and the number of
feet (of the 1,500) lying to the right and left respectively of this line ; these particulars are to be furnished also to the Mining Recorder. He must mark the line
by blazing trees or post planting, and place a post where he found rock "in place,"
and as near as possible to four corners of the claim. He is entitled to all the minerals within the claim. The claim is not to be recorded without an affidavit that
mineral has been found " in place " on the claim, that the legal notes and posts 84                            BRITISH   COLUIV
IBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
have been put up, that ground is un
occupied, etc.    A location made on Sunday or
a holiday is not invalid.    Where, fr
om the nature of the ground the location can-
not be thus marked, posts may be s
et as near as possible, and the direction and
distance recorded.    The free mine
r shall record his claim with the Mining Re-
corder within 15 days, if his office i
3 within 10 miles, with an additional day for
every additional 10 miles.    A clairr
1 recorded by error in the wrong district may
be recorded anew in the right dis
trict with the original date.    If left in the Re-
corder's absence, the applicant is er
titled to a record of that date.    The claim may
be held from year to year on a certi
ificate by the Gold Commissioner, or Mining
Recorder, that -work has been done
on it to the value of $100.    Assessment work
to be counted in certificate.    A fr
se miner or partners having adjoining claims
work them together,
ark done on one.    A free mir
ecorder.    Disputes as to titles
isforalltheclaii
lieu of work, pay $100 to the Min
nined by priority.
■Jo free miner can hold (except by purchase) mor<
vein or lode, but he may hold by location a claim
He may abandon his claim by notice i
re-locate the same claim (or
1 permission from the Gold
tunnel to develop a lode
the owner.    The interes
The lawful ownei
of $500 to the Govern
ered a part of $500) ai
the Gold Commissione
f a mineral claim is entitled
after having obtained a ceri
on payment
ier need not
and inside the r
With a certificate of improver
belt is entitled to a Crown gi
acre to the Mining Recorder.
The claim for the grant must be made within three months. The issue c
grant does not invalidate any previous lien.    The grant covers all minerals e:
Conveyances, mortgages, etc., of mineral claims shall be recorded or
not be good against third parties, and transfers must be in writing. A free mi
claim shall not be open for location during his last illness, nor for twelve m<
after his death.    The Gold Commissioner and official  administrator admii
A mill site may be located by a free
unoccupied and unreserved Crown lands
obtain a lease for one year, during
1 proof of having 1 $500 on machinery, and shall be entitled to a Crown grant for $5 an acre.    This
from the Gold Commissioner. Water rights may be granted to him by the Gold
Commissioner, and must be recorded, rights of miners working on the streams
being safe. He may not sell the water, and the grant shall cease when the mine
is no longer worked. Work must be begun within 60 days; and there must be no
waste of water, and an outlet must be provided for superfluous water.
Mining partnerships and limited liability companies are regulated by a mim
ing Recorders and Gold Commissioners are fully laid down,
by a two-thirds vote a Recorder, where there is none.
re mining jurisdiction which is fully provided for.
vening the Act or refusing to obey the lawful order of a
to  a  fine  of $250 or  three  months'
An annual tax of 25 cents an acre is payable on every claim held under Crown
grant. The tax shall be remitted on proof that the sum of $200 has been
expended on the claim within the year.
Mines and moneys invested in them are not exempt from provincial taxation.
The Lieutenant-Governor in Council may make orders to carry out the Act.
(Cons. Act, 1888, chap. 82, and amending Acts, 1889, chap. 16 (repealed) ;
1890, chap. 31 (repealed); 1S91, chap. 25; 1892, chap. 32; 1893, chap. 29;
1894, chap. 32, and 1895, chap. 39; 1896, chap. 34 ; 1897, chap. 45 ; and Acts
of 1898.)
Placer Mining Act.—Every free miner holding a certificate may mine for
gold or other precious metals on any land, except Government reserves for town-
I   sites, lands occupied by buildings, curtilages and orchards, or for placer mining
on Indian reserves.    He must give security for damages.
He may locate a placer claim on each separate creek, ravine or hill, but not
more than two in the same locality, and only one a creek claim, But he may hold
any number for purchase. A creek claim shall be 100 feet long, and in width from
base to base of the hills ; a bar diggings claim shall be a strip 100 feet long, and
in width, from high water mark to the lowest water level; a dry diggings claim
I shall be 100 feet square, and the same for bench diggings and hill diggings. Discoverers of new mines shall be allowed : If one, a claim 300 feet long; if a party
of two, 600 feet; if three, 800 feet; if four, 1000 feet; if more than four, ordinary
Placer claims shall be as nearly rectangular as possible. Posts shall be placed
at the corners, and the initial post shall bear names and description.    Locations BRITISH   COL1
OARD   OF   TRADE,
on Sundays and holidays shall not be invalid. Placer claims must be recorded
with the Mining Recorder. The removal of posts entails forfeiture. Records
of placer claims may be renewed on payment of the fees, $2.50 a year.
A placer claim gives no right to a vein or lode unless the ground is located
and recorded as a mineral claim.
A placer claim must be worked continuously by the holder or his employee,
and shall be held abandoned and forfeited if unworked for 72 hours, except for
reasonable cause, satisfying the Gold Commissioner. A year's leave of absence
may be given if the sum of $1000 has been expended without reasonable return, or
if all holders of the set of claims sign the application.
Provisions
partnerships, n
ing free miner';
) the
ind drains,
er rights (see 1879, cap. 45)
county courts, penalties, pay-
me as those regarding mineral
Provisions are made for " bed rock flumes."
Free miners may obtain a lease of placer mining ground for 20 years, as follows :—Before application for lease, legal posts to be placed, with names and descriptions, and plans, etc., to be deposited with Mining Recorder ; creek diggings,
or abandoned or unworked creeks, half a mile in length ; any olher placer mining
grounds, 80 acres ; precious stone diggings, 10 acres. The lease may be renewed.
The ground must be already occupied (without consent of occupiers) nor immediately available for agricultural purposes; and only placer mining must be carried
on. Consolidation of holdings into one not to exceed 640 acres is provided for by
Act of 1898, amending the Placer-mining Act, 1891.
Wal
:ed by the Gold Commissioner for hydi
workings 0
Lease;
smaj
-begra
nter
1 for
tw
enty yean
; of the bed- 0
f th<
■rive
r for d
redging
(Act,
; 1896,
1891,
chap
Chap.
35* 1
26,
897
and
, cha
ip.
nending t
29; 1897,
ktsj 1894, ch
chap. 45.)
ap. ;
||
,d 189!
;, chap.
A Bill
intit
uled ".
Act
A.ct 1
has
be
epeal an Act to aid the De\
en passed (1896, chap  36.)
elopr
An
nent of
Act to
?mea_d
msolidated Acts of 1888 and subsequent amending Acts t
1 twenty-four British Columbia Acts relating to mining, witl
1 special Acts concerning hydraulic mining companies. APPENDICES. 87
A Bureau of Mines was established in 1895, under the Minister of Mines,
with a Provincial Mineralogist, whose duty it is to collect information relating to
the mining industry and publish it. Besides a museum, there are lo be lecture
rooms, as assay office and laboratory, where assets and tests may be made according to a schedule of fees. Arrangements may be made for giving instructions to
prospectors and others, and societies of arts and other societies may affiliate with
the Mining Bureau for the instruction and examination of students.
An Act intituled the " Inspection of Metaliferous Mines Act, 1897," am
1899, provides for the appointment of an Inspector, and contains rul«
gulations for the safe working of mines other than coal.
nded
DOMINION.
cite,
The Dominion Government have provided regulations for the disposal of coal
s the property of the Dominion in Manitoba and the Northwest Territories,
se regulations provide that locations of an area not exceeding 320 acres, may
;served for an applicant for a period of sixty days to prospect for coal, on
nent of a fee of $10 and an expenditure in prospecting of $2 a day. A
tion may be sold at the rate of $10 per acre (cash) unless the coal is anthra-
case the price is $20 per acre.
Settlers at a dii
e from coal mines worked by purchasers may secure permits authorizing them to mine for domestic purposes, on payment of a royalty of
20 cents for anthracite, and 15 cents for bituminous, and 10 cents for lignite coal.
The regulations provide that the location shall be marked on the ground, that the
frontage shall not exceed three chains, and the length ten chains; that the applicant shall within thirty days after marking his location, file application with the
agent, who is to issue a permit at the rate of $5 an acre or fraction of an acre per
In the Yukon Territory all applications for coal lands are to be made
awn Timber and Land Agent, who is empowered to sell such lands at $
e (cash) if the coal is anthracite, and $20 for any other coal.
Persons of 18 years and over, and joint stock companies holding a free
miner's certificate may obtain entry for a mining location.
A free miner's certificate (non-transferable) is granted for one year. The fee
for an individual is $10, and to a joint stock company $50 to $100, according to
capital.
The holder of a free miner's certificate who has discovered mineral in place,
may locate a claim 1,500 feet by 1,500 feet, by marking it with two legal posts,
one at each end, on the line of the lode or vein, and marking out the line between. BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
Upon each post shall be marked tl
date, and the number of feet lying
: name of the claim, the person locating and
o the right and left of line.
The claim shall be recorded with the Mining Recorder of the district within
15 days, if located within 10 miles of the office ; one additional day allowed for
every additional 10 miles or fraction. If a claim is more than 100 miles from a
recorder's office, and situated where other claims are being located, five free
miners may appoint a Free Miner's Recorder ; but if the latter fails within three
months to notify the nearest Government Mining Recorder of his appointment,
the claims will not hold good.    Fee for recording a claim is $5.
At least $100 per year must be expended on the claim, or paid to the Mining
Recorder in lieu. When $500 has been expended or paid, the locator may upon
having a survey made and upon complying with certain other requirements, pur-
chase the land at :
disposed of, at $2 ai
$5 P
re, cash.
but if
the surfac
e right!
idy been
but
the
The
Yul
A location for 1
if therein other
:  Minister of th
:on Territory.
valuable 1
mineral:
ca not exceeding
) grant  160 acre
160 acres may be
miner's right is li
reverting to the
s for copper mini:
granted,
afte
The patent for
r be imposed on
i of patent.
the
ning 1
■alty t
1 forever v
0 be collec
/hateve
r royalty may here-
sales made prior to
Crc
Provini
1 British C
.nds.
:ial Government La
are classified as
veyed or unsur-
veyed lands, a
.ndrn
ay be acqui
red by e
ntry at the Gove
rnment Lands Office, pre-
emption
orpu
rchase.
Th!
; folk
iwing
persons rr
lay pre-e
mpt Crown land
s :    Any person being the
head of
afam
ily.a
widow, or
a single
man over eight
een years
of age, being a
British s
lubjecl
:, ma;
f record sui
veyed 01
• unsurveyed Cro
wn lands, ;
which are unoc-
cupied,
orunr
eserv
ed, and un:
recorded (that is unreser
ved for In.
dians or others,
or unrecorded
inth
e name of 1
iny othe
r applicant).
Aliens  tr
,ay a
Iso record
such sui
veyed  or unsur
i-eyed land
on  making  a
declarat
ion of
inter
ition to bee
omeaB
ritish subject.
Th.
:quan
tity of land that
may be recorded or pr<
:-empted is
i not to exceed
320 acr,
as northwa
rd and eas
itward 0
f the Cascade 0:
r Coast Mi
Duntains, or 160
acres in
there
st of
the provin
No
persoi
a can
hold more
than one
: pre-emption cla:
im at a tim,
:.    Prior record
or pre-e:
mptioi
-of c
me claim, 1
and all 1
ighLs under it, 1
ire forfeitec
1 by subsequent
record 0
empti
on of anotl
ier clain Land recorded or pre-empted c
Crown, grant has been issued.
Continuous absence for
granted not exceeding six
rectification of the boundaries) within five years from date of record.
After survey has been made, upon proof, in declaration in writing of himself
and two other persons, of occupation for two years from date of pre-emption, and
of having made permanent improvement on the land to the value of two dollars
and fifty cents per acre, the settler on producing the pre-emption certificate,
obtains a certificate of improvement.
After
btaining the certificate of improven
p of record or pre-emption, and yearly
.yable till after the survey, if the land is
160 acres each, and res
per acre made on some
s may enter into partnership with pre-emptions of
i thereof will secure Crown grant for the whole.
The Crown grant reserves to the Crown a royalty of f
every ton of merchantable coal raised or gotten from the land
or fine slack, and fifty cents per M. on limber. All coal aj
lands are now reserved under Land Act Amendment, 1899.
empted by virtue of his declaring his intention ti
he has become naturalized.
a British subject, unless BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
:irs of devisees of the settler are entitled to the Crown grant o
s, $2.50 per a
cres. Minimum price
e ; third class, $1 per
;s a second purchase is
ind $1, third class.
re for first class ; $2.50, secon
if Crown lands in lots not exceeding 20 acres may be obtained ; and
mprovements are made at ihe expiration of lease, Crown grants are
Leases are also granted for hay
for any purpose whatsoever, except c
Twenty-one years' timber lease
the highest cash bonus is accepted, s
ce, of
>r a term not exceeding 21 years.
bject to public competition, and
: 50 cents per M. royalty above
15 cents per acre. The holder
..SS than 1,000 feet of lumber per
such lease ; and such mill shall be
ofoi
• of this
be entitled to obtain Crown
five per cent, of such instal-
, 1900, twenty-five per cent,
y-five per cent, on or before
of ii
of
in full of all instalments of
after said 31st day of December, 1901, but

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