Open Collections

BC Historical Books

BC Historical Books

BC Historical Books

British Columbia. Return to an address of the Honourable the House of Commons, dated 2 July 1868;-for,… Great Britain. Colonial Office 1868

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcbooks-1.0222166.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcbooks-1.0222166.json
JSON-LD: bcbooks-1.0222166-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcbooks-1.0222166-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcbooks-1.0222166-rdf.json
Turtle: bcbooks-1.0222166-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcbooks-1.0222166-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcbooks-1.0222166-source.json
Full Text
bcbooks-1.0222166-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcbooks-1.0222166.ris

Full Text

Array BRITISH    COLUMBIA. 
RETURN to an Address of the Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated 2 July 1868 ;—-for, 
" COPY or Extracts of Correspondence between Governor Kennedy of 
Vancouver  Island,  Governor Seymour   of  British  Columbia,  and the 
Colonial Office, on the subject of a Site  for the Capital of British 
Columbia." 
Colonial Office,
27 July 1868.
C. B. ADDERLEY.
(Mr. Graves.)
Ordered, by The House of Commons, to he Printed,
28 July 1868.

483. [     2     ]
LIST   OF   PAPERS.
DESPATCHES FROM THE GOVERNOR.
No.
1
(41)   -   ■
■   -    11 March 1867    -   -
-    (Extract)
PAGE
3
2
(61)   -
-   -    10 April 1867      -   -
-   (Extract)
3
3
(87)    -    ■
•   -    13 July 1867       -    -
-    (Extract)
4
4
(161)   --   ■
■    -    10 December 1867   -
.-— ...
8
5
(164)    -   -
■    -   24 December 1867   -
-       -       -
9
6
(31)   -
-   -    29 April 1868
9
7
(51)    -
-   -    28 May 1868   -
12
No.
1
2
4
DESPATCHES PROM  THE  SECRETARY OF  STATE.
(49)
(67)
(46)
17 August 1867
1 October 1867
9 July 1868    -
PAGE
13
13
14 [    3    ]
COPY or Extracts of Correspondence between Governor Kennedy of
Vancouver Island, Governor Seymour of British Columbia, and the
Colonial Office, on the subject of a Site for the Capital of British
Columbia.
Despatches from the Governor.
— No. 1. —
No. i.
Extract of a DESPATCH from Governor Seymour to His Grace the Duke of Governor Seymour
Buckingham and Chandos, dated New Westminster, 11th March 1867.   No. 41.    t0 *e.Duke of
Buckingham and
" I have the honour to forward the address and reply with which the present Chandos.
Legislative Session was opened," ii March 1867.
Enclosure 1, in No. 1.
Extract of Speech of the Governor.
I shall address you by message on the subject of education and a few other topics of
importance during the course of the session. One of these will probably be as to the cause
of the selection made for the seat of Government of the United Colony. Up to within a
few hours of meeting you, I had not the intention of touching upon it; but I am informed
that the question creates an amount of interest which I cannot comprehend, but, which
appears to me a sign of great local depression.    I shall address you on the subject by
Enclosure 2, in No. 1.
Extract of Reply of the Legislative Council.
We shall look forward with anxiety to the messages which your Excellency has been
pleased to promise us upon the important subjects of education and the seat of Government.
En cl. 2, in No. 1.
— No. 2. —
No. 2.
Extract of DESPATCH from Governor Seymour to His Grace the Duke of Governor Seymour
Buckingham and Chandos, dated New Westminster, 10th April 1867.   No. 61.   to the Duke of
" I have the honour to report that I closed the first session of the Legisla- Chandos.
ture of the United Colony on the 2nd instant.    I enclose copy of my speech."       io April 1868.
483- A 2 Encl. in No. 2.
4 CORRESPONDENCE RELATIVE TO A SITE
Enclosure in No. 2.
Extract of Governor's Speech.
If, in spite of your resolution in favour of Victoria, I still hesitate on removing my abode
and the seat of the Legislature from the spot established by law, you will understand that I
consider the public faith and honour engaged on the one side, and possible expediency on
the other. If, as some persons assert, the present uncertainty be found to be more detrimental to the public interests than any decision which may be arrived at, I shall come to
that decision, and make public the recommendation I may lay before the Secretary of State.
I, however, look confidently forward to the time when the centre of population will be found
on the eastern side of the Cascade Range.
No. 3.
Governor Seymour
to the Duke of
Buckingham and
Chandos.
13 July 1867.
— No. 3. —
Extract of DESPATCH from Governor Seymour to His Grace the Duke of
Buckingham and Chandos, dated Victoria, 13th July 1867. No. 87.
" I wish the question of the seat of Government to be set at rest, and if
your Grace can see your way to establish it at Victoria without injustice to
those who have purchased land at New Westminster on the faith of the
proclamations I enclose, I shall not offer one word of remonstrance. Either
town will suit me equally well as a place of residence, and in the present
financial condition of the Colony, I shall be very glad to have but one house to
keep up. Victoria has made the most progress; consequently, perhaps, under
existing depression, it would be well to concentrate our waning resources upon
the spot where the greatest outlay has been made. I will not allow that Victoria
possesses any natural advantages over New Westminster, but it is older and
more developed as a town."
#   , # # * * #
I enclose the message I addressed to the Legislative Council on the subject.
The last paragraph simply means that I will not be controlled in my policy by
meetings held in the Victoria Theatre.
Enclosure 1, in No. 3.
End. l, in No. 3.
BRITISH   COLUMBIA.
Proclamation
By His Excellency James Douglas, Companion of the Most Honourable Order of the
Bath, Governor and Commander in Chief of British Columbia.
Whereas it is expedient to publish, for general information, the method to be pursued
with respect to the alienation and possession of agricultural lands, and of lands proposed for
the sites of towns in British Columbia, and with reference also to the places for levying
shipping and customs duties, and for establishing a capital and port of entry in the said
Colony;
Now therefore, I, James Douglas, Governor of the said Colony, do proclaim and declare
as follows, viz.:
1. All the lands in British Columbia, and all the mines and minerals therein, belong to
the Crown in fee.
2. The price of lands, not being intended for the sites of towns, and not being reputed
to be mineral lands, shall be 10 s. per acre, payable one-half in cash at the time of the sale,
and the other half at the end of two years from such sale. Provided that under special
circumstances some other price, or some other terms of payment may from time to time
he specially announced for particular localities.
3. It FOR THE CAPITAL OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 5
3. It shall also be competent to the executive at any time to reserve such portions
of the unoccupied Crown lands, and for such purposes as the executive shali deem
advisable.
4. Except as aforesaid, all the land in British Columbia will be exposed in lots for sale,
by public competition at the upset price above mentioned, as soon as the same shall have
been surveyed and made ready for sale. Due notice will be given of all such sales.
Notice at the same time will be given of the upset price and terms of payment when they
vary from those above stated, and also of the rights reserved (if any) for public convenience.
5. All lands which shall remain unsold at any such auction may be sold by private
contract at the upset price, and on the terms and conditions herein mentioned, on application to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works.
6. Unless otherwise specially notified at the time of sale, all such sales of Crown land
shall be subject to such public rights of way as may at any time after such sale, and to
such private rights of way, and of leading or using water for animals, and for mining
and engineering purposes as may at the time of such sale be specified by the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works.
7. Unless otherwise specially announced at the lime of sale, the conveyance of the land
shall include all trees and all mines and minerals within and under the same, except mines
of gold and silver.
8. When any " Ditch Privilege" shall be granted, there shall be included (unless
excluded by express words) the right to lop, dress, or fell any trees standing on unoccupied
Crown lands which, in the opinion of the proprietors of the ditch, might by their accidental
fall or otherwise, endanger the safety of the ditch or any part thereof.
Gold Claims.
9. Until further notice, gold claims and mines shall continue to be worked, subject to
the existing regulations.
Capital of British Columbia.
10. It is intended with all dispatch to lay out and settle the site of a city to be the
capital of British Columbia, on the right or north bank of Fraser River.
11. Plans of the city are intended to be prepared and published in the month of
March next. Three-fourths of the whole number of lots, excluding the public reserves,
will be submitted in lots to public competition, by auction, in the month of April. One-
fourth of the whole number of lots, excluding the public reserves, will be reserved in
blocks for purchasers in the United Kingdom, Her Majesty's Colonies in North America,
and elsewhere. All of such last-mentioned lots which may not be disposed of in the
United Kingdom, or Her Majesty's Colonies, other than British Columbia, will be
submitted to public competition  in this Colony,   of which due notice will be given.
12. As the Government is desirous of concentrating the commercial interest of the
Colony in and around the capital, purchasers of town lots in the said proposed capital
who may be owners of town lots in Langley, under the late sale on the 25th November
last, on which the whole amount of purchase-money has been paid to the Government, will
if so disposed, be allowed to surrender the Jots in Langley so purchased, and to have the
price so paid to the Government allowed them as payment in full for a lot or lots purchased by them in the said proposed capital of an equal or less price in the aggregate,
and as payment in part for lots in the said proposed capital of a greater price in the
aggregate. Every such surrender must be executed and delivered in writing, addressed
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works in British Columbia, at Victoria, Vancouver Island, one week at least, previous to the day appointed for the intended sale.
13. The proposed capital will be declared to be a port of entry so soon as the necessary
arrangements shall have been provided, which will be done with all convenient dispatch.
Custom House officers will then be stationed there, and vessels will be able to proceed
direct to Fraser River without touching at Victoria, or may clear at Victoria, at their
option.
14. The whole of the river frontage will be laid out in a continuous road, the edge of
which it is contemplated ultimately to convert into a public quay. No quay will, however, be at present constructed at the public expense, nor will the absolute property of the
soil along the edge of the water be now alienated by the Crown. But the right to make
and maintain quays of convenient sizes, and to demand certain tolls and rates for the use
thereof, will be granted to private individuals for the space of seven years; such rights
will be disposed of at public auction at or immediately after the sale of town lots,to the
483. A 3 bidder 6 CORRESPONDENCE RELATIVE TO A SITE
bidder of ihe hiuhest annual rent. No restrictions will be placed on the lessee as to the
form or nature of the quays, except such as shall be necessary to protect the public safety
and convenience.
Issued under the public seal of the Colony of British Columbia at Victoria,
Vancouver Island, this fourteenth day of February, one thousand eichthundred
and fifty-nine, in the twenty-second year of Her Majesty's reign, by me,
James Douglas.        (l. s.)
By his Excellency's command,
William A. G, Young, Acting Colonial Secretary.
god save the queen.
Encl. 2, in No. 3.
Enclosure 2, in No. 3.
BRITISH   COLUMBIA.
Proclamation
By His Excellency James Douglas, Companion of the most Honourable Order of the
Bath, Governor and Commander in Chief of British Columbia, Vice Admiral of the
same, &c.
Whereas Her Majesty the Queen has been graciously pleased to decide that the capital
of British Columbia shall be styled the City of New Westminster;
Now therefore, I, James Douglas, do hereby declare and proclaim that the town heretofore called and known as Queensborough, and sometimes as Queenborough, in the Colony
of British Columbia, shall from henceforth be called and known as New Westminster, and
shall be so described in all legal processes and official documents.
Issued under the public seal of the said Colony at Victoria, Vancouver Island,
this twentieth day of July, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-nine, in the
twenty-third year of Her Majesty's reign.
(signed)        James Douglas.
By command of his Excellency,
William A. G. Young, Acting Colonial Secretary,
GOD   SAVE   THE   QUEEN.
Enclosure 3, in No. 3.
Enol. 3, in No. 3. (No. 37.)
MESSAGE.
Frederick Seymour.
The Governor lays before the Legislative Council, for their information, certain petitions
addressed to him, requesting that Victoria may be made, according to some of these papers,
the capital, according to others, the seat of Government of the United Colony.
It is in no cavilling spirit that he points out that those first alluded to, appear to have
been signed under a false impression. There is no intention of erecting public offices in New
Westminster during the present condition of the colonial finances. The Government officers
do not complain of the accommodation afforded to them; and if economy be alone considered, the retention of the seat of Government on the banks of the Fraser is to be
preferred, inasmuch as a considerable outlay would be required to make the Government
House at Victoria permanently habitable.
It is a matter of sincere regret to the Governor, that this vast and thinly-peopled territory
should, in the early stage of its political existence, have been divided into (wo separate
Colonies, and that two necessarily rival towns should have been founded in comparatively
close proximity. His labours would now be lighter, and the Colony more prosperous, had
the spare resources of the inhabitants been concentrated in the erection of one town of
magnitude, of sufficient importance and attraction to retain during the winter the greater
part of the unattached population of the Colony. He would not care if the site for the
capital had been fixed where Victoria now stands, or on the Bay of Esquimalt, or at New
Westminster. Nor could he, if the matter had been clearly understood by all, have objected
to one scale of taxation being fixed, favourable to commerce, upon those who elected to
live FOR THE CAPITAL OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 7
live in the chief town, or within a certain radius of it, and another upon those who took to
other occupations in outlying districts. But it is not in order to express regret over the
past, that the Governor now comments on the petitions he forwards.
New Westminster was, by proclamation, having the force of law, created the " Capital"
of British Columbia. Her Majesty was invited to name the young city, and bestowed on
it the designation it now hears. Though styled capital, it would not appear to have been
the seat of Government, and the affairs of the mainland were directed from the chief
town of the neighbouring insular Colony. Dissatisf'aciion, whether general or local
the Governor is not in a position to say, ensued, and Her Majesty was advised to
separate the Administration of the Government of British Columbia from that of Vancouver Island.
On his acceptance of office in this Colony, the present Governor was instructed to use all
means in his power to bring about an entire union of the two Colonies, which the Secretary
of State had reluctantly advised the Queen to disconnect. His Grace stated that it was the
intention of the Government, that New Westminster should be the seat of Government of
the Colony, if a fusion could be obtained, ahhough he believed that Victoria would always
retain commercial supremacy. The Legislature of the. Mainland was accordingly called
upon to provide a house, suitably furnished, for the residence of the Governor, while no such
provision was requied from Vancouver Island.
On bis arrival in the Colony, the Governor found the sum of 10,000/. voted for the erection of public buildiugs in New Westminster, but with the cheerful concurrence of the public
officers interested, he declined to lay out the money in that manner, choosing rather, in the
general interest, to devote it to the lowering, by improvements in communication, the price
of commodities in the gold districts.
The desire for union the Governor looked for, grew and matured in a section of
the present Colony, until the Imperial Legislature considered the time had arrived for
carrying into effect a policy Her Majesty's Government had steadily kept in view.
Then British interests on the shores of the North Pacific were consolidated by Act of Parliament.
The Governor understands that, during the passage of the Act, it was stated in both
Houses of Parliament, that New Westminster should be the seat of the general Government. An influential member of the Government informed him a i'ew days before his
departure from England—"I do not think it necessary that the Secretary of State should
give you instructions as to the seat of Government. It is understood that New Westminster
should be the capital, and that you should visit Victoria when you think necessary. But
if you wish for definite orders, you will do best to ask for them in a formal letter ;o the
Secretary of State." The Governor has no doubt that such an application would have
resulted in a Royal decision in favour of New Westminster, and he may state that it was
on his intercession alone that the order to sell the Government House at Victoria was
withheld.
He is of opinion that the question as to the future seat of Government and of the assembling of the Legislature had better, ultimately, be decided on local recommendation. He
would, however, not desire that the interests of New Westminster should be prejudiced by
his regard for the general interests of the Colony having been superior to that he felt for the
comfort of himself and public officers. Nor, on the other hand, would he wish any undue
consideration to be given in favour of Victoria, on account of a large outlay having been
made on a governor's residence, at a time when Vancouver Island could but ill afford it.
He would take no advantage of the fact of one section of the Colony having asked for unconditional union, while the other stood aloof; nor would he maintain that any Proclamation,
though having the force of law, may not be repealed when the community reaches a more
advanced state of population and mode of government, but, for the present, he will leave
matters as they are. He will watch, without preference or prejudice, over the general
interests of the Colony as they may develope themselves in the uncertain future, and will be
prepared to act upon his own judgment in the advice, if any, which he may lay before Her
Majesty's Ministers.
He trusts that no immediate action may be urged upon him. He feels deeply the injury
the Colony has sustained from political agitation, and now states plainly that should he
find it necessary to set the present question at rest, he will humbly recommend to the
Queen that he and his successors in office be commanded to reside permanently in the
present capital of the Colony.
Government House, 2? March 1867.
483- A 4 8 CORRESPONDENCE RELATIVE TO A SITE
— No. 4. —
No. 4. (No. 161.)
Governor Seymour Copy of a DESPATCH  from Governor Seymour to His Grace the Duke of
to the Duke of Buckingham and Chandos.
Buckingham and J
Chandos.
10 Dec. 1867. My Lord Duke, New Westminster, 10 December 1867.
I have had the honour to receive your Grace's Despatch, No. 49, of the 17th
August, respecting certain resolutions passed by the Legislative Council in favour
of the seat of Government of the Colony being established at Victoria. The
schedule of Despatches received by your Grace from me, which came by the
* Pao-e 4. same mail, shows me that my communication, No. 87,* of the 13th July, on this
subject is already before you.
2. The question is one really of very great difficulty in the present depressed
condition of the Colony. Were either Victoria or New Westminster prosperous,
it would matter but little where the Governor had his abode, and where the
Legislative Council met.
3. New Westminster was proclaimed the capital of British Columbia. Vancouver Island prayed and agitated for admission on any terms into an union
with the mainland Colony. Hence it would seem but natural that New
Westminster should be the capital of the united Colony. Victoria, however,
previous to the separation of the Colonies, was virtually the capital of both, and,
as I have clearly stated in my Despatch above referred to, had concentrated many
powerful influences.
4. If I may be permitted to set aside the consideration of Sir James Douglas's
proclamation, and the apparent deviation from good faith towards the purchasers of town lots in New Westminster, I would state the case as follows :—
5. Victoria has the largest population, the richest shopkeepers, the largest
Church endowments, the greatest trade, and is singularly favoured by the headquarters of the Pacific squadron being placed in the neighbouring harbour of
Esquimalt. It is also unquestionably the most convenient place for communicating,
if desirable, with, the United States' authorities at San Francisco or Alaska.
It has certain public offices of good appearance, but I am informed by Major
General Moody, r.e., of the most unsatisfactory construction. Victoria possesses
additionally a Government House of some pretensions, built at a cost of about
9,000 I., at the time when the Colony could not meet its indebtedness. This
house is large and unfurnished, but being situated amongst rocks, so disposed as
to keep off the sun, and not the cold breezes of the Straits, it is singularly
unattractive. The walls have no paper to hide the cracks which the settlement
of the older portions of the buildings have entailed upon them. There is no
water on the grounds in summer ; all for consumption has to be purchased.
6. New Westminster has, on the other hand, the disadvantage of being more
out of the way of foreign callers, and being less connected with Her Majesty's
Navy. It is away from the head-quarters of the Hudson's Bay Company's
establishments, and from the abodes of the principal merchants of the Colony.
It is but a small place as compared with Victoria. Its public offices are inferior ;
and if there be, as seems to be supposed in Victoria, a necessary connection
between trade and Government, New Westminster must yield the palm to the
older city. Here, however, the Government House is a cottage, without
pretention, on the banks of the Fraser. It is a modest English house, nicely
furnished, in a lovely situation, and abundantly supplied with water. I can
hardly imagine a Governor of his own free will leaving it for the more ambitious
building at Victoria, which fails to supply one of the necessaries of comfort
after an outlay of three times as much as the house from which I now write
has cost.
7. It is held in certain petitions which have been presented to your Grace,
and to which 1 shall refer in a separate Despatch, that the seat of Government
should be where the population is most concentrated ; yet such is not the opinion
in the neighbouring states. Washington has not the trade or bustle of New
York; Sacramento is insignificant as a settlement compared with San Francisco.
I might
—*- FOR THE CAPITAL OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. .     9
I might go the round of the states by name, and show that the deliberative and
executive government are removed from the great bustling and excitable centres
of population. Our, to us here, eastern Colonies seem to have followed the
same principle ; Ottawa has not the trade of Quebec or Montreal, Frederickton
that of St. John's.
8. As regards the political question connected with the seat of Government
for British Columbia, I would observe, that I never saw a community more
politically excitable and tempest-torn than that of Victoria. Your Grace's predecessors will have had but too great knowledge of the mode in which matters
were conducted under the late legislative constitution of Vancouver Island.
Under that at present existing people are quieter, but I do not think that the
Council would be as much able to do their duty to the community at large when
sitting in the feverish political atmosphere of Victoria, as if deliberating in the
less troubled town of New Westminster.
9. If, however, we consider the question merely as how to please immediately the greater number of persons, the selection of Victoria as a capital
would be most advisable.
10. I had written thus far when I received your Grace's Despatch, No. 67,*
of the 1st October ; the matter to which it refers shall have my most careful
consideration, and I shall reply to it by the next opportunity.
I have, &c.
(signed)        Frederick Seymour.
* Page 13.
— No. 5. —
(No. 164.)
Copy of a DESPATCH from Governor Seymour to His Grace the Duke of
Buckingham and Chandos.
My Lord Duke, New Westminster, 24 December 1867.
I have the honour to forward the following documents:
t A memorial from the president and members of the municipal council of
New Westminster, addressed to your Grace, praying that this city may be
declared formally the capital of the united Colony of British Columbia.
Certain resolutions passed at a public meeting in Victoria, representing that
that city had better be selected as the seat of government.
2. This latter is the complement of the papers which were forwarded to me in
your Grace's Despatch, No. Gl,% of the 1st October. These papers fairly represent the two communities.
I have, &c.
(signed)        Frederick Seymour.
No. 5.
Governor Seymour
to the Duke of
Buckingham and
Chandos.
24 Dec. 1867.
f The Enclosures
not printed.
% Page 13.
(No. 31.)
No. 6.
Copy of a DESPATCH from Governor Seymour to his Grace the Duke of
Buckingham and Chandos.
My Lord Duke, New Westminster, 29 April 1868.
In obedience to the instructions conveyed in your Grace's Despatch, No. 67,§
of the 1st of October 1867, I have fixed upon a capital for the united Colony.
The Message which I enclose will show that I have selected Victoria.
2. There is one circumstance in the affair which I trust you will pardon, and
that is my  having ventured to lay your Grace's Despatch before the Council.
483- B The
No. 6.
Governor Seymour
to the Duke of
Buckingham and
Chandos.
29 April 1868.
j Page 13. io CORRESPONDENCE RELATIVE TO A SITE
The feeling existing in both New Westminster and Victoria is so strong on the
subject of the seat of Government, that I felt it necessary when acting in the
matter to invoke the assistance of a stronger power than my own in order to
prevent disturbance.
3. I forwarded your Grace's Despatch in the Message I enclose. I received the
following reply.    I commenced my Despatch with the final conclusion.
4. I sincerely trust I have acted for the best. I well know I have secured
but present tranquillity.
5. In my own heart, I must allow, there was a feeling in favour of the manly,
respectable, loyal, and enterprising community established on the banks of the
Fraser.
I have, &c.
(signed)        Frederick Seymour.
End. l, in No. 6. Enclosure 1, in No. 6.
Message No. i.
Frederick Seymour.
* Vide page 13. The Governor lays before the Legislative Council a Despatch,* with Enclosures, from Her
Majesty's Secretary of State, directing him to come to a decision as to the selection of a
seat of Government for the united Colony of British Columbia. He adds a copy of his
reply.
The Governor would feel greatly obliged by the Honourable Council assisting him
with their advice on the subject. He wishes it to be clearly understood that
Honourable Members holding official positions are requested freely to pronounce their
opinion.
Government House, 30 March 1868.
End. 2, in No. 6. Enclosure 2, in No. 6.
Pursuant to the Order of the day, the consideration of his Excellency the Governor's
Message No. 1 was taken up.
The Hon. Mr. Walkem moved, the Hon. Mr. Stamp seconding:
" That this Council having been requested by his Excellency the Governor to assist him
with their advice in coming to a decision as to the selection of a seat of Government for the
United Colony of British Columbia, is of opinion, after careful consideration of his Excel
lency's Message and its Enclosures on the subject, that Victoria is the place most suitable
for the seat of Government of the United Colony."
Moved in amendment by the Hon. Mr. Robson, the Hon. Mr. Barnard seconding:
" Whereas, it is highly probable that this Colony will very shortly form a part of the new
Dominion of Canada;
" And whereas, under Confederation, the seat of Government will naturally gravitate
towards the centre of population on the mainland ;
" And whereas, a considerable expenditure of revenue would be involved in the removal of
the seat of Government to Victoria;
"And whereas, a reaction has already set in on the mainland against the removal of the
seat of Government to Victoria ;
"And wheieas, it is probable that, were the seat of Government now removed to Victoria,
the people on the mainland would be found, in less than 12 months, petitioning for its
restoration to the mainland ;
" And whereas, the frequent removal of the seat of Government involves great expense and
inconvenience, and exerts a most injurious influence upon the public mind, by keeping up
a continual agitation upon the subject, and destroying confidence ;
"And whereas, the constitution of this Council is not of that representative character
which should entitle it to deal with such a question as the removal of the seat of Government, where it has been established by law ;
" And whereas, there is every reason to believe that a dissolution of this Council and a
direct appeal to the country would demonstrate that a large majority of the bond fide
colonists are averse to the removal of the seat of Government to Victoria;
"And ^
-
FOR THE CAPITAL OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
11
" And whereas, the removal of the seat of Government from where it is at present
established would inflict serious injury upon an important community of British subjects,
without securing any compensating advantages to the Colony at large;
" Be it therefore Resolved:
" That this Council is of opinion that it would be inexpedient to remove the seat of Government, at least until the Colony shall possess such full powers of self-government as will
render its Legislature competent to deal with the question, and such fixity of population
and permanent interests as may indicate, with some degree of clearness, a site which would
prove to be permanently suitable."
Whereupon a debate arose.
On the amendment being put, the Council divided:
Ayes 5.
Messrs. Crease,
Hamley,
Barnard,
Robson,
Ball.
Noes 14.
Messrs. Smith,
Spalding,
Ker,
Elwyn,
Wood,
Walkem,
Macdouald,
Helmcken,
De Cosmos,
Stamp,
Pemberton,
Cox,
O'Reilly,
Trutch.
The names having been taken down by the clerk, pursuant to request.
So the amendment was lost.
The Hon. Mr. Robson rose to speak to a question of privilege.
The Hon. the Presiding Member ruled that it could not be brought before the Council
until after the question now before it was disposed of.
On the original question being put, the Council again divided ;
Noes 5.
Messrs. Crease,
Hamley,
Barnard,
Robson,
Ball.
Ayes 14.
Messrs. Smith,
Spalding,
Ker,
Elwyn,
Wood,
Walkem,
Macdonald,
Helmcken,
De Cosmos,
Stamp,
Pemberton,
Cox,
O'Reilly,
Trutch.
The names having been taken down by the Clerk, pursuant to request.
So it was carried in the affirmative, and resolved accordingly.
Enclosure 3, in No. 6.
Message No. 16.
End. 3, in No. 6.
Frederick Seymour.
The Governor has received the Resolution of the Legislative Council, of the 2nd of April,
expressing the opinion that Victoria is the place most suitable for the capital of the united'
Colony.    Her Majesty's Government would seem to lean to the same opinion.    Under
these circumstances, the Governor will cause to be proclaimed, on the Queen's birthday
the selection of the capital within the town which bears Her Royal name.
Government House, 28 April 1868.
483.
c 12 CORRESPONDENCE RELATIVE TO A SITE
— No. 7. —
No. 7. (No- 5'->
Governor Seymour Copy of a DESPATCH from Governor Seymour to His Grace the
to the Duke of Duke of Buckingham and Chandos.
Buckingham and
Chandos. My Lord Duke, Victoria, 28 May 1868.
28 May 1868. I have the honour to forward copy of the Proclamation by which I declared
Victoria to be the capital of the united Colony.
2. So thoroughly has the question of the relative merits of the two principal
towns for the seat of Government been canvassed, that I do not think it necessary that I should prolong the present Despatch.
I have, &c.
(signed)        Frederick Seymour.
Enclosure in No. 7.
End. in No. 7. Government Gazette Extraordinary.
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
(l. s.)        Frederick Seymour.
Proclamation
By His Excellency Frederick Seymour, Esq., Governor and Commander in Chief in and
over the Colony of British Columbia and its Dependencies, Vice Admiral and Ordinary
of the same, Stc, &c.
Whereas, under and by virtue of a Proclamation, made and issued on die 14th day of
February 1859, the site of the present city of New Westminster was laid out as the Capital
of the Colony of British Columbia as then defined and existing.
And whereas, under and by virtue of an Act of Parliament, made and passed in the 29th
and 30th years of the reign of Her Majesty Queen Victoria, intituled " The British
Columbia Act, 1866," and the Proclamation thereof made by the Governor of British
Columbia, upon the 19th day of November 1866, the formerly separate Colony of
Vancouver Island and its dependencies was united with the formerly separate Colony
of British Columbia and its dependencies, under the name of the Colony of British
Columbia :
And whereas it is expedient to declare the capital and seat of Government of the
said united Colony :
Now know ye, and I do hereby proclaim and declare as follows :—
From and after the date hereof, and until otherwise appointed by Her said Majesty
Queen Victoria, Her heirs and successors, the City of Victoria, in the Colony of
British Columbia, shall be and be deemed for all purposes whatsoever the capital and
seat of Government of the united Colony of British Columbia.
Given under my hand and the public seal of the Colony of British
Columbia, at Government House, Victoria, in the said Colony, this 25th day
of May, in the year of Our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight,
and in the 31st year of Her Majesty's reign.
By Command,
(signed)        William A. O. Young.
god save the queen. FOR THE CAPITAL OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 13
Despatches from the Secretary of State.
— No. 1. —
(No. 49.)
No. 1,
Copy of a DESPATCH from His Grace the Duke of Buckingham and Chandos The Duke of
to Governor Seymour. Buckingham and
Chandos to Go-
Sir, Oownins-Street, 17  August 1867.        ™-nor Seymour.
I have had brought under my notice the resolutions apparently passed by 17 A"SU8t 1867,
the Legislative Council of British Columbia in March last, hut respecting which
I have not received any report from you, for placing the seat of Government at
Vancouvers Island, but I have informed the gentlemen from whom I received
them, that I must decline adopting any conclusion on the subject until the arrival
of your report, which I conclude that I shall shortly receive.
I have, &c.
(signed)        Buckingham and Chandos.
— 2. —
(No. 67.)
No. 2.
The Duke of
Copy of a DESPATCH from His Grace the Duke of Buckingham and Chandos
to Governor Seymour. Buckingham and
Chandos to Go-
Sir, Downing-street, 1 October 1867.      vemor Seymour.
I have to acknowledge your Despatch, No. 87*, of the 13,th of July last, from    1 October 1867.
which I ieam that you are not yet prepared to recommend the adoption either of        * Page 4-
Victoria or of New Westminster as the capital of British Columbia.
I leave the determination of this question still in your hands, merely desiring
that it may not be long delayed!.
I take the opportunity of forwarding to you various documentsf which may f Not printed,
affect your judgment, but which I have not hitherto sent to you, because I was
expecting from you a definite recommendation on the subject to which they
related.
As the second paragraph of your Despatch contains something like an appeal
to me for an expression of opinion, I think it requisite to say that the establishment of New Westminster as the capital of British Columbia did not, in my
opinion, involve any pledge on the part of the Government that the site of that
capital shall never be moved. It is, of course, always undesirable to disappoint
natural expectations, and much consideration may be due to those who are so disappointed. But every land purchaser in New Westminster or any other locality,
must be considered to buy his land, subject to the possible changes which the
varying political or commercial interests of the whole community may from time
to time render necessary.
I will add that, although I do not prescribe to you the choice of one or the
other capital, you will be at liberty, in case you should decide in favour of
Victoria, to quote the authority of the Home Government in support of that
course.
I have, &c.
(signed)        Buckingham and Chandos.
483. i4     CORRESPONDENCE:—CAPITAL OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
No. 3.
The Duke of
Buckingham and
Chandos to Governor Seymour.
9 July 1868.
• Page 9.
t Page 12.
(No. 46.)
No. 3.
Copy of a DESPATCH from His Grace the Duke of Buckingham and Chandos
to Governor Seymour.
Sir, Downing-street, 9 July 1868.
I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Despatches, No. 31*, of
the 29th of April, and No. 51f, of the 28th of May, the first reporting that,
having brought the question of the selection of a capital for the united Colony
under the consideration of the Legislative Council, you had received a resolution
from them, expressing the opinion that Victoria is the place most suitable for the
capital; and the second, forwarding a copy of the Proclamation by which you
declared Victoria to be the capital of the united Colony on the 25th of May.
In reply, I have to inform you that I have been glad to he apprised of the
settlement of a question which, while it remained open, must have furnished a
continual source of irritation and uncertainty, and I feel little doubt that you
have judged rightly in placing the seat of Government in that part of the
Colony where the greatest stationary population has collected, and where
maritime communication is easiest.
I have, &c.
(signed)        Buckingham and Chandos,

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcbooks.1-0222166/manifest

Comment

Related Items