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BC Historical Books

Souvenir of the Police Department, Vancouver, B.C 1901

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NORTHWEST HISTORY
Vancouver Public Library VANCOUVER  PUBLIC  L[BRARY
3 1383 04293 7709  C-/U. -^yX^y^
\7i, ^Uv ^
^UJZAs^l^J>
Souvenir
1901.
Department
Vancouver,
British Columbia,
CLARKE  A STUART,   PRINTERS.
352.2
S71
Pam t: ~V *y *?•' "♦ ~*  *  ■:• '•:•   •:•   •:-   •:-   •:-   -:•
VANCOUVER   ENGINEERING   WORKS,   Ltd,
* ENGINEERS   AND   CONTRACTORS
I MACHINISTS, HEAVY FORGE WORK, PATTERN MAKERS AND IRON FOUNDERS I
HYDRAULIC   RIVETTED   STEEL   PIPE.
BOILERS
ENGINES
PUMPS
BLOWERS
Marine and Sawmill Outfits.
STEEL RAILS
ANGLE IRON
COLD   ROLLED   SHAFTING
PLATES
BELTING
PIPE
VALVES
ETC.
Smokestacks are a Specialty of Ours.
We also have on hand New and Second-Hand Machinery for Immediate Delivery.   Write us for prices.
We make a specialty of Quick  Repair Work,  both   Land  and Marine, and have a Gridiron  at our Shops to
Dock Boats.
Telephone 250.
Office and Works:   Foot of Heatley Avenue.  !      <#       Chief North.       <#      I
ifr't**t"frt|*»t**f"t"T"»^
^^4^it^»if4.»^^u|«tt^i|utM)<)ftT*^^4uMJi»»^»»it«x
The position of Chief of Police in now.filled by Samuel North, a
man of well-known ability and unswerving integrity. Chief North, an
excellent portrait of whom appears on the opposite page, is a native
of Norfolk County, Ontario. He started out to earn a living for himself very early in life, having at the age of sixteen migrated to the
lumber districts near Bay City, Mich,, where he worked for three
years. He spent eight years in Manitoba and the Northwest Territory, and was in the transport service during the Northwest Rebellion.
He came to Vancouver (then Granville) in the fall of 1SS6. The
town was then being rebuilt after the disastrous fire and work of all
kinds was plentiful. His first connection with the police department
was in February, 1890, when he accepted the position of patrolman.
He served two years as jailer, and in 1897 was appointed sergeant
under Chief Stewart. On July 15th of the present year Mr. North
was appointed chief of the department, which position he holds with
credit to himself and the city. He has all tho lequisites whiA go to
make an exemplary chief. Ho is keen of perception, quick to act, has
a disposition of firnfness tempered with kindliness, and marked executive ability. He has already instituted a number of changes for th.e
betterment of the service, and makes a study of the needs and
requirements of his department.
Criminals are as progressive as the rest of mankind. A burglar-
of a quarter of a century ago would make very little headway against
a burglar-proof vault^or safe of to-day, and would in all probability
not remain long out of jail. The heavy kit of burglars' tools has been
supplanted by a much more effective one, which can easily be carried
in the breast pocket. Likewise in every branch of crime a continual
advance may be noted. It necessarily devolves upon the police to-
keep abreast of, or rather outstrip them in shrewdness, for the perpetrators of new forms of rascality and vice must be confronted by a
superior intelligence.
The Vancouver Police Department, under Chief North, is rapidly
assuming a position that will make it the envy of many larger cities. '
In.the near future the force must be increased, a new headquarters-
building erected and modern improvements and equipment must'ofT
necessity be added from time to time. The department in discipline
and morale is on a par with that of much larger cities, and the citi-
zens owe it a great debt of gratitude. The business communitv has-
time and again had cause to. recognize the efficiency of the police, and
the amount of stolen property recovered will aggregate thousands of
dollars. Only a few days before the writing of this article the wife-
of one of Vancouver's most prominent citizens recovered, through the-
instrumentality of Detective Wyfie and Chief North, stolen jewelry
aggregating in value upwards of $2,000. Many such cases come-
before the department from time to time, which are always acted upon,
with great promptness and almost invariablj' with success,. SOUVENIR
OF  THE
POLICE     DEPARTMENT
VANCOUVER,   B. C.
PUBLISHED "LXN-DEIE THE AUSPICES OF THE
VANCOUVER    POLICE    RELIEF    ASSOCIATION. HEADQUARTERS OF VANCOUVER POLICE DEPARTMENT  I     <&     Sergeant Butler.     <£
1 t
Sergeant Thomas H. Butler is one of the most popular men in
the department. He is familiarly known as " Tom," and is liked by
everyone who has the good fortune to make his acquaintance. He
has done some of the' cleverest work of the department, and his elevation to the position of sergeant is the result of meritorious work.
Sergeant Butler is a native of Newfoundland, where he spent his
younger manhood. He worked in the Grand Trunk car shops at
Montreal as carpenter for three years, coming to Vancouver thirteen
years ago, where he has since remained. He worked at his trade for
three years, having assisted in building the first power house in Vancouver, the Sugar Refinery, B. C. Iron Works and other prominent
factories and buildings. On March 7th, 1892, he became connected
with the police department as patrolman, in which capacity he served
for three years, when he was appointed detective by the police committee. During his six years of service as a detective Mr. Butler
proved himself a most capable, efficient and thorough officer of the
law. He has performed some of the best work of the department,,
and has a large number of notable arrests to his credit. Though'
genial in disposition, Mr. Butler is not easily deceived, and he is
possessed of a strong will power, fine physique and unlimited nerve.
He has been instrumental in breaking up several gangs of thieves,
burglars and other law breakers, and rendered most valuable service
to the city.    Ho became acting sergeant March 6th of the present
<#     Sergeant Harris.     *£
*
*
*
nt appt
at August
26th.
Sergeant E. A. Harris is perhaps one of the most -scrupulous and
punctilious police officers in the country. If he has a duty to perform
he will perform it to the letter, regardless of consequences. He is a
native of Meaford, Ontario, and a descendant of one of the old United
Empire Loyalist families who moved to Canada on the breaking out
of the Revolutionary War, and later took part in many battles. Mr.
Harris left home at the age of, sixteen for San Francisco. After four
years spent in various occupations in the Golden State, he went to
Portland, Ore., and later to Dakota, where he farmed for several
years. In the spring of 1890 he found himself in Vancouver and
went to work logging, but in the following February joined the police
force as patrolman under Chief McLaren. In December, 1895, he
was made acting sergeant, which position he filled for one year.
After this he served as detective for two and a half years, and then
as patrolman again until the appointment of Chief North, when he
was appointed sergeant in recognition of his valuable services. He
also has made many important arrests, and has gained an enviable
reputation as an officer of the law.
In 1897 all the principal cities of British Columbia, Vancouver,
Victoria and New Westminster, were terrorized by a burglar, who
was designated the auger man on account of his peculiar method of
entering stores by boring holes through the doors or walls with an
auger. The police of all three cities were after him for some time,
but he was finally run to earth and captured by Detectives Harris
and McAllister.  <&     Thomas Wylie.     <£
The detective branch of a police department is a most important
one, and Vancouver can boast of one of the best, for its size, in the
country It consists of four men, viz.: Chief Thomas Wylie, Chas.
C. Park, John Jackson and Chas. Mulhearn.
Thomas Wylie, chief of the detective branch of the Vancouver
Police Department, whose portrait appears on the opposite page, is a
man of especial fitness for such a position. No city has ever been
better served by a member of its detective force than has Vancouver
been by Mr. Wylie. He is possessed of rare tact, keen perception,
dogged determination, a will power that overcomes apparently insurmountable obstacles and a physical energy and force that enables him
to stand- untold punishments and hardships. He has distinguished
himself many times by really clever work in Vancouver and vicinity,
to such an extent that his name is well known in police circles on the
Pacific Coast. A Scotchman by birth, he emigrated at the age of 21
to the United States and settled in Pittsburg, Pa., but after one year
returned to Scotland. In the spring of 1888, however, he again
determined to cross the Atlantic, and this time set out for Toronto,
position with tike Delta Cannery, and soon became its working or
-practical manager. Later, at the request of .the cannery men, he
joined the Steveston police force. Among the many services rendered while serving in this capacity, was the capture of two safe
crackers who had committed several depredations in Vancouver and
elsewhere. In recognition of services rendered to the Vancouver
police department, Chief Stewart installed him in the detective service
in the latter part of that year. Since entering the Vancouver department Mr. Wylie has made a number of notable, arrests. There are
many readers of this volume who will recall the shocking murder of
Alex. Main, the chief of police of Steveston, who was killed with an
axe in the hands of a Chinaman he had just placed under arrest, and
his body mutilated and buried by the murderer and his two pals.
Wylie had a very flimsy clue to work on, but he formed his theory
and went ahead, never stopping to eat or sleep, his whole thought and
energy bent on a single object, with the consequent result that he
captured first one, then another and finally the third of the murderers,
subsequently by a "flank movement" saving them from lynching at
the hands of a mob. Every theory held by Wylie in connection with
this case proved correct, and his remarkable work won him unstinted
praise in police circles throughout the Pacific Coast. Mr. Wylie has
figured in many cases, captured various burglars, thieves, footpads,
etc, and has in fact rendered great service to the citizens of Vancouver. It was solely on his merits as a valuable officer that by the
recommendation of Chief North, almost immediately on the latter
assuming the reins of chief of the department, Mr. Wylie was given
the appointment by the City Council of Chief of Detectives.  Xi>Htnti'tniirtntlittti"l»t"t"*">fii
A Few Noteworthy Crimes.
In 1898 two men attempted to rob the bank of Winter Smith
by placing dynamite under the building, it being the intention to
wreck the building and help themselves to the loot. Fortunately the
fuse went out when within half an inch of the explosive. Had it
exploded it would have caused great loss of life and property, as a number
of persons lived in the building. Great alarm resulted from the discovery of the dastardly attempt, the bank people becoming almost
panic-stricken. The matter was placed in the hands of Detectives
Harris and McAllister, with the result that by 11 o'clock the next
morning both men were in custody.
In the fall and winter of 1895-6, Vancouver experienced an era
of safe-cracking, during which time the Standard Oil Company's safe
was blown almost to pieces, J. Leckie's store on Granville street was
broken into, the B. C. Fruit Canning Company's safe was blown open,
the Moodyville Lumber Company's safe was taken out of the office
and in an attempt to get it aboard of a boat it fell overboard. A
number of other burglaries were committed, and the officers were
nonplussed for a time. In searching the shacks and vacant houses of
the city, Sergeant (then detective) Butler located four men in a shack
in an alley between Pender and Dunsmuir streets. Knowing the
desperate character of the men who were doing this work, Mr. Butler"
took three others with him, viz.: Detective Malcolm McLean, Sergeant Johnston and Officer Grady. Butler and McLean entered the
house at the back door, while the other two guarded the.front.    The
men being taken unawares, their arrest was easy.' Four loaded
revolvers were found under the pillows of the beds, one large revolver
hung on the wall and two others were hidden under one of the windows to be handy in case of a hurried flight. Two of the men,.
Rhynehart and Robinson, were convicted. The other two escaped
from jail before trial.
Charles Williams and John Edwards in the latter part of 1S9T
invented a unique contrivance for prying the combination lock off of
a safe. They entered the Inns of Court building one night and tried
their invention, they being afraid it would be too noisy for practical.
use. They were arrested before making further use of it, and as they
were responsible for several burglaries in Vancouver and New Westminster, their capture was considered an important one. Each was-
convictcd and sentenced to three years at hard labor.
Thomas Wilton, a burglar who bad served several terms on the-
American side, was leader of a gang who committed several burglaries-
in this city in 1895-6. They broke into several stores and were-
finally caught. Wilton turned Queen's evidence and was set free.
He later served in the capacity of special detective, or spotter, for the-
police of Seattle and Portland.
Such, then, is the life of a policeman. His duties are of such a
nature that he frequently leaves the station house on a case when he-
knows he is taking his life in his hands. But he must never flinch
from duty's call. There is exacted from him constant vigilance; becomes in contact with all classes of society: crime, degradation and
misery pass before his eyes every hour. Not only does he risk his-
life to prevent crime, but his health suffers from exposure, and if he--
escapes the assassin's bullet or knife, he grows old in a service that
holds but few pleasures and fewer emoluments. -John W. Mcintosh, the very effi-
-cient and very gentlemanly clerk of
the Vancouver Police Court, an excellent portrait of whom appears on this
page, is a native of Pictou County,
Nova Scotia. He started out very
-early to earn a living for himself, and
at the age of seventeen was in Manitoba, where he engaged at various
times in railroad work, carpentering
and farming. He was in the transport service in Manitoba during the
Northwest Rebellion of 1885. He
first came to British Columbia in
1887, but after two years returned to
the Northwest Territory. He made
^several trips to British Columbia
while in the railroad service, and
-finally settled in Vancouver in 1895.
In June of that year he joined the
police force as a patrolman. He was
-appointed to the position of police
-court clerk in February, 1897, which
office he still fills with credit to himself and the department.
In the performance of his duty as
a police officer Mr. Mcintosh has had
some exciting experiences and narrow
escapes. He carries several wounds
on his body, each of which tells of a
fight for life. On one occasion he
was patrolling his beat in company
with Patrolman Butler, when he saw
a man lurking in the shadow of a
building in an evident endeavor to
break in. Mcintosh started for him,
when the fellow quickly turned and
fired, the bullet passing through the
officer's helmet. Mcintosh fired in
return, but his man escaped. Two
nights later Officer Caldwell arrested
a Chinaman for breaking into a store.
He had a fresh bullet wound on his
scalp, which he said was caused by a
policeman having shot him two nights
previously. Mr. Mcintosh has a large
number of arrests to his credit, for,
despite his position being a clerical
one, he frequently is called upon and
is always found ready to act. He is
one of the most popular men in the
department, and a more careful and
thorough man could not be found to
fill the exacting office. VXXJ.X^JL^j.xXAAXJ^XA^L4.J.X4^XXJLJ.jLj.j^LjLXJ^.i.J^^4.XJ
E. 5. WILBAND,
SHEET METAL AND ROOFING WORKS I
MANUFACTURERS   OF
*   GALVANIZED IRON OR COPPER CORNICES AND SKYLIGHTS
BLAST  PIPEING  AND  FURNACE  WORK.    ASPHALT,  SLATE  OR   TAR   AND   GRAVEL ROOFING.
G)  n , 1 - . , II ,,;Ui,.,. s4 fMWi M&< ,-„ „ „
$&     Estimates Furnished,      46 HASTINGS ST., WEST, VANCOUVER, B. C.        Telephone 741
i
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♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦»♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦i»o»»«»«o«*»»»»»»»»oix-o..<"■<■•> ■»»<■»♦♦«««♦♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦«««♦ >♦♦»♦♦«»♦♦»«
♦ ♦
! ROBERT WARD   &  CO., Limited,
| COMMISSION    MERCHANTS J
♦   ♦
J Shipping, Insurance and Financial Agents,                     X
♦ victoria office, VANCOUVER,   B.C. London office,                    t
I TEMPLE BUILDING. 70 BASINGHALL STREET.    ♦
♦ ♦
♦ =GENERAL   AGESrTS=
♦
ROYAL INSURANCE CO., of Liverpool. LONDON & LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO., of Liverpool.
♦ NORTHERN ASSURANCE CO., of Edinburgh. LONDON & PROVINCIAL MARINE INS. CO., of London.
t               LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION, of London.                HARTFORD STEAM BOILER INSURANCE CO. t
t     MOODYVILLE LANDS & SAW MILLS.                PUGET SOUND TUG BOAT CO., of Seattle.               WILKINS & CO., Steel Wire Ropes.     J
♦ PILCHERS, Limited, Linseed Oils. IMPORTERS OF ALL KINDS OF BRITISH AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE.. ?
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦j«♦♦♦♦««♦»»♦♦»♦«♦♦♦♦» Detective  CHARLES  C. PARK
came to Vancouver in 1888.    Entered the departm*
patrolman in June 1890.
foi'ce one year ago.
Appointed on the detective
Detective JOHN JACKSON
is a native of Belfast, Ireland. He emigrated "to Canada
in 1886 and settled at Hamilton, Ontario, where he
worked at his trade of machinist until 1800. In March
of that year he came to Vancouver and nine years later
became connected with the police department as'patrol-.
man. In. February of the present year he was made a
member of the detective 'force on account of his recognised abilities in that'll ne of work. "gge^aBsraes*.* ♦♦♦♦*»♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦♦♦*♦*♦♦*♦ + ♦♦♦♦♦ ♦ 5fiaf?3>*> *♦♦•♦-♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ • * ♦ ♦ ♦♦♦♦«•♦♦♦♦♦•♦ #XiK3k9!
~-5=i " • ■ -
-«fg    R. WOLFERSTAN THOMAS. J. O. BENWELL
-If
m
m
n
f&lft Hi IIS^ l1ffi8IML *
1m-
51
■H
IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
EVERY DESCRIPTION OF
M
-if
m
-M
■m.
Andrew Usher & Co.'s Scotch Whiskies
Hirano Mineral Water.
Bass & Co.'s Pale and Burton Ales.
Livierato & Co., Egyptian Cigarettes
J
TELEPHONE   890 :
-SB   Offices and  Cellars:   Cambie  Street,   -   VANCOUVER,  B.  C
-Ss>3^. ♦♦♦♦♦'♦,♦'♦ 't;><53ts*;'. .♦♦.♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦•♦».♦♦♦♦♦♦..♦»♦.♦»♦*•»♦♦•♦♦••*».♦ . . . . ........
Str
Wi&-
&?H§«!T Patrolmak JOHN McKEOWN
Came to Vancouver in September, 1887, and
shortly thereafter became special nightwatch-
man. In the spring of 1890 he became a
regular patrolman, in which capacity he still
serves. He is one of the .oldest .and best
known members of the department.
A native of Onto
couver  in   1887.
occupations until March, 189£
the department as a patrol mai
he now holds. Vancouver City Iron Works,
ROSS & HOWARD,  Proprietors.
Engineers, Iron Founders, Pattern Makers, Blacksmiths,
Boilermakers,  Etc.
Manufacturers of Marine Stationary and Hoisting Engines,
Marine, Saw Mill and Mining Machinery and Architectural Iron
Work of all kinds.
At present we are unable to fully meet the requirements of the trade in our
works, but we now have in course of construction, in the East End of the City, an
plant, Foundry, Machine Shop, Pipe Shop, Boiler Shop and Blacksmith Shop, which,
pleted, will give us excellent facilities—second to none in the Province—of handling
work intrusted to us.
"We
carry in stock Cold Rolled Steel Shaftintr,   Bar  Steel,   Sheet  Steel,
aner   Bolts,   Coupling Bolts and Finished Nuts,   Brass Spring Wire,
overcrowded
entirely new
when corn-
all kinds of
Cap Screws,
Tubing and
set Brass.
If in need of anything
in our line call
write fo:
pno
Repair Work PromptIy_Attended to and Satisfaction Guaranteed.
CITV   WORKS:    525 - 527 - 529    CARRALL   ST.,    VANCOUVER,
J) EAST END WORKS:    FOOT OF WOODLAND DRIVE, BETWEEN RAILROAD AND WATER FRONT.
B.   C
f
^% Patrolman  KEELER FULTON,
A native of Novia Scotia, came to Vancouver in 1806
and engaged in the dravage business as a member of
the firm of Gross & Fulton.   He joined the police
department in November, 1866, as patrolman.
JOHN MoLEAN
Came to Vancouver in
years with, the Bangor
fore going on the poli<
special police work. Oi
red handed, has saved se
family in Mount Pleosi
joined the department at
1896, pi
ind Arc
o which 1
k Eailroat
McLean c
n he captu
i served twelve
in Maine. Be-
d quite a little
•ed two burglars
•mil being robbed at
ig burned to death.
October, 1897.
He W. A. BROWN,   PLUMBING AND HEATING,
HARDWARE, PAINTS AND OILS
67 Hastings Street, East, VANCOUVER, B. C.—  —Westminster Ave., Mt Pleasant,   §
j Telephone 770 Telephone 447
When you want Strictly First-Class Work, call on me.      Estimates Cheerfully Given.
IJfiiljGlJisjrjirj^^
CRAWFORD & STUART,
Patent Salmon Net and Twine Manufacturers, I
Importers   Of   Oiled   Clothing,   Rubber   Boots (Canadian and American)
Cotton and Manilla Ropes and Twines.
531   GRANVILLE   STREET.        'PHONE 555. JOHN  S. TAIT, manager.
IiiiMEfiilfiiMDM^^ Gaoler J. H. GRADY
Is a native of Nova Scotia and spent the early
life in Ontario and Manitoba, having lived twenty
former and seventeen years in the latter province.
—'•■" A—:— the Fenian troubles in 1866, and sei-vec
1870-71 through the Red River Rebelli.
in 1887, and became connected will
"Wblsel
toVai
uU     >   rlllUJIIVri      111     lOUl,     XU.1U     UUliUIIIT    VUUUCUl«U     Willi!
ment as patrolman in October, 1889. The following
charge of the chain gang.- He- is gaoler by appoi
still retains charge of the gang.   Mr. Grady is the ol
part
years
He si
i million.   H
the I
rearl
of his
in the
.w ser-
• Lord
but one in the department.
Jepart-
took
iitment, and
lest member
patbolman dan. Mcintosh,
A native of Ontario, came to Vancouver in 1890. He
worked at his trade of carpenter for several years,
and became connected with the department as
patrolman in the fall of 1897. Isay
m
Wbtn Visiting
Vancouver
REMEMBER TO CALL AT
Zbt Tyokl Laland
Just one Block from the C. P. R.
Depot and Steamboat Wharves.
This Hotel has been newly Furnished and Refitted
Throughout and is now one of the Leading Hotels of the
City.    My motto is : Courteous Attention to All.
American Plan, $2.00 Per Day.
R. DOWSWELL, Prop.
\J\
U
11 lit
LIMITED,
HARDWARE
i ciiifiji in wis
FULL   LINE   OF
HOUSE FURNISHINGS.
Hardware Department, 8- and 10 Cordova Street-
Ship Chandlery,   I to 8 Alexander Street
VANCOUVER,   B. C. Patrolman D. D. McINTOSH
Came to Vancouver in 1894 and became a patrolman on
the police  force in February, 1893     He has done excellent work for the department and has many prominent
arrests to his credit.
DAN LEATHERDALE,
Assistant goaler and chain gang guard, is a native of
Ontario province. He came to Vancouver in . 1889
and engaged in the draying business until March 1898
when he became connected with the department in the
same capacity as he now serves.
sto\ ».:♦:;♦;:♦::♦;:♦:;♦;:«!♦, :♦;:♦;:♦;.>.;♦.:*:;♦;:♦;»: [♦f:« ;♦;:♦: V ♦ ♦ ♦ :♦: :♦: :«5T»f»r»;;»; :«r*^WT»:«»; ;*?♦::♦;»;:♦::♦: :♦-♦;:«
I  A.   WALLACE
.j,.-/
HI
HI
_>
All Classes of       l&L.
^^cuiict^i^"*       P   Repairs promptly    *Q
JI       attended to. usf"-
Ship   Builder   and   Contractor, fc
VANCOUVER,    B. C. |h
Yards and Boa! Factory: Granville St. Bridie.      'Phone 273. Marine Ways: False Greek, t Patrolman JAMES A. PRESTON,
Is a native of Ontario.     In   1897  he came to
Vancouver and  two  years  later became connected  with the  department in  the  capacity
in which he still serves.
Patrolman  A.  WADDELL,
enjoys the distinction of being the tallest man on the f
standing six feet four inches in his boots.    He is well pre
portioned, however, weighing 214 pounds.    He is a native
Ontario and came  to  Vancouver in 1897.     He became  co
nested with the department in March, 1899 as patrolman,
which capacity he still serves. 1
* a *::«:;?•.:♦ ■> :&^JKJ&yms®%^wj!zyzyzyz
ft
O0Fd
i-
G. CLAYTON LEONARD, Prop.
|    Open Day and iligbt.
1
gg      Corner Cordova and Carrall Streets,
• Lt v
i      SHIP  YARD  AND
MARINE RAILWAY
m
BURTON & BLACKSTONE,    -     Proprietors.
Tar, Pitch, Oakum, Spikes, Paints,
constantly on hand.
Telephone 618
Yard and Dock : Foot of Burrard Street,
Corner Beach Avenue, False Creek,
M Telephone 798.    VANCOUVER, B. C. %
VANCOUVER, B. C.
5 Open Day and Night
%     Rooms on European Plan
<i Meals at All Hours
■
i
| 'Phone 118
I Abbott St.,    Vancouver, B. C.
I
■■ * * * •:• * *.«>x :*-.;*•: .*_**.'/ * Patrolman ARTHUR DA VIES,
A native of Prince Edward Island, came tji Vancouver
in 1889. He served the 'British Columbia Jilectric Railway Company nine years as conductor 32^motorman and
joined the police department in February, 1900, as a
patrolman.
Patrolman GEORGE J. MILLER,
Also a native of Ontario province, came to Vancouver in
1898 and became connected with the department in
February 1900. Prior to coming to Vancouver Mr.
Miller served for three years with the police department
of Brock\i'le, Out., and was on the force at that place at
the time the notorious LaPoint killed one man and wounded eleven others including the Chief and Sergeant of
Police. Hotel Dominion
F. BAYNES, Proprietor.
New   Fireproof  Building:   Centrally   Located.
RATES: $1.25 AND $1.50 PER DAY
FREE '.MUS
ABBOTT STREET, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Office, Corner Gore Ave. and Railway
INTERNATIONAL ICE &
STORAGE CO., 11
MANUFACTURERS OF ICE FROM DISTlttED WATER
Storage and Freezing at
Rates.
DEALERS IN
Fresh Clarified and  Pasteurized Milk,
Cream and Ice Cream.
- CREAMERY BUTTER MANUFACTURED DAILY.
J.  J.   LOGAN,  SECRETARY AND  MANAGER. Patrolman E. A. SNYDER,
A native of Ontario province, he arrived in Vaneo
For three years was corresponding agent of t
Detective Bureau. For seven years he was a co;
stevedore and an electric motomian for five yeai
ember, 1900, he joined the police force as a patrol 11 ia
Nation
■ictor ai
In No
Patrolman JAME)
Is one of the youngest men on
Aberdeen, Scotland, and came to
South Africa  with  the first Cai
year in the war,  taking part  i]
J. SINCLAIR,
he force.   He is a native of
Vancouver in 1897 ;  went to
uli.-in contingent; served one
the battles of FaardeberK,
Bloomfontein and Tabanshu. At Winburg he. was invalided
with fever and sent to the hospital at Springfontein. He served
as clerk for Major Snyder, orderly clerk for the Canada detail
and later on the military police. He returned with the regiment December 81st, 1900; and six weeks later joined the police
force as patrolman. He is also the drill master of the department. JBanh of Ifoamtlton
HEAD OFFICE j HAMILTON, ONT.
Capital Paid Up,
Reserve Fund,
Total Assets,
$ 2,000,000.
1,500,000.
17,000,000.
VANCOUVER     BRANCH.
A   GENERAL   BANKING   BUSINESS   TRANSACTED.
SAVINGS    DEPARTMENT.
Deposits of $1.00 and upwards  received   and Interest allowed.
0. S. CLARKE, Agent, Vancouver.
MANUFACTUBERS OI
Plain and Fancy Cakes, Candy, Ice Cream and Ices
WEDDING   CAKES   A   SPECIALTY
OYSTERS AND  LUNCHES SERVED
J. E. ARMISHAW, Prop. 'Phone 1051
72 CORDOVA ST
TURNER, BEETON & CO.
WHOLESALE
LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
Agents for Brown's Four Crown Scotch Whisky.
Corby's Canadian Rye Whisky.
Shippers and Importers.        VANCOUVER, B.C.
fytnry Bloom field <£ Son,
ARTISTS   IN
STASHED GLASS
For Dwellings, Public Buildings and Churches.   Memorial and
Heraldic Windows.   Copper Bar Glazing.   Beveled Plate Work
I Mirrors.   Sketches and Estimates on application.
Works,   2532 Columbia Street, Mt. Pleasant.
(On Fairview Car Line)
y Agents, MESSON, FIFE & HUNTER, 24 Cordova Street. Patbolmax MALCOLM B. McLENNAN,
Came to Vancouver in 1897 and became connected
with the department as patrolman in May of the
present year.
He
Enjoys the  dii
department,
in 1807.   He has s
of Salem, Oregon.
tbolman DAVID SCOTT
tiou   of  being  the  latest addition   to  the
a Scotchman by birth and came to this city
red on both the flre and police departments
Served as driver of the hook and ladder
company  in  the   Vancouver  Fire  Department  for  eighteen
months and joined the police force in September of the present Don't Tell Your
Troubles to a
Policeman
If they are Eye
Troubles, go to
DR. JORDAN
BOSTON OPTICAL CO.
K.  O.  ATKINS
A. M.   JOHXSO>"
JItkins & Johnson
Express,  Truck  and  Dray
1    Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Ice and Wellington Coal    1
a a
1 STORAGE   •WAREHOUSES I
TO   INSURE   GOOD   AND RELIABLE   PLUMBING SEE
OTTO  LAURSEN
PLUMBER
Telephone 477.
326 Homer St
TELEPHONES =   Office, 176 s Stable, 115, Cold Storage, 415.
ORDERS BY .MAIL PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
120 Water St.,    VANCOUVER,  B. C.
the Arlington fiotel |
R. HURRY, Proprietor, I
302 and 304 CORDOVA ST., WEST. §
'PHONE   585-
European Plan.
BARROOM DM CONNECTION.    BEST BRANDS OF LIQUORS
AND CIGARS.   ELEGANTLY. FURNISHED ROOMS.
TERMS   MODERATE.
BSIjajiMISlDlJSJttllSJBI^
isssk License Inspector JOHN T. BROWN,
A native of Ontario province, came to Vancouver in 1891.
He engaged in the livery business for eight months and
was for three years in the grocery business. In October,
1894, he entered the city employ as license inspector,
which position he still holds.
THOMAS CRAWFORD, Night Gaoler,
Is a native of Dublin, Ireland and came to Vancouver
in 1886, before the fire. He served as special policeman
until the fall of 1890 when he was placed on the regular
force as a patrolman. He was for a time acting sergeant
under chief Ward and has been night gaoler for the past
six years. Mr. Crawford saw service during the North-
West Rebellion and holds a sergeant's medal and clasp,
of the 91st Winnipeg Light Infantry. ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦♦t«♦♦»♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«»♦♦««♦«♦»♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦>«»»♦♦♦♦♦.♦♦♦♦««♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦««♦♦*«♦♦♦*»*»»
B. £. Clothing Innovatory
and toilet Supply Company
Cleaning and Dyeing in all Its branches.
Full Dress Suits and Masquerade Costumes of all Descriptions for Hire.
STEAM  DYEING AND
CLEANING WORKS
1_ H. COHN, Proprietor
Offices and Stores furnished with  Racks. Soap. Combs,
Brushes, Whisk Brooms, and Clean Towels
Daily.
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»»«♦»♦♦♦♦*♦»«»♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦»«**«««♦»♦»*«♦♦♦«»*♦«»♦♦»♦♦♦♦
BOARD   OF   TRADE
HOTEL  AND   GRTLJLt ROOM
508   HASTINGS   STREET
ALEX.   SMITH:.  Proprietor
♦♦♦»♦♦♦»♦»♦»♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦«♦««♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦»»«»♦♦♦»♦«♦♦»♦»»♦♦♦«♦»«♦♦««♦♦»♦«♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«« Is a
Patrolman JOHN  H.   PURDY
native of Ontario.    Nine years ago he joined the
provincial police as a special officer on the Fraser River.
After a year of this service he was appointed merchants'
patrolman on the Vancouver police force, in which capacity he still serves.
Merchants' Pa'
A native of Ont
1886, before then
some tiiiH: and w
Stevenston, being succeeded by
the  Vancouver police   departt
man THOMAS F. CALBRICK
province, came to  Vancouver
thret
in
provincial police for
chief  of  police of
Main     He entered
in   April,   1897,  as
merchants' patrolman, in which capacity he still serves *•*   ••?„ *£iv. *J*    *•*   ***   *•*   *•*   ***   ***    •»*' *•*   *•*   ***   *lv",*&'^.''*   v   V   ••*
Rooms: Westminster and City Trams Hot and Cold Baths.
Single or En Suite. pass the door. Electric Light throughout.
HOTEL BLACKBURN
A. E. B1ACKBURN, Proprietor.
*   ■>   '.■   ■>   *
RATES PER DAY:
$110 to $1,50.   Rooms: 50c, 75c, and $
Most Comfortable and Homelike Hotel in the City.
People's Tuel Co.
149 Powell St,    Phone 675.
Has now a complete stock of DRY WOOD as follows:
MILL WOOD, CUT AND SPLIT,FREE FROM SAP; CORD
WOOD, ALDER AND FIR, CUT AND SPLIT OR BY THE
CORD: also BARK.
318 Westminster Ave.,
VANCOUVER, B, C.
Leave your orders and they will be filled promptly.
i^K^^STSK^v •?••>   •>   *>
J Y GR
WHOLESALE
PROVISIONS
121 and 123 Water Street,
VANCOUVER, B. C.
PHONE    215
T. MARSHALL
PLUMBER
STEAM AND GAS FITTER
216 Cambie St., VANCOUVER, B.C. Caretaker JOHN CLOUGH,
Is a native of Lincolnshire, England. He went to the United
States at the age of seventeen and has figured as a frontiersman
and miner nearly all his life. He crossed the plains to California in the early '50*s and mined and prospected up and
down the coast from California to the Fraser river for twenty-
five years. While a foreman of the C.P.R. he lost his right arm
by a premature blast. His connection with the Vancouver
police force dates with its very beginning, when he became
assistant gaoler and caretaker, which position he still holds.
Mr. Clough is seventy-one years of age, the oldest man on the
force both in age and length of service.
PoOnd-Keep
Is a native of Scotland but
Canada.   He lived for twer
Manitoba, coming to Vaueoirt
He  became  connected   with
August, 189ft, as pound-keeper
still serves in that capacity.
n life to
Ontario and
n January, 1894.
department   in
police officer and •1
"i
—^i
-S
1
"■jfll
-II
rfel
ALBION IRON WORKS CO.,
LIJVJCITKD,
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
Manufacturers  of all kinds  of Boilers  and   Machinery.
We make a specialty of  STOVES AND   COOKING   RANGES,   which are always on
view at our Show Room, 620 Cordova Street.
N.  THOMPSON,   local manager.
M. FITZPATRICK J. A. MERCER
ilbe Criterion
SEATTLE BEER ON DRAUGHT
Telephone 280. P. O. Box 283:
Fairfield Block, 431  Granville Street, VANCOUVER, B. C.
ft*,—
ft-
Mr
ft
sfe-
w
Pi-
ft
t
is— Hastings Street, showing the STRAND HOTEL an it appeared on the occasion of the Royal visit. The decorations were.very
beautiful and tasteful and elicited much favorable comment. The Strand is the finest and most comfortably furnished European plan
hotel in Vancouver. Has a first-class Restaurant in connection and boasts one of the finest bars in Canada, where the choicest brands
of "Wines, Liquors and Cigars can always be found.    It is located on Hastings Street between Granville and Seymour Streets.
The MINT SALOON, corner of Hastings and Carrall Streets, is under the same management and here also is carried the finest
brands of Wines, Liquors and Cigars, their greatest speciality being the celebrated Seattle Rainier Draught Beer. IsjIBIHHfflBlEISISIBEIBiaSlfflBHrBBJBIM
SAYI
Gold Seal Whiskey, 50 cents per bottle,
and Red Cross Export Lager, 75 cents
per dozen.
The best in the world at the price.
Money back if it isn't true.
Gold Seal Liquor Co.
722 Pender St.
Telephone 842
Greenhouse Plants at the lowest prices.
Bee Supplies, Seeds and Fertilizers.
Agricultural Implements.
Fruit Baskets and Crates.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees.
Bulbs for fall planting.
Catalogues free.
M. J.  HENRY
3009 Westminster Road, Vancouver, B. C.
WHITE LABOR ONLY
PACIFIC
LOAN OFFICE
243 CARRALL ST.
A.  F. LOW,  PROP.
Pays the highest prices for Watches, g
Diamonds, Jewelry and all articles        S
BUSINESS STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL.  I
EDWARD LIPSETT
Sail, Tent and Awning Maker
Importer of Cotton Duck-',
Drills,   Ropes,  Twines  and
Pishing Supplies..
AGENT:   Jos. Gunrhy & Co.'s Salmon Nets and
• Twines; Arthur James* Fish Hooks.
69 Water St., VANCOUVER, B. C.
S.  SAMPIETKO
Klondike fiohl
SAMPIETRO BROS., Props.
The Bar furnished with the best of
Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
Rooms  newly furnished  in  first-
class style.
Restaurant in connection.
210 CarraU Street, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Former guests always revisit us when in
the city.—A Sure Sign of Satisfaction.
The Carter House
Mrs. J. L. Carter, Proprietress.
154 Water St.,      -      VANCOUVER, B. C.
The Leading Dollar-a-Day House in the City
Pirst-Class Table
Well-Furnished Rooms
RATES:   ONE DOLLAR PER DAY
Special Kates per Week
. Free 'Bus meets all Trains and Boats
IliiJHSJeMlGlli^ 3§§r§&
^^^fy'.''.''.-^^-.'''.'.'.'.'^,Q^^^-'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.^^.'.\.
.  .
:   HACK   AND    BOARDING    STABLES   1
£
8
£
HACKS
ON
STAND
DAY
AND
NIGHT
#*^F. ^l. LEE
Orders
Promptly
Attended
to at all
Hours.
5?
X    Office, 101J CORDOVA ST.
vj< Telephones 172 and 917
P. 0. Box 469
*£££§$§§§
Stables, 550 WESTMINSTER AVE.
Telephone 195 \a>j
McDONELL & SIMPSON, Proprietors.
♦
|       No.  135  CORDOVA  STREET,
: VANCOUVER,   B. C.
| The Mightiest Popular Priced Theatre
♦ in Canada.
; The Only Place of Amusement Dis-
• pensing Vaudeville in the City.
♦
'PHONE  68
^   (9
Piwwe
.j?
fto, BlIM
544   CAMBIE   STREET,
Hacks, Drays and Express Wagons
Sole Authorized C. P. R. Bag-gage Agents
Commercial Sample Rooms
'PHONE   68
k. a Mclennan.
Manager.
F. C. TINGLEY,
■\,
^ Cordova Street, showing unique arch of Firemen's Ladders erected by the Vancouver Fire
Department in honor of the visit of Their Royal Highnesses, the Duke and Duchess of Corn-wall
and  York, September  30th,   1901. ^<0K3EC38K33OOSC38OSr*" ■:•   *   «3&3SK3K3*   *   •?,":,S£SK
: L, DON'T WALK HOME
: t      CALL A HACK
Sherman
House
H. PEPPARD
A. MITCHELL
RING UP
I FRED WOOD,
i
1 'PHONE  721
i
I   Office,  307  Abbott St.,
NEXT  TO   HOTEL   METROPOLE
1
(J Hacks at all Hours,
1
I   Day and Night,
•>  JAS. CANNON,
Proprieto
D
fll
* Best Wines, Liquors*   sale and boarding stables.  9
I and Cigars. fin
.>  Hacks,   Carriages,   Buggies,   Double I
QOOd Restaurant     § and Single Rigs.
I        and Rooms.        |
£ JJ2 Cordova and Water Sts., ^
SUPERB SADDLE HORSES. g
Special Attention is called to our Rubber Tired jsj
Buggies.    Try them.
We Recommend our Imported Stock to the public ••*
'Phone 138 I
VANCOUVER, B. C.
♦ VANCOUVER    LINE.
The Vancouver Line has just completed and placed   on   the   route
point of comfort and beauty anything heretofore seen on Puget Sound  water
MAINLANDER" VANCOUVER LINE.
ie Steamer " Mainlander," which far surpasses in
The immaculate cleanliness of the boat and the
superiority of the cuisine has won for this line
great popularity with the best class of travellers,
and while the time card shows an evening departure from each end of the route, the calm beauty
of an early morning on Sound and Gulf is something never to be forgotten. The vista of rose
tinted, snowy mountain peaks rising majestically
to a height of 15,000 feet, like Aphrodite, from
the clear depths of the great inland sea; the
sombre firs of the primeval forests and the
"Sound of  the  invisible breath that stirs at once
all their green tops
" Steals over one,   and  bows   his  spirit  with   the
thought of boundless power and inaccessible
majesty."
South Bound leaves Vancouver every Tuesday,
Thursday and Saturday at 10 p. m, arriving in
Seattle at 9 o'clock next morning.
North Bound leaves Seattle every Monday,
"Wednesday and Friday at 10 p.m., arriving in Vancouver at 9 o'clock next morning.
The Steamer "North Pacific" now runs on
alternate days, thus giving a daily service between
Seattle and Vancouver. The time of arrival and
departure is the same as that of the " Mainlander." 1 JSank of /llbontrcal
K/> ESTABLISHED   1817.
>& INCORPORATED BY ACT OF PARLIAMENT.                                                                                          • ]•
■I- CAPITAL (all paid up),           -           -           -           $12,000,000.00                                '['■
M RESERVED FUND,                -          -          -              7,000,000.00 1
p UNDIVIDED PROFITS,         -          -          -                764,703.19
Bg HEAD  OFFICE:   MONTREAL.
|Xi BOARD   OF   DIRECTORS:
jo; Rt. Hon. Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal, G.C.M.G., President.
K>! Hun. G. A. Drummond, Vice-President.
?<.••• A. T. Paterson, Esq. Edward B. Greenshields, Esq. Sir William G. Macdonald. R. B. Angus, Esq.
Is
A. F. Gault, Esq. James Ross, Esq. R. G. Reid, Esq.
-  •
E. S. OLOUSTON, General Manager. A. Macnider, Chief Inspector and Superintendent of Branches.
W. S. Oloi'Ston, Inspector of Branch Returns. F. W. Taylor, Assistant Inspector.
|x! JAMES AIRD, Secretarv.
I —IK :::
8>j VANCOUVER   BRANCH: >8j
DV C.   SWEENY,   MANAGER. ROBERT  RENTOUL, ASSISTANT MANAGER. ^
£>v DRAFTS AND LETTERS OF CREDIT ISSUED ON DAWSON,  ATLIN AND  OTHER NORTHERN POINTS,  AND A 3§
P££ GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS DONE WITH ANT PART OF THE WORLD. >& Building of the Bank of Montreal, V
during the visit of Their Royal Hi
■uses the Duke and I
Dunsmuir Streets, as decorated,
d York, September 30th, 1901. JOHN HENDRY,
PRESIDENT.
C. M. BEECHER,
VICK-PRESID]
R. H. ALEXANDER,
SECRETARY.
II Mill 118
HEAD OFFICE, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Manufacturers of Fir and Cedar Lumber, Doors,
Windows, Mouldings, &c.
Codes Used :
A 1, A. B. C,  Watkins', Scott's,
Lumberman's Standard. Cable Address:
" Timber"
BRANCHES;
Hastings Saw Mill, )
Royal City Planing Mills,   )
Royal City Planing Mills, New Westminster, B. C.
Vancouver, B. C. Magnificent Arch erected on the grounds of the British Columbia Mills, Timber and Trading Company, at the entrance
to the Hastings Mill, on the occasion of the visit of Their Royal Highnesses, the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York,
September 30th, 1901. The Royal party is shown passing under the arch on returning from the mill. Their Royal
Highnesses were greatly impressed with the sight of a large sawmill in full operation and declared that this was one of the
most interesting sights of their long journey Bath Rooms on Every Pioor.
Newlv furnished.
Elevator.
Heated by Hot Water.
Rates from $2.00 to $2.50 Per Day.
V J-t-t-H-t-11-t.i-t-i-t.J.i-t.-L-LXl.i..L.kXX J.XJ. J- X J.XX J.4.J. J. J-XJ.J.J, J 111 J.y
Hold
HefropolG
¥H. HODSON, Proprietor
GEO. PARKER, Manager
Commercial Headquarters.
Commodious Sample Rooms all in the
Building.
Bank of
1  British Uortb JImerica.   I
Established in 1836
LONDON OFFICE:
Incorporated by Royal Charter in 1840
en Street, E. C.
Paid-up Capital,
Reserve Fund,
£ 1,000,000 Sterling
350,000       "
J. H. Brodie
John James Catc:
Gaspard Farrer
COURT OF DIRECTORS
Richard B. Glyn
E. A. Hoare
II. J. B. Kendall
A. G. Wallis, Secretary
Geo. D. Whatman
Frederic Lubbock
Henry R. Farrer
id Office in Canada:   St. James Street, Montreal
CEMAX, General Manager J. ELMSLY, Inspector
ISKANCHES XX CANADA :
London
" Brantford
Hamilton
Toronto
Midland
Kingston
Drafts
Sydney, Cape Bre
hi Winnipeg. Man.
Brandon, Man.
n. N. B.      Ashcroft, B. C.
cton. N.B. Greenwood, B. C.
t. N. S.        Kaslo. B. C.
Rossland, B. C.
Vancouver. B. C.
"Victoria, B. C.
Atlin. B. C.
Dawson City, Y.'
l South Africa
nay be
obtained at the Bank's Branches
Nb
YOR
:EXCI ES IN THE I'MTEI) STATES, Etc.:
c—52 Wall Street—W. Lawson and J. C. Welsh, Agents.
San Francisco—121 Sansome Street—H. M. J. McMichacl and J. R.
Ambrose, Agents.
London Bankers—The Bank of England, Messrs.' Glyn & Co.
Foreign Agents- Liverpool—Bank of Liverpool. Scotland—National
Bank of Scotland, Limited, and brandies. Ireland—Provincial Bank of Ireland, Limited, and branches; National Bank, limited, and branches.
Australia—Union Bonk of Australia, Limited. New Zealand—Union Bank
of Australia, Limited. India, China and Japan—Mercantile Bank of India,
Limited. West Indies—Colonial Bank. Paris—Messrs. Marcuard, Kr.ni-
ct Cie.   Lyons—Credit Lyonnais. ank of British North America Building, Vancouver Branch, corner of
Hastings And Richards Streets, Vancouver. ate
■yjvv'. »g*S?"
H3Nt 'Phone 783 |NSg-
-$*i: pis-
I Pac///c Bottling Works i
-$8»: GORE AVENUE,    -   -   -   -    VANCOUVER, B. C. :g«g-
jg importers and Bottlers. M
-$3t^» SOLE AGENTS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA OF |^S?~
-^Wf SEATTLE  BREWING  &  MALTING   CO.'S !>X<£
3 -RAINIER" and iBOHEMIANI BEER g
^fflv'a »"irSr^
ALSO
39te /^« f T">        if *   CELEBRATED "G. a LIQUEUR,"    C        if      W7f   '    f   <
_^s<    Cjreenlees t>rothers     -lorne," -rare old -    Scotch Whiskies
^^ A FULL STOCK OF WINES AND LIQUORS ON HAND. gST
-#Ǥ BOTTLING FOR HOTELS AND FAMILIES A SPECIALTY. 1*6-
'1^\^t-s;i^^ii?^'a^?;fir<*o'iJ<*,of{;*; ;♦;!♦>,♦;■♦- ■♦■ ♦••♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦.•*♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦•♦ •■;♦-•■:♦: ♦ ♦♦■,♦♦ ♦♦•♦•♦♦♦♦•♦♦»•♦♦♦♦•* * ♦ ♦ ♦ •••*.* .♦■»:jes^^
ua|t|i|i|iOTrai|i|iM Canadian Pacific Railway Station as decorated on the occasion of the visit of Their Royal
Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York, September 30th, 1901. The decorations
and illumination of this magnificent bui!ding vrerd by far the most elaborate and baautiful ever seen
in British Columbia, ^
^f5
i _J.J-.iy"
-~&*
"1"!
m
The Meal Estate Exchange
WM.   S.   DICKSON,  Proprietor
Xr
~i
H
gi
VANCOUVl
THE HOWE SOUND HOTEL
HOOD POINT,
BO WEN ISLAND, B. C.
(U MILES FROM VAXCOUVER)
The finest location in B. C. for Bathing, Fishing;, Boating and   Shooting.     Six  hundred  yards
bathing beach.   An ideal spot for recreation and rest.   Picnics and social gatherings catered for.
EVERYTHING    FIRST-CLASS.
A GENERAL STORE will be run in connection with the Hotel, at which provisions can be procured nt current rates.
> A. NEWLAND, Proprietor.
-fr
Ir- ?gest
The Vancouver Plant of The Hastings Shingrle Manufacturing: Company, Li m i ted* This company is tt
manufacturer of red cedar shingles in the world. Has one mill for the manufacture of lumber, fir and cedar mouldings, sidi_
work, etc., and two shingle mills in British Columbia and three shingle mills in the state of Washington, U.S., with a total capacit
of 250,000,000 shingles. These plants are kept running day and nignt to keep up with orders, and the Company has found it necessar
to increase its capacity each year. It is now preparing for a further increase of about fifty per cent., and hence is prepared to tab
care of all orders that come its way. On account of the exceptional quality of its products this Company has been leading the van i
the red cedar shingle business in Canada and the United States; their 10, 18, 20 and 24 inch Hhingles being particular favorites in tb
different markets. The officers of the Company are James A. McNair, president; Robert McNair, vice-president; F. M. Brittoi
secretary and N. X D. McNair, treasurer.   The home office of the Company is m- Vancouver. ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»»♦♦♦♦♦»
SUN  BAN"
JAPANESE   STORE
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦»»♦»»«»♦»♦««♦♦»««««♦«♦»
N. HAMAMURA & CO. I
TAjMURA
♦       Opp. Post Office. 618-622 Granville St.. VANCOUVER, B. C
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦,♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦■♦
FANCY
JAPANESE
STORE
ALL KINDS OF FANCY GOODS AND
VANCOUVER VIEWS
5 and 6 ARCADE,
VANCOUVER, B. C.
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»*.«* Hastings Street, showing arch erected in
of Vancouver on the occasion of the visit of
York, September 30th, 1901.
High]
sd Gates of Japs
ises the Duke a:
Monti
Hand ♦♦♦♦»♦»♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»«»«♦♦♦««»♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦»»»♦♦
♦   Telephone 435.
VICTORIA   LAGER   BEER
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
THE LOUVRE
R.  MINATY,   Proprietor
THE  ONLY CIRCULAR  BAR  ON  THE COAST
♦
♦
♦
♦
| 323 Carrall Street, Vancouver, B. c. :
t t
♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦«♦«♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦♦»♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦♦♦«»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦«♦♦«♦♦♦»♦»♦«» Hastings Street, East, showing beautiful Oriental arch erected at the intersection of Carrall Street by the
Chinese residents of Vancouver on the occasion of the visit of Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess
of Cornwall and York, Septerber 30th, 1901. The Tontine Savings Association of Minneapolis, Minn.
INCORPORATED   JANUARY   6,   1694
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL STOCK, $100,000 HOME OFFICE:  NEW YORK LIFE BUILDING
S. W. Devore, president E. D. ZIESEL, vice-president and Manager N. A. SPRONG, Secretary and treasurer
In August, 1897,
duced a special
ciation intrc
the form c
DATS OF THI!
DIAMOND CONTRACTS ^
EMENT WE HAVB DISBURSED  I>* SATISFACTION OF DlA
$7 58,1 5Q.OO
Lie sale of Diamonds on  the  instal-
t plan under the Tontine principle.
mond Contracts,
OUR, PLAN EXPLAINED.
Briefly stated, this Association's contract with its patrons is
as follows : When you sign an application for a Diamond Contract you pay_the agent or the Association Five Dollars down,
whereupon an explicit contract is delivered to you by the
Association. This contract calls for the payment of $1.25 per
week for sixty consecutive weeks, making the total payments
amount to $80.00. If you keep up these payments for the full
sixty weeks, then, when the contract is reached in order of performance, that is, when, yours is the oldest outstanding contract,
the Association will deliver to you a two-carat, commercial
white, clear and flawless Diamond worth $200.00 at retail.
All contracts whatsoever issued by any person or concern
should either guarantee as to the amount or as to the time. In
most cases, if not all, building and loan societies or companies
guarantee as to the time of payment to their respective patrons
and estimate the amount which shall be due them.
In the planof the Diamond Contract issued by this Association we reverse that order and make amount the essence of our
contract and the time is estimated.
To illustrate: If you pay the sixty consecutive payments
your contract then becomes fully paid and non-forfei table, and
you will be entitled to receive the diamond if reached in the
order of performance at that time. But should the period of
maturity exceed sixty weeks, or run ovex\ as the common expression is, you will he to no expense of further payment of
instalments, but will be holding practically what an insurance
company would term a paid-up policy. In their companies the
policy would be payable to your beneficiary at your death, in
which case time is also estimated and is termed " your period of
expectancy of life." You may die much earlier than that period,
or you may live long after it, but the law of average protects the
company or association in its estimate. In our case (he amount
would be payable to you when yours became the oldest outstanding contract. The period of maturity will not remain
steadily at any given point, as the volume of new business and
amount of lapsations are subject to the same fluctuations that
suiTound any ordinary business enterprise, but the law of average fully protects you against an unreasonable length of time
and guarantees perpetuity* to the business.
It is said that fully eighty per cent, of the membership of
beneficiary" organizations let their payments or dues lapse
at one period or another, and as naught is returned to them
such lapses accrue to the benefit of those who do make full
payment.
SEPTEMBER    DISBURSEMENTS,    $51,662.50
E. W.  MacLEAN, Agent,
Vancouver, B. C. ^^•^TJ/* ♦*♦♦*•♦♦•♦♦•••*••♦♦•■• ♦»*» ♦♦*♦•♦♦•♦* ♦•♦•*•♦♦♦•• ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦•♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦•♦•♦♦•♦♦•• *SAri*^
Man Lee Co. i
IMPORTERS OF   AND   WHOLESALE m^
DEALERS   IN sg^.
RICE, TEA AND f
GENERAL  MERCHANDISE.
5^5
-1-6   DUPONT   ST.
VANCOUVER,   B. C. Ladees* and Gents' Repairing All Kinds of Dry Cleaning       ♦•
Neatly Done a Specialty +
VANCOUVER  STEAM   DYE   WORKS I
ESTABLISHED   1886.
♦ Ladies'  and   Gents'  Clothing   of  Every   Description   Cleaned   or   Dyed. *
T Ties,  Gloves,   Rugs,   Portieres,   Feathers,  Silks.   Furs  Tanned  and   Dressed. ♦
| t
£ OUR WORK IS DISTINCT FROM THAT OF ANY OTHER CONCERN IN THE CITY. £
|     J. G. ROUGIER, Proprietor. 14 Cordova St, East t
Imperial JSanfc of Canada t
1 HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO.    D. R. Wilkie, General Manager. 2.
± ♦■
J CAPITAL, ..... $2,500,000 J
REST, ..... $1,850,000 J
VANCOUVER   BRANCH:   A.  JUKES,   Manager.
| SAVINGS   DEPARTMENT %
i INTEREST ALLOWED ON DEPOSITS OF $(.00 AND UPWARDS AT CURRENT RATES
♦
♦
♦♦♦♦»»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦«««♦«»♦♦♦♦«♦,««♦«♦♦♦♦«««♦»♦♦♦«»»? -51
-Si
11
H
in
i?4?4¥4f^Ti1?'
-giL
o . 6 vovo _ o _ o vcr^K^Sr. 6 _ fi< _ o g £» _ *> _ o . Tfii xr i W. ror^'fir4,'Cr'i^AtK'. if.. "©; - tot^^A^ t^_ i&: . ff. ^\ ^; /6c.
MARK LONG CO.,
LIMITED,
VANCOUVER,   B. C.
MANUFACTURERS  OF
LADIES' SILK WRAPPERS, MATTANAISE,
CHEMISES, DRAWERS, ETC.
We are   Direct   Importers of Chinese  and Japanese Silks,
which enables us to give our customers good goods at low prices.
We also import Japanese Quilted Dressing Gowns, Smoking
Jackets, etc.
All orders whether large or small promptly attended to and
satisfaction guaranteed.
Goods sent C. O. D. with privilege of inspection.
wS-~
Ifir
WE-
Wt
HE"
•HE"
lit
III}"
Ht
§&■
$E"
St
.Ms-
ATA 7A7AYA
i$Xra$$i$i^^ *5S&TGX5r&J&tP)f''"J Y +'Y'-PXGre^+^ + y+\ifeKy^
■M
'"S
"3m
~"M
•~.f»$
■'21
~M
-•Pi
••"H
■-si
■Si
■jji
Hotel
Badminton
J. W. Wallis, Prop.
Most Popular Resort
for Tourists
Pleasant  Location.
Special Rate to Families
Special Commercial Rate.   Commodious Rooms and Parlors.
Cor. of Dunsmuir and Howe Streets,   VANCOUVER, B. C.
SBsssililla-
Tilt 5EC0HH MOTEL
C. BROWN, Proprietor.
$1,00 PER DAY,   BOARD BY THE
Till
1,50 TO $5.50.
Special Rates to Families and other Large Parties.
31 ea Is 25c.   American and European Plans.    Komi is 25c.
Free 'Bus to and from all Boats and Trains.
Bar supplied with the best Wines, Liquors and Cigars
Within a few blocks of the Depot and Wharves,
One block off Leading Business Centre.
401 Powell St.,      Vancouver, B. C.
C.  UCHIDA,
Dealer in Groceries, Provisions, Foreign and Domestic Fruits, Confectionery
IMPORTER  OF JAPANESE  PRODUCE.
BOARDING   HOUSE   UPSTAIRS. Telephone 60. P. O. Box 575.
109 Hastings Street, East, VANCOUVER, B. C
5*9"
Wt
i^fflra^^^rarararararara^ra^^fflra^rara^^^^ isk.iSE-
U (Mili ptl    Wa verley Hotel g
J. H. TRAVELBEA, Proprietor
Rates:   Board and Room   $1 per Dav, $5 per Week.
B.ai- Supplied with the Best "Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
Street Cars pass the Door Every Few Minutes.
1300, 1302, 1304 Granville St.,   VANCOUVER, B. C.
The Avenue Hotel
'W. S. COOK, Proprietor.
": I  The Finest Brands of Wines,  Liquors and
$1.00 to $1.50 Per Day.
Meals 25c.
I Ins Mouse has just been renovate
and Clea
verything New,   Neat
Cor. Seymour and Georgia Streets, Vancouver, 12. C.
My Motto t Only Standard Brands of
LIQUORS AND CIOARS.
An Excellent Free Lunch
at all hours.
-J?
Cigars.
TELEPHONE 190.
COLUMBIA AVE., VANCOUVER, B. C.
/ ?   I   i  i   i   it   i   i  i   i   i   i  i  i   I   i   ivi'i.
JNO. DECKER, Proprietor M
Known   for   the   best   Glass of Beer in Town for 5c. ♦.:
Carrall St., Vancouver, B. C.        m -,iii«. y# ♦ ♦ * ♦ V ♦ ♦ '♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦■♦♦ »*♦•»♦♦ * * • ♦,♦»♦♦ ••»♦.'•.♦♦♦»♦♦♦ ♦ ♦ * • ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ •  ♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦ + ♦♦♦♦*♦♦»»»♦ •***»"" -*^
2?^ BOARD $1 A DAY TELEPHONE 630        ♦g*"*T
3 HOTEL   GRAND **=* IE
^,"7? "Nice House, Good Beds"—Pickwick *&%**'
c3 ^^^^       1 Choicest Wines and Liquors.   Best Cigars. = H^fT
-&*$i ALF. AUSTIN    Proprietor W^~
~?SK5s (Late of New York, formerly proprietor of "Ship and Star," London, E. C. ) ®&~
~m< 614, 616, 618 Cordova St., opp. C. P. R. Station, VANCOUVER,   B. C. f*&-
DON'T FORGET TO DROP LN" AT THE S£-
J! CENTRAL   HOTEL H
■^Nl   Tim;E & ErDGK a""™"" 4.2   CORDOVA   STREET j§?*^"
"^^: @^~
"^3 NICE, CLEAN, AIRY ROOMS i?^
H3^ BAR SUPPLIED WITH BEST BRANDS OF WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS §*£- £ft?RS
TrT?%
#eu? Tountain fyotet
C. SCHWAHN, Proprietor.
NEWLY FURNISHED THROUGHOUT.
LIGHTED BY ELECTRICITY.
Meals, 25c. and up.
Rooms,
29 and 3 J Cordova Street,
Beds, 25c, per Night,
51,50 per Week and up,
VANCOUVER, B. C.
-J*K§
c
H
-Finest Brands of=
Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
/
101 CORDOVA STREET,        -        -        -        VANCOUVER, B. C.
J. T. A BRAY, Proprietor, ex-member of Vancouver Police Force. ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
♦ ♦
t __ X
*
. ♦
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦to**********
■HeP.
Si
KING'S HOTEL
FRANK TAMBURINO, Prop.
♦ Choice  Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
Good Beds, 25c. and 50c.
WM. McNEISH, Proprietor
|
t
t
t Corner Cordova and Carrall Streets,
TELEPHONE 182
Meals 15c.  and Upwards.
| VANCOUVER, B. C. t
t t
************************************♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
I 218 Carrall St.,   Vancouver, B. G !
! !
*********************************************** MT. PLEASANT.
SHERDAHL,    Prop!
TELEPHONE 256
Ornamental and Shade  Trees, Cut
Flowers  and  Green House Plants.
Our stock, of Fruit Trees cannot be surpassed.
golden Gate fiotel
S. T. TEEZE, Proprietor
'Bar Supplied with the Best Brands
of Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
1 Rates: $1.00 per Day, $4^0 per Week
1 1200 Granville St., Vancouver, B. C.
E. BURNS
HACKS OR CARRIAGES FOR  HIRE
DAY OR  NIGHT
BOARD AND SALE STABLES
PLEASURE DRIVING A SPECIALTY
694 SEYMOUR STREET
Special attention is called to our Rubber Tired Buggies
The Palace Hotel
Schmehl & Muixer, Props.
CHOICE WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS
Board and Lodging by tlie Day or Week
COR. CARRALL AND HASTINGS STS.,
VANCOUVER, B. C.
AUGUST SCHWAHN
FRED. SCHWAHN
PROPRIETORS
Atlantic
Saloon
Finest Brands of Wines,
Liquors and Cigars.
61   CORDOVA   STREET,
VANCOUVER, B. C.
@n^51]ri!Jri!JDM^ WHOLESALE   AND   RETAIL
41
POWELL   STREET
'PHONE   889
BILLY WILLIAMS
PROPRIETOR
VANCOUVER, B.C.
CHOICEST WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
FOUBERT'S ENGLISH ALES AND PORTER
ON DRAUGHT.
Cor. Pender and Seymour Streets, VANCOUVER,  B. C.
3
1
HOPKIRK. 5PENCE & CO.'
Proprietors.
cALL PHOTOS USED LN
THIS PUBLICATION
WERE MADE BY
VANCOUVER, B. C
ipDIrDIijyiaiijijrgij^j^ jj
Rustic Dining Rooms
318 WEST CORDOVA ST.
m
THE BEST isc. MEAL IN  THE  CITY.
UNION LABOR ONLY. M. B. MURPHY, Prop.
THE LEADING PHOTOGRAPHER
VANCOUVER, B. C.
m
ROYAL HOTEL
Mcar to all steamboat landings and railway dopot.
RATES, $1.00 to $2.00 per day.   Special per week.
MEAL TICKETS, 21 Meals, $4.00.
J3f5 WATER STREET, WING SANG ®. CO.,
29    DUPONT   STREET,
Between Carrall St. and Columbia Ave.  \3
VANCOUVER,   B. C.
y
256
BSS3J3
Importers oi
Telephone l\l r^^^^^^m^^^^^^^^^^^m^^^mmm^^^^^^}.
SAM KEE
i
IMPORTER   AND   DEALER   IN 1
I JAPANESE and CHINESE RICE I
AND 25
I
&*
General Merchandise.
:•:   Manufacturer of Alder and Fir Charcoal. P. 0. Box 257.   &j
xSjpgi    48i Dkfont St., Vancouver, b. c. m*m
gMinimnp
LP n*
n_
IMPORTERS
Wholesale   General   Merchandise   and   0[mim.
P.  O.  BOX  290
21   DUPONT   STREET,   VANCOUVER,   B. C.
*3^!t^^^\D^?3^Di\t7*N
^^^^^^^^l
1
1
HING REE <& CO.
DEALERS   IN
Teas,   Dry   Goods   and   Chinese   Merchandise
of Every   Description.
P. O. Box 238.
17  Dupont Street, Vancouver,    B. C. n
• ■
GENERAL MERCHANDISE AND DRY GOODS
LABOR   CONTRACTORS
Intelligence Office:    25   Dupont   Street,
P. O. Box 617. VANCOUVER,    B. C.
HIP TUCK LUNG & CO.
i
i
1
1
IMPORTERS,   WHOLESALE   AND   RETAIL   DEALERS   IN
g °§l?f Chinese Goods, Provisions, l$ce, Tea, Opium, Etc. l€§r
853
No. 4 DUPONT ST.,  VANCOUVER, B. C.
P. O. BOX 255.
SasSSKS
!£2222x5a£2sfiQo&£V$Sf5f5o
S*£3&3  ♦ •:•** **♦•><•.>*****.:..!•**:•
i
■  ■
^   k   b   = k \^   |   b^rak ^B|
J-
" i! l:    * ^-^ ^      l\ l'3*
•^nxxj ^W3 ^ wua ^assfe 'asafe Tj&gg^ w^ss! i«g^ ■<
I    P. O. Box 254. DUPONT  ST.,   VANCOUVER,  B. C.
I      Established 1780. Branch WING YEE CHUNG & CO., Agents, Hongkong, China.
1       HAI HING LUNG & CO.
I IMPORTERS  OF
Chinese Rices,   Sugar,   Oils, and  General  Merchandise
ALL KINDS OF SILK HANDKERCHIEFS, CLOTHES, SHOES, ETC.
|    P. O. Box 270. 513   CARRALL  ST.,   VANCOUVER, B. C. r^^W^^-^-jr^^wW-ig
*£
/t rr
T/ie Vancouver Police Department    <&
'4£± .-————-j^
 oOppppuQj^mM*
iiiiit    itiiJiitX
4~—■'  \.'J:;'„" .'.."/"..'.v., ^~.."s.""./-^
R some time past the Police Department of Vancouver
is seen the desirability, in fact almost the necessity,
f forming a Police Relief Association for the relief of sick
or disabled members. Such associations now exist in connection
with the police departments of nearly if not quite all cities in Canada
and the United States, and the enormous good they have accomplished
is almost past belief. Such an association is now about to be formed,
and a committee, consisting of Chief North, Sergeant Butler and Clerk
Mcintosh, has been appointed to arrange the details of the organization. It is hoped that the publication of this Souvenir will net a
snug little sum as a nucleus for what will eventually become a self-
sustaining Police Relief Association.
If the people of Vancouver enjoy the priceless boon of almost
absolute security and freedom from crime and criminals, they should
not make the very common error of believing that " we have but little
need for policemen because we have such an orderly and well-behaved
city." There are always a goodly number of the vicious element
knocking at our doors ready to enter the moment the vigilant eye of
the officer of the law is withdrawn. It is owing entirely to the never-
ending vigilance of its police force and the rigid administration of law
and justice  that any  city enjoys more immunity from crime and
viciousness than its neighbors. Vancouver is said to be the most
orderly city on the Pacific Coast, yet with an inferior or less energetic
police department as golden opportunities would await the criminal
classes here as elsewhere. And it certainly redounds greatly to the
credit of the police department that as this is the most orderly city
on the Coast, it is so despite the fact that in point of population it
has the smallest police force on the Coast.
But these facts do not make the policeman's life entirely secure
from the dangers which beset his confreres in other cities, by any
means. On the contrary, his life is ever one of peril, and may be
ended any moment by the class of whom he is the particular dread.
The dangers to which he is expo
sed never
find.
When
the city is
peacefully sleeping he keeps his 1
mely vigil,
read
y to' do
dis duty at
all times, come what may, even th
ough it le
id h
m toaln
lost certain
death.
Life insurance among police
officers is i
are,
owing t(
> the heavy
premiums asked, as the dangers t
) which he
is (
onstantl
r* subjected
make him an " undesirable risk."
The frat
srnal
insuran
ce societies
do not seek him.    His life is a h
ard one, a
id ii
i propor
,ion to the
His work
is i
requentl
rt criticized
and rarely commended. At the time of the fire (1886) Vancouver, then known as Granville, had a population of not more than 500 and a police department
of five men, or one policeman to each 100 of population. To-day it
has a population of 30,000, with a vast ocean commerce and rail and
water communication with the entire world in every direction, north,
south, east and west, and only twenty-six men all told connected with
the department, or about one for each 1,150 of population, and there
is less actual crime in our midst to-day than at any time in the history
of the city.
It is not the intention, in compiling this brief history, to record
a detailed account of the doings of the department or to even mention
the manifold duties that have to be performed by the police force, the
hundreds of petty cases that come before it for adjustment, the many
minor arrests made, the suspicious characters that are watched and
oftentimes driven from the city, and the thousand and one other matters that engage almost constantly the eagle eye of the police officer,
who, firm in the conviction that "an ounce of prevention is worth a
pound of cure," is ever, night and day, watchful to prevent crime and disorder and thus obviate the necessity of constantly hunting down
criminals. It is rather the desire to merely publish a record of its
growth from its inception to the present day, with the changes in its
•+-M-++++-I'
official head and a few of the mor<
before it.
important caS'
History of the Department
The history of the Vancouver Police Department dates from the
early spring of 1886. At this time Vancouver was a mere village of
500 persons and was known as Granville. There were all told five
men in the department: J. M. Stewart, chief; John McLaren, sergeant ; V. "W. Haywood and William "Wood, patrolmen, and John
Clough, jailer. The first jail was anything but a pretentious affair.
It consisted of a small wooden building on Water street and contained
three cells. Brush fires were very bad in this section during the
spring and summer of 1886, and in the early part of June of that
year burned so fiercely as to threaten the safety of the town. Every
precaution was taken to prevent a spread of the flames, but in spite
of these the fire reached the town June 13th, and the volunteer fire
department was unable to prevent its entire destruction. Nineteen
persons perished in the flames and only one building remained standing in the town. Jailer Clough had but one prisoner in his little jail
at the time, but he stuck to his post of duty until ordered bv his
chief to turn the man loose and both run for their lives. The morning of June 14th was a desolate one for the Granville people. Every
citizen was homeless and the town literally "wiped off the earth."
Provisions there were none. The weather was fortunately warm and
tents and supplies soon began to arrive from Victoria and elsewhere.
As  soon as possible the work of rebuilding began,  and Granville became a very busy place. The name was shortly afterwards changed
to Vancouver, and the population increased rapidly. With this increase
■the size of the police department also increased, though in a somewhat smaller proportion. Three men were first added, which gave
the department eight altogether, and no more were put on until after
"four or five years, since which time it has gradually been increased
until now it numbers twenty-six men.
In the latter part of 1886 the police building on Powell street
was erected- It is still in use as the police court, police headquarters
and jail, though a number of additions have been made from time to
time.
Chief Stewart retained his position as head of the department
until 1891, when he was succeeded by John McLaren. The latter
•served until the first part of June, 1895. He- was in turn superseded
by William Ward, formerly inspector of police in Toronto and a vet-
•eran of the Crimean War. J. W. Johnston was sergeant and E. A.
Harris acting sergeant. In September of the following year Chief
Ward was deposed and Sergeant Johnston served as acting chief for
-"three months, until the re-appointment of J. M. Stewart, with Samuel
North and J. W. Johnston as sergeants. Chief Stewart served until
-Jury 15th of the present year, when Sergeant North was appointed
■chief, very much to the gratification of the majority of the citizens.
The present sergeants are Thos. H. Butler and E. A. Harris, and it
■would be difficult to find two more efficient officers.
Owing to the great amount of travel to Alaska, the Yukon and
■other points, there are at all times a goodly number of strangers in
the city, and frequently the number becomes very large.    That crime
is not more common is due to the constant vigilance of each individual
man on the force.    Minor arrests are quite frequent, and in order to
avoid the possibility of crime, suspicious characters are driven from
the city without ceremony.    Several members of the force have been
engaged at various times in desperate work, but the records thus far
show that no man ever yet flinched from the performance of his duty,
and fortunately no officer has yet fallen a victim to the
knife or bullet, though some there are who will carry w
them to their graves.    The' policeman never knows wh
become involved in a fight for his life with some desperat
still he must make his arrests without any unnecessary foi
ever cool and collected, even though facing death itself,
here be said, to the credit of Vancouver's police force, th
are handled with consideration.    The police are well tra
active and physically powerful, as fine a body of men, for its size, as
can be found in any police department in the country.
Unlike many cities, Vancouver has fortunately had no serious,
strikes or riots to contend with, but Chief North realizes that the
police must be drilled and in readiness to contend with any cracr-
al's
unds v
rifch
n he
nay
charac
ter,
le, mus
t be
And If
t it
tpriso
aers
ert, I Praise Where Praise is Due. I
I 1
During the visit of Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and
.Duchess of Cornwall and York on Sept. 30th, the police arrangements
were as nearly perfect as can be imagined, and Chief North, Sergeants
Butler and Harris and the entire department, in fact, were the recipients of unstinted praise, not only from the residents of the city,
but from the visitors themselves. Even H. R. H. the Duke himself
noted the perfect order maintained, and took occasion to speak of it
to his worship the mayor in very complimentary terms. The many newspaper men who accompanied the royal party agreed that the arrangements were better and the order maintained more nearly perfect than
in any other city visited. Wherever the royal party drove the streets
were kept entirely clear of people, though the sidewalks were thronged.
The crowd was perhaps the largest ever seen in Vancouver, the entire
populace was enabled to procure an excellent view of the royal procession, and the latter was entirely unhampered in its progress by
jostling crowds.
The following article was taken from the Vancouver Evening
World of October 2nd, and tends to show the appreciation felt by
Magistrate Russell, which reflects the sentiment of the entire community :
"At the conclusion of the session of the police court yesterday
afternoon,  Magistrate   Russell  praised  the  department  which  acts
under Chief North's instructions in very complimentary terms.
' " Upon this occasion," ' Mr. Russell said, ' " I cannot help but
convey to the force the appreciation of the visitors in connection with
the very excellent order maintained while the royal guests were in the-
city. It reflects great credit upon the officials in charge, and it was-
especially noticed by the visiting pressmen, who stated that the regulations and the work done here surpassed that of the police force in
any other part of Canada.
' " I am glad that the opportunity has presented itself when I
may speak of the good work done by the force that it might be encouraged to go further ahead in the future.
'' " Few people realize that in Vancouver better police work is
done, comparatively speaking, than in any other part of the Dominion, and when there are taken into consideration the many conditions,
such as the situation of the city to the sea, the cosmopolitan population, etc., and the convictions, the work of the force is worthy of
every laudation. Whenever the opportunity offers I will always be-
ready to put in a good word for the department of this city, and I am
glad to be able to take advantage of the opportunity on this occasion." '
" The compliment was received with applause by those who were-
in the court room, and Chief North and his sergeants were the subjects of congratulation.
"This appreciation also extends to Chief Detective Wylie, who-
superiu tended the work of the 60 men in plain clothes who were
sworn in specially for that day, and also to each individual member of
the force." ij* ♦••*♦♦•♦♦♦•••*•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦*•♦♦#••♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦•♦♦»♦ ********* *************** ******** ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ • * ♦';* \ffcjL
TAI SING & CO.
-S*l  P. O. Box 307.
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3*?:   P.  O.  BOX 269
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I CHINESE   MERCHANDISE j
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116  DUPONT ST.,   VANCOUVER,  B. C. 1**
JUN  KEE
*« CHINESE   MERCHANDISE Iff
28   DUPONT  ST.,  VANCOUVER, B. C
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WING YUEN CHONG KEE CO.
IMPORTERS, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN
Fine Tea, Rice, Nut Oil and all kinds of Chinese Medicines and Merchandise
P. O. BOX 279.
\    \2 DUPONT STREET, VANCOUVER, B. C.
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j I"    TAI ON CO. I■'■■ .
P IMPORTERS AND MERCHANTS
1 Wholesale and Retail Rice, Tea, Nut Oil, |
i Silkware and a General line of Groceries. 1
501 Carrall Street, cor. Dupont, VANCOUVER, B. C. ^idr.444^^^
1 Tongoun & Co.^
-*       Ladies' and Gents' tailors
fj Make the Finest Clothes in the City at Lowest
J3*       Prices.    Fit and' Workmanship guaranteed.
-j* 100 Hastings St.,  cor.  Columbia  Ave.
»: .♦: ;♦; *i^Jr^n^
WO   KEE   1
CHINESE LAUNDRY t
FAMILY   WASHING   A  SPECIALTY U-
P. O. BOX 294 p-
264 Hastings Street, East, VANCOUVER, B. C. fL
1    HANG ON JUNG & CO.
CHINESE GOODS and GREEN TEA,
YanWarHing&Co.f
20   DUPONT  STREET,
IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN
Chinese Merchandise and Drugs,
TEA, RICE, SUGAR, ETC.
'Wr
P. O. Box 239      VANCOUVER, B. C.
P. O. BOX  280 Itp
35 Dupont St.,   VANCOUVER, B. C. I
f   n   T
rT\ Rwong Vee Cai $ €
CHINESE   MERCHANDISE
AND    CONTRACT   LABOR
P. O. BOX 73
feL
WING HONG ON & CO. I
IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN
CHINESE AND JAPANESE
MERCHANDISE
P. O. BOX 219
534 Carrall Street,   Uancower, B. €,. 133 Dupont street,
*feu
•it
VANCOUVER, B. C m
I    KWONO   HANG   CHOUG
t* Importer of Chinese Goods, Japanese Gauds and Curiosities.
M All kinds of Teas (including Ceylon) at cheap rates. Matting
j-* of all kinds.    Cane Chairs and Furniture. P. O. Box 218
X 126 Cordova St*,       -       Vancouver, B* Cm
1      LEE   CHUNG
I LATJ1S1DRY
J Family Washing a Specialty.     7 Dupont Street.
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PAWN BROKER
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No. 2 Dupont St., Up-Stairs
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Rice, Teas, Silks,  Handkerchiefs,  Shoes
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P. O. Box S3B
509 Oarrall St.,
Vancouver. B. O,
China and Japan Rice, Fine Teas,
Silks, Groceries and Cigars
P. O. Box 219
33 DUPONT ST.,
VANCOUVER, B. C. -4te|te^^^
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22 DUPONT ST.
P. O. BOX 249
VANCOUVER, B.C.
WO LEE
IMPORTER OF FINE TEAS
420 COLUMBIA AVE., VANCOUVER, B. C.
TAI CHONG & CO.
Wholesale and Retail lira], r»-in
China Merchandise
IMPORTERS OF JAPANESE DRY GOODS
272. 274, 276 and 278 CARRALL ST.,
Near Hastings Street,
P. O. BOX 237
VANCOUVER, B.C.
L ;**fckii4^kivfcM«fe
VANCOUVER BREWERIES, Limited,
VANCOUVER,    B.   C.
RED CROSS
STOUT
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EXPORT
LAGER
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ALEXANDRA   LAGER   BEER   a specialty.*
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