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Report of the commission respecting freight tariffs on fruit and agricultural products on the Canadian… Palmer, R. M. 1902

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Array REPORT OF THE COMMISSION
-RESPECTING-
FREIGHT    TARIFFS
FRUITS AND AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS
—ON  THE	
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY.
THEGOVEfmMEHTOf
TBE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMN*
VICTORIA, B. C:
Printed by Richard Wolfbxden, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
19(12.  REPORT OF THE COMMISSION
 RESPECTING-
FREIGHT    TARIFFS
—ON-
FRUITS AND AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS
-ON   THE	
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY.
THE GOVERNMENT or
TBE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COlLKMft
VICTORIA, B. C:
Printed by Richard Wolfenden, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1902.  2 Ed. 7
Agricultural Freight Tariffs,
707
REPORT
Of R. M. Palmer, Joint Commissioner of the Provincial Government and the Canadian
Pacific Railway Company, to enquire into the question of freight rates on farm
produce in the Province of British Columbia and the improvement of shipping
facilities in respect to such products.
By Command.
J. D. PRENTICE,
Minister of Finance and Agriculture.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
February lUh, 1908.
Victoria, 14th March, 1901.
R. M. Palmer, Esq.,
Department of Agriculture, Victoria.
Dear Mr. -Palmer,—Herewith find enclosed a letter from Mr. Geo. McL. Brown,
Executive Agent'of the 0. P. R., to Mr. Peters, District Freight Agent, Vancouver. You
are hereby authorised to discuss freight matters with Mr. Peters, so far as they affect
agricultural produce .in this Province, and other matters which may affect the farmers'
interests, in so far as the C. P. R. is concerned. In returning to Victoria, you will be in a
position to enter upon your duties as a Special Commissioner in respect of the matters, in
question, and I will then give you more definite instructions as to the course to pursue.
Yours truly,
(Signed)       J. H. Turner,
Minister of Agriculture.
Victoria, 19th March, 1901.
R. M. Palmer, Esq.,,
"Department of Agriculture, Victoria.
Dear Sir,—With further reference to our former conversations and my note of the 14th
instant, you are authorised to confer with the C. P. R. authorities in relation to freight rates
on farm produce, and to co-operate with them with a view to adjusting any grievances which
may exist and of promoting the sale of British Columbia products in British Columbia and
the North-West, so as, as far as possible, to conserve the market in this Province to our own
people.
For this purpose the Government has decided to commission you to devote yourself for
the next two or three months, or as long as may be necessary, to this work. Your name
suggested itself to my mind as a fit and proper person to undertake this mission, owing to
your familiarity with agriculture in this Province and your knowledge of the economic
conditions governing the industry; and as such I recommended your appointment, as in every
way more satisfactory to the farming community than the bringing in of an outside Commissioner, as was at first proposed by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company.
You are expected, therefore, after a conference with the officials of the C. P. R. freight
department, and obtaining the necessary authority to act on their behalf in dealing with the
. farmers, to thoroughly acquaint yourself with the tariff of rates so far as British Columbia 708- Canadian Pacific Railway.. 1902
and the North-West are concerned, and also the tariff in respect of produce imported into
British Columbia from the United States and from Eastern Canada. You are further
expected to enquire fully into the requirements of the agricultural industry, so far as British
Columbia is concerned, and into any grievances that may at present exist, and to do your
utmost to so adjust the freight rates as to be satisfactory to the farming community dependent
on markets for their produce and to further the object in view, viz., the development of inter-
Provincial and inter-sectional trade.
I may add that the arrangement is satisfactory to the Canadian Pacific Railway Company,
the officials of which have cheerfully accepted and acted upon the proposal, and I therefore
bespeak for you their very cordial co-operation in bringing about a reasonable adjustment of
the whole question of freight rates, so far as they affect the farmer.
Yours truly,
(Signed)        J. H. Turner,
Minister of Finance and Agriculture.
Victoria, B. C, February 10th, 1902.
To the Honourable
the Minister of Finance and Agriculture.
Sir,—In accordance with the instructions contained in your communication of March
19th, 1901, I at once proceeded to Vancouver, and after interviewing the following officials of
the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, viz: Mr. G. M. Bosworth, Freight Traffic Manager;
Mr. W. R. Mclnnes, Assistant Freight Traffic Manager ; and Mr. F. W. Peters, General
Freight Agent, completed arrangements for carrying out the objects of the commission.
From the commencement of the work to its close every facility and opportunity desired
was given by the Canadian Pacific Railway Officials, and I was assured it was their desire to
remove any grievances which might exist, and, if necessary, make such changes in freight rates
and services as would further promote the marketing of fruit and farm produce and hasten
the development of the country served by, the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Through the courtesy of Mr. J. C. Metcalfe, Secretary of the Transportation Committee of
the Central Farmers' Institute, I received information collected by him bearing upon freight
rates and production, also correspondence relating thereto, which proved of considerable service.
The following places and districts were visited during the inquiry :—
Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Lytton, Kelowna, Peachland, Penticton, Vernon,
Galletly's Landing, Coldstream Ranch, Salmon Arm, Armstrong, Enderby, Mara, Revelstoke,
Greenwood, Anaconda, Midway, Grand Forks, Nelson, Waneta, Rossland, Chilliwack,
Harrison, Port Hammond, Mission City, Huntingdon, Abbotsford, Agassiz, Lumby,'Hazelmere,
Winnipeg, Brandon, Regina, Calgary, Lethbridge, McLeod and Fernie, wherever possible; also
at British Columbia points public meetings were held for the discussion of the questions dealt
with.
Special freight tariffs, naming rates and defining the conditions of shipment for fruits and
farm produce, were issued by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company as follows:—
1.—Special Freight Tariff No. 628, on apples, fruit and vegetables, at owner's risk;
released from stations on the Pacific Division to West Kootenay mining points, stations on
Boundary Section, and on Crow's Nest Section; also to stations on Pacific and Western
Divisions.    Effective March 20th, 1901.
2.-—Special freight tariff No. 629, on apples, fruit and vegetables, at owner's risk.; released
from stations .on the Pacific Division to Vancouver, Westminster, Victoria and Nanaimo.
Effective March 20th, 1901.
' 3.—Special Freight Tariff No. 630, on grain, flour, oatmeal, millstuffs and vegetables, in
straight or mixed carloads, from stations on the Pacific Division to Vancouver, Westminster,
Victoria and Nanaimo.     Effective March 20th, 1901.
4.—Special Freight Tariff No. 631, on grain, flour, oatmeal, millstuffs and vegetables, in
straight or mixed carloads; also hay in carloads, from stations on the Pacific Division to West
Kootenay points, stations on Boundary Section and Crow's Nest Section, via Arrowhead B. C.
Effective April 2nd, 1901.    Superseding Tariff No. 568, March 28th, 1900. 2 Ed. 7. Agricultural Freight Tariffs, 709
And by the Canadian Pacific Navigation Company, as follows:—
5.—Special Freight Tariff No. 3, naming rates for transportation of freight between
Victoria, Vancouver, Ladner's Landing, Steveston, Chilliwack, West Coast Points, Northern
Coast Points and intermediate ports of call. Effective May 1st, 1901. Superseding all
previous tariffs.
These tariffs formed the basis upon which questions of freight rates and service affecting
agricultural interests were considered at the meetings held, or discussed with individuals in
the districts visited,
Copies of these special tariffs are attached to this report.
During the progress of the work, based on information obtained and knowledge of the
conditions appertaining, recommendations were made, from time to time, to the officials of the
Canadian Pacific-Railway Company regarding freight rates and service, resulting in the
following special rates and concessions being made :—
6.—Special Rate No. P. 1/94, taking effect May 27th, 1901 ; covering the shipment of
fruit box shooks and veneer fruit packages between Vancouver, Port Moody, New Westminster
and points along the main line of the Canadian Pacific Railway as far as Revelstoke, and
points along the Shuswap <& Okanagan branch line, and Okanagan Lake ports.
This special rate covered a reduction of from 20 to 50 %, according to distance from
shipping point, on the rate which'applied to similar shipments previously. The object of this
rate was to encourage the use of modern improved packages for shipping fruits.
7.—Special Rate No. P. 1/95, taking effect May 28th, 1901 ; covering the shipment of
fresh fruits in less than carloads between Kamloops and intermediate points and Vancouver,
Victoria, New Westminster and Nanaimo.
Interior points, through this special rate, obtained a reduction of, 33 % on the rates
previously in force on fresh fruit shipments.
8.—Supplement No. 1 to Special Freight Tariff No. 628, on apples, fruit and vegetables
at owner's risk"; released from stations on the Pacific Division to West Kootenay mining
points, stations on Boundary Section and on Crow's Nest Section, allowing the shipment of
mixed carloads of apples, fruit and vegetables at the rates applying respectively to straight
carloads.    Effective, June 5th, 1901.
The object of this concession was to facilitate trade and to meet the requirements of
buyers and sellers of fruits and farm produce, particularly in early shipments. It has proved
a most valuable concession.
9.—Supplement to Special Freight Tariff No. 3, Canadian Pacific Navigation Company,
naming rates for transportation of freight between Victoria, Vancouver, Ladner's Landing,
Steveston, Chilliwack, West Coast Points, Northern Coast Points and intermediate ports of
call.    Effective, August 1st, 1901; superseding all conflicting rates in tariff No. 3.
This supplement covers reductions in rates on shipments of fruit and farm produce
generally, including hogs, between Chilliwack and intermediate points and coast points, and
includes also a reduction of one-half on through shipments in wharfage charges, as provided
for in Special Freight Tariff No. 3. In this connection, also, the dates of sailing of the
steamer on the Chilliwack route were changed to meet the wishes of residents of that district.
10.—Special Rate No. P. 1/119, in effect from July 16th, 1901, to August 11th, 1901.
This special rate allowed the shipment of carloads of potatoes from Okanagan points, including
the lake ports, to West Kootenay points, at the special rate given in Tariff No. 631, with
minimum weights of 24,000 pounds in place of 36,000 pounds: The object of this concession
—which was freely used—was the encouragement of trade in early potatoes between the points
named.
11.—Special Rate No. P. 1/131, taking effect August 13th, 1901. This rate provided
for the shipment of rye in carloads from Okanagan Lake points to Armstrong and Enderby,
at a reduction of $2 per ton from the rate previously in force.
12.—Special Rate No. P. 1/136, taking effect August 15th, 1901. This rate provided for
the shipment of green vegetables, including potatoes, from Okanagan points and lake ports to
Calgary at a reduction of rather more than 30 % from the ordinary classification rate.
13.—Special Rate No. P. 1/76. This provided for the shipment of fresh fruit at a nominal
rate^from Trout Creek and Peachland to Kelowna, and for re-packing and shipment from that
point to North-West and Kootenay points. Its object was the development of trade in car
lots with distant markets. 710 Canadian Pacific Railway. 1902
14.—Special Rate on stumping powder. This rate provided for the shipment of stumping
and blasting powder in carloads, supplied through the Provincial Government at one-half the
usual rate, and allowed the distribution of same in lots as required at points along the line of
railway.
Up to the present time, unfortunately, this concession has not been taken advantage of,
but no doubt will be in the near future.
15.—Special Rate on stock shipments. . This rate provided for the shipment of stockers
(young cattle) from Ontario points to points in the ranching districts of the Province, at $175
per carload, a reduction of $25 per car from the rate previously in force. It was made to meet
the requirements of the ranching districts, in re-stocking, through the agency of the Provincial
Live Stock & Dairymen's Association, and has been largely used.
16.—Wharfage charges on freight delivered at Kelowna.    These are to be discontinued.
17.—Free transportation was granted to the expert fruit-packer engaged by the British
Columbia Fruit Growers' Association to give lessons in grading, packing and shipping fruit to
and from all'points on the Pacific Division of the Canadian Pacific Railway, while engaged in
this work during the past season, and to the agent of the British Columbia Fruit Growers'
Association in charge of the car of fruit ''shipped to Winnipeg.
Two important matters in connection with the transportation of fruit to distant markets
yet remain to be dealt with in a satisfactory manner, viz.: suitable refrigerator cars for
carrying soft fruits, with which may be included, arrangements for icing en route; and the
making of quicker time between shipping points and destination than ordinarily.
The attention of the Canadian Pacific Railway officials has been drawn to these questions,
and the service has been improved in both respects.
With the development of the fruit-shipping trade, it will in time become possible to give
a special, expedited fruit service, such as is in operation between fruit-growing centres in
California and Oregon to this Province. At the present time it must be recognised that the
comparative insignificance of the fruit business in British Columbia renders it difficult to
arrange for the use of first-class"'refrigerator cars and give the fast service required—just at
the time they are wanted.
Owing, in part, to the unfortunate strike which prevailed amongst track employees of the
Canadian Pacific Railway during the summer of 1901, some contemplated improvements in
freight service and shipping facilities, concerning which representations had been made, have
been laid over, but will be dealt with, I am assured, during the season of 1902. Other
representations are still under consideration by the Canadian Pacific Railway officials.
Amongst these are a way-freight service between points along the Mission Branch of the
Canadian Pacific Railway and the cities of New Westminster and Vancouver, and improved
shipping facilities from Armstrong and Enderby.
It is with much pleasure I am able to report that the crops of fruit and farm produce
raised during the past season in the districts tributary to the Canadian Pacific Railway have
been well marketed. Prices have ranged higher than in preceding years, especially in the
case of apples and other fruits. This, in conjunction with favourable rates and better service,
has resulted in a marked improvement in the condition of the agricultural community generally. vThe outlook for the future is brighter and fully justifies the hopeful feeling existent.
One of the greatest difficulties with which the shipper of fruit and farm produce has had
to contend, and which can only be overcome gradually, has been the inadequate supply available compared with the demand. The impossibility which often existed of making up carload
lots prevented the utilisation of carload rates. Shipments were often not sufficiently large
to command the attention of wholesale dealers, and on this aceount prices would be cut to
make quick sales and escape storage charges, and consignments would be placed with small
dealers outside the regular trade channels to the detriment and disadvantage of the trade
generally, but particularly of the unfortunate shipper. Some districts now produce on a large
enough scale and are sufficiently well organised to avoid these troubles, but not all. And I
wish to urge the importance of systematic endeavours to increase production—particularly
of fruits and early vegetables. There are thousands of acres of land in the Kamloops,
Okanagan and Osoyoos Districts, especially well-adapted to these purposes, but which at
'present are in large holdings and used for stock-ranching or wheat-growing purposes. The
sub-division of these lands into small holdings, where water is available, in conjunction with
the'budding of irrigation ditches, would furnish homes and opportunity for profitable occupa-
t(on of suitable settlers, build up towns, and in every way inure to the well-being of the 2 Ed. 7. Agricultural Freight Tariffs, 711
The growing of small fruits, of varieties which will stand transportation, is capable of
indefinite extension far beyond present prospects of increase. At none of the points visited
during the season in Manitoba, the North-West Territories, or East Kootenay, had the supply
of small fruits been adequate, and the dealers everywhere asked : " Why do you not send us
more strawberries and other small fruits 1"
In 1901, for the first time, Winnipeg imported strawberries in carload lots. These all
came from the Hood River District, in Oregon, arrived in good condition, and proved entirely
satisfactory. Four carloads were imported, on which the freight charges and duty alone
amounted to $3,000. This fruit was grown under conditions of soil and climate similar to
those of portions of the Okanagan and Kamloops Districts, where at present the home demand
for this fruit is insufficiently supplied.
During the time of my trip to market points, information as to prices and market
conditions was furnished to shippers. The following letter sent from Winnipeg in August,
1901, indicated the situation in regard to fruits at that time:—
" Winnipeg, August 1st,  190L
" The markets for fruit in Manitoba and the North-West Territories are in a very healthy
condition. The magnificent wheat crop of the country is fast ripening and will soon be finding
its way to market. This will make money plentiful and still further increase the demand for
fruit. At the present time all fruit is scarce and high in price. Plums and Bartlett pears
from California, and water-melons from Georgia, are most in evidence. In Winnipeg, the
wholesale fruit trade is controlled by a Fruit Exchange, whose members are the wholesale
dealers. Uniform prices are made to retail dealers, and the supply is regulated to avoid a glut
of fruit at any time. Short credit only is given, and the system is apparently satisfactory to
all concerned, except, perhaps, those who are looking for bargains in cheap fruits. British
Columbia fruit will meet with active competition in all North-West markets, with fruit from
Oregon, Washington and Ontario, and it is most important that great care should be exercised
in packing and grading the fruit shipped. In plums, especially, it is necessary to be careful;
the fruit should be uniform in degree of ripeness and in size, and gathered in that condition
which will permit of the fruit 'standing up' several days after reaching destination. Packages
should be well filled, so that each crate will contain not less than 24 lbs. net weight of fruit.
',' California fruit is preferred by retail dealers, principally on account of its keeping
qualities. It is freely admitted that British Columbia fruit which arrives in good condition is
superior in quality and flavour, but, unfortunately, many of the plum shipments from the
Fraser Valley, in recent years, have arrived in soft condition and could not be marketed satisfactorily ; hence, loss and disappointment to all concerned. On the other hand, fruit from the
Okanagan Valley has arrived in fine order, firm and well packed, and has given great satisfaction; consequently, there will be plenty of competition amongst buyers for fruit from
this district. Freight rates are in favour of the British Columbia shipper, as against shippers
from the United States.
"The rate from California points to Winnipeg on fruit in carloacl is $1.40 per 100 lbs.,
with icing charges of 10 cents per package on plums and peaches, and 20 cents per package on
pears and apples. From Oregon and Snake River points the rate is $1.25 per 100 Bis., from
Washington points $1.12£ per hundred, with icing charges of $25 per car, as against $1 per
100 lbs. from British Columbia points, and lower icing charges.
" It is estimated that at least 50 carloads of pears, peaches and plums will be required
for the Winnipeg trade during the present season of 1901.
(Signed)        " R. M. Palmer."
Up to the season of 1901, Winnipeg and Brandon were the nearest wholesale distributing
points for fruit on the line of the Canadian Pacific Railway east of British Columbia; but the
rapid settlement of the great North-West has brought about corresponding changes in the
distribution of fruits as well as other commodities.
The McPherson Fruit Co., in 1901, established a wholesale supply dep6t for fruits and
produce at Calgary, and distributing rates were made from that point to Lethbridge and intermediate points south, Edmonton and intermediate points north, and to points east along the
main line of the Canadian Pacific Railway.
' As a natural result of this trade development, carload shipments of British  Columbia
fruit, such as apples, plums and pears, are necessary to maintain the advantage in realised net 712 Canadian Pacific Railway. 1902
prices, which properly belongs to fruit-growers of this Province, in supplying the requirements
of these sections.
A matter of considerable importance in connection with the shipment of plums and
peaches is that the average net weight of fruit in the ordinary four-basket shipping-crate is
4 lbs. less in the British Columbia than in the United States package. This does not mean
that the British Columbia grower is endeavouring to sell light weight packages of fruit, but
indicates a misunderstanding of the competition he has to meet. As a matter of fact, the
smaller package is at a disadvantage in every way, as it appears by comparison to be only
partially filled, and the price realised is generally less in proportion than the actual weight of
fruit would justify. No one is deceived but the shipper, as the wholesale merchants discriminate in price to their customers, and the retail buyer is always better satisfied with a well-
filled package, even at a higher price.
In a printed price list of fruits issued by the McPherson Fruit Co. at Calgary, August
23rd, 1901, the attention of their customers is drawn to the British Columbia packages in the
following note :•—
" Please remember that California and Washington plums weigh 5 Bos. more per crate
than British Columbian."
Washington plums were quoted at $1.70 per crate; British Columbia plums at $1.10 per
crate.    Further comment is hardly necessary.
Freight rates on carload shipments of British Columbia fruit to Calgary are from 60 cents
to 90 cents per 100 lbs. lower than on similar shipments to this point from California, Oregon
or Washington.
It may be mentioned here that the transportation of small fruits, such as strawberries,
raspberries, blackberries and cherries, is carried on by the Dominion Express Co., their cars
being attached to the regular express service from British Columbia points to outside markets,
both in the Kootenays and Slocan and North-West.
The rates charged compare most favourably with rates on similar shipments carried by
United States Express Companies, in some instances are 40 per cent, lower over equal distances.
Besides this, special efforts have been made to assist the marketing of fruit and to encourage
and develop the fruit-growing industry.
Kootenay Markets.
The principal markets, of West Kootenay—Nelson and Rossland—were found to be
supplied with early garden produce, such as asparagus, rhubarb, turnips, beets, green onions
and spinach, almost entirely from United States sources, shipped in by way of and usually
wholesaled from Spokane. The markets were well supplied, and on inquiry it was found that
United States-grown garden produce was perferred to that which had been sent in from
British Columbia sources :—
1! Because of the more neat and handy size of the packages used and the careful methods
of packing followed:
2. The continuity of supply, early shipments coming originally from California, later ones
from Oregon, and later still from Washington :
3. The possibility of supplying trade requirements in other lines, such as fruits, tropical
and  Otherwise, and groceries, when buying vegetables, and thus making up carload
,   shipments, and taking advantage of carload rates on the whole :
4. The shorter time required to reach these markets from Spokane,  as compared with
British Columbia shipping points.
One notable exception was found to exist in the case of greenhouse lettuce, shipped in
from Victoria by express, which had displaced the United States grown lettuce on account of
its superior quality, so far as the supply available would permit. A similar condition of affairs
in regard to early vegetable shipments existed in the Boundary District markets—Grand
Forks, Greenwood and other towns—until the local supply of vegetables produced in the
famous Kettle River Valley became available, when importation ceased.
There is no reason why a good proportion of the demand for produce of this character
should not be supplied from British Columbia sources, but to displace United States grown
produce it is imperative that the methods of packing, grading and shipping adopted by United
States growers should be closely followed, and a continuous supply of vegetables in season
planned for by those catering to this trade. 2 Ed. 7. Agricultural Freight Tariffs, 713
The demand for winter vegetables in both East and West Kootenay markets is already
chiefly supplied from the Okanagan and Thompson Valleys. The business is on a sound basis,
as the market requirements are understood, and under the provisions embodied in Special
Tariff No. 628 and the supplement thereto, the freight rates and service are satisfactory.
The greater portion of the fruit of all kinds supplied to West Kootenay markets also came
from United States sources, and owing to the proximity of the fruit-growing districts of
Eastern Washington to these markets, and the low prices usually prevailing there for fruit,
these are difficult markets for British Columbia shippers to supply at remunerative prices.
The supply of early fruits, maturing in advance of those of Eastern Washington or
British Columbia, naturally comes from California and Oregon sources, via Spokane, under
conditions of shipment similar to those of early vegetables. On the 18th August, 1901, peach
plums (the earliest good market variety), of similar quality to those produced in the fruit
sections of the Okanagan Valley, B. O, were laid down at Nelson from Myers Falls, Washington, for 80 cents per crate of 22 to 24 lbs. net weight, freight and duty paid. At this time,
peach plums were being marketed freely from British Columbia in North-West and East
Kootenay markets, netting from 75c. to $1 per crate at the point of shipment, express or
freight charges being paid by, the consignees. This is not a solitary instance, but fairly
indicates che prevalent market condition for fruits and the reason why West Kootenay
merchants invariably stated that British Columbia growers wanted too much for their fruit,
and British. Columbia fruit shippers almost invariably considered that freight rates on fruit
on the C. P. B. were too high. It was evident that no possible reduction in freight rates would
at all times divert British Columbia fruit shipments to Kootenay points, provided that growers
and shippers were informed as to prevailing prices in other accessible markets.
Naturally, therefore, the larger portion of the fruit crop of British Columbia for 1901,
available for export, found its way to Manitoba, North-West or East Kootenay markets,
where it competed on more favourable terms with United States grown fruit.
This condition, with some modification, may be expected to continue, although, as a result
of the concessions previously referred to under Supplement No. 1 to Special Tariff No. 628,
mixed shipments of fruits and vegetables to Nelson have given satisfactory returns to shippers,
and much- larger shipments of fruits, including apples, have been made than in any previous
season.
Owing to the unfortunate labour troubles at Rossland, this point—which naturally would
furnish a more favourable market than Nelson, owing to the higher rate on fruit going there
by United States lines—was unable to take advantage of the concessions made.
As instancing the nearness of the source of supply, it may be mentioned that during the
season of 1900 apples, plums and prunes were hauled to Rossland by waggon from Bossburg
and distributed direct to consumers.
Potato Shipments.
Usually the opinion was held by growers that lower freight rates should be made, and
that a reduction in these meant an increase in the prices paid to growers for produce shipped,
and this, while true in some instances, is just as erroneous in others, as demonstrated forcibly
by enquiry into the cause of the low prices paid to growers of potatoes shipped from the
districts of Kamloops, Ashcroft, Salmon Arm and the Okanagan Valley to the West Kootenay
markets during the shipping season of 1900. Potatoes are carried by the C. P. R. from
Okanagan common points to Nelson common points for 25c. per 100 lbs. in carload lots, and
from Kelowna or Kamloops common points to same destination for 28c. per 100 lbs., the length
of haul ranging from 260 to 350 miles.
From Spokane and Colville Valley points potatoes are carried via the, Spokane Falls &
Northern Railway to Nelson or to Rossland, via the Red Mountain Railway, for 25c. per
100 lbs. in carloads. The haul is much shorter, ranging between 50 and 200 miles less than
from B- C. shipping points.
The customs duty required to be paid on potatoes imported into Canada from the United
States is 25c. per bushel, or approximately $5 per ton of 2,000 lbs., so that British Columbia
shippers have an advantage of that amount, other things being equal, over the United States
shipper. Competition, however, to supply the requirements of the market between growers
and shippers of the British Columbia districts was such that prices for the main crop shipments
were reduced to a very low figure. Potatoes were wholesaled at delivery points as low as $13
per ton, and Kelowna growers reported net returns as low as $7.50 per ton in some instances. 714 Canadian Pacific Railway. 1902
As the United States grower demands from $9 to $10 per ton for potatoes at point of
shipment, it is evident that prices were reduced to an unreasonable extent, and the United
States product would have been just as effectually excluded if prices had been maintained at
least $5 per ton in advance of those actually realised. This difference, while hardly noticeable
in retail prices of potatoes, is sufficient to make the business of potato-growing very profitable
or the reverse.
Unfortunately, the market conditions were not generally understood by our farmers, and
the C. P. R. was asked to reduce rates—already low—with the idea that any reduction
secured would accrue to the grower. It is evident, however, in this case, that lower freight
charges really meant lower prices to the Kootenay wholesale buyer, at the expense of the
transportation company.
Cooperation between the/different potato-growing districts is essential, if fair prices are
to be maintained in Kootenay and other outside markets; and also to prevent overstocking at
any point. The ease with which the potato crop can be produced renders the product particularly subject to fluctuation in price, and there is considerable danger of the crop becoming
a nonpaying one, despite favourable transportation rates and protective duty, unless intelligent
methods of marketing are generally adopted.
Sufficient attention has not been given to the demand for potatoes early in the season for
shipment to Dawson City and other northern points. This trade requires sound, well-ripened
tubers^—white skinned preferred—and they must be delivered at coast points, Vancouver or
Victoria, for re-shipment north not later than the 10th September. This demand is estimated
at 1,500 tons annually.
Up to the present time the greater portion of the potatoes shipped north from British
Columbia ports have been imported from the United States. Victoria District has furnished
a portion, and some have been drawn from the high lands of the Fraser River. The districts
named and early locations in the Okanagan and Thompson River Valleys could easily supply
the total amount required, and the line of production indicated would relieve other markets
for later crops and probably prove more profitable than the latter, judging by the prices realised
for early potatoes during the past two seasons. Carload shipments are necessary to take
advantage of the special rates given in Tariff No. 630, and care is necessary in the selection of
varieties to ensure having well-matured tubers, and also in the use of water in districts where
irrigation is practised, for the same reason. The water must be withdrawn from the field
sufficiently long before digging the crop to allow the tubers to ripen perfectly, or they will not
stand shipping.
Complaint was made both by shippers and consignees of losses in shipment of early
potatoes to Kootenay markets, resulting from the heating of the potatoes in transit in the
cars. The losses were found to be due to the immature condition of the potatoes, which rendered them specially liable to heat, and the neglect of arranging for ventilation and circulation
of air throughout the car when loaded.
Recommendations were made to shippers; more attention has been given to these matters
during the past season, and the loss has been much less; but it is evident that to avoid
altogether the risk of loss, regulations covering the ventilation of cars of potatoes or vegetables
in transit are necessary on the part of the transportation company, requiring their servants to
see that this is provided for.
Hay Shipments.
While the yearly hay trade between the Okanagan Valley and Thompson River Valley
districts and the Kootenay and Boundary markets has been very large, it has not been
altogether satisfactory to either buyers or sellers. In some instances it was claimed that
freight rates were too high and partly responsible for the existing dissatisfaction.
Enquiry at Kootenay and Boundary market points shewed that United States hay, grown
in" the Colville Valley, Eastern Washington, was preferred by buyers to that usually shipped
in'from British Columbia sources, because it was, composed of clean, bright timothy, cured
green; whereas the British Columbia hay usually consisted of timothy, more or less mixed
with clover and wild grasses, and was not so well cured. Comparison of different samples of
hay proved the contention was well founded, and that the fault rested with the growers.
Freight rates on hay from the Colville Valley to Nelson via the Spokane Falls and
Northern Railway, or to Rossland via the Red Mountain Railway, are practically the same
as from Okanagan points to these markets, by the Canadian Pacific Railway, while the length 2 Ed. 7 Agricultural Freight Tariffs, 715
of haul on the latter is greater by at least 100 miles; so that, given an equally good quality
of hay from either source, British Columbia growers should have the amount of the duty on
imported hay—$2 per ton—to their advantage. Whereas, enquiry at Nelson, Rossland and
Grand Forks- shewed that the average price realised for United States hay was from $2 to $3
per ton higher than for the British Columbia hay, and the greatest demand was for the
former.
I am pleased to report that special efforts were made by Okanagan and Thompson Valley
hay-growers, during the past season, to meet market requirements. The hay crop generally
was saved in fine condition, and compares much more favourably with the United States hay
than in previous seasons.
In this connection, credit is due to the Brack man-Ker Milling Company, which does a
very large trade in hay and feed products with the Kootenays, and used its best endeavours
to foster and develop the hay trade with British Columbia growers. By means of circular
letters and through the press, information was conveyed to farmers and dealers as to market
conditions and requirements and methods of curing necessary to secure the quality of hay in
demand.
Certain districts will always produce hay more suitable for market than others, and it is
advisable in districts where the requisite quality and colour are not attainable to feed the hay
on the farm, turning it into beef or butter, rather than to attempt to force sales in distant
markets—which is equivalent to inviting trouble—and is also apt to disturb market prices for
better quality hay.
During the " boom " period of the Kootenays, when railway construction and the building -
up of the centres of activity were in full swing, the demand for hay was so extensive that
buyers were glad to get supplies from all sources, and all qualities were saleable; but with the
steadying of trade conditions consequent on the passing of this period, supply and demand
became equally balanced. Buyers discriminate, and dealers are obliged to consider carefully the
requirements of their customers, with the net result that only first-class hay is wanted and
should.be shipped to this market.
Northern Hay Trade.
Besides the markets mentioned, another extensive one is open to British Columbia hay in
Dawson and other Northern towns and mining centres. This market, however, is even more
exacting in the quality demanded than the former. The higher irrigated lands of the Thompson
River and Okanagan Valleys will produce the quality wanted, but special attention must be
given to the curing process to secure the requisite colour and quality. Hay for this trade also
requires to be baled in very small compass, arid special presses are used for this work. I am
glad to report that more attention has been given to the curing of the hay crops in the districts mentioned having this trade in view. The Brackman-Ker Milling Co. has made a
specialty of the trade, and the Canadian Pacific Railway has given a special rate for carrying
the product to coast points.
While shipments made during the last two seasons have not been satisfactory, market
requirements are now better understood and appreciated, and the quality suitable for shipment
should increase yearly.
Butter and Eggs.
The supply of first-class fresh creamery butter and strictly fresh eggs for the principal
towns of the Kootenay and Boundary Districts, is drawn chiefly from Spokane, and one firm
which makes a specialty of the business handles the larger part of the trade. The demand is
not fully supplied, although high prices are realised, and the firm referred to would be glad to
draw supplies from British Columbia points, although a United States house.
During the past two years more attention has been given to poultry farming in the districts of the Province which naturally look to the. mining towns as their market, that is, along
the main line of the Canadian Pacific Railway east of Agassiz and the Shuswap and Okanagan
branch lines. The Dominion Express Co. is also paying attention to the trade in fresh butter
and eggs, and at present does practically all the carrying. The business is profitable, and it
may be confidently expected that the output will gradually increase.
As soon as the trade is sufficiently large to justify the step, the Canadian Pacific Railway
has intimated its willingness to establish a weekly refrigerator way-car service between the
districts mentioned, similar to that in existence between Manitoba and North-West points
and British Columbia points for the carriage of dairy products, eggs and dressed meats, at
special rates, 716 Canadian Pacific Railway. 1902
Ordinary trade qualities of butter and eggs are shipped in carload lots from North-West
and Manitoba points to Kootenay and Boundary markets; but these do not interfere with the
sale of strictly first-class products, which command fancy prices for table use.
Reviewing the Situation.
The conditions confronting the farmers and fruit-growers of British Columbia who live in
the districts traversed by the Canadian Pacific Railway are certainly unique. They are
extended along the routes of rail and water-way for a distance of 450 miles. The different
settlements are but very slightly in touch with one another, and the class and quality of the
products raised vary in accordance with the differences of soil and climate occurring.
The markets open for produce raised may be classed in three divisions:—
1. The Coast Cities, with/which may be included the Northern trade :
2. The Kootenay, Boundary and Slocan mining town and camps :
3. The Manitoba and North-West markets.
These all present different features, and by means of special freight rates have been brought
within reach of shipments.
The competition which has to be met in these different markets comes from different
sources, under greatly varying conditions,,and as a consequence prices of produce in the respective markets vary considerably. Besides this, the proportion of the total amount of produce
required in these markets which can, under present conditions, be supplied from British
Columbia sources is a very small one.
It is evident that the trade of the Kootenays and the Boundary District cannot be secured
without a full measure of co-operation between producers and the Canadian Pacific Railway
Company to meet the advantages of nearness to the principal market points possessed by
United States producers, the cheap land available for farming and fruit-growing purposes, and
shorter length of haul. The Canadian Pacific Railway has evidenced its desire to meet the
requirements of the situation by making transportation rates and service favourable. Increased
production and wise distribution of the produce raised are two most important factors with
which the grower is, or should be, concerned in British Columbia. It is also evident that to
enable growers and shippers to obtain the highest prices for products, and to distribute these
so that unnecessary competition is avoided, it is important that they should at all times be able
to get reliable information as to market conditions and prices generally, and also as to the
methods of harvesting, packing, shipping and marketing followed by their competitors. I
venture to think this work could well be undertaken by arrangement between the Provincial
Government and the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, and would, efficiently carried out,
prove of the greatest service to the agricultural interests of the Province at large.
Attached to this report are copies of resolutions passed at meetings of Farmers' Institutes
at Vernon, Kamloops, Langley, Mission, Chilliwack, Victoria, Enderby and Armstrong, and
at the annual meeting of the British Columbia Fruit-Growers' Association, 1902, held at
Vancouver, bearing out the opinion expressed of the usefulness and value of such information,
and approving the results already obtained.
In conclusion, owing to the limited time available for the work, the great extent of country
which was necessarily travelled over—making it impossible to remain long in any particular
district or market,—and recognising that conditions of trade, markets and transportation are
constantly changing, this report is presented with the knowledge that it will but partially
meet the requirements of the Commission authorising the work; but trusting that sufficient
has been accomplished to justify its continuance on a larger and broader scale, and in the
hope that a better understanding has been brought about between the Canadian Pacific Railway Company and the farming community served by its system, and a basis established for
the future profitable development of the interests concerned.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
R. M. PALMER,
Commissioner. 2 Ed. 7 Agricultural Freight Tariffs, 717
Copy of Resolutions passed at the Okanagan Farmers' Institute at Vernon, December 18th, 1901.
" Resolved, That Mr. R. M. Palmer be cordially thanked by this meeting for the good
work he has accomplished in getting freight arrangeriients for fruit and farm produce placed
on an equitable basis."
" Resolved, That it would be to the benefit of this district if information concerning
market conditions in the Kootenays, North-West Territories, and other markets, were available during the shipping season for fruit and farm produce, and that Mr. Palmer be asked to
submit a copy of this resolution to the Honourable the Minister of Agriculture for British
Columbia." ' (Signed)        H. Percy Hodges,
Secretary Okanagan Farmers' Institute.
Copy of Resolution passed at the annual meeting of the Kamloops District Farmers' Institute.
Kamloops, B. O, January 18th, 1902.
"Resolved, That this Institute indorse the resolution of the Okanagan Farmers' Institute.
1 That it would be to the benefit of this district if information concerning the market conditions in the Kootenays, North-West Territories, and other markets, were available during
the shipping season for fruit and farm produce, and that Mr. R. M. Palmer be asked to submit
a copy of this resolution to the Honourable the Minister of Agriculture for British Columbia.' "
Langlby, B. O, January 20th, 1902.
Mr. R. M. Palmer, Victoria, B. C.
Sir,—The following resolution was passed at the annual meeting of the Langley Farmers'
Institute, held on the 18th January, 1902.
" Resolved, That the members of this Institute indorse the resolution as passed by the
Okanagan Farmers' Institute, petitioning the Honourable the Minister of Agriculture to
supply information concerning market conditions in the Kootenays, North-West Territories,
and other markets, during the shipping season for fruit and farm produce, as it would be of
benefit to this district."
(Signed)        H. Harris, President.
» J. T. Beamwell, Secretary-Treasurer.
Mission City, B. C, 25th January, 1902.
Dear Sir,—At the annual meeting of our Institute a unanimous vote af thanks was
tendered to you for your efficient services in the matter of reduction of freight rates on fruit
and farm produce. The Institute will also be happy for you to address them on this subject
at any date convenient to yourself before spring. Yours truly,
(Signed)        A. T. Verchere,
R. M. Palmer, Esq., Victoria, B.C. Sec. Mission Farmers' Institute.
P. S.—Our Institute also indorses resolution of the Okanagan Farmers' Institute, herewith attached.
Mission City, 3rd February, 1902.
Dear Sir,—The following is a copy of a resolution passed by the Okanagan Farmers'
Institute, and indorsed by the Mission District Farmers' Institute on the 24th January, 1902:
" That it would be to the benefit of this District if information concerning market conditions in the Kootenays, North-West Territories and other markets, were available during
the shipping season for fruit and farm produce; that Mr. Palmer be asked to submit a copy
of this resolution to the Hon. the Minister of Agriculture of British Columbia."
Hoping you may be able to act in accordance with above desires,
I am, etc.,
(Signed)       A. T. Verchere,
R. M. Palmer, Esq., Victoria. Sec. Mission Farmers' Institute. 718 Canadian Pacific Railway. 1902
Copy of Resolution passed at the Annual Meeting of the B. C. Fruit Growers' Association,
January 28rd, 1902.
" Resolved, That this Association respectfully urges upon the Canadian Pacific Railway
Company and the Government of British Columbia the necessity and importance of continuing
the work carried on by Mr. R. M. Palmer during the past season in connection with the
transportation and marketing of fruit and farm products of British Columbia, and that copies
of this resolution be forwarded to the Hon. J. D. Prentice, Minister of Finance and Agriculture,
and to Mr. F. W. Peters, General Freight Agent, C. P. R."
Copy of Resolution passed at tJie Annual Meeting of the B. C. Fruit Growers' Association,
Vancouver, Jan. 28rd, 1902.
Moved by Mr. Thomas Cunningham, seconded by Mr. Tom Wilson and—■
" Resolved, That whereas the Canadian Pacific Railway Company has, during the past
year, manifested an earnest desire to encourage the development of the fruit-growing industry
of British Columbia by'material'reduction in rates of freight from British Columbia to
Manitoba and the North-West Territories, also to mining centres of the Province, and otherwise assisting our fruit-growers by many acts of courtesy and co-operation :
" Be it therefore Resolved, That this Provincial Fruit Growers' Association in annual
meeting assembled desires to place on record its sincere and hearty thanks to the managers and
officers of the said Canadian Pacific Railway Company for the kindly co-operative spirit in
which they have met the desires and suggestions of the Executive and Directors of this
Association:
" Resolved, That copies of this resolution be forwarded to Messrs. R. Marpole, FVW.
Peters, E. J. Coyle, and to the Hon. Minister of Agriculture respectively."
Victoria, Jan. 25th, 1902.    -
At the annual meeting of the Centra] Farmers' Institute, composed of delegates from the
various Farmers' Institutes of the Province, the following resolution was offered by Mr. Cade,
seconded by Mr. Venables, and carried unanimously :
" Resolved, That the Institute desires to impress on the Government and the C. P. R.,
the necessity for continuing the special tariff commissioner, Mr. R. M. Palmer, in the work so
ably conducted by him during the past season."
And it was further moved by Munroe Miller, and seconded by J. Churchland, and carried :
"That this Central Institute wishes to convey to the Government its appreciation of the
services of Mr. R. M. Palmer in the arrangement and manipulation of freight rates, as well as
the intelligent manner in which his reports are made, so made that all may readily understand
what he wishes to convey :
" And, further, that we tender him our sincere thanks for his very excellent, entertaining
and instructive report."
Chilliwack, B. C, February 4th, 1902.
R. M. Palmer, Esq.
Dear Sir,—I beg to inform you that at our annual meeting held on January 31st, 1902,
I placed your letter of 8th January before the meeting on January 25th, 1902. Every one
spoke in the highest terms of the way you had succeeded in securing better freight rates both
by steamer and rail, and we will be glad to take advantage of your kind offer to address our
Institute in the near future.    Our Institute passed the resolution enclosed herewith.
I have, etc.,
(Signed)        G. W. Chadsey. 2 Ed. 7 Agricultural Freight Tariffs, 719
Copy of Resolution passed by Chilliwack Farmers' Institute at the Annual Meeting held on
January 81st, 1902.
Resolved, That we consider the reduction in freight rates during the last year on fruits,
etc., over the Canadian Pacific Railway, has been of great benefit to this locality, and we
would be pleased to have Mr.' Palmer address this Institute at some future date, for the
purpose of securing further concessions with the Canadian Pacific Railroad.
(Signed)        G. W. Chadsey,
Secretary-Treasurer,
Chilliwhack Farmers' Institnte.
Enderby, B. C, 20th February, 1902.
R. M. Palmer, Esq.,
Enderby.
Dear Sir,—At a meeting of the Spallumcheen branch of the Farmers' Institute held in
Enderby on the 19th inst., the members wish to record their high appreciation of the action of
the Government and the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, to meet their interests.
■   A vote of thanks was unanimously carried for your able address.'
Yours truly,
(Signed)       H. W. Harvey,
Acting Secretary.
At a meeting held February 20th at Armstrong, the following resolution was passed:—
That the Spallumcheen Farmers' Institute are pleased that the Government through Mr.
R. M. Palmer have co-operated with the C. P. R. in obtaining a reduction in freight rates on
produce, fruit, etc., to Kootenay, Coast and North-West markets, and we hope that in future
the Railway Co. will keep the interests of the farmers in view in the same manner as they
have recently done.    Carried unanimously.
(Signed)        W. P. Horsley,
Secretary-Treasurer.
Extract from letter from Manager Kelowna Shippers' Union re Freight Rates and Service.
Kelowna, B. O, January, 25th, 1902.
R. M. Palmer, Esq.,
Victoria, B. C.
Dear Sir,—I am in receipt of your letter of the 14th inst. I delayed answering it until
we could get time to get out some details of the business we have done this past summer.
We snipped 6 cars of fruit to Calgary, 5 cars fruit to Nelson, 1 car fruit to Fernie, 2 cars
of mixed fruit and vegetables to Nelson, 1 car of mixed fruit and vegetables to Cranbrook;
total, 15 cars with fruit.
We shipped 17 cars of vegetables to Nelson, 2 cars to Calgary, 2 cars to Fernie, 4 cars to
other Kootenay points; total, 25 cars vegetables.
Of hay we shipped 12 cars, and expect to ship about 29 in the next two months.
Now, heretofore we found it almost impossible to sell fruit in Nelson, and this year we
sold five cars and two mixed cars of fruit and vegetables.
These figures speak for themselves, but at the same time I would point out that the
Special Supplement No. 628 has not had a fair trial this year on account of the disturbance
to business due to the Rossland strike. Rossland is the point where it might have been
expected that this special concession on the mixed cars would have been of most benefit; the
strike prevented us testing the working of it there.
Though, on the whole, we have every reason to be satisfied with the freight service, there
are still some points that might be bettered.
(Signed)       T. W. Stirling. 720
Canadian Pacific Railway.
1902
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY (WESTERN LINES).
 o	
Special Freight Tariff (No. 628) on Apples, Fruit and Vegetables, at Owner's
Risk; Released from Stations on the Pacific Division to West Kootenay
Mining Points, Stations on Boundary Section, and on Crow's Nest Section,
also to Stations on Pacific and Western Divisions.
Effective March 20th, 1901.
FROM
Stations on Cascade and Thompson Sections
Hammond,
*Haney,
•Wharnoek,
*Ruskin,
Mission Jet.,
* Maple Grove,
•Abbottsford,
Sumas,
*.Nicomen,
Harrison,
Agassiz,
*Ruby Creek,
*Hope,
Yale,
*Spuzzum,
North Bend,
Keefers,
*Kanaka,
Lytton,
*(}ladwin,
*Thompson Siding,
*Drynock,
Spence's Bridge,
*Spatsum,
*Basque Ranch,
Ashcroft,
*Pennys,
Savonas,
*Cherry Creek,
TO
Apples, in boxes
or barrels; and
Fresh Fruit in
Apples in boxes
■    Packages.
Apples in boxes
Vegetables in
or barrels.
Vegetables in
(Peaches, Plums,
Points Shown in Numbered
or barrels, L. C. L.
Packages L. C. L.
C. L. Min. 24,000
packages.
Berries, etc.,)
Groups.
lbs.
Mixed C L. Min.
24,000 lbs.
C. L.'Min. 20,000
lbs.
(See next page.)
■
Rat
:s in Cents per 10C
lbs.
Group No. 1. Nelson, &c..
70
70
60
60
70
»       2. 'Cascade, <fco.
80
80
70
70
80
n       3. Midway, &c.
85
85
75
75
85
a       4. Fernie, &c. .
90
90
75
75
90
n       5. Macleod,&c.
95
95
80
80
95
a       6. Canmore,&c.
90
90
75
75
90
//       7. Calgary, &c.
95
95
80
80
95
To stations on Canadian Pacific Railway, Main Line, Shepard to Winnipeg, and to stations
on Edmonton and Macleod Sections, and on all other branch lines, on apples, in boxes or
barrels—C. L. Min. 24,000 lbs., 85c. per 100 Bis.
Fresh fruit, in packages (peaches* plums, cherries, berries, &c), C. L. Min. 20,000 ttis.;
also, apples, in boxes or barrels, and fresh fruit, in packages, mixed C. L. Min. 20,000 lbs., $1
per 100 Sis.
FROM
Stations on Shuswap and.Okanagan Sections, and Okanagan Lake Ports
Kamloops,
*Ducks,
Shuswap,
•Notch Hill,
*Tappen Siding,
♦Kualt,
Salmon Arm,
Sicamous Junction
*Mara,
Enderby,
Armstrong,
*Larkin,
Vernon,
Okanagan Landing
Kelowna,
*Peachland,
Penticton, 2 Ed. 7
Agricultural Freight Tariffs.
721
TO
Apples in boxes
or barrels; and
Fresh Fruit in
Apples in boxes
Packages.
Apples, in boxes
or barrels, L. 0. L.
Vegetables, in
or barrels.
Vegetables in ■
(Peaches, Plums,
Points Shown in' Numbered
Packages, L.' C. L.
C. L. Min. 24,000
Packages.
Berries, etc.)
Groups.
lbs. .
Mixed C. L. Min.
24,000 lbs.
C. L. Min. 20,000
lbs.
(See below and next page.)
-
Rates in Cents pep
100 lbs.
Group No. 1. Nelson, &o. .
60
60
50
50
60
a       2. Cascade^&c.
a       3. Midway, &c.
70
70
60
60
70
75
75
65
65
75
n       4. Fernie, &o..
SO
80
65
65
80
n       5. Maeleod, &c.
85
85
70
70
85
a       6. Canmore, &c
80
80
65
65
80
'/        7. Calgary, &c.
85
85
70
70
85
To stations on Canadian Pacific Railway, Main Line, Shepard to Winnipeg, and to stations
on Edmonton and Maeleod Sections, and on all other branch lines, on apples, in boxes or
barrels—C. L. Min. 24,000 Bos., 75c. per 100 lbs.
Fresh fruit, in packages (peaches, plums, cherries, berries, etc.), C. L. Min. 20,000 ft>s.;
also, apples in boxes or barrels, and fresh fruit in packages, mixed C. L. Min. 20,000 Bos., $1
per 100 lbs.
Note 1.—On mixed carloads of apples, vegetables and fresh fruits, minimum weight 20,000 lbs., the
rates provided above for fresh fruit, will apply.
Note 2.—Rates on vegetables, straight carloads, and vegetables, grain, flour, etc., mixed carloads to
Nelson, Cascade, etc., are provided in Tariff 631.
List of Points Comprised in Numbered Groups (Referred to on
previous page).
-
Group No. 1.
Columbia River Landings:
•Sholto,
•Enterprise,
•    Trail,
'Halcyon,
•Wilsons,
•Ashburn.
•Warfield,
*Leon,
•Genelle's Mills,
Columbia & Kootenay Rail
Rossland.
Nakusp,
•Rook Island,
West Robson,
way :
Kootenay Lake Ports:
Nakusp <t- Slocan Railway:
Slocan City,
•McDonald's Landing,
"Burton,
•Summit Siding,
•Lemon Creek,
•Kokanee Creek,
*Cariboo City,
•Hills,
•Park Siding,
•Balfour,
•Fire Valley,
•Sanderson s Point,
Rosebery,
•Thrums,
•Pilot Bay,
•Denver Canyon Siding,
Slocan Jet.,
•Coffee Creek,
*Van Hou ten Creek,
•Alamo Concentrator,
•Bonnington Falls,
Ainsworth,
*Cap^ Horn,
•Three Forks,
•Granite,
•Mile Point,
•Little Deer Park,
Sandon.
Nelson.
•Cedar Creek,
*Dog Creek,
Slocan Lake Ports.
C.  &  W.   Railway—Ross
•Hendryx,
•Deer Park,
New Denver,
land Section:
•Wood berry,
•Fritz,
Silverton,
•West Waterloo,
*Tam O'Shanter,
•McCormicks,
•Gold Creek,
Smelter Jet.,
Kaslo.
•
Group No. 2.
C. <Ss W. Railway—Boundary Section.
•Shields,
•Farron,                           1    *Fife,
Cascade.
•Tunnel,
•Coryell,                         1
Group No. 3.
C. & W. Railway—Boundary Section.
•Gilpin,
*B. C. Mine,
•Hartford Jet.,
•Mother Lode Mine,
Grand Forks,
•Winnipeg Mine,
Phoenix,
•Boundary Falls,
•Fisherman,
•Golden Crown Mine,
Greenwood,
Midway.
Eholt,
Note.—Freight for B.
C. Mine, Winnipeg Mine, Golden Crown Mine and Ha
rtford Jet. can be accepted
with charges to collect, in
which case waybills must be drawn on Eholt with dest
ination shown. 722
Canadian Pacific Railway.
1902
Group No. 4.
Crow's Nest Branch.
Sirdar,
Creston Jet.,
Oreston,
Kitchener,
•Goat Fell,
•Yahk,
•Tochty,
•Aldridge,
Moyie,
•Swansea,
Cranbrook,
•Wanklyn,
•Porteous,
Kimberly,
Fort Steele Jet.,
•Wardner,
•Jaffray,
Group No. 5.
Crow's Nest Branch.
Galloway,
Elko,
•Morrissey,
*Coal Creek,
Fernie.
•Hosmer,
•Sparwood,
Michel,
•McGillivray,
Crow's Nest,
•Skinner,
Blairmore,
•Burmis,
•Cowley,
Pincher,
Group No. 6.
Mountain Section.
•Brocket,
•Peigan,
Maeleod.
•Twin Bute,
Albert Canyon,
Illeeillewaet,
•Laurie Siding,
•Ross Peak Siding,
Glacier House,
•Roger's Pass,
*Bear Creek,
•Six Mile Creek,
Beavermouth,
Donald,
•Leanehoil
Moberly,
•Ottertail,
Golden,
Field,
Glenogle,
•Hector,
Palliser,
•Stephen.
Calgary Section.
Laggan,
•Eldon,
•Castle Mountain,
•Sawback,
Banff,
Anthracite,
Group No. 7.
Calgary Section.
Canmore.
•The Gap,
•Kananaskis,
Morley,
•Radnor,
Cochrane,
•Keith,
Calgary.
*No Agent.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
1. The rates in this tariff are subject to the general notices and conditions of carriage
endorsed on the Company's form of shipping.receipt.
2. Charges on shipments handled under this tariff must be prepaid or guaranteed.
3. Minimum Charges—No single shipment will be carried for less than 100 lbs. at less
carload rate herein provided.
4. Marine Insurance—The rates printed in this tariff, where water service is involved,
are exclusive of marine risk; and must be so quoted and endorsed on shipping receipts.
5. Carload Rates named herein will apply only on shipments from one shipper and at one
shipping point consigned and to be delivered to one. consignee at one destination. Cars will
not be allowed to be stopped in transit at an intermediate point to complete loading or to
partly unload.
. .6. Maximum Rates—The rates printed herein are   maximum rates, and must not   be
exceeded on like traffic to any intermediate point on the direct line of transit. 2 Ed. 7
Agricultural Freight Tariffs.
723
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY (WESTERN LINES).
 o .
Special Freight Tariff. (No. 629) on Apples, Fruit and Vegetables, at Owner's Risk,
Released, from Stations on the Pacific Division to Vancouver, Westminster,
Victoria and Nanaimo.
Effective March 20th, 1901.
FROM
(Casoade Section.)
•Ruby Creek 	
•Hope	
Yale	
•Spuzzum 	
(Thompson Section.)
North Bend	
•Keefers	
•Kanaka	
Lytton	
•Gladwin	
•Thompson Siding	
*Drynock	
Spence's Bridge	
*Spatsum	
•Basque Ranch	
Ashcrof t	
*Pennys. ■	
Savonas 	
•Cherry Creek	
(Shuswap Section.)
Kamloops 	
•Ducks	
Shuswap 	
•Notch Hill 	
*Tappen Siding	
•Kualt	
Salmon Arm	
Sicamous Junction 	
(Okanagan Branch.)
*Mara	
Enderby	
Armstrong	
*Larkin ....'.	
Vernon	
Okanagan Landing	
(Okanagan Lake Ports.)
Kelowna 	
*Peaohland	
Penticton ,   	
VANCOUVER AND WESTMINSTER.
Apples, in boxes
or barrels.
L.C.L.
Vegetables, in
packages.
L.C.L.
36
47
55
55
60
65
65
Apples, in boxes
or barrels.
O.L. Min. 24,000
lbs.
Apples, in boxes
or barrels; and
Vegetables, in -
packages.
Mixed C.L. Min.
24,000 lbs.
Fresh Fruit, in
packages
(Peaches,Pluins,
Berries, etc.)
C.L. Min. 20,000
lbs.
Rates in Cents per 100 lbs.
36
47
55
55
60
65
65
22
30
35
35
40
45
45
22
30
35
35
40
45
45
30
38
43
43
48
53
53
•No Agent. 724
Canadian Pacific Railway.
1902
FROM
(Cascade Section.)'
•Ruby Creek.
•Hope	
Yale	
•Spuzzum	
(Thompson Section.)
North Bend	
•Keefers	
•Kanaka	
Lytton	
•Gladwin	
•Thompson Siding.
•Drynock	
Spence's Bridge . .
•Spatsum	
•Basque Ranch
Ashcrof t	
•Pennys	
Savonas 	
•Cherry Creek	
(Shuswap Section.)
Kamloops	
•Ducks	
Shuswap	
•Notch Hill	
•Tappen Siding	
•Kualt	
Salmon Arm	
Sicamous Junction.
(Okanagan Branch.)
•Mara	
Enderby	
Armstrong	
•Larkin	
Vernon	
Okanagan Landing,
(Okanagan Lake Ports.)
Kelowna .
•Peachland
Pentieton.
TO
VICTORIA AND NANAIMO.
Apples, in boxes
or barrels.
L.C.L.
434
544
624
624
674
724
724
Vegetables, in
packages.
L.C.L.
Apples, in boxes
or barrels.
C.L. Min. 24,000
lbs.
Apples, in boxes
or oarrels; and
Vegetables, in
packages.
Mixed C.L. Min.
24,000 lbs.
Fresh Fruit, in
packages
(Peaehes.Phmis,
Berries, etc.)
C.L. Min. 20,000
lbs.
Rates in Cents per 100 lbs.
434
544
624
624
674
724
724
27
35
40
40
45
50
50
27
35
40
40
45
50
50
35
43
48
48
53
58
58
*No Agent.
Special Notices.
1. The rates in this tariff are subject to the general notices and conditions of carriage
endorsed on the Company's form of shipping receipt.
2. On mixed carloads of Apples, Vegetables and Fresh Fruit, the rates provided herein
for Fresh Fruit will apply; minimum, 20,000 fts: 2 Ed. 7 Agricultural Freight Tariffs. 725
3. Rates on vegetables,- straight carloads, and vegetables, grain, flour, etc., mixed carloads, to Vancouver, Westminster, etc., are provided in Tariff No. 630, March 20th, 1901.
4. Minimum Charge.—No single shipment will be carried for less than 100 lbs. at less
than carload weight herein provided.
5. Bulk freight must not be contracted from Okanagan Lake ports.
6. Charges on shipments handled under this tariff must be prepaid or guaranteed.
7. Marine Insurance.—The rates printed in this tariff are exclusive of marine risk on
Okanagan Lake, and must be so quoted and endorsed on shipping receipt.
8. Carload Rates named herein will apply only on shipments from one shipper, and at
one shipping point consigned and to be delivered to one consignee at one destination. Cars
will not be allowed to be stopped in transit at an intermediate point to complete loading or to
partly unload.
9. Maximum Rates.—The rates printed herein are maximum rates, and must not be
exceeded on like traffic to any intermediate point on the direct line of transit.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY (WESTERN LINES).
Special Freight Tariff (No. 630) on Grain, Flour, Oatmeal, Millstuffs and Vegetables, in straight or mixed carloads, from Stations on the Pacific Division
to Vancouver, Westminster, Victoria and Nanaimo.
Effective March 20th, 1901; (Superseding Tariff No. 84.7, August 28th, 1896.)
Special Notices.
1. The rates in this tariff are subject to the general notices and conditions of carriage
endorsed on the Company's form of shipping receipt.
2. Bulk freight must not be contracted from Okanagan Lake ports.
3. Charges on vegetables must be prepaid or guaranteed  between  October 15th and
April 30th.
4. Marine Insurance.—The rates printed in this tariff are exclusive of marine risk on
Okanagan Lake; and must be quoted and endorsed on shipping receipt.
5. Maximum Rates.—The rates printed herein are maximum  rates, and must not be
exceeded on like traffic to any intermediate point on the direct line of transit.
Maximum and Minimum Weights.
The maximum weight will be the stencilled capacity of the car.
r»       The minimum weight for standard 40,000 lb. cars will be 36,000 lbs.
„ „ ,i 60,000 ft. cars will be 56,000 lbs.
* "       Exceptions.
40,000 ft. Cars. 60,000 lb. Cars.
Flour in bbls      30,000 ft>s. 50,000 lbs.
Bran and shorts, in straight or mixed carloads.     30,000 lbs. 50,000 lbs.
Note-.—The above requirements will be waived when ears having a less capacity than 40,000 lbs. are
provided. In such cases actual weight, but not less than 24,000 lbs., will be accepted. Cars without
stencilled capacity will be considered as having a capacity of 24,000 lbs. 726
Canadian Pacific Railway.
1902
FROM
•Haney	
•Wharnoek :'	
•Ruskin  	
Mission Junction    £
•Maple Grove 2
•Abbottsford / S
Sumas  m
•Nicomen     h
Harrison $!
Agassiz  §
•Ruby Creek g
•Hope	
Yale	
•Spuzzum	
North Bend 	
•Keefers	
•Kanaka	
Lytton §
•Gladwin B
•Thompson Siding «
•Drynock m
Spence's Bridge o
•Spatsum  S
•Basque Ranch  ' g
Ashoroft  tU
•Pennys ' ^
Savonas	
•Cherry Creek	
Kamloops fe
•Ducks §
Shuswap o
•Notch Hill «
•Tappen Siding %
•Kualt £
Salmon Arm g
Sicamous Junction ; W
•Mara  g
Enderby  '. -«s
Armstrong §
•Larkin la
Vernon Jj
Okanagan Landing g
Kelowna  (Okanagan
•Peachland  -{Lake
Penticton [Ports
TO
Vancouver
Westminster
Victoria
Nanaimo
Grain, Flour, Oatmeal, Millstuffs and Vegetables
(Beets, Cabbages, Carrots, Onions, Parsnips, Potatoes,
Pumpkins and Turnips; at owner's risk; released.)
In straight or mixed carloads.
Rates in Cents Per 100 lbs.
No Agent. 2 Ed. 7
Agricultural Freight Tariffs.
727
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY (WESTERN LINES.)
 o	
Special Through Tariff (No. 631) on Grain, Flour, Oatmeal, Millstuffs and Vegetables in Straight or Mixed Carloads, Also Hay in Carloads from Stations
on the Pacific Division to West Kootenay Points, Stations on Boundary
Section and Crow's Nest Section via Arrowhead, B. C.
Effective April 2nd, 1901 ; (Superseding Tariff No. 568, March 28th, 1900.)
TO
GROUP 1.
GROUP 2.
GROUP 3.
GROUP 4.
GROUP 5.
FROM
Columbia
River Landings.
Nelson
Common Points.
Fernie
Common Points.
Cascade
Common Points.
Midway
Common Points.
Grain, Flour, Oatmeal, Millstuffs and Vegetables (Beets, Cabbages, Carrots, Onions,
Parsnips, Potatoes, Pumpkins and Turnips ; at Owner's risk ; released.)    In
straight or mixed carloads.   Also Hay in carloads.
Rates in Cents per 100 lbs.
Group A Kelowna, etc .-,-.
a      B Okanagan Landing, etc. . .
n      C Kamloops, etc	
a      D Lytton, etc	
23
20
23
25
30
35
28
25
28
30
35
35
38
35
38
40
45
45
38
35
38
40
45
45
43
40
43
45
a      E Agassiz, etc	
50
«      F Vancouver, etc	
50
List of Pacific Division Forwarding  Stations    (Comprised in Lettered Groups Referred to on
next Page.
Group A.—Kelowna, *Peachland, Penticton.
Group B.—Armstrong, Enderby, *Kualt, •Larkin, 'Mara, *Notch Hill, Okanagan Landing, Salmon
Arm, Shuswap, Sicamous Junction, *Tappen Siding, Vernon.
Group C.—*Ducks, Kamloops.
Group D.—Asheroft, *Basque Ranch, *Cherry Creek, •Drynock, *Gladwin, Lytton, *Pennys, Savonas,
•Spatsum, Spences Bridge, *Thompson Siding.
Group E.—Agassiz, Harrison, *Hope, *Kanaka, *Keefers, *Nicomen, North Bend, *Ruby Creek,
•Spuzzum, Yale.
Group F.—*Abbottsford, *Barnet, Hammond, *Haney, *Hastings, *Maple Grove, *Millside, Mission
Junction, Port Moody, *Ruskin, *Sapperton, Sumas, Vancouver, Westminster, Westminster Junction,
•Wharnock.
List of West Kootenay Mining Points, Stations on  Boundary Section and Crow's Nest Section.
(Comprised in Numbered Groups,  Referred to on previous Page.)
Group No. 1,-List of Columbia River Landings.—*Burton, *Cape Horn, *Cariboo City, *Deer
Park, *Dog Creek, *Fire Valley, "Fritz, "Halcyon, *Leon, *Little Deer Park, B Nakusp, *Rock Island,
•Sanderson's Point, *Shields, "Van Houten Creek.
Group No. 2, List of Nelson Common Points.—Ainsworth, B*Alamo Concentrator, *Ashburn,
•Balfour, B*Bonnington Falls, *Cedar Creek, *Ooffee Creek, *Crawford Bay, B*Denver Canyon Siding,
•Enterprise, *Gold Creek, B*Granite, *Hendryx, B*Hills, Kaslo, *Kokanee Creek, Kootenay Landing,
•Kuskonook, B*Lemon Creek, *McDonald's Landing, *Mile Point, B Nelson, New Denver, B'Park Siding,
•Pilot Bay, B Rosebery, B Rossland, B Sandon, Silverton, B Slocan City, B Slocan Junction, B Smelter Jet,
B*Summit Siding, *Tam O'Shanter, B*Thrums, B Trail, B Three Forks, B'Warfield, B West Robson,
B*West Waterloo, *Woodbury.
Group No. 3, List of Fernie Common Points.—*Aldridge, *Coal Creek, Cranbrook, Creston, Ores-
ton Junction, Elko, Fernie, Fort Steele Junction, "Galloway, *Goat Fell, *Jaffray, Kimberly, Kitchener,
•Morrissey, Moyie, *Porteous, Sirdar, *Sirdar Junction, 'Swansea, *Tochty, *Wanklyn, *Wardner, *Yahk.
Group No. 4, List of Cascade Common Points. —Cascade, *Coryell, "Farron, *Fife, "Shields, *Tunnel.
Group No. 5, List of Midway Common Points.—*B. C. Mine, *Boundary Falls, Eholt, "Fisherman,
"Gilpin, "Golden Crown Mine, Grand Forks, "Hartford Junction, Greenwood, Midway, "Mother Lode Mine,
Phrenix, "Winnipeg Mine.
Note.—Freight for B. C. Mine, Winnipeg Mine, Golden Crown Mine and Hartford Junction can be
accepted with charges to collect, in which case way bills must be drawn on Eholt with destination shown.
*No Agent.    Freight must be prepaid. 728 Canadian Pacific Railway. 1902
Special Notices.
1. The rates in this Tariff are subject to the general notices and conditions of carriage
endorsed on the Company's form of shipping receipt.
2. Charges on vegetables must be prepaid or guaranteed between Oct. 15th and April 30th.
3. Grain and vegetables in bulk will be accepted for shipment to stations on Boundary
and Crow's Nest Sections, and to West Kootenay points marked "B." To all other points the
goods must be put in packages.
4. Marine Insurance.—The rates printed in this Tariff, where water service is involved,
are exclusive of marine risk, and must be so quoted and endorsed on shipping receipts.
5. Maximum Rates.—The rates printed herein are maximum rates, and must not be
exceeded on like traffic to any intermediate point on the direct line of transit.
6. Grain may be "milled in transit " at intermediate stations on the direct line of shipment. The grain, when shipped to the mill, will be charged the current local grain rate, and
the same tonnage in flour and offal will be forwarded at balance of the through rate from point
of origin of the grain to final .destination, with one cent per one hundred pounds added for
terminal service at the mill, provided shipment is made within six months from receipt of the
grain at the milling station, otherwise regular published rates will apply.
Maximum and Minimum Weights.
The maximum weight will be the stencilled capacity of the.car.
The minimum weight for standard 40,000 lb. cars will be 36,000 Bos.
M H       60,000 n 56,000 lbs.
Exceptions.
40,000 lb. Cars. 60,000 lb. Cars.
Flour in bbls    30,000 lbs.        50,000 lbs.
Bran and shorts, in straight or mixed carloads. .   30,000 K>s.        50,000 lbs.
Hay    20,000 fts.        24,000 ffira.
Note.—The above requirements will be waived when cars having a less capacity than
40,000 Bis. are provided. In such cases actual weight, but not less than 24,000 lbs. will be
accepted.    Cars without stencilled capacity will be considered as having a capacity of 24,000 lbs. 2 Ed. 7
Agricultural Freight Tariffs.
729
CANADIAN PACIFIC NAVIGATION COMPANY, LIMITED.
Special Freight Tariff (No. 3) naming rates of Transportation of Freight between
Victoria, Vancouver, Ladners Landing, Steveston, Chilliwack, West Coast
Points, Northern Coast Points and Intermediate Ports of Call.
Effective May 1st, 1901; (Superseding all previous Tariffs.).
Subject to change with or without notice.
BETWEEN VICTORIA AND VANCOUVER.
Agricultural Implements and Vehicles	
Biscuits and Confectionery	
Boots and Shoes, Dry Goods, Cordage, Drugs and Medicines	
Cigars, Cigarettes and Cut Tobacco	
Deer Skins and Dry Hides	
Dressed Meats	
Earthenware, Glassware and Crockery	
Furniture, Household Goods and Bathtubs .. •.	
Gasoline and Carbide of Calcium—Carried only on special authority	
General Merchandise and Groceries, N. 0. S., excepting Biscuits and Confectionery
Glass, common window, 0. R. B	
Grain, Flour, Feed, Millstuffs and Oatmeal—Carloads	
a a a a a       —Less Carloads	
Green Hides	
Hay, in bales, less carloads .'	
Hay, in bales, carloads	
Hardware, Iron and Steel	
Iron Sash Weights	
Liquors	
Paints and Oils	
Plate Glass, 0. R. B., Released	
Powder—Carloads—When authorised...'	
Powder—Less Carloads—When authorised	
Vegetables, Green, N. 0. S	
Lettuce and Tomatoes, per crate or box	
Horses and Cattle—Less Carloads 	
w a     —Carloads	
Sheep 	
Hogs.—When authorised	
Calves 	
Rates in cents
per 100 lbs.    '
20
15
12
15
20
20
20
20
40
10
15
5
10
10
10
74
10
74
10
10
20
15
40
10
EACH.
$0  10
00
00
20
50
50
General Merchandise, ex. San Francisco, loaded at Outer Wharf, $2.00 per ton, as billed, and 25 cents
per ton additional to cover Customs expenses.
Wharfage.—The above rates are exclusive of wharfage—50 cents per ton at Victoria and Vancouver;
minimum charge any single shipment, 10 cents. 730
Canadian Pacific Railway.
1902
VICTORIA-WESTMINSTER ROUTE.
Between Victoria and following Ports of Call:—Plumper's Pass, Steveston,
Westminster and other Regular Landings en route.
Ladner's Landing,
Agricultural Implements and Vehicles	
Biscuits and Confectionery	
Boots and Shoes, Dry Goods, Cordage, Drugs and Medicines	
Cigars, Cigarettes and Cut Tobacco	
Canned Salmon	
Pickled Salmon	
Deer Skins and Dry Hides    	
Dressed Meats	
Earthenware, Glassware and Crockery	
Furniture, Household Goods and Bathtubs	
Gasoline and Carbide of Calcium—carried only on special authority	
General Merchandise and Groceries, N. 0. S. excepting Biscuits and Confectionery
Glass, common window, O. R. B	
Grain, Flour, Feed, Milltsuffs and Oatmeal—Carloads	
n       a a n a      —Less Carloads	
Green Hides	
Hardware, Iron and Steel	
Hay in Bales—Lots under 10 tons	
Hay in. Bales—Lots over 10 tons	
Iron Sash Weights	
Liquors	
Paints and Oils	
Powder—Carloads—When authorised	
Powder—Less Carloads—When authorised	
Plate Glass, O. R. B., Released	
Vegetables, green, N. 0. S	
Lettuce and Tomatoes, per crate or box	
Horses and Cattle—Less Carloads	
a a    —Carloads	
Calves	
Sheep	
Hogs	
Acid, in carboys	
Retorts    	
Rates in cents
per 100 lbs.
20
15
12
15
5
74
20
20
20
20
40
10
15
5
10
10
10
10
74
74
10
10
15
40
20
10
EACH.
• $0 10
3 00
2 00
f 50
20
50
75
$10 to $S
General Merchandise, ex. San Francisco, loaded at Outer Wharf, $2.00 per ton, as billed, and 25 cents
per ton additional to cover Customs expenses.
Wharfage.—The above rates are exclusive of wharfage—50 cents per ton at Victoria and Westminster;
minimum charge any single shipment, 10 cents.
Empty packages which have been used in transporting farm and dairy products from Fraser River
points to Victoria, and empty aeid carboys, will be returned to original point of shipment free of charge. 2 Ed. 7
Agricultubal Freight Tariffs.
731
B. C. NORTHERN PORTS ROUTE.
From Victoria and Vancouver to Point9 Comprised in Numbered Groups shown on next page.
Group
12
Acid Carboys, each '	
Beef Quarters, each	
Boxes Salmon in shooks; each	
Boxes Biscuit in shooks, each	
Boxes Soap in shooks, each	
Boats, large fishing, each 	
Boats, fishing skin's, each 	
Bricks, per M	
Deer and Hair Seal Skins, Per ton measurement 	
Empty Oil Tanks, each	
Empty Oil Barrels, each	
Furs, per ton measurement	
General Merchandise, KO.S	
Hides, dry, each	
Hides, green or salt, each j...
Oattle, Horses and Mules, each	
Sheep and Hogs, each	
Lumber, per M 	
Mutton, per carcass	
Retorts	
Salmon, canned or pickled, per ton weight.*,
t Powder, per ton measurement	
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
1
2
3
4
6
6
7
8
9
10
11
$4 00
$4 00
$4 00
S4 00
$4 00
*
$
8'
%
S4 00
*
1 60
1 50
1 50
1 50
1 50
1 50
1 50
1 50
1 50
1 50
1 50
l\
■l\
W
It
w
21
21
2*
2*
11
24
21
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
15 00
15 00
15 00
15 00
15 00
15 00
5 00
6 00
5 00
5 00
5 00
5 00
6 00
6 00
6 00
7 00
8 00
8 00
8 00
8 00
8 00
8 00
10 00
1 50
1 60
1 60
1 50
1 50
1 60
1 50
1 50
1 50
1 60
1 50
50
50
60
60
50
60
60
60
60
50
50
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
6 00
6 00
6 00
8 00
S 00
8 00
8 00
8 00
8 00
8 00
8 00
3 00
3 00
3 00
4 00
3 50
6 00
6 00
4 00
4 00
5 00
8 00
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
30
30
30
SO
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
5 00
6 00
6 00
8 00
8 00
8 00
8 00
8 00
8 00
8 00
8 00
1 00
1 00
1 00
1 25
1 26
1 25
1 25
1 25
1 25
1 25
1 25
6 00
6 00
6 00
8 00
8 00
10 00
10 00
8 00
8 00
•8 00
10 00
50
60
50
50
60
50
50
50
50
60
50
50 00
60 00
50 50
60 00
60 00
50 00
50 50
50 00
50 00
50 00
50 00
2 50
2 50
2 50
3 00
3 50
3 60
12 00
12 00
12 00
16 00
14 00
24 00
24 00
24 00
16 00
20 00
32 00
It
§»
t Subject to special conditions as authorised.
Light and bulky articles taken by special contract only.
List of B. C. Northern Points taking Rates shown previous page.
Group    1.—Van Anda, "Marble Bay, Union, *Quathiaski Cove, Alert Bay.
Group 2.—*Fort Rupert, *Hardy Bay, *Shushartie Bay, Wadham's Cannery, Good Hope Cannery,
Vancouver Cannery, Brunswick Cannery, Wannuck Cannery, Rivers Inlet Cannery, Victoria Cannery.
Group   3.—Namu, Bella Bella.
Group 4.—"China Hat, *River Bight, Lowe Inlet Cannery, Carlisle Cannery, British American Cannery, North Pacific Cannery, Princess Royal Cannery, *Surf Inlet, Standard Cannery, Port Bssington
Cannery, Balmoral Cannery, Inverness Cannery, *Gribble Island, *Hartly Bay, Claxton Cannery, Herman's
Cannery, Windsor Cannery.
Group   5.—*Bella Coola.
Group   6.—*Kitamaat.
Group   7.—*Kitkatlah.
Group   8.—*Metlakahtla.
Group   9.—Port Simpson.
Group 10.—Naas Harbour, Mill Bay.
Group 11.—Skidegate.
Group 12.—Clue, Masset.
"Charges must be prepaid. 732
Canadian Pacific Kailway.
1902
WEST COAST ROUTE.
From Victoria to Points comprised in Numbered Groups shown below.
General Merchandise, N.O.S., Weight or Measurement, per ton. .
Bricks, per M	
Pilot Bread, Weight or Measurement	
Lumber, per M ' •
Cattle, Horses and Mules, each	
Sheep, each	
Hogs, each	
Calves, each 	
Fresh Meats—Beef, per quarter 	
Mutton, per carcass ,	
Acid, carboys, each	
"Powder, Gasoline and other Explosives, Weight or Measurement
Grain, Millstuffs and Oatmeal 	
Fertilizer, Weight, lots of 1,000 lbs. or over	
Empty Oil Barrels returned, each	
Group 1.
Group 2.
Group 3.
$4 00
$5 00
$4 00
5 00
6 00
5 00
3 00
4 00
3 00
6 00
6 00
6 00
4 00
5 00
5 00
35
40
45
65
70
75
75
80
85
1 50
1 50
1 50
50
50
50
4 00
4 00
4 00
16 00
16 00
16 00
3 00
4 00
3 00
3 00
4 00
3 00
15
15
15
Group 4.
$6 00
00
00
6 00
5 00
50
80
90
1 50
50
4 00
16 00
5 00
5 00
15
Between intermediate ports of call, General Merchandise, f 3 per ton, weight or measurement;
Lumber, $4 per M.
Shipments prom West Coast Points to Victoria.
Farm Produce, lots under 10 tons, per ton, weight $3 00
n in lots 10 tons or over, per ton, weight       1 50
Deer Skins, per ton, measurement  4 00
Pickled Fish in Barrels, Oils, etc., per ton, weight  4 00
Canned Salmon from Clayoquot Cannery, per ton, weight.   ..'  2 00
List of Points comprised in West Coast Route taking Rates shown above.
Group 1.—San Juan, Carmanah, Clo-oose, Dodger Cove, Copper Island, Monitor Mine, New Alberni.
Group 2.—Alberni, Port Hughes, Sidney Inlet, Hesquiot, Nootka, Neuchatletz, Kyuquot.
Group 3.— Sechart, Ucluelet, Clayoquot, Ahouset.
Group 4.—Quatsino, Cape Scott.
^Subject to special conditions as authorised.
UPPER FRASER RIVER ROUTE.
From Westminster to Points comprised in Numbered Groups shown below.
General Merchandise, Groceries, N.O.S., Hardware, Iron and Steel,
per ton, weight or measurement 	
Lumber, per M	
Flour, Feed, Oatmeal, and Millstuffs, lots under 5 tons	
" // lots over 5 tons	
Bricks, per M	
Cattle, Horses and Mules, each	
Calves, each	
Hogs and Sheep, each	
Farm Waggons, K.D., each.	
Buggies, K.D., each	
Road Carts, K.D., each	
Boats and Skiffs, under 17 feet, each	
a over 17 feet, each	
Canoes, under 15 feet, each  	
a       17 feet and over, each	
Powder, Dynamite and high Explosives (when authorised), case	
Group 1.
Group 2.
Group 3.
$1 25
$1 50
$3 00
2 50
2.50
4 00
1 20
1 20
4 00
80
SO
4 00
3 00
3 00
4 00
1 00
1 50
50
50
20
20
1 00
1 00
1 50
1 50
50
50
1 50
1 50
2 50
2 50
50
50
1 00
1 00
15
20
Group 4.
$5 00
5 00
5 00
5 00
5 00 2 Ed. 7 Agricultural Freight Tariffs. 733
. List of Points, Upper Fraser River Route, taking Rates shown above.
Group 1.—Westminster to Langley and intermediate points.
Group 2.—Westminster to all points above Langley, to and including Chilliwack,
Group 3.—Harrison Hot Springs.
Group 4.—Pt. Douglas.
From Chilliwack and Way Landings to Westminster.
Farm Produce, per ton, weight $1 50
Hay, in small bales, per ton, weight <  1 00
Hay, in large bales, ,per ton, weight  1 50
Cattle, Horses and Mules, eacli   1 50
Calves, Live, each  50
a     Dressed, each  25
Hogs and Sheep  20
Cream, in barrels and cans, per package  25
Ferrying Cattle and Horses between regular landings, 4 head and less, $1 eacli; over 4 head, 75c. each.
Farm Produce, Chilliwack to Victoria, lots 10 tons or over, $2.50 per ton, weight, exclusive of wharfage
at Victoria.
LOWER FRASER RIVER ROUTE.
Between Westminster, Ladner's Landing, Steveston and all other Ports of Call.
General Merchandise, Groceries and Hardware         5c. per 100 lbs.
Farm Produce         5c. n
Horses and Cattle  |1 00 each.
Calves       25     «
Hogs •       25     //
Sheep       20     „
Lambs ..".       15     //
Lumber ."  2 00 per M.
Net Floats   1 50     »
Bricks  3 00     „
Parcels       25 each.
Canned and Pickled Salmon        5 per 100 lbs.
From Ladner's to Woodward's Landing.
Cattle  75c. each.
Calves, Sheep and Hogs   10c.    «
Lambs     5c.     n
Rules and Conditions.
1. The rates in this Tariff are subject to the General Notices and conditions of carriage
endorsed on the Company's form of shipping receipt, and special live-stock contract.
2. Minimum Charge.—No single shipment will be taken for less than twenty-five cents.
3. Marine Insurance.—The rates printed in this tariff are exclusive of marine risk.
4. Transportation of men- in charge of live stock.—One man will be passed free in charge
of shipments of horses or cattle consisting of six head or more, and on shipments of not less
than twenty head of sheep or hogs.
5. Empty Carriers Returned.—Empty packages which have been used in transporting
farm and dairy products to Westminster from all points on the Fraser River will be returned
to original point of shipment free of charge. 734
Canadian Pacific Railway.
1902
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY (WESTERN LINES).
 o	
Office of the Assistant General Freight Agent,
Vancouver, B. C, May 27th, 1901.
Special Rate Notice No. P 1J94-
Taking effect at once, I have agreed with all shippers to carry fruit box shooks, K. D. in
bundles, lots 2,000 lbs. and over, and veneer fruit boxes, K. D. flat, in bundles, lots 500 lbs.
and over, from Vancouver, Port Moody and Westminster.
TO
Rates in cents per 100 lbs.
On veneer fruit boxes.   On fruit box shooks.
Hammond	
*Haney 	
*Wharnock	
"Ruskin	
Mission Junction	
"Maple Grove	
"Abbottsford	
Sumas	
*Nicomen    	
Harrison	
Agassiz	
Ruby Creek	
*Hope	
Yale	
"Spuzzum	
North Bend	
"Keefers	
*Kanaka	
Lytton	
"Gladwin	
"Thompson's Siding	
*Drynock . ... :	
Spences Bridge	
*Spatsum	
"Basque Ranch	
Ashcroft	
"Pennys	
Savonas 	
"Cherry Creek	
Kamloops .' :	
"Ducks	
Shuswap	
"Notch Hill	
"Tappen Siding	
"Kualt	
Salmon Arm	
Sicamous Junction	
"Mara 	
Enderby	
Armstrong	
"Larkin    	
Vernon	
Okanagan Landing	
Kelowna  \
"Peachland [-Okanagan Lake Ports
Penticton J
"Craigellachie	
"Griffin Lake	
"Clanwilliam '	
Revelstoke 	
W. R. MacInnes,
G. F. A., Winnipeg.
10
11
Hi
12
124
13
13
134
134
144
15
164
17
18
19
21
22
23
234
234
24
244
25
26
264
27
28
284
294
304
314
33
34
35
354
354
364
37
374
38
39
39
40
524
554
59
37
38
38
39
F. W. Peters,
A. 67. F. A., Vancouver. 2 Ed. 7
Agricultural Freight Tariffs.
735
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY (WESTERN LINES).
Office of Assistant General Freight Agent,
Vancouver, B. C, May 28th, 1901.
Special Rate Notice No. P 1/95.
Taking effect at once, I have agreed with all shippers to carry Fresh Fruits (excepting
apples), in packages, L. C. L.:— .
FROM
Kamloops	
"Cherry Creek	
Savonas 	
"Pennys 	
Ashcrof t	
"Basque Ranch
"Spatsum ......	
Spence's Bridge'. ..
"Drynock 	
"Thompson's Siding
"Gladwin	
Lytton	
* Kanaka	
"Keefers 	
North Bend. ......
"Spuzzum	
Yale../...:	
"Hope	
"Ruby Creek .
Agassiz	
Harrison	
"Nicomen '.	
Sumas 	
"Abbottsford	
"Maple Grove	
Mission Junction..
"Ruskin	
"Wharnock	
"Haney ...   	
Hammond	
Port Moody    	
TO
Vancouver
AND
Westminster.
Victoria
and
Nanaimo.
Rates in Cents per 100 lbs.
Minimum charge :—No single shipment will be taken for less than 100 lbs. at above rates.
Minimum, 35 cents.
Shipments carried entirely at " owner's risk, released."    Charges must  be  prepaid or
guaranteed.
F. W. Peters,
W. R. MacInnes, A. G. F. A., Vancouver.
G. F. A., Winnipeg. 736 Canadian Pacific Eailway." 1902
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY (WESTERN LINES).
Supplement No. -1 to Special Freight Tariff on Apples, Fruit, and Vegetables, at
" Owner's Risk, Released," from Stations on the Pacific Division to West
Kootenay Mining Points, Stations on Boundary Section, and on Crow's Nest
Section.
Mixed Carload of Apples, Fruit and Vegetables.
(Effective June 5th, 1901.)
Note 3.—Mixed carload of Apples, Fruit and Vegetables, at "owner's risk, released,"
may be loaded in mixed carloads, and will be charged for at their respective carload rates,
subject to the following conditions :—
Minimum carload weight 30,000 lbs., at which minimum there must not be less than
10,000 lbs. of Apples (and or) Fruit.
First Example.—The minimum charge on a mixed carload will be as follows :—
From Vernon to Nelson—
Vegetables (beets, cabbages, carrots, onions, parsnips, potatoes,
pumpkins and turnips)—Tariff No. 631, weight 20,000 lbs.,
at 25c. per 100 fts     $50 00
Apples, (in boxes or barrels)—Tariff No. 628, weight 10,000 lbs.,
at 50c. per 100 lbs.       50 00
Total minimum charge    $100 00
Second Example.—Mixed carloads of apples, fruit and vegetables, will be charged as
provided by above rule.
From Vernon to Nelson—
Vegetables (beets,  cabbages, carrots, onions, parsnips, potatoes,
.   pumpkins and  turnips)—Tariff No. 631, weight 23,000 lbs.,
at 25c. per 100 lbs      $57 50
Fresh Fruit in packages (peaches, plums,  berries, etc.)—Tariff
No. 628, weight 3,000 lbs., at 60c. per 100 fts       18 00
Apples (in boxes or barrels)—Tariff No. 628, weight 7,000 fts.,
at 50c. per 100 fts       35 00
Total charges    $110 50 2 Ed. 7
Agricultural Freight Tariffs.
737
CANADIAN PACIFIC NAVIGATION COMPANY, LIMITED.
Supplement No.  1 to Special Freight Tariff No. 3, naming rates for transportation
OF   FREIGHT   BETWEEN   VICTORIA,   VANCOUVER,   LaDNER's   LANDING,   STEVESTON, CHILLI-
wack, West Coast Points, Northern Coast  Points and Intermediate Ports of
call.
Effective August 1st, 1901.
(Superseding all conflicting rates in Tariff No. 8.    Subject to
change with or without notice.)
Between Victoria and all points on the Fraser  River, above  New Westminster, to
and including chilliwack.
Rates in cents
per 100 lbs.
Agricultural Implements and Vehicles, K. D	
Biscuits and Confectionery	
Boots and Shoes, Dry Goods, Cordage, Drugs and Medicines	
Bricks, per M	
Cigars, Cigarettes and Out Tobacco    	
Deer Skins and Dry Hides	
Earthenware, Glassware and Crockery	
Furniture, Household Goods and Bathtubs _.;    	
General Merchandise and Groceries, N. 0. S., excepting Biscuits and Confectionery
Glass, common window, 0. R. B	
Grain, Flour, Feed, Millstuffs and Oatmeal:—Lots under 5 tons	
a a —Lots 5 tons and over	
Green Hides  ...    	
Hardware, Iron and Steel	
Hay in Bales—Lots under 10 tons    	
a —Lots 10 tons and over	
Iron Sash Weights	
Liquors 	
Paints and Oils     -.	
Powder—When authorised    	
Plate Glass, O. R. B., Released	
Wool, in Bales	
Farm Produce—Lots 5 tons or over	
Horses, Cattle and Mules—Less carloads '.. .
Calves	
Sheep	
Hogs	
25
20
17
$5.00
20
25
25
25
15
20
15
9
15
15
15
124
124
15
15
50
30
25
124
Each.
|3.50
75
35
50
Wharfage.—The above rates are exclusive of wharfage at Victoria.    No wharfage charge
will be made at Westminster on shipments consigned through.
From Fraser River Canneries to' Westminster, Victoria and Vancouver.
Canned and Pickled Salmon, Fish Oil in barrels and drums, Guano in sacks—5 cents per
100 fts. . 738.
Canadian Pacific Railway.
1902
Amendments.
Tariff No. 8.
Correct heading to read, " Between Victoria and Vancouver and points comprised in
numbered groups."
Change General Merchandise N. O. S. to read " Weight or measurement.".
Change Retorts, "each."
Correct Salmon, canned or pickled, to read " Canned and Pickled Salmon, Fish Oil in
barrels and drums, and Guano in sacks," per ton weight, viz:—
Group
1.
Group
2.
Group
3.
Group
4.
Group
5.
Group
6.
Group
7.
Group
8.
Group
9.
Group
10.
Group
11.
12.50
$2.50
$2.50
$3.00
$3.50   J $4.00   j $4.00   J $4.00
$3.00
$3.50
$4.00
Add Refuge Bay to Group 4.
Add Kemsquit to Group 6. ' •
Make following corrections.
Change heading to read " Between Victoria and points comprised in numbered groups
shown below."
Sheep, each 	
Hogs, each 	
' Calves, each	
Powder, Gasoline and other explosives (weight or measurement), per ton
Lumber, per M	
Acid, carboys, each	
Group 2.
45 cts.
75 cts.
85 cts.
$20.00
7.00
5.00
Group 3.
40 cts.
70 cts.
80 cts.
Notice to Agents and Pursers.
Regulations for Transportation of Men in charge of Live Stock.
The following rules will govern the transportation'of men in charge of live stock between
Westminster, Vancouver'and Victoria:—
One (1) man will be passed one way with one (1) car of live stock, and return at half
first-class fare.
One (1) man will be passed both ways with two (2) cars of live stock.
Two (2) men will be passed both ways with three (3) to five (5) cars of live stock.
Three (3) men will be passed both ways with six (6) to nine (9) cars of live stock.
Four (i) men will be passed both ways with ten (10) or more cars of live stock.
Not more than four men will be passed with any one shipment of live stock.
Men entitled to return transportation as above specified will be furnished with the same
through the Agent ^t the terminal point, provided they surrender the original contract and
return within thirty (30) days from date of contract.
Only the owner, shipper, or his employees, in actual charge of and accompanying the stock
will be entitled to free passage on account of the stock, and Agents and Pursers are forbidden
to endorse upon the stock contracts, as entitled to free passage, the name of any other person
than that of the owner, shipper, or such actual employees, and will refuse to endorse on the
contract names of. any other person than the owner, shipper, or such employees actually in
charge of the stock. 2 Ed. 7 Agricultural Freight Tariffs. 739
Agents and Pursers must use due diligence to establish the identity of the men applying
for the return transportation as being the men who actually accompanied the stock and whose
names appear upon the contract. The Agent at" the point where the stock is loaded must
enter upon the back of the contract the names of the men who are to pass free with the stock,
and such men must also affix their personal signatures to the contract. Such entries will
form the authority of the purser for their transportation with the shipment.
Tickets issued on the authority of this Circular must be endorsed " Stock," not to include
meals or berth.
One contract only can be issued to one shipper for any number of cars of live stock loaded
at the same time and /forwarded in the same boat to same destination. Agents will not be
permitted to cut up such shipments into smaller lots, issuing contracts for each lot, to enable
shipper to accommodate with free transportation more men than it is the intent of the rules
to accord.
Above does not conflict with Rule No. 4-, Special Tariff No. 3.
Seventeen (17) head cattle, horses and mules; 100 sheep or 60 hogs will be considered a
carload under the above regulations.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY (WESTERN LINES).
Office of the General Freight Agent,
Vancouver, B. C, July 16th, 1901. .
Special Rate No. P 1/119.
I have agreed with all shippers to carry new potatoes, in carload lots, from all points on
Okanagan Lake and Shuswap and Okanagan Railway to West Kootenay Points, at rates
provided for in Special Through Tariff, 631; minimum 24,000 fts. This arrangement expires
August 11th, 1901.
F. W. Peters,
W. R. MacTnnes, ' • G. F. A., Vancouver.
A. F. T. M., Winnipeg.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY (WESTERN LINES)
 o	
Office of the General Freight Agent,
Vancouver, B. C, August 13th, 1901.
Special Rate No. P 1/181.
I have agreed with all shippers to carry Rye, in carloads, minimum 30,000 fts., from all
points on the Okanagan Lake to Armstrong and Enderby, at the rate of 15 cents per 100 fts.
F. W. Peters,
W. R. Ma'cTnnes, G. F. A., Vancouver.
A. F. T. M., Winnipeg. 740 Canadian Pacific Railway. 1902
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY (WESTERN LINES.)
Office of the General Freight Agent,
Vancouver, B. C, August 15th, 1901.
Special Rate P 1/186.
I have agreed with all shippers to carry green vegetables, including potatoes, in carloads,
minimum 36,000 fts.
From stations on the Shuswap and Okanagan Branch to Calgary ; 30 cents per 100 fts.
From Okanagan Lake Ports of call to Calgary ; 33 cents per 100 fts.      At owner's risk ;
charges prepaid or guaranteed.
' F. W. Peters,
W. R. MacInnes, • G. F. A.   Vancouver.
A. F.  T.  M.   Winnipeg.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY (PACIFIC DIVISION).
 o	
Office of the Ass't. General Freight Agent,
Vancouver, April 27th, 1901.
Special Rate Notice No. P 1/76.
I have agreed with all shippers to carry fresh fruit, L. C. L., from Trout Creek and Peach-
land to Kelowna, when consigned to Kelowna Shippers' Union, at 10 cents per 100 fts; to be
. re-packed for shipment to Prairie and Kootenay points.
VICTORIA, B. C. :
Printed by Richard Wolfbndbn, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
190-2.

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