Open Collections

BC Historical Books

BC Historical Books

BC Historical Books

Tenth annual report published by the Board of School Trustees City of Vancouver for the year ending December… Vancouver School Board 1912

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcbooks-1.0221944.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcbooks-1.0221944.json
JSON-LD: bcbooks-1.0221944-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcbooks-1.0221944-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcbooks-1.0221944-rdf.json
Turtle: bcbooks-1.0221944-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcbooks-1.0221944-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcbooks-1.0221944-source.json
Full Text
bcbooks-1.0221944-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcbooks-1.0221944.ris

Full Text

Array TENTH
ANNUAL REPORT
PUBLISHED BY THE
Board of School Trustees
city  of Vancouver
For   Year   Ending   December   31st,   1912
Wm
m
Vancouver, B. C.
The Clarke & Stuart Co., Ltd., Printers 1
i/rVICO'JVE
PitY
^WNMSB^St
IP1
*^s«*w^wm BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
1913
Retire December  31st,   1913.
Mrs.  P.  McNaughton.    Wm. IT. P. Clubb       Geo.  J. Dyke.    W.  E.  Flumerfelt.
Retire December 31st, 1914.
W.  D.  Brydone-Jack,  M.D. Thos. Duke. ' J.  J.  Dougan.
EXECUTIVE   BOARD
1913.
Chairman £ , W.  D.  Brydone-Jack,  M.D.
Chairman School   Management   Committee ...Thos.   Duke
Chairman Building and Grounds Committee Wm. H. P. Clubb
Chairman Finance  Committee Wm.  H.  P.  Clubb
STANDING COMMITTEES
School Management. Building and  Grounds.
Thos. Duke, Chairman, Wm. H. P. Clubb, Chairman.
J. J. Dougan. Geo. J. Dyke.
Mrs. P. McNaughton W. E. Flumerfelt.
Finance.
Wm. H. P. Clubb, Chairman.
Thos. Duke.
W. D. Brydone-Jack, M.D.
The Chairman of the Board is  ex-officio member of all Committees.
DATE  OE MEETINGS.
Board—Third Monday in each month, at 8 o'clock p.m.
Management Committee—Tviesday preceding the  3rd Monday,  at  8  p.m.
Building Committee—Thursday preceding the  3rd Monday,  at 3 p.m.
Finance   Committee—Monday   before   Board   meeting.
All meetings, for the transaction of school business are held in the School
Board Office Building, corner Hamilton and Dunsmuir Streets; and
all correspondence to officials should be- addressed to the same
building.
OFFICIALS.
1913.
Municipal Inspector of Schools J.  S.  Gordon,  B.A.
Secretary   and   Accountant - Gerald   Upton
Chief   Clerk S.   D.   Gardner
Clerk Harold Hicks
,     Miss  E.   Balfour
Stenographers     ]     Miss L. Judge
I     Miss D.  Chaffer
Architect , C.    L.   Morgan
Building   Superintendent T.   H.   Self
James  Inglis
Attendance   Officers        <      N.  Jensen
|      W.  Godfrey BOARD   OF  SCHOOL  TRUSTEES
FROM 1886 TO 1912 INCLUSIVE
Dr. D. B.  Beckingsale,  Secretary
J.  B. Henderson
D. B. Charleson
1887-1888
John  Devine,   Secretary
G. I. Wilson
W. J. McGuigan, M.D.
Wm.  Brown
A.  G.  Johnson
G. F. Baldwin
1888-1889
G. I. Wilson
John Devine
C.  W. Murray
Wm. Brown
A. H. B. Macgowan, Secretary
G.   F.   Baldwin
1889-1890
G. I. Wilson
Chas. Whetham, M.A.
C. W. Murray
Wm.  Brown
A. H. B. Macgowan,  Secretary
G.   F.   Baldwin
1890-1891
Appointed   by   the   Lieut.-Governor
J.   M.   Browning
G. I. Wilson
Henry   Collins
Appointed  by  the  Council
Wm. Brown, Chairman
A. H. B. Macgowan, Secretary
C.  W.   Murray
G.  F.  Baldwin
1891-1892
Appointed   by   the   Lieut.-Governor
B. Springer
• G. I. Wilson
Henry  Collins
Appointed  by   the   Council
Wm.  Brown,  Chairman
A. H B. Macgowan, Secretary
C. W.   Murray
G.  F.  Baldwin
1892-1893
Wm.  Brown
A. H. B. Macgowan, Secretary
Henry  Collins
G.  I. Wilson,  Chairman
• Wm. Templeton
G.   R.   Gordon
1893-1894
A. H. B. Macgowan, Chairman
C.   W.   Murray,   Secretary
John McAllister
Wm. Templeton
C. C. Eldridge
G.  R. Gordon
1894-1895
A. H. B. Macgowan, Chairman
C. W. Murray, Secretary
W.  D.  Brydone-Jack,  M.D.
Wm.  Templeton
C.   C.   Eldridge
G.   R.   Gordon
C.  F.  Foreman
1895-1896
Wm.  Templeton,  Chairman
C.  C.  Eldridge
G.  R.  Gordon
C.   F.  Foreman
A. H. B. Macgowan
C. W. Murray,  Secretary
W.  D.  Brydone-Jack,  M.D.
1896-1897
G. R. Gordon, Chairman
Wm.   Templeton
C.  C.  Eldridge
J. /J. Logan
W.  J.  McGuigan,  M.D.
W. D. Brydone-Jack, M.D.
C.   W.   Murray,   Secretary
1897-1898
C.   C.  Eldridge,  Chairman
Mrs. C. Reid
Wm.  Brown
Jas.   Ramsay
W.  J.  McGuigan,  M.D.
W. D. Brydone-Jack, M.D.
C. W.  Murray,  Secretary
1898-1899
W.  D.  Brydone-Jack, M.D.,  Chairman
W.  J.  McGuigan,  M.D.
C. W. Murray, Secretary
C.   C.   Eldridge
Mrs.  C.   Reid
Wm.  Brown
Jas. Ramsay
1899-1900
C. W. Murray, Chairman
G. R. Gordon
J.  J. Banfield
J. J. Logan
Jas.  Ramsay
W.  D.   Brydone-Jack.   M.D.
W. J. McGuigan, M.D.
J.   J. Woods,   Secretary BOARD  OF  SCHOOL  TRUSTEES
FROM 1886 TO 1912 INCLUSIVE)
1900-1901
C. W. Murray, Chairman
W. J.  McGuigan, M.D.
Thos.  Duke
G. R. Gordon
J.   J.   Banfield
J.  J.  Logan
Jas.  Ramsay
J. J. Woods, Secretary
1901-1902
C. W. Murray, Chairman
W. J. McGuigan, M.D.
Thos.  Duke
G.   R.   Gordon
J. J. Banfield
W. D. Brydone-Jack, M.D.
James Ramsay, Chairman from 1st
July,   1902,  to  31st December,  1902
Geo. S. B. Perry, Secretary
Geo. B. Perry, Secretary
1902-1903
J. J. Banfield, Chairman
Thos.   Duke
Jas. Ramsay
W.  J.  McGuigan, M.D.
G.   R.   Gordon
W. D. Brydone-Jack, M.D.
D. Donaldson
C. W. Murray, Secretary
1903-1904
Thos. Duke, Chairman
D. Donaldson
W.   J.   McGuigan,   M.D.
Jas. Ramsay
William Clubb
J.  J. Dougan
W.  B.  McKechnie,  M.D.
W. P. Argue, B.A., Superintendent
C. W. Murray,  Secretary
1904-1905
W. B. McKechnie, M.D.,  Chairman
William   Clubb
Jas.   Ramsay
J. J. Dougan
.   Thos.  Duke
R. P. McLennan
J.  B.  Ferguson
C. W. Murray,  Secretary
W. P. Argue, B.A., Superintendent
19O5-1906
Wm.  H. P. Clubb, Chairman
Jas.  Ramsay
W.  B.  McKechnie,  M.D.
Thos.  Duke
R. P. McLennan
J. B. Ferguson
Victor Odium
W. P. Argue, B.A., Superintendent
C. W. Murray, Secretary and Building
Superintendent
1906-1907
R. P. McLennan, Chairman
W. H. P. Clubb
James Ramsay
"Yv.  B. McKechnie, M.D.
Thos.   Duke
J.  J. Dougan
V. W. Odium  (Jan.  to Oct.)
Charles Hope  (Oct. to Dec.)
W. P. Argue, B.A., Superintendent
C. W. Murray, Secretary and Building
Superintendent.
1907-1908
Chas. E.  Hope,  Chairman
R. P. McLennan
W. H. P. Clubb
W.   E.   Flumerfelt
Thos. Duke
J.  J. Dougan
W. D. Brydone-Jack, M.D.
1908-1909
J. D. Breeze, Chairman
Chas. E. Hope
W. HP. Clubb
W.  E.  Flumerfelt
Thos. Duke
W. D. Brydone-Jack, M.D.
J. J. Dougan
1909-1910
W.  E.  Flumerfelt,  Chairman
W.  H. P.  Clubb
Thos. Duke
W.  D.  Brydone-Jack,  M.D.
J. J. Dougan
Geo.   Dyke
J. D. Breeze
1910-1911
W.  D.  Brydone-Jack,  M.D.,  Chairman
W. E. Flumerfelt
W. H. P. Clubb
Thomas   Duke
J.   J.  Dougan
Geo.  J.  Dyke
J.   D.   Breeze
1911-1912
.   W.   D.   Brydone-Jack, M.D.,  Chairman
Thos.  Duke
J.   J.  Dougan
Mrs. P.  McNaughton
Wm.  H.  P.   Clubb.
Geo.  J.  Dyke
W.   E.  Flumerfelt  BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
CHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS
Vancouver, B.C., January 7,  1913.
Mrs. McNaughton and Gentlemen:—
According to custom, I have much pleasure in laying before you a
brief resume of the work done during the past year. Before dealing directly
with this, I would like to pay tribute to Mrs. McNaughton, the second
Lady School Trustee, who has graced the School Board by her presence,
the first being on the Board 1897-8 and 9. Mrs. McNaughton, during
the year she has been on the Board, has done a great deal of good, effective
work along various lines, and her presence and excellent advice have been
of material assistance in furthering the educational interests of the city.
During the year the Board has labored under many difficulties, but
I am pleased to be able to state that each member has risen to the occasion
and by setting aside personal convenience has enabled the work to be successfully proceeded with, and I do not think that any member can regret
any action the Board has been compelled to assume the responsibility of.
During the year, in July, our City Superintendent, Mr. W. P. Argue,
resigned, and as it was impossible to replace him immediately the Committee of Management shouldered the responsibility and very successfully
carried on the work until November, when the Board decided to appoint
Mr. J. S. Gordon, B.A., Municipal Inspector of our City Schools. In
connection with this appointment the suggestion emanated solely from the
members of the Board and not from any outside source.
The wisdom of appointing a man who was well acquainted with the
work of our City Public Schools and who has been more or less identified
with them for many years, and not an outsider, is rendered very apparent
by the fact that as far as I know there has not been the slightest adverse
criticism of him as a scholar, a gentleman and a close student of the educational interests of the city and the Province, and I feel confident that his
guidance and advice in matters relative to our public schools will be of
material assistance to trie Board in advancing our educational facilities.
The Building Committee had to shoulder a large amount of responsibility during the absence of our Secretary, Mr. C. W. Murray, who
took what was practically his first holiday since his connection with the
Board as Secretary in the year 1 902, and a great deal of credit is due them
for the amount of time spent and their successful prosecution of the work.
In connection with the work of the Management and Building Committees, and for the sake of comparison and to show you the rapid increase
of work in connection with our school system, I have had tabulated, etc.,
our number of teachers, number of school buildings, estimated value of
buildings, grounds; teachers' salaries and maintenance for the years 1905,
1910 and 1912; also figures showing appropriations for new buildings
completed or nearing completion  191 2-1 91 3.    They are as follows: BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
SCHOOL ATTENDANCE.
1905. 1910. 1912.
October 5,609     October ......9,942     October 12,393
Number of Teachers, inclusive of Manual Training, Domestic Science,
etc., and Supervisors:
1905 1 17       1910  1 245       1912 340
Number of School buildings ,
1905 9       1910 16       1912 26
Estimated value of buildings and contents
as at 31/12/11 $1,443,271.67
Total capital expenditure on buildings and
contents as at 31/12/12       822,31 1.99
$2,265,583.66
Total value of buildings 	
Estimated     value     of     grounds     as     at
31/12/1 1  $1,91 1,900.00
Total expended on land and improvements
during 1912       241,736.08
 $2,153,636.08
teachers' salaries.
1905 .$85,332.70     1910 $245,115.89    1912 $390,942.40
MAINTENANCE.
1905 $13,109.82  1910 $44,978.49  1912 $91,178.22
(Est. for Dec. ace.) 5,000.00
NEW  BUliMpGS   COMPLETED   OR   NEARING  COMPLETION
(Gross appropriation for same)
King Edward High, 12 rooms,  1911   By-law $
Cecil Rhodes, 8 rooms..  	
Florence Nightingale, 8 rooms	
Block 81, D. L. 301, 8 rooms	
Block 23, D. L. 301, 8 rooms	
Britannia High, 16 rooms, 1911  By-law	
Block 44, Hastings, 3 rooms	
Beaconsfield,   1   room 	
Macdonald School,  1  outside room	
Broadway and Lakewood, 8 rooms (ready about Easter)..
Block 39, Hastings, 8 rooms (ready about Easter) 	
.Dawson, 18 rooms (ready about August)	
Central School, Night Class Addition, 5 rooms (large)....
Tennyson,  8 rooms,   1911   By-law	
General Gordon, 8 rooms, 1911  By-law	
$96,178.22
,  1912-13
150,000.00
78,000.00
75,000.00
65,000.00
65,000.00
145,000.00
5,500.00
5,500.00
60,000.00
65,000.00
150,000.00
25,000.00
92,000.00
57,000.00
$1,038,000.00 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Night Classes commenced October 18,  1909.    Number of subjects
taught 10, as follows:—
Arithmetic
Book-keeping
Mathematics
Modelling
Building Construction
English
Engineering
Drawing
Builders' Quantity Surveying
Architecture
Amount of teachers' salaries for  1909, $1,980.00.
Subjects taught in 1912, 36, as follows:—
English  (also for Foreigners)
Arithmetic   (Commercial  and.
Workshop)
Book-keeping
Drawing
Typewriting
Mathematics
Carpentry and Joinery
Architectural Drawing
Estimating
Drawing and Painting
Modelling
Magnetism and Electricity
Machine Construction and Engineering Drawing
Navigation
Cooking
Music
Special Class for Drug Clerks
French
German
Latin
Civil Service
Shorthand
Manual Training
Sheet Metal Working
Building Construction
Decorative Trade Class
Wood Carving
Brass and Copper Work
St. John's Ambulance and First Aid
Marine and Stationary Engineering
Embroidery and Art Needlework   .
Dressmaking and Millinery
Physical Culture
Chemistry Course
Amount of salaries to November  $8,984.25
Estimated December salaries   2,200.00
 $11,184.25
These figures show remarkable advances, and in order to keep proper
data and to administer properly the expenditure of the large amount of
money required for school purposes your Finance Committee had to reorganize the office staff and to make fresh appointments both in the Secretary's
Department and the Municipal Inspector's office.
In consequence of all the above work there have been more committee
meetings than in any one year since I have had the honor of being connected
with the Board. However, we trust that now the work will proceed
smoothly along the new lines and that during the succeeding year the
members of the Board will not be required to sacrifice quite so much time
as heretofore.  BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
During the ensuing year there are many questions which will come
up for consideration.    May I enumerate a few?
Under the present School Act there is no provision for the expenditure
of money except along certain lines as indicated in Sections 44 and 45 of
the School Act, which clauses in particular I would advise each member
to read. Now we have had under consideration expenditures not only for
the benefit of our school children, but also for the advantage of our citizens,
but our hands are tied and we can, strictly speaking, advance only in
accordance with the Act.
1. We have no provision whereby lunches can be provided for
children except they pay for same.
2. No provision whereby a child can receive any form of medical
or surgical assistance where they are too poor to afford to pay for same.
3. No provision whereby arrangements can be made for attention
to the teeth of a child too poor to pay for same.
4. No provision whereby arrangements can be made for lecturers
on special subjects to teachers, parents and children in connection with
educational subjects, public health, home economics and other subjects of
educational value.
5. No provision for the establishment of kindergartens.
6. Cadet work.
7. Parental Schools.
8. Night School work, except as in Sections 127, 128, and 129,
which is as follows: "Where it appears that in any school district there
are twenty or more persons of the age of 1 4 years and upwards desirous of
obtaining instruction in the ordinary branches of an English education, the
Board of School Trustees may establish, under regulations issued by the
Council of Public Instruction, a Night School or Night Schools for their
benefit." In connection with Night School work, I believe it is already the
intention of the Department to amend the Act so as to enable them to
broaden the scope of the Night Schools.
9. No provision for technical schools, whether day or night schools.
In connection with this I have reason to believe that the Educational Department have the matter under consideration and that as soon as sufficient
data are acquired and the report of the Commission on Technical Education
is out, it is their intention to erect a large technical school both here and in
Victoria, and that all necessary provisions will be made then for the efficient
carrying on of educational technical work in its various branches.
10. Provision for separate schools for those feebly minded or
physically incapacitated, who, by reason of their afflictions, are unable to
keep up with others of the same age. BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
1 1. Official recognition of our High School classes in manual training
and home economics.
There are no doubt many other subjects for consideration which will
occur to the individual members of the Board, and we trust they will bring
them up in proper season, such as more modern legislation in truancy and
child labor, official inspection of private schools, etc.
In connection with Cadet work, through the kindness and assistance of
His Worship the Mayor and members of the City Council, the Provincial
and Dominion Governments, the Militia authorities, Sir William McKenzie
and certain residents of the city, the present Cadet Corps of our High
Schools has had many advantages, among them a trip to Australia, New
Zealand, etc., which will, I trust, be of material advantage not only to the
individual members of the Corps, but also to the City of Vancouver, the
Province and the Dominion.
It would be well if some steps were taken whereby Cadet work could
be extended to every boy in our High Schools physically capable of taking
up the necessary training. I feel convinced that every boy would be materially benefited physically, mentally and morally.
In reference to the girls of our High Schools, if more opportunities for
perfecting themselves in home economics and in physical culture were given
them, I feel assured that it would result in great benefit to not only the
present generation, but also to future generations.
Other matters of interest to the Board will be touched on by the
Chairman of the Management and Building Committees, and reports of the
Municipal. Inspector, Medical Inspector, Supervisors and other officials.
The fact that the three Trustees who were nominated for re-election
met with no opposition and were declared elected by acclamation may be
taken as an indication that the policy the Board has pursued during
the past year has been approved of by the electors. This is, I believe, the
first occasion that all the members of the old Board have been re-elected
without opposition.
In conclusion I would thank the members of the Board for their harmonious co-operation in the arduous work of the year 1912; to their
individual work and assistance must be attributed any success that has
attended our labors.
Respectfully  submitted,
W. D. BRYDONE-JACK,
Chairman of School Board. BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
13
REPORT OF THE MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE
Vancouver, B. C, January 7, 1913.
Mr. Chairman, Mrs. McNaughton and Gentlemen
I beg to submit the following Report of the Management Committee
for the past year.
As in former years, the providing of adequate school accommodation
for a rapidly increasing school population has been our most serious problem. That it was not more serious was due to the generosity and farsightedness of our citizens. Last January they passed By-laws for amounts
totalling $776,500, and, by the judicious expenditure of the greater part
of that sum, we have been able to provide the necessary buildings, make
much-needed improvements to school grounds, and add materially to the
equipment of our schools.
During the past year eight new rooms and an auditorium were added
to the Lord Tennyson School, and also to the Cecil Rhodes School; eight
rooms to the Florence Nightingale School; sixteen rooms and an auditorium
to Britannia High School; and fifteen rooms and an auditorium to King
Edward High School.
Three new buildings of eight rooms each were erected during the
year: General Gordon School, at the corner of Bayswater Street and
Sixth Avenue; Livingstone School, at the corner of Twenty-third and
Sophia Street, and Charles Dickens School, at the corner of Eighteenth
Avenue and James Street. In each of the two latter arrangement has been
made for auditoriums.
Two new Manual Training rooms were also erected—one at the
Model, the other at the Henry Hudson School; also Franklin School a
three-room building on Block 44, Hastings.
Besides these a new eighteen-room building with arrangement for an
auditorium is nearing completion on the Dawson School grounds, an eight-
room building with arrangement for an auditorium on Block 39, Hastings,
and a similar school, to be called the Laura Secord School, at the corner
of Lakewood Drive and Broadway.
Notwithstanding the great increase in school accommodation in 1912,
an equally large increase will be imperative in 1913. The ratepayers
will, therefore, be asked at the coming election to vote on By-laws for
amounts totalling $776,000.
By doubling the capacity of the Florence Nightingale School and
erecting Livingstone School and Charles Dickens School in D.L. 301, we
start the new year with only one spare room in Mt. Pleasant School, one
in Simon Fraser, one in Alexandra, two in Florence Nightingale and in BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Charles Dickens Schools and three in Livingstone School. In these rapidly
growing districts these rooms will soon be filled and new ones will be
needed.
By the time the new eight-room school is completed in Hastings, there
will be children enough there for seven rooms or possibly for eight, and the .
three-room building on Block 44, Franklin School, is already filled. In
the Henry Hudson District and also in the General Gordon District the
schools are overcrowded and a small one-room frame building has recently
been erected in each in consequence. In the Kitsilano School the year
opens with only two spare rooms. It is quite apparent that increased
school accommodation will be needed very soon in these districts, that are
fast filling up with families.
A consideration of the above facts must impress you not only with
the thought that new schools are needed, but that they are urgently needed
at a very early date. If considerable money is not to be almost wasted
in the erection of temporary schools six months from now, a number of
substantial modern ones should be completed in the next seven months. I
wish further to point out to you not only the loss of money but the loss to
children generally arising from the necessity of reclassifying them in
January when permanent schools are opened. In the interests of our
children there should be no changing of school boundaries in the middle
of the school year, for this disorganizes the classification of all schools
whose boundaries are so changed. This can only be avoided by the completion of our permanent schools in August.
The present High School accommodation may be sufficient for the
next year. Still it will be well to plan for High School extension in different parts of the city for the near future. Do you not think that by
bringing the High School within easier reach of students, the attendance
might be materially increased?
In my report last year, I spoke of the need of Technical Schools in
Vancouver. In the establishment of such schools it is all-important to
start aright. As little as possible should be done that will need to be
undone.
Our Federal Government seem to have recognized this fundamental
principle over two years ago when they took the first step to encourage the
establishment of Technical Schools on a broad national basis. It appointed
a Royal Commission on Industrial Training and Technical Education to
study this whole question and report later. The members of this commission, led by Professor J. W. Robertson, an ardent, enthusiastic advocate
of Technical Education, have studied the needs of Canada, province by
province—one might say city by city. They have also carefully studied
the best technical school systems of America and Europe. They have
evidently proceeded with judicial caution; and we may, therefore, confidently expect to find in their report, when it is published, a very valuable
treatise for the guidance of Provincial Legislatures.  16 BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
We understand our Provincial Government is awaiting eagerly that
report and means to legislate in the light of it. In fact, it is now sending
a man to the United States, Eastern Canada and Europe to collect data
that will be of use in formulating an educational policy along technical
lines.
It remains for us, therefore, to be prepared to take advantage, at the
earliest possible date, of the opportunity afforded by such legislation for
the opening of technical schools.
In the meantime we must do well what will ever be the sure foundation of all successful training, technical or professional. We must have
our boys and girls well equipped mentally by the time they enter upon the
technical or professional courses that are the more immediate preparation
for life's work.
During the year just closed we have done our best to increase the
efficiency of the schools. The accommodation has been greatly increased
and the school equipment has been so improved that both pupils and teachers are now, generally speaking, working under ideal conditions. Salaries
have been materially increased and every precaution has been taken to
secure the best teachers possible.
As a result of our efforts, we feel that the general tone of our schools
was never better nor the standing of the students higher than at present.
No serious troubles have had to be dealt with throughout the year in the
administration of our schools. Complaints from pupils, teachers and parents
have been comparatively rare and never of a very serious character. The
various educational forces of the city have worked harmoniously together.
Teachers, special instructors and all officers in the employ of the Board
have done their best in their own spheres.
The results of the Entrance Examination held last midsummer were
very gratifying. Of the 766 students who wrote, 546, or 71% of them,
were successful, as compared with 59% for the preceding year.
In the High School Examinations too the students gave a good account of themselves in all subjects except drawing. Of the 559 who wrote
in the King Edward High School, 453, or 81 %, were successful; while
in the Britannia High School 92, or 82.9% out of 1 1 1 came up to the
standard required for promotion.
The Manual Training and Domestic Science and Art work have been
done very satisfactorily under the careful oversight of the present supervisors. The work has also been extended. Two new Manual Training
centres have been opened and two additional teachers appointed. The
Domestic Art work in the King Edward High School has also increased
so as to necessitate the appointment of a second teacher of Domestic Art
work in that school. BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 17
Realizing that more attention should be given to the teaching of
Music than was possible under a single supervisor, a second one has been
appointed to take charge of the Music in the Junior classes. The results
in the teaching of this subject in the past have been very good; but we may
confidently expect them to be even better during the coming year.
As our teaching staff increases and teachers join it who have but
little knowledge of drawing, it may be necessary to appoint a second supervisor of this subject. In doing so, however, we wish it to be clearly
understood that we do not favor having all the teaching in any class room
done by specialists in this subject. Intelligent teachers can learn to teach
drawing as well as they can learn to teach writing or arithmetic, and they
should do so. Supervisors discharge their duties when they teach the untutored teacher to teach their special subject, and then see that they do it.
The past year has seen the system of physical exercises recommended
by the Department of Education under the terms of the Strathcona Trust
given a fair trial with good results. The Board has continued its educational work under Lieut. Bundy so that now nearly every teacher on our
staff is qualified to teach the course. At present the exercises are taken up
in nearly every class room, and Mr. Bundy has been instructed to draw up
a limit of work covering the entire syllabus in such a way that a certain
number of new exercises shall be taken up by pupils in each class throughout their course. Next year should, therefore, see the entire syllabus taught
satisfactorily in our schools.
The rifle classes have been carried on as usual during the year and
two new classes are to be organized in the near future—one in the General
Gordon School, the other in the Kitsilano School.
The Cadet Corps of the King Edward High School has been conducted as in former years, except that during the summer it paid a visit
to Australia, Tasmania and New Zealand, where it received a very enthusiastic welcome. While proud of the present corps we believe the
cadet movement should be more general. As every Public School boy,
physically fit, is expected to take physical drill, so every healthy High
School boy should be a cadet, and every cadet a student with a good
record.
A new departure was made last February in the appointment of Miss
E. J. Trembath as Supervisor of Primary work. To her new duties she
has devoted her best energies, as she formerly did in her own class room,
and with equally good results. We have every reason to believe that,
under her intelligent and faithful leadership, many of our boys and girls
will get a much happier and much more satisfactory start in their school
life than they otherwise could have got.
As the number of supervisors is increased, we feel that steps should
be taken to prevent energy being wasted by the unnecessary conflicting of
their programmes with each other or with those of the teachers.     They will, 18 BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
therefore, hereafter be expected to plan their work well in advance in such
a way as to prevent overlapping and to conflict as little as possible with the
plans of individual teachers. To do this satisfactorily it will also be
necessary that teachers should supply a copy of their own time tables to be
kept in the School Board Offices for the use of Supervisors when planning
their work.
The work of Medical Inspection has been carried on throughout the
year by Dr. F. W. Brydone-Jack and his assistants in a highly satisfactory
manner. There can be little doubt that to the vigilance of the doctors
and the school nurses may be attributed the comparatively small amount of
serious illness in our schools and homes for the past twelve months.
The nurses, under the direction of the Medical Inspector, have been
doing excellent work in the home as well as in the school by their educational work along hygienic lines. In fact so valuable has this work proven
that we have appointed two additional nurses. If these bring to their
work the intelligence and kindly sympathy of the^ other two, we may rest
assured the work of Medical Inspection for the coming year will be all that
can be desired.
The attendance of pupils in our schools for the year has been very
good, but we feel there is still room for improvement. The Attendance
Officers have worked well, doing their utmost to secure regular attendance.
From certain schools, however, we have heard complaints that teachers
are not as careful about reporting absentees to the Attendance Officers as
they should be. To safeguard against this in the future, we have prepared suitable blank forms for teachers to use in reporting, and have sent
printed instructions to the schools for the guidance of teachers in this
matter. As these forms, filled out by teachers, principals and attendance
officers, will hereafter be kept on file in our offices it will be possible to
ascertain how faithfully teachers co-operate with the attendance officers in
their endeavors to keep children regularly at .school. A lack of fidelity and
system on the part of teachers in such a matter as this may, we think, give
a general idea of their work along other lines. Strong teachers, we invariably find, secure good attendance without the aid of an Attendance Officer,
but are always ready to co-operate with him if necessary.
The Night School Classes continue, under the energetic direction of
Mr. John Kyle, to do good work. They are evidently supplying a felt
need among young men and young women. A visit to these night classes
will bring you face to face with students who are most anxious to better
equip themselves for life's work. With equally earnest teachers they
cannot but receive much good from their studies.
One thing, however, must strike even the casual visitor of our night
classes, that is, the almost entire absence of boys and girls from 1 4 to 18
years of age. This forces upon the thoughtful mind the query: Where are
the young people of our city who have turned their backs on the High BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
19
School, claiming the curriculum does not suit them? Here in our night
classes we have courses on practically all lines of present-day activity,
but few students from 14 to 18 years of age. Something should be
done, it seems to me, to give these young people some true conception of
what education will do for them: at present they evidently lack this. It
is really too bad to see them losing golden opportunities for self-improvement during those critical years of young manhood and young womanhood.
Last summer a well-earned holiday was granted to our Secretary
and Building Superintendent, Mr. C. W. Murray, who had served the
Board faithfully, in various capacities, for twenty-three years. During his
absence, Mr. Murray visited the leading cities of Great Britain and made
a close study of school administration in them. He has recently returned
to resume his duties with renewed energy and with a broader outlook as
the result of his holiday.
Several changes have taken place throughout the year in the teaching
and official staff. In June last Mr. W. P. Argue, who had for nine
years .so acceptably served as City Superintendent, resigned his position.
As chairman of the Management Committee I have always found Mr.
Argue an efficient and faithful official. His long experience in school
matters made him a wise counsellor, to whom your committee never turned
in vain when confronted by any difficult school problem. It was, therefore, with regret that we learned of his intention to resign.
Mr. Argue's resignation taking effect at the end of the summer term,
when many changes were to be made in the teaching staff, we found ourselves somewhat perplexed as to the best way to select teachers for the
coming year. It was at length decided to have an advisory committee of
three Principals to assist us. The men chosen for this committee were
Mr. Clark of the Fairview School, Mr. Cowperthwaite of the Lord
Tennyson School, and Mr. King of the Kitsilano School. To these men
we are much indebted for the valuable assistance they so readily rendered
us at a very critical time.
I am pleased also to make mention of the excellent service Miss E.
Balfour rendered during the time Mr. Argue's position remained vacant.
Her capacity for work and her grasp of official duties when left alone in
the Superintendent's office were a surprise to even those of us who had long
appreciated her worth. In preparing work, too, for our committee to
transact in regular and special meetings, Miss Balfour has shown exceptional ability.
Notwithstanding the fact that we managed to get our schools nicely
started at the close of the summer holidays, it soon became apparent that
a successor to Mr. Argue must be chosen. Accordingly, early in November we secured the services of Mr. J. S. Gordon, Provincial High School
Inspector.     Mr. Gordon had taught for five years in the Public and High 20
BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Schools of this city before becoming Inspector of Public Schools in 1902.
After eight years of faithful and efficient service as Public School Inspector, he was placed in charge of the High Schools of the Province, and
served in that capacity most acceptably for over two years.
We feel that we have been extremely fortunate in securing Mr. Gordon's services. His long and varied experience as a teacher and as an
Inspector of Schools has been a splendid preparation for the work he is
now undertaking. That he is a man who understands men as well as
children, many, with whom he has worked for years in all parts of this
Province, can testify. Naturally of a kindly, sympathetic disposition, he
is nevertheless fearless and firm in his stand for what he believes to be rights
On educational questions he is characterized by sane moderation, being
neither unduly wedded to the old nor rash in his haste for the new. We
may, therefore, rest assured that we have in him a leader in the educational
work of this city who may safely be trusted by all who work with him.
Under his wise and energetic leadership we confidently expect great things
in the  future.
In closing permit me to urge that our watchword ever be Onward
and Upward. We have grand opportunities in this great new city of the
Last Great West. The coming generation in Vancouver will be largely
what we make it.
Respectfully submitted,
THOMAS DUKE,
Chairman Management Committee. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
21
REPORT OF THE BUILDING AND GROUNDS
COMMITTEE
Vancouver, B. C, January 7,  1913.
Mr. Chairman, Mrs. McNaughton and Gentlemen:
I beg to place before you this, my report for the year ending December 31,  1912.
As you are aware, the Building Committee work is, more or less, the
adjusting and distributing of contracts on the various works. It must,
therefore, be more or less a statement of figures. The year 1912, I
think I can safely say, has been by far the busiest year the Building
Committee have had to deal with. I am going to refer back to the report
of last year, in which it states the total amount of $967,000.00 as having
been expended or will be expended this year 1911. I am basing my figures
and classifying same differently from the manner that has been adopted in
the past year, which allows a comparison to be made on this figure, that
is to say, that the actual capital expenditure exceeds the above figure by
practically $130,000.00, being $1,095,400.00. This figure represents
capital expenditure for 1912, excepting revenue charges for painting, of
approximately  $6,000.00.
It is a very easy thing to make quotations of this nature. They are
simply a collection of figures, and one hundred thousand increase over
last year's work may not strike some people as to the enormous amount of
work that has been entailed in this expenditure. We have had a total of
54 meetings, which is very nearly 5 meetings per month, and the duration
of same would be approximately an average of 3 hours. This will itself
give you some idea of the strenuous work that the Members of the Building Committee have had to face for 1912.
I will now take this amount of $1,095,400.00 and show you what
same consists of:—
CAPITAL EXPENDITURE, ARCHITECT'S CERTIFICATES
Building   contracts I .$62«00.00
Buildings,  1 0 per cent, basis.....         7,000.00
Heating and ventilating contracts     1 04,500.00
Heating and ventilating,   10 per cent, basis..      12,700.00
Electrical construction contracts and otherwise     6,300.00
Excavating   and   grading....      25,400.00
Linoleum § -     1 1,000.00
Retaining  walls      -        lHDO.00
Desks        8,700.00
Blinds       2,700.00
Blackboards   ----- |        2,700.00
Janitors' houses, the construction, repairs, renewals and removing       15,300.00
 $   823,200.00
!■*- 22 BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
CAPITAL EXPENDITURE, SECRETARY
Repairs, renewals, alterations to buildings, including King Edward High School $  33,000.00
Grading grounds, improvements, etc., by day
labour    --     35,400.00
 68,400.00
Manual    Training    and    Domestic    Science
equipment     7,800.00
Capital expenditure—land purchases         1 96,000.00
$1,095,400.00
In glancing over these figures, I might mention some of the amounts
involved; for instance, land purchase, $196,000.00. Although this will
be paid out in large amounts and does not entail the amount of work that
the smaller items would do, it has taken up probably more time than anything else with the exception of some of the big contracts that the Building
Committee has had to deal with, because it was necessary on many occasions to go over proposed sites to enable the Members of this Committee
to obtain what they honestly thought was the best, and at the most
reasonable cost. It is not so much a matter of buying land at the present,
as far as school sites are concerned, but we, as a body, have to use the
best of our judgment as to the future value and usefulness of any site that
may be purchased in years to come. Our predecessors have certainly
done exceedingly well in this way and some of the school sites at the
present moment are a credit to a City of very much greater size than
Vancouver is to-day; therefore, let us hope that the same thing can be
said about us in our selection of grounds when Vancouver becomes the
great City that she undoubtedly will.
Another item I will touch on is the grading of grounds, etc. This is
also a considerable item, totaling altogether $35,400.00, and has been
done by labourers employed by the Board direct, under the able supervision of foremen who have been in the employ of the Board of School
Trustees for a great number of years. This work has also received a
large portion of the Members of the Building Committee's attention during
the year, as on many occasions they have visited the various grounds, giving advice where necessary and seeing that the money so expended has
been with the object of giving the best playgrounds for the children,
at the same time making them creditable to the City from a sightseer's point
of view. Although perhaps many of the grounds are not showing
the benefit of this supervision at the present moment, they undoubtedly will
in the next few years. Much as we should like to see grass and nice
trees, etc., around the schools, it is a very hard matter to get this adjusted,
even in one year's work. It is not through lack of effort on our part, as
much as owing to the alteration of grades, etc., in this growing City.  24 BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
A further item I shall touch upon will be repairs, renewals, building
and removing of janitors' houses, $15,300.00. It has been the endeavor
of this Committee to make suggestions from time to time which have been
adopted by your Board as to this expenditure. Several of the janitors'
houses have been thoroughly fixed up, and again new ones have been
built on the grounds of the various schools. The janitors are a very
important item in the school system, in so far as their houses being in close
proximity to the school, they are on the grounds and are able to take
thorough care of buildings, equipment, etc., at all times. By managing this
Department in this way, it enables your Board to have a very efficient
and up-to-date system of janitors, and we have not hesitated in any one
instance to comply with any reasonable and right request of any of the
janitors in matters relating to their houses.
The next item that I shall take up on this schedule is linoleum, cost
$1 1,000.00. My reason for so doing is, that I wish to suggest to the
incoming Board that this being such a large item, it would be as well
to have this classified under one,, By-law. In estimating the cost of a
building, one may, be forgiven, perhaps, on occasions for overlooking small
details of cost, and if the expenditure on new buildings was a little more
analyzed, the giving of contracts would be to a certain extent simplified,
as we, as a Committee, would then know the actual figure for proposed
building that would be available. In the past, it has been the custom to
have By-laws for desks, which, as you will see, was not such a big item,
being only $8,700.00. The rest of the furnishings only amount to a very
small proportion of the final cost, and they could not be dealt with in any
more satisfactory way than they are. at present.
I will now take up the question of buildings, which will be a very
short one. The following is a list of the rooms per school that have been
opened during the year 1912, with an estimated seating capacity thereto:
School. Rooms.  Seating Capacity.
King Edward High School 1  12 400
Tennyson   —    8 300
Cecil Rhodes  8 300
Florence Nightingale   8 300
Charles Dickens, Eighteenth and James  8 300
Livingstone, Block 23, D. L. 301  8 300
Britannia High School   16 600
Franklin, Block 44  3 100
Beaconsfield              1 40
' General  Gordon  8 300
The following schools will be opened and ready for occupation on
or about the Easter term: BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
25
Rooms.  Seating Capacity.
I      8 300
I      8 300
the
same manner on
School.
Laura Secord, Lakewood and Broadway..
Hastings, Block 39, Hastings         I
Further, the Dawson School will be opened in
or about August—18 rooms, seating capacity 700.
In estimating the capacity of these rooms, a very low one has been
put on same. It is a very hard thing to keep up the schools to the necessary
capacity, owing, as you know, to the enormous increase and growth of
Vancouver; and the prospects are, of which we as citizens of Vancouver
are proud, that this will continue to be so for a great number of years
to come, but it all tends to show that Members of the Building Committee,
as well as of your Board, have been doing, and will have to do, an
enormous amount of work for the benefit of education, and I know that the
present Members, in their past year's work, have exerted themselves to
their utmost on behalf of the educational system of Vancouver.
I do not think there are any further points that I can touch upon
with advantage and without encroaching upon other Departments. As
the Chairman of your Board, as well as the Chairman of the Management
Committee, are dealing fully with all matters of the past year, in so far
as their work is concerned, and also as there are various sub-reports made
every year, I will draw my remarks to a conclusion. Thanking you, one
and all, for the able assistance and excellent advice that you have given
me and the Committee I represent, and trusting that the year 1913 will
meet with the success 1912 was fortunate enough to receive.
Respectfully submitted,
WM. H. P. CLUBB,
Chairman Building and Grounds Committee. 26 BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
REPORT OF THE MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
Vancouver, B. C, January 7,  1913. '
Mr. Chairman, Mrs. McNaughton and Gentlemen:
I wish herewith to present to you my first report. It can hardly be
regarded, as an annual, seeing it covers only the last six weeks of the year
just closed.
On entering upon my duties I found, as might be expected, an
accumulation of work resulting from the vacancy of the office for over
four months. In spite of the heavy and intelligent work done by Miss
Balfour, considerable of the summer's work I have had to crowd into the
last month of the year, which in itself is a very busy one.
Much correspondence and many interviews with teachers and supervisors have been necessary. I have had to devote much time to studying
conditions as they were and as I think they should be in the future.
Circular letters and printed instructions on various phases of school activity
have been prepared for the guidance of teachers and officials; while some
correspondence has been rendered necessary by new teachers, unfamiliar
with the rules and regulations, unwittingly breaking them. These points I
mention simply to emphasize the necessity of your having compiled as
soon as possible an up-to-date manual of rules and regulations. This
will involve considerable work, as it will need to be done with extreme
care. Such a compilation, however, will be of great value and will repay
you for all work put upon it.
Beginning my work on November 1 8, and knowing that resignations
could not be demanded legally after the end of the month, I at once
undertook to ascertain the character of the work being done in the various
class rooms. To personally inspect all, or even many, was impossible, and
in reality needless.
I found that the Provincial Inspectors had been hard at work and
were reporting regularly on the condition of the schools they were inspecting. The principals of the schools, too, had nearly all sent in reports on
the work of their assistants for the term. These reports, which I found
carefully and systematically filed, I read, noting as I did the teachers who'
were unfavourably reported by both Inspectors and Principals. The class
rooms of these supposedly weak teachers I at once made a point to visit
to judge for myself as to conditions. In every case I found the unfavourable reports quite warranted. In some cases, however, I felt the teachers
had improved their work as a result of the criticisms and suggestions
offered, and were therefore entitled to a second chance in their own classes. BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 27
In a couple of cases, where I felt conditions must have become worse after
the Inspector and Principal reported, I made second visits, and was more
fully convinced that the situation could only be improved by having a
new  teacher.     Resignations  followed.
There are a few cases not altogether hopeless, but rather discouraging,
where I shall transfer weak but faithful teachers, in the hope that they
may do better work under more favourable conditions.
The two Provincial Inspectors were not able to inspect all the class
rooms last term, nor were they able to do all work as thoroughly as they
themselves could have wished. I am, therefore, pleased to know that a
third man is to join them in January. With this staff of Inspectors and
our own Supervisors and Principals, free even a half day per week to
supervise the work in their own schools, I feel that the teaching in this city
is sure to improve very materially.
These Inspectors from now on will know as they could not have
known before where the weak teachers are; in other words, they will
know where their help is most needed. The same applies to the Principals
as Supervisors and to the regular Supervisors. I have already met with
the latter, and have emphasized the desirability of their being teachers of
teachers, of their spending comparatively little time with the strong but
much time with the weak, of their not doing the work of the weak, and
thus confirming them in their weakness, but of showing them how to work
and develop strength in the putting forth of effort. If this policy be followed, as I believe it will be, we shall have loss of energy in our class
rooms reduced to a minimum.
At this point it may not be amiss to refer briefly to fears entertained
that there may be a conflict of authority between myself and the Provincial
Inspectors. I anticipate no difficulty in that direction. I mean to direct the
educational activities of our schools in strict conformity with the school
law, and while I do so no Provincial Inspector can, with impunity, even
if he wished, give orders conflicting with mine. But let it be supposed,
for the sake of argument, he did do so. What then? The court of final
appeal would be the Council of Public Instruction, of course. To that
court I would appeal for a ruling, and if sustained by it, as I have no
doubt I should be, if right, the loss would be the other man's. If, however, I were found to be wrong, I should consider it my duty to give
place to one whose judgment could be more safely relied upon.
If no more perplexing problem confront me in the years to come than
that of working harmoniously with the Provincial Inspectors of Schools in
Vancouver, we shall indeed have every reason to be thankful.
The completion of two new schools in D. L. 301 and of the addition
to Florence Nightingale School, and the overcrowding of some others, have
meant considerable work in the re-defining of boundaries for districts.     I 28
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
have endeavoured to take away about 90 pupils from Simon Fraser, 1 60
from Mount Pleasant and over 70 from Alexandra, and to reduce the
staffs of these schools one, four and one respectively, while four new
rooms are to be opened in the Florence Nightingale, three in the school at
the corner of Twenty-third Avenue and Sophia, and three more in the
school at the corner of Eighteenth and James.
By this arrangement none of the schools concerned will be overcrowded to begin this term—in fact, there will be room in each for other
classes; and in the classes now arranged for there will be room for the
influx of school population between now and the summer holidays.
The opening of another room at General Gordon, two at Kitsilano,
one at Henry Hudson, one at Cecil Rhodes, one at Lord Nelson and one
at Hastings, it is to be hoped will serve the needs of these districts till July.
The above reference to reorganization leads naturally to the thought
of loss to pupils by being thus transferred from school to school, and, of
course, from teacher to teacher, in the middle of the school year.
I realize that you may find great difficulty in having new schools
ready for occupation by the middle of August; but I should like, if it be
at all possible, that this be done in future. If it is, the advantage to our
pupils, in remaining throughout the year with the same teacher, would be
sufficient to well repay you for the extra money, time and energy expended
in hurrying schools  to  completion.
I feel that in this report some reference should be made to the work
done by Supervisors, but I have not been able thus far to get a very
definite idea of the work done by them all. In fact, at present I feel
there is no ready way of ascertaining just what time these Supervisors
spend in school or how their time is divided up among the various
teachers. This last point I consider a very vital one, and I mean in future,
by keeping on file a weekly programme of the work of Supervisors, to keep
posted as to whether their efforts are always put forth where they will
count for most. We must guard against what I believe is a danger in
some quarters, namely, of weak teachers depending on a Supervisor doing
work for them that they could do as well for themselves. Never under
such conditions will the work in the class rooms of such teachers be satisfactory. I shall, therefore, spend much time and thought during the
coming year in enabling teachers to regard Supervisors not as substitutes to
do their work for them, but as guides, philosophers and friends always
and only able to help those who help themselves. Thus far, from my
personal interviews with the various Supervisors, I judge that we see eye
to eye on this point. The carrying out of the scheme outlined above is,
therefore, only a question of time and thought.
As to my own work of inspecting, I propose to spend most of my
school time in the class rooms of those teachers whose work fails to meet BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 29
with the approval of Inspectors, Supervisors or Principals. I shall do my
utmost to help such teachers make a success of teaching. Where I find
this impossible, however, I shall expect your undivided support in applying
the only remedy available—dismissal where resignations are not forthcoming. We must ever conduct our school business with due regard to
the very manifest truths that the school is made for the child and not for
the teacher, and that it is neither wisdom nor kindness to retain a teacher
whose work in a class room is proving a failure.
Besides coming in touch with weaker teachers, I trust to meet others
in their class rooms, there to encourage them and their pupils to undertake
cheerfully and bravely the work, the real value of which even the wisest
of us at present underestimate.
I shall also have occasion to meet the teachers collectively from time
to time to discuss school matters with them, and shall be pleased, if it be
possible, to have similar opportunities of discussing school affairs with
parents. This, I trust, may be more and more possible as we secure in time
proper facilities for the assembling of large audiences in school assembly
halls. Of this let us be convinced—our schools will never reach the
high level we wish for until parents take a more intelligent interest in the
work done in them. They will then more correctly estimate the value
of that work and naturally be prepared to pay salaries that will insure
the obtaining in time of better-trained and more capable teachers—in fact,
they might be prepared to pay an expert teacher as much for training
forty children as a horse fancier will now pay a jockey for training his
favourite steed.
For years I have followed with much interest the gradual increase
made by your Board in salaries for teachers and other school employees.
I have noted, with satisfaction, many salaries more than doubled. May
I express the hope that the revision upward has not yet been completed
and that you may see your way clear to continue the commendable work
of salary readjustment in the proper direction.
In concluding this, my first, report to your Board, I wish to express
my sincerest thanks for the kindly, hearty assistance that has been accorded
me by every individual I have met with in my work since coming to Vancouver. I have noted, with extreme pleasure, the readiness of all to do
their best in whatever sphere they are working. All have been ready to
help, none to hinder. While this continues—and I trust it always will—
I know that my work among you, let it be ever so heavy, will never
cease  to be  enjoyable.
Respectfully submitted,
J. S. GORDON,
Municipal Inspector of Schools. School Medical Staff BOARD  OF  SCHOOL TRUSTEES                  31
MEDICAL INSPECTION
Vancouver, B. C, January 7,  1913.
/. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:
I have much pleasure in submitting to you  the report on Medical
Inspection for the year ending December 31,  1912.
Number  of  schools                         29
Highest  enrolment                              12,393
Total number of examinations, inspections, etc       68,380
Total number of visits to schools          1,085
Number of inspections      56,683
Number of physical examinations         9,965
Number of examinations at school clinic                     1,890
Number of pupils excluded from school             495
Number of pupils readmitted to school                                                      1,426
Number of notices sent to parents              7,426
Number of home   visits         1,181
Number of pupils having received treatment         2,912
Number of swabs   taken                  372
Number of swabs positive (diphtheria) j               1 3
^Communicable Diseases in children of school age:
1. Anterior    Poliomyelitis..       0
2. Chicken-pox       21
3. Diphtheria   .. 1     67     About 30% living at the Children's
Home.
4. Measles        658                  p||         5             g        J § «j
5. Mumps      59                ~ tj       2          &       iPs!
6.     Scarlet   fever                           62                    c«g        H        *d         °§^
7. Smallpox          0                  3 Q        i 5        .^         bc^_ >
8. Typhoid  fever            .....        9                   ^o        jp         g        -§°S
9.     Whooping-cough          21                    H         * g         ilfilliSI
P   rv      1                                         ^g       <       ^S   ^2S
o/firc Diseases:                                               ^           ^            3       Wmmi
1     Eczema          29            10          10          20     100%
2. Impetigo contagiosa ......     30      30          30          30     100%
3. Pediculosis   1086     1086    1086     1086    100%
4. Scabies  (Itch)          .....    44     42        42        42     100%
5.    Ringworm     34         34        34        34    100%
6.     Unclean                             .151          151         151         151      100% 32 BOARD  OF  SCHOOL TRUSTEES
63
15
6
40%
29
363
137
38%
38
9
4
45%
Diseases of the Circulatory System:
1. Anaemia   296           50 16 12        75%
2. Heart      (organic     and
functional  defects)....  209           14 14 11      '79%
Diseases of the Respiratory System:
1. Pulmonary Tuberculosis        1      (Excluded from school)
2. Bronchitis    (Acute   and
chronic)      60
Diseases of the Glandular System:
1. Enlarged  and  Palpable
Glands 4103     ...
2. Enlarged    Tonsils    and
Adenoids ..2730     ...
3. Enlarged     Thyroid
(Goitre)         171      ...
Deformities:
1. Chest  83
2. Extremities  9
3. Spine    5
4. Palate  3
Mental Defectives:
Mental Defectives      42
Eye Trouble \  662   279 109 116 106%
Ear Trouble    590   302 44 24 55%
Bad Teeth   6576  3922 3922 1729 44%
*Note.    All cases not reported   Average %=65%
On examining the above figures we find that in 68,380 examinations there were found 1,086 cases of pediculosis. Under this name
were included many cases where there were only a few old, dry, dead nits,
evidence only of past and cured disease. This means only 1.5 per cent
have had verminous conditions of the head or body, a remarkably low
figure when we consider that 40 per cent, is the usual figure given for a
great many cities in the Old Country.
In 9,965 physical examinations only one case of pulmonary tuberculosis of the adult type was found. This type of tuberculosis is not
commonly found in school. When children develop lung tuberculosis they
are usually too sick to attend school. We are able to devote on an average fourteen minutes to each child for a physical examination, but when a
child gives a suspicious history we take a much longer time, With this
short examination, even when there is no history, we are able to eliminate Boiler Room—Nelson School
Drinking Fountain—Nelson School 34
BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
all the gross cases of pulmonary tuberculosis. There is no doubt but that
beginning cases might be easily missed, but the same is also often true
even when a parent goes to his family physician and receives a searching
examination of his chest, taking one-half hour' and longer.
The next important figure to consider is the fact that hardly 65 per
cent, of those actually in need of treatment receive treatment. These
cases are visited repeatedly and will not be given up until they finally
receive treatment. Instead of 65 per cent, we should have at least 95
per cent, of these children treated. Two reasons can be given to account
for the comparatively small number treated:
1. Parental apathy and ignorance.
2. The inadequate facilities for free treatment of children.
We must grapple with the first of these by education. We must
reason with the parent and show him why the treatment is necessary, how
it will benefit the child, and how the child will be harmed by not having
treatment. There are some, however, that no amount of reasoning will
convince. Lately a little boy broke his collar bone. There was considerable deformity with the condition. The parents would not take the
child to a doctor, although the teacher, the nurse and the school doctor
tried their persuasive powers to the utmost. The city's Detective Department was informed of the case, a local Magistrate was approached concerning it, and a letter was written to the City Medical Health Officer,
but all to no purpose, the reason being that apparently there was no law
governing this case and similar ones. I would, therefore, recommend that
the Board approach the Provincial Legislature so that laws may be
enacted to prevent similar occurrences.
As regards the inadequate facilities for free treatment of school children, it seems to me that a school clinic such as is established in most of the
large, progressive cities of Great Britain, Europe, and the United States,
controlled by the education authorities, is the only logical means of meeting our duty. Until last year in Vancouver there was not even the
smallest free dispensary. Through the interest of the Vancouver Medical
Association a small beginning has been made, but the work is carried on
under poor conditions and would not be satisfactory for school purposes.
We are at the present time completing arrangements with the Vancouver
Dental Association to start a school Dental Clinic. Before, however, any
work can be done it may be necessary for the Provincial Government to
insert a special clause in the School Act, empowering Boards of School
Trustees to establish school clinics in cities where there is the need.
Again examining the figures, we find 42 cases of mental deficiency.
These children are all attending school, some 22 of them being enrolled
in special classes. There are quite a number not attending school. Nearly
all of these 42 cases are incapable of looking after themselves and cannot Wash Basins-Nelson School
Fil I      "<r:
■ M
y
m<
,i«J
Toilet-Nelson School 36
BOARD  OF SCHOOL  TRUSTEES
be trained to become good citizens. Most could be trained so they could
support themselves if they were kept in a special institution, but would fail
most miserably if they had to compete by themselves with normal men and
women.
For such children I would recommend a special building having at
least four class rooms. There should be a number of bed rooms provided,
so that parents could have bad cases placed permanently in the building.
Milder cases need only attend during the day. Provision should be made
so that each child should be developed particularly along the lines of domestic science and manual training and agriculture, and the products of
their labor should be saleable. This idea might be developed so that
the institution would be a Provincial one and would take care of all cases
of all ages.
For the milder grades of mental deficiency, in which children can
be trained to be capable of earning a living and looking after themselves,
I would recommend the formation of an ungraded class in each of the
large schools. In this class the very dull, the backward, and- those slightly
feeble minded could receive special instruction, and those capable of rejoining classes of normally advanced children could do so from time to time.
The aim of the Medical Inspection is to elevate the physical and the
mental condition of the race by carefully guarding the children. We must
also educate them in hygiene if we are to obtain the best results and
lasting ones. Hygiene at the present time is only taught in the higher
grades. It would do a great deal of good if it were taught very simply
in the lower grades as well. I would recommend that the Department of
Education be approached to obtain their permission to teach hygiene in
every class of the Public School.
Too much credit cannot be given to my assistant, Dr. A. W. Hunter,
and to the two nurses, Miss Breeze and Miss McLellan, for their interest
and faithfulness in their work. We have to thank the teachers and the
other officials of the Board for their co-operation, without which we could
not succeed. We also wish to thank the Board for their many courtesies
and for the great help they have been to the Department during the past
year.
Respectfully submitted,
F. W. BRYDONE-JACK,
School Medical Officer.  38 BOARD  OF SCHOOL  TRUSTEES
DRAWING
Drawn by Geo. Solkover—Strathcona School
Vancouver, B.  C, January 6,  1913. •
/. 5.  Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools.
Dear Sir:
I beg to submit my report for the past year. The teaching of this
subject is steadily improving and much excellent work has been accomplished.
A most important and hitherto somewhat neglected branch of our
work, memory drawing, has been taken up with great success by the senior
grades during the past year, and I should like to see more work in this
direction in the intermediate grades. This branch of the work is of great
educational value, as it gives the pupils the opportunity to apply the principles previously learned and requires more mental activity than continued
direct copying from objects.     Teachers are realizing this  fact,  and find
also that, when taken in the proper manner, considerable interest is added
to the work.
Another feature I should like to see more generally in use in the
junior grades is the construction of simple objects in paper and cardboard.
This would make a good introduction to the manual training course which
commences in the intermediate grade.
The nature drawing I find as a rule needs more exact observation
and more finished execution. This is, perhaps, one of the most difficult
branches of the subject to teach satisfactorily on account of the technical
skill required in order to direct the class to observe closely and give life to
their drawing.
Design work shows the most satisfactory results, some of last term's
work being really excellent and showing a great advance in freedom of
treatment, arrangement and colour.
Another branch of work which has been receiving special attention
is that of pencil drawing in the junior and intermediate grades.    It requires BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
39
more close observation and patience to obtain good results with the pencil
than* with the brush, and first attempts are often discouraging. In consequence, it has sometimes been neglected. This term, however, has shown
considerable improvement in this direction. Geometry is being well taught
in the entrance classes, but in many of the other senior classes I would like
to see less direct working of problems from the books. The aim should
be to apply these problems to other cases and develop the reasoning
powers of the children.
Two exhibits of work from all the schools have been prepared during
the year—one for Vancouver and one for Toronto. Both these exhibits
compare well with that of the previous year and show a higher standard of
work.
In conclusion, I wish to thank the principals and teachers for their
hearty co-operation during the past year.
Respectfully submitted,
W. P. WESTON,
Supervisor of Drawing.
Brush Drawing—Grandview School  BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 41
MUSIC
Vancouver, B. C, January 6,  1913.
/. 5. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:
In presenting this, my seventh annual report of the Music Department of our schools, I am pleased to say that notwithstanding the unprecedented influx of new teachers, totalling nearly one hundred during the
year, we have been enabled, through the splendid efforts of many of our
older teachers, and the hearty co-operation of the principals, to maintain
a fair standard, and we are enabled to look out upon the new year with
encouraging prospects.
There was a time when many of our teachers used to think that
because music was a special subject it was not compulsory, and there may
be a few who cherish the thought still. I am glad to say, however, that
the majority of those who once held such views have changed them, and
their attitude now is of interest and loyalty to the subject.
The new teachers who have come to us during the past year, with
few exceptions, have manifested a splendid attitude toward the work of
this department. Very few, indeed, had any previous experience with
the subject before coming here. They have attended our teachers' class
regularly, and several have already made a very creditable beginning.
With few exceptions, both old and new teachers have shown commendable interest and a sincere desire to carry out the Supervisor's plans.
The greatest obstacle to successful work in this department is the
employment of so many teachers who possess no adequate teaching knowledge of the subject. It is not only necessary that the teacher shall know
the subject-matter to be taught: she must understand the application of
pedagogical principles to the teaching of the subject. She must have
a good working knowledge of methods which are founded upon the pedagogical principles. There are many teachers who possess splendid and
accurate knowledge of the subject material, but who are not very successful
as instructors, and this is because they do not know how to properly present
the subject to the young, immature minds.
The foregoing is offered not as a reflection upon our teachers, but
simply to show the necessity for teachers making a thorough and systematic study of methods.
The children in the primary grades are taught mainly by ear. The
work in these grades consists almost entirely of ear-training, tonal production, and the singing of songs. It is very important, therefore, that we have
teachers with well-trained ears and good voices in these grades. 42
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Excellent work has been done by many of our primary teachers
during the year, and also in the intermediate grades some good results have
been obtained in unison and part-singing and in sight reading.
I regret to report that the work in the senior grades is not so satisfactory. The amount of time given to the subject in the senior grades does
not average thirty minutes a week, which is simply absurd.
During the year we were honoured with a visit from the Duke of
Connaught, Governor-General of Canada; the Duchess of Connaught
and Princess Patricia. They were accorded a magnificent reception by
the city, our schools doing their part in a highly creditable manner. Four
thousand five hundred children and 200 teachers assembled on the Aberdeen School Grounds, sang and cheered in such a manner as to bring
forth most flattering comments from their Royal Highnesses, saying it was
the best children's singing they had ever heard.
Our Night School classes have been well attended, artd the members are very enthusiastic in their work. On May 6 the Choral Class
and Orchestra gave a concert in the Vancouver Opera House, which was
a most creditable performance, and was appreciated by a large and influential audience.
This season the membership is much larger than last, and the interest
is correspondingly larger.
It will be of interest to you, Sir, to learn that the membership of
our Orchestra and Choral Society is composed largely of past pupils of
our Public Schools, High Schools, Normal students and teachers, and I
am sure it will be pleasing to the Board of Trustees, as it was with this
object in view that the classes were organized.
It is also gratifying to know that the public performances of these
classes compare most favorably with the best in B. C.
In conclusion, I desire to express my sincere thanks to the Board
of Trustees, the Supervisors of other subjects, Principals, and all others
who have in any way helped to make our work pleasant and profitable
during the year, and to yourself, Sir, for the tokens of encouragement
which I have already received from you.
Respectfully submitted,
GEO. P. HICKS,
Supervisor of Music. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
43
k
•.it* ' '
jgilflSrc;
•S"9*  J'J^.*2%tf
*4 v-
^jj£&&£
4^1
8 m *~* "r"*rT:
■^*8^f
w^^^^^-%!7
ClassExercise— Central School 44
BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
PHYSICAL CULTURE, DRILL, ETC.
Vancouver, B. G, January 6,   1913.
/. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:
I beg to submit the following on the subject of Physical Culture,
Fire Drill and other daily movements of the pupils of our City Schools for
the year 1912:
Physical Culture—In connection with the change of system
in Physical Culture, as required by the conditions of the Strathcona Trust,
I desire to state that an excellent foundation for
the prescribed course (as per syllabus of instruction) has been laid, as far as physical benefit to
the pupils is concerned. This has been accomplished mainly by the efforts of the teachers of
the school staff, to whom much credit is due.
Teachers' afternoon classes were held, after
school hours, for seveial months and instruction
given in several of the tables, which resulted in
the laying of the foundation for the course. Our
teachers seemingly have endeavoured to qualify
themselves in this subject at their earliest convenience, the result being that they are now imparting the instruction to the pupils of their own
classes, and not only are better results obtained
physically by the pupils, but greater uniformity is assured.
To refer again to the teachers preparing themselves to instruct in
this subject, I will mention that during the Night School session, held at
the latter part of 191 1 and the beginning of 1912, no less than 55 of
our teachers attended my class. At the end of the course they were
examined by the Provincial Inspector of Physical Culture, and granted
certificates as instructors. Again, during July of 1912, I was requested
by the Department of Militia to instruct another course held at the Vancouver Drill Hall, at which 183 teachers, from various parts of the
Province, attended. About 40 of that number were members of the
City School Staff. I believe that all of them were successful at the
examination, and we now have about 155 qualified teachers. At the
Night School Session, now being held, there are 12 7 teachers enrolled.
I hope to complete the course by the end of March or the beginning of ,
April, 1913, and should those attending be successful, then, with a few
exceptions, all the teachers of the Vancouver School Staff will be qualified
Lieut. Bundy,
Drill Instructor BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 45
as instructors.    This, I think, shows very rapid progress, and reflects great
credit on the teachers themselves.
While good results have been obtained in all our schools, much
remains to be done. With the approval of the Board, it is my intention,
at the beginning of the year 1913, to commence the grading of the various
tables of exercises (of which there are 72) to suit the age and size of
the pupils, and the different grades of classes. As the number of classes
in each school varies somewhat, this will require careful preparation and
supervision.
FlRE DRILL—The important subject of "Fire Drill" has been
receiving careful attention on the part of the individual teachers and
myself. The system, as used now, permits of each individual class being
practised by its own teacher at any moment without the sounding of the
General Alarm and disturbing all classes too often. The same Commands
and Movements are used in both cases, and with the pupils in any position.
Daily Movements—The daily movements of the pupils, such as
assembling, dismissing, etc., are still being strictly adhered to, and are
adjusted for the use of the teachers in handling the pupils daily, from the
opening to the closing of school.
SCHOOL RlFLE TEAMS—The progress of the official Rifle Teams
has been exceedingly good under the able instruction of Mr. S. Gardner.
The number of these teams has now been increased from 16 to 20, and
are at present receiving instruction from Mr. V. Z. Manning, who was
appointed to the position at the latter part of the year, vice Mr. S.
Gardner.
Attached please find official report for the school year ending June
30th, 1912.
In conclusion, I desire to thank the Board for their support during
the year just ended.
Respectfully submitted,
A. C. BUNDY,
Supervisor of Physical Culture. 46
BOARD  OF  SCHOOL TRUSTEES
FINAL  RESULTS  OF  THE  PUBLIC  SCHOOLS
RIFLE COMPETITION.
The Public Schools Rifle Competition for 1911-12 was concluded
during the past week and the winning teams and individuals have received
their well-earned prizes. Sixteen schools had teams competing and twelve
completed the full number of shoots. The season has been a most successful one, and some particularly good scores have been made by the youthful marksmen. The competition takes place at the Drill Hall, by the
courtesy of Lieutenant-Colonel J. Duff-Stuart, and is held after school
hours, and is entirely voluntary. When one looks at the appended prize
list he will realize what a keen interest the citizens of Vancouver take
in the competition. The prize list filled in less than a week and many
others wanted to give. The latter will be remembered next year, when
a further lot of prizes will be required.    The Model School, with a good
aggregate of 3,012, wins the Challenge Cup presented by Mayor Findiay,
a handsome trophy, of which the boys are very proud. The cup will be
competed for annually until it is won three times by any school, when it
will become the property of the winners. The second team prize, the
Townley Cup, was won by the Macdonald School, with a score of 2,882.
R. Galloway, of the Roberts School, wins the silver medal presented by
the B. C. Rifle Association, with a fine aggregate of 419 out of a possible
455, with J. Willmon running him a close second with 406, and takes
the bronze medal presented by the same association. Mr. S. Gardner,
who looks after the shooting, wishes to express the hearty thanks of the
members of the City Public Schools to the donors of prizes mentioned
below.
Appended is a list of prize winners and standing of the teams:
School
Model
Macdonald ....
Lord Roberts
Seymour 	
Name Prize
J.   Fraser ...Cup
E.   Smith   Medal
W.   Crawford ;Cup
G.    Doran  Medal
R.  Galloway  Cup
R.   Granger  Medal
W. Quirt        Cup
A. Cetti I Medal BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
47
School
Dawson
Strathcona
Lord Tennyson
Lord   Nelson....
Alexandra
Cecil Rhodes
Mount Pleasant
Central 	
Grandview	
Simon Fraser ....
Kitsilano	
.1.
.2.
.1.
.2.
..1.
..2.
n
..2.
..1.
..2.
..1.
..2.
..1.
..2.
..1.
..2.
..1.
..1.
...1.
...1.
Name Prize
F.   Voitkevic Cup
H.    Dixon I Medal
P.   Chatters Cup
D. Rose Medal
W.    Rose Cup
B. Hillis Medal
A.   MacLellan Cup
E. Wood       Medal
F. DeWolf Cup
C. Welch Medal
F. Garvin Cup
R. Leonards Medal
J.   Willmon Cup
1   Fraser Medal
W.    Martin Cup
S.   Thomson Medal
G. McDonald Medal
T.   H.   Pratt Medal
G.    McAllister Medal
E.    Johnson Medal
The following boys each received a special medal for making a
"possible": P. Chatters, Strathcona School; R. Galloway, Lord Roberts
School; B. Esplen, Model School; H. Conway, Simon Fraser School;
L. Kyle, Fairview School; R. Leonards, Alexandra School; C. Crawford,
Macdonald School; G. Doran, Macdonald School; F. DeWolf, Fair-
view School.
Standing of Schools That Completed 13 Shoots.
Model     3,012    Lord Tennyson   2,622
Macdonald   2,882    Lord Nelson  2,599
Lord Roberts  2,861     Fairview     2,587
Seymour     2,784 Alexandra    2,557
Dawson    2,782    Cecil Rhodes   2,530
Strathcona   2,718    Mount Pleasant   (12)   2,408
Prize List.
Mayor Findiay, challenge cup; Dr. W. D. Brydone-Jack, cup and
medal; Lieutenant-Colonel J. Duff-Stuart, cup; Lieutenant-Colonel R. G.
Edwards-Leckie, cup; Messrs. Clubb & Stewart, cup; Daily Province,
cup; The World, cup; News-Advertiser, cup; Thomas Duke, Esq., cup;
A. E. Austen, cup; H. Birks & Sons, Ltd., cup; J. A. Flett, Ltd., cup;
C. W. Murray, Esq., cheque; William Murray, cheque; W. E. Flumerfelt, Esq., medal; George J. Dyke, medal; W. P. Argue, Esq.,
medal; David Soencer, Ltd., medals; B. C. Electric, cheque; J. R.
Tacey, cheque; E. Hermon, cheque; Gordon-Drysdale, Ltd., cup.
A. C. BUNDY. 48
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
No. 1-S. NORTHROP
Supervisor of Manual Training
No. 2-C. W. MURRAY
Secretary of School Trustees and School Building
Superintendent
No. 3—J. S. GORDON
Municipal Inspector of Schools
No. 4—W. P. WESTON
Supervisor of Drawing
No. 5—GEO. P. HICKS
Supervisor of Music
No. 6-MISS E. BERRY
Supervisor of Domestic Science  50
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
PRIMARY WORK
Vancouver, B. C, January 4, 1913.
/. S. Gordon, Esq., B.A.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:—
I herewith submit the general report upon Primary Work for the
year  1912.
My appointment to the work of the Primary Department was made
last February and there were then sixty-six primer classes in operation.
At the beginning of the second term several changes were made in the
staff. A few teachers had resigned and some had been assigned to other
positions. This necessitated the appointment of fourteen new teachers,
while eight others who had been doing Intermediate or Senior grade work
were given Primary classes. Three new rooms were opened at once and
others later on, and at present there are seventy-one primer classes in the
City.
Owing to the prevalence of infectious disease early in the year the
progress of a large number of children was greatly retarded.
Little time has been spent with capable teachers. Those having less
experience have been visited frequently and have been given as much
assistance as possible with organization of work, methods of instruction,
and the classification and promotion of pupils.
The necessity of thoroughly grounding pupils in the more essential
subjects on the school course has often been impressed upon the teachers,
and it is to be regretted that children are sometimes promoted to the next
grade before they are prepared for the work.
The use of the new limit table will probably do much toward securing
thoroughness and uniformity in all the subjects.
As monthly reports upon general progress have been furnished, it will
be sufficient if the more important subjects are briefly discussed here.
Reading has been better taught than any subject on the course. The
majority of the children are reading with fluency and natural expression.
Number work should receive more attention. When pupils are weak in
this subject it is usually found that a proper use of objects has not been
made. The value of dictation and transcription exercises should be more
generally recognized.     Good results have been obtained in spelling.    A BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
51
test was given last June and with few exceptions the class percentages were
excellent.
Teachers have been requested to give special consideration to the
development of backward pupils.
The courtesy extended me by the principals and teachers and their
kindly co--operation in the interests of the Primary Department have been
greatly appreciated.
Yours   respectfully,
EMILY J. TREMBATH,
Supervisor of Primary Work.
Modelled by G. Robson—Evening Class m BOARD  OF  SCHOOL TRUSTEES 53
MANUAL TRAINING
Vancouver, B. C, December 31,   1912.
/. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools.
Dear Sir:—
I beg to submit the following report on the Manual Training Department of the City schools for the past year.
The number of pupils is still on the increase. The maximum registration was 2,108 in the Public Schools and 378 in the High Schools,
or a total in actual attendance of 2,482 boys.
There are now eleven centres for Public School pupils and two for
High School pupils, new centres having been opened at the Model and
the Henry Hudson Schools.
The staff now numbers thirteen, three additional teachers having been
appointed during the year.
The increased population in the east and south of the city calls for
additional accommodation, and included in the estimates for next year are
provisions for centres at the Florence Nightingale School and either the
Lord Tennyson or General Gordon School. An outside building will be
erected on the Alexandra School grounds to displace the present basement
room. This is a step in the right direction and should be continued until
all the basement centres are done away with.
During my visits to the various centres, I have found the work progressing favourably upon the whole, though there is, of course, room for
improvement in some places. So far as possible our work is correlated to
that of the main school and the principles taught there in the abstract are
put into concrete form in our centres. The Manual Training teachers
report a lack of ability on the part of most pupils to solve problems based
on the before mentioned principles as they occur in the practical benchwork
and drawing. The application of these principles (in Euclid, Geometry,
Geography, etc.) to everyday life is the main end and aim of our modern
educational work, and cannot be too strongly emphasized,
I am looking forward to the time when some of our more practical
minded children will be directly provided for in our curriculum, and their
natural bent be developed, so that by the time they are 1 8 years of age
they will be prepared to take their places efficiently in any trade or industry without loss of time in apprenticeship. I feel assured that then
there will be a decrease in the number of those who leave school before the
present High School period, and who become lost in the great mass of
inefficients. 54
BOARD  OE1 SCHOOL TRUSTEES
I trust during the coming year to be able to report the commencement
of work in the long delayed forging and machine shops of the High
Schools.
I beg to remain, yours faithfully,
(Signed)        S. NORTHROP,
Supervisor Manual Training.
Drawn by Miss V. Hall—Night Class  56
BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Drawn by Miss McManus—Night Class
NIGHT SCHOOLS
Vancouver, B. C, January 7,  1913.
/. 5. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
The   Night   Schools   opened  on  October   1   with   an   enrolment  of
1,792  pupils  and at the end of December there were   1,533  attending
regularly.     Considering all things this is quite
atisfactory.
We have sixty Instructors, and our
curriculum embraces thirty-six subjects.
The scheme of work is much more
complete than it has ever been heretofore,
and our equipment in the various classes is
gradually growing more practical and useful.
1 am sure the students and instructors are
deeply grateful for the readiness with which
the Board have granted the various requests
put before them.
It is very desirable that the parents as
well as the boys and girls be sufficiently informed about the value of these classes
before  they  leave  the  Day  Schools.     The J. Kyle, a.r.c.a.
experience  of  other  nations  has  taught  the
Educational bodies that such a step is absolutely essential to success in the
undertaking. The various principals of schools should be in close touch
with the Night Schools and be able to advise and direct the pupils who
are leaving the Day Schools, too often to take up some erratic occupation,
with good remuneration perhaps but no prospects of future advancement.
Employers of labour should also be consulted and an Advisory Board
formed of such men as are able and willing to assist the Board of School
Trustees with their undertaking.     This step is  adopted in all important BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
57
centres and leads to better organization, and to the adoption of the course
of study best suited to the needs of the various trades.
It would also be well to approach the Members of the Government
resident in Vancouver, with a view to having a clause inserted in the Act
relating to Night Schools and giving sanction to any Board of School
Trustees to organize, and carry on at the public expense, any classes they
may deem desirable and necessary for the efficient education of the citizens,
in order that they may the better take part in trade and commerce.
Trusting that this report will meet with your approval,
I am, yours respectfully,
(Signed) JOHN KYLE,
Director of Night Schools.
Drawn by W. Johnston—Night Class BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
ATTENDANCE REPORT.
Vancouver, B. C, January 2, 1913.
/. S.. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:—
I have the honour to submit to you my sixth annual report for the
year 1912.
During the year there was a total of 3,441 complaints investigated
by this Department; of the above 3,115 were reported by the various
school principals, as follows:—
January 235
February    319
March 343
April  344
May   458
June | 263
September 225
October, 356
November     343
December  229
There were 302 street cases, 3 from City Police, 5 from South
Vancouver Schools, and 1 3 from other sources. Two hundred and fifty
cases of truancy were discovered, 213 cases of infectious diseases and 26
children returned to school who were working under school age.
It was necessary to take 1 1 cases before the Police Magistrate; 10
convictions were secured and fines imposed or warnings given; one case
withdrawn.
It has been my custom to attend Juvenile Court when cases directly
arose out of school, but acting under your instructions the weekly sessions
are now attended. We are thus able to keep in touch with delinquent
cases and thereby assist the Court Probation Officers to keep a close
supervision over the school boy or girl who is under their care.
I must here again express my opinion that a parental school, or some
place where children can be placed under proper care and supervision, is
needed, for it is generally the home that is at fault in most delinquent cases,
and that is where the reformation should begin.
James Inglis
Attendance Officer BOARD  OF  SCHOOL TRUSTEES
59
If these people had to bear the cost of keeping their children under
proper care it would make them realize their duty to their offspring. When
these children are placed under proper care and in good surroundings, they
give very little trouble to those having them in charge. A visit to the City
Detention Home or to the Provincial Industrial School and a talk with
their Superintendent will bear me out on this point. The License Law for
newsboys should also be kept to the front. If we had such a law, parents
would be assisted to keep their children from selling papers against their will.
I would also strongly urge that our request for a Child Labour Law
be kept up and that the school age of children be increased to fifteen or
sixteen unless they are regularly employed. The latter would stop a lot
of boys who leave school from getting into idle habits, and it is only fit
that the employer should be kept liable, the same as the parent, unless an
employment certificate was produced. A Commission of Inquiry into
conditions will sit in Vancouver shortly. I should recommend that our
case be laid before them.
I take this opportunity of thanking the teachers and principals of our
schools, the Judge and Probation Officers of the Juvenile Court, with whom
this Department has worked harmoniously for the best results.
Respectfully submitted,
(Signed) JAS. INGLIS,
Attendance  Officer.
Drawn by Miss Eaves— Night Class BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
ENROLMENT AND AVERAGE ATTENDANCE
FOR  1913
En
rolment.
11,573
11,764
11,651
11,757
11,375
10,743
10,919
12,075
12,393
12,384
11,828
year since 189
Av.  Attend.
10,007.55
10,210.64
9,963.87
9,902.37
9,658.34
9,502.10
10,308.54
10,708.85
October 	
10,925.82
10,713.84
December 	
Enrolment for the
Year
1898 ,
month of Octobf
Enrol.
 2724
 3117
r for each
Year
1906 .
10,673.52
Enrol.
. .. 6437
1899	
1907:..
 7370
1900	
 3393
 3710
1908...
 7984
1901	
1909
. ...8845
1902	
 4087
 4416
1910...
 9942
1903	
1911
11385
1904	
 4994
 5609
s  on  the Vancou
1912
123 93
1905	
Number of teacher
since 1902:
December,  1903	
December,  1904  	
December,  1905   	
December,  1906   	
December,  1907  	
December,  1908   	
December,  1909   	
December,  1910  	
December,  1911   	
December,  1912   	
ver "staff in
Males.
     29
     30
      29
     38
     47
     58
     66
      71
1777.73.   93
Decemb
er for each  year
emales.        Total.
63                          92
71                        101
83                       112
92                       130
103                       150
115                      173
128                       193
155                       226
181                       263
220                       313
Special Instructors employed by the Board, 1912:
Instructors of Manual  Training	
Supervisor of Manual Training	
Instructors of Domestic Science	
Supervisor of Domestic  Science	
Supervisor of  Music	
Supervisor of Primary Work	
Supervisor   of  Drawing	
Supervisor   of  Drill :	
Musketry  Instructor	
Director of Night Classes	
Teachers in Night Classes	
1
60
Special Officers employed by the Board:
Municipal Inspector of Schools	
Medical  Health   Officers	
Nurses	
Attendance Officers	
Number of Teachers holding the different grades of certificates:
University Graduate in Arts or Science	
Academic   Certificate    ".'.*"".	
First-class Certificate  '.7.7777".	
Second-class Certificate 	
Third-class  Certificate  ""!"!!"!"""."	
Temporary Certificate  /. ..'.V.V.....V.V.V....
107
81 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
61
LIST  OF TEACHERS
With Grade of Certificate and Date of Appointment
Name
Alexander,   Irene   B	
Amos,  Maude  2nd..
Anderson, Emily  B.A   August,'   1908
Anderson, Margaret 1 1st August,    1912
Anderson,  Mary K B.A August,   1908  and  1912
Anstey,  Arthur   B.A August,    1910
Anstie,  Elizabeth    2nd August,
Anstie, J. K 1st August,
Archibald,  Margaret E 1st  ..        August,
Ashmore,   R.   H B.A  August!
Astle,   Mabel  C 2nd March,
Certificate Date of Appointment
-2nd January,    1909
..August,   1912
1912
1906
1912
1912
1908
Bam,  Nellie    1st August,    1908
Baker,  P. Edna B. A January,  1906
Balkwill, Alice M 2nd August,   1911
Bambrick, Carlotta  1st January,   1909
Bawtenheimer,  Lucy   1st August,    1909
Baynes, Caroline  2nd August,   1908
Beath,  James  2nd February,    1903
Beckman, Elta M ,-Academic August,    1911
Beech,   W.   K B.   A August,   1912
Bell,   Edna  B M.   A August,   1909
Belyea,  Marie  L 2nd Angust,   1912
Benjamin,  Fanny  C B.  A October,   1912
Bentley, Nora M B.   A August,   1910
Bigney, Elizabeth J 1st August.    1909
Blair,   Eliz.   J 1st August,    1911
Bowen,   "Winnifred    2nd August,    1910
Bowles,   Allan    B. A January, 1909   •
Boyes, David A 1st August, 1911
Bridgman, Mary L B'. A August, 1911
Brough,  Thos. A B. A August, 1904
Brown,  Harriet W 2nd p August,    1912
Brown,  J.  Elmer B. A August, 1912
Brunton*   Lulu 2nd August,   1908
Bryant,   S.  J 1st November, 1912
Bryant,   Ethel  D 2nd     1908,   1911
Burpee,   Ethel  L 1st January,   1903
Butler,   Constance   E 1st January,   1912
Cahill, Hattie M 1st September, 1912
Cairns,   Kate    2nd January, 1910
Cairns,  Louise  1st August, 1911
Cameron,   C.   Alice B.   A August, 1909
Campbell,  Donald W B.   A August, 1908
Campbell,   Jessie  M 1st October, 1902
Cantelon,   Jean  M 1 st November, 1907
Carruthers,  Irene F 2nd : .August, 191.2
Carter,   Hilda  M  ...2nd August, 1903
Caspell, Edmund  1st August, 1899
Caspell, Violet  2nd November, 1912
Cattell,   Dorothy    1st January, 1904
Cattell, Margaret  2nd January, 1911
Chadwick,   Clara   1st August, 1908
Chodat,   Henri    M.   A August, 1906
Chute,   Clyde   C 1st August, 1908
Clark,   Angus    1st August, 1902
Clark,   Ethel   G 1st September, 1907
Clarke, Margaret  1st August, 1910
Clements,  Mary  1st August, 1909
Close,   Florence  J 1st August, 1912
Close,  L.  Laurina 1st August, 1912
Code,  Lome B B. A August, 1910
Coldwell,   Ross   F B.  A November, 1910
Cole, Josephine A 1st August, 1911
Colter,   Jennie   J B.   A August, 1911
Cook,   Eva    1st January, 1910
Coombs,   Mrs.   Florence  A B.   A January, 1909
Coulthurst,   Clarice  E 1st October, 1912 62
BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Date of Appointment
 August, 1911
 August, 1908
1890-1897  and 1902
1st January, 1910
Name Certificate
Cowan,   E.   Mabel 2nd....
Cowan,   Susie   1 2nd....
Cowperthwaite,   F.   M B. A,
Cox,   Bertha  C Is.—
Cox,  Nellie   S 1st August,    1910
Crake,  Ethel M 2nd August,    1909
Crandall,  I.  May B.   A January,   1911
Creech, Winifred 2nd April,   1902
Creelman,  Amelia B.   A August,   1910
Cresswell,   John   A B. A January,  1912
Crombie, I M M.   A August,   19
Cronkhite,   A.   M	
Currie,  Blanche	
Currie,   Katharine   B..
„B.   A October,   1911
..1st January,
..1st April,
Dalley,  Lucy C 1st August,
Dauphinee, A Josephine 1st January,
Davidson, Augusta J 2nd February,
Davidsont   Jessie 1st September,
Davidson,  J  G B. A.,  Ph.D September,
Davidson,    Lucretia 1st August,
Davies,  Edith A R B. A -" August,
Davy, R N M. A October,
DeBury,   Madeline  V B.  A October,
DeLong,   John  B B. A August,
DesBrisay,  Isabel J Academic January,
Dewis,   Martha  E B.   A August,
Dickey,   Alberta   F Academic January,
Dixon,  Ellis B 1st August,
Dixon,   Margaret B.   A September,
Dobson,   F   H B.   A - August,
Dole,  Harvey P M.   A January,
Dunbar,   John 1st August,
Dunning,  J TJ. .„„ M.   A August,
Dutcher,   II  K M.   Sc September,
Dyke, Kathleen A 2nd August,
Eaton, Alice A	
Eldridge, Dorothy
Elliott, Clarence....
Elliott,   Margaret
Elmsley, Ada B	
Evans, C R	
Evans,   Eleanor	
Fee, Wilfred J	
Fennell, W T	
Ferguson, Mary J	
Fierheller,  Ina	
Finlayson,    Alexander	
Fisher, Jessie E	
Fitch,  H  B	
Flanagan, Claire T	
Fletcher,   Elizabeth  E	
Flett,   William	
Ford,   Luvia	
Frame,   Emma   M	
Frank,    Pauline	
Fraser,  David R !	
Fraser,   H   C I	
Frederickson,  Gertrude  M..
Frith,   L.   Elsie	
Fullerton,   Florence A	
 B.   A..
 2nd	
 B.   A..
 2nd	
 1st	
 1st	
George, Elizabeth L....
Gillanders,   Hilda C—
Gourlie,'Wm G....	
Gower,   G  H	
Grant,   Fannie   1	
Grant, Mabel L	
Gray,   Susie  W	
Greenway,   Elizabeth..
Greggs,   Gladys	
Grenfell,  Mary E	
..B.   A...
..1st	
..B.   A...
..2nd	
..1st	
..2nd	
..B.   A...
..B.  A...
..2nd	
..B.  A...
..2nd	
..1st	
..1st	
..B.   A...
..B.  A...
..2nd	
..2nd	
..1st	
..2nd	
..1st	
-B. A....
-B.   A...
-2nd	
-1st	
-B.   A..
..1st	
..B.    A..
-B.   A..
 October,
 January,
 May,
 March,
....November;
...November,
 August,
 August,
 October,
 August,
 October,
 August,
 January,
 August,
 January,
 August,
 January,
 January,
 August,
..November,
 August,
—September,
 January,
 January,
 August,
1911
1910
1912
1910
1900
1910
1907
1910
1912
1906
1911
1911
1912
1911
1907
1912
1911
1907
1910
1912
1906
1907
1907
1912
1908
1912
 August,
 March,
 August,
 August,
....December,
-September,
 January,
 October,
...November,
 August,
1907
1912
1912
1912
1911
1912
1908
1912
1911
1893
1912
1912
1909
1911
1912
1911
1898
1911
1907
1908
1907
1911
1912
1909
1912
1909 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
63
Name
Hall,  J  H	
Hamilton,   Margaret P..
Harper,   Lulu	
Haughton,   Agnes..
Hemsworth,   E  A„
Henderson, H R 1st..
Henderson,   James M.  A..
Henry, J K B. A...
Hewton,  Sara 2nd	
Hodgins, Lena B 2nd..
Holloway,  Mary E N 2nd-
Certificate Date of Appointment
 B.   Litt August,   1911
..2nd August,   1909
..1st January,  1910
..1st August, 1912
..1st August,   1910
...August,    1912
..January,   1902
 August, 1893
....August,   1908
....August,   1911
1904
Hornby, Dorothy L 2nd August, 1912
Hornby,   Dulcie 2nd January, 1907
Howard, F Mabel S B.  A August, 1912
Huggard, Mrs Ada C 1st January, 1906
Jacks, M Gertrude 2nd August,   1909
Jamieson,   Annie   B B. A January, 1907
Jamieson,   G   W 1st August,    18(90
Jewett, F Arnold B.   A August,   1909
Johnston, D B B. A January, 1902
Johnson, Emily May 2nd October,    1912
Johnson, Elizabeth M 2nd August,   1907
Johnson,   Evelyn  M 1st September,  1912
Johnstone, Bessie 1st j March,    1891
Jordan, E E M. A October,  1912
Jukes, Marion B. 2nd March,   1911
Keith,  Walter  C	
Kelly, Minnie E	
Kendall,   George	
Kerr,  Ruby	
King, H B	
Kingston,   Emily   G..
Langley,  Celia	
Laursen, Lili J U	
Lawrence,  Frederick J..
Leek,  Edith  L	
LeFeuvre,   Eva L „.
Lewis,  Alice M	
Little,  D  C	
Little, R A	
Lindseth, Clara E	
Loggie, Annie M	
Long,  L  Pearl	
Loughead,  Mary E	
Luscombe,  E Helen	
..B.   A	
..1st	
-B.   Sc	
..2nd	
..Academic.
-2nd	
 March,
 January,
..November,
 May,
 January,
 August,
...Academic.
...1st	
-1st	
...2nd	
-1st	
—2nd	
-B. A	
...B.   A	
...2nd	
-1st	
...1st	
...1st	
...1st	
 August,
 August,
 August,
 March,
 August,
 August,
 January,
 August,
 October,
 January,
-September,
..September,
..September,
1912
1910
1907
1910
1904
1909
1906
1905
1910
1904
1903
1905
1906
1912
1906
1911
1912
1912
1911
Maggs,  A.   B	
Manning, Dorothy D...
Manning, Viril Z	
Martin,   John	
Mathews,  Stanley W..
Maxwell, Mary E L—.
Mayers,   F H	
Meadows,   Stanley  D..
Merriman,   Mildred	
Messinger,   Clarence  1
Mills,    Sadie	
Milne, Helen	
Milne, Victoria A	
Moody,    Margaret	
Morrison,   Mabel   I	
Mullin,   Isadore	
Munn, D W	
Munro, Ernest A	
McAdam,   Guy  J	
McAlpine,   Sara	
McCallum, Ada E	
McCoy, Emma C—j	
McDiarmid,   Kate	
Macdonald,    Agnes	
..B. 1
-B. A
..B. A
-lst...
-M. I
-lst..
..B. A
..B. A
-lst...
„lst...
..2nd-
„M. A., M. Sc.
..2nd...
..2nd-
 August,
...September,
 January,
 January,
 April,
 August,
...November,
 August,
-September,
 August,
 October,
 October,
 January,
 August,
..September,
 October,
...September,
 August,
 August,
 August,
 August,
 August,
 January,
 August,
1910
1911
1912
1904
1902
1908
1907
1911
1911
1909
1912
1905
1911
1909
1912
1911
1908
1911
1911
1900
1895
1910
1912
1910 64
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Name
Certificate
Macdonald,  Christina A	
 2nd—
McDonald, C May	
 1st	
MacDonald,  Edna C	
 2nd—
McDonald,   H  Lucretia	
 1st	
McDonagh,   Wm	
 1st	
McDougall, Elizabeth M	
 3rd—
McEwen,   Agnes  E	
 1st	
McEwen,  Florence E	
 1st	
McFarland,   Cora H	
 B. A..
Macgregor,   Annabelle ....
 2nd—
Mclnnes, Isabel..'.	
 M.   A
Mclntyre, Beatrice A	
 1st	
McKay,   George	
 M.   A.
McKay, Minna G	
 2nd—
McKee,  George E	
- B.   A.
McKee, Wm C	
 1st	
McKenzie, Annie S	
 B.  A..
McKenzie,  Grace	
 1st	
McKenzie,  Margaret N	
 1st	
McKenzie,  Mary L	
 B.   A.
McKenzie,  Winewood  F	
 B.   A.
McKinnon,  Mary	
 2nd—
McLean,   Alice	
 B.   A.
McLellan, Margaret E	
 B.   A.
McLeod,   Hazel  E	
 B. A..
MacNaghten,   Russell E	
 M.   A
McNair,   Muriel	
 2nd—
McPherson,  Annie  R	
 1st	
McQueen, E D	
 B.   A.
McQueen, Kate H	
, B.   A.
Date of Appointment
Neil, Mrs A B Stewart 1st	
Newby,   Myrtle   S 2nd	
Olding, Elizabeth 2nd	
Paget, Harry L 1st	
Painter, Emily 2nd	
Patterson,    Jean 1st	
Pattison,   Thomas M.   A..
Pearson,  Ethel  M 2nd    .
Peck, Eva L B.   A.Pennington,   Margaret B.   A..
Perkins,  Alice G 1st
Perkins, Ella D B.   A...
Perry, Florence G 1st	
Pickering, Walter 1st	
Pollock,  James  R 1st	
Preston,   Bessie 2nd	
Purdie,  A J Grosvenor B.   A..
Purdy, Ruth S 2nd	
Ramage, Wm G	
 B. A	
Reid, Alice T G	
 2nd	
Reveley,  Ethel  H	
 2nd	
Richdale,  Marguerite I...
 2nd	
Rines,  Alfred	
 1st —
Rines, Alice R	
 1st	
Roberts, T H R	
 B.   A	
Robertson,  Lemuel	
 M.   A	
Robinson, Geo E	
 B.   A	
Ross,   A W	
 M.   A	
Ross, Ellen D	
 1st	
Ross,   Lillian  A	
Ross, Lillian M	
 1st	
Salter,  Milred E	
 2nd	
Saunders, M B	
 Academic
Sexsmith,   Myrtle	
 2nd	
Sheepy, Janet	
 Temporar
Sherman, R S	
 1st	
Sherrin, Alice M	
 1st	
Shine, Mrs A G	
 2nd	
Shine,  Isabelle  M	
 2nd	
...February,
1911
 August,
1908
 August,
1906
.September,
1910
...February,-
1903
 August,
1912
 August,
1905
September,
1906
 January,
1911
 August,
1906
 January,
1910
 August,
1912
 August,
1911
 March,
1891
 May,
1905
 May,
1912
 January,
1912
 August,
1908
 January,
1905
 August,
1908
 August,
1912
 January,
1897
 August,
1910
 August,
1911
 January,
1912
 January,
1910
 July,
1905
 August,
1910
...December,
1907
 January,
1911
 August,
1908
 August,
1912
 January,
1902
 October,
1912
 January,
1909
 January,
1907
—February,
1901
 January,
1911
 August,
1912
 August,
1912
...September,
1912
 August,
1905
 August,
1911
 August,
1912
 August,
1910
 January,
1910
 August,
1912
 January,
1908
 August,
1912
 August,
1912
 October,
1912
..November,
1911
 August,
1908
 August,
1912
 August,
1910
 August,
1901
 August,
1893
 January,
1909
 February
1912
 January.
1911
 August,
1911
 January,
1910
 August,
1906
 1907   and
1912
  August
1911
 February
1903
 January
1909
 April,
1903
...November,
1912 BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
65
Name
Sinclair, Annie M..
Sinclair, Madge P..
T	
snide
Ei
ng, Ellen M.:
:ate Date of Appointment
.   A September,   1911
id August,   1910
id January,   1910
k! August,   1904
tdemic August,    1910
Snarling, R 1st February, 1901
Spencer,   Agnes 1st August,    1912
Stables, Nellie T 2nd February,   1912
Steeves, M Eloise 1st August,    1910
Stephens, Emma L 1st January,  1910
Sterns, Clara M B. A August, 1911
Sterns, Edith B B. A August, 1910
Stewart, Christina E 1 st August, 1912
Stewart,  Edith  L 1st '. August, 1910
Stewart, Ewen 1st August,    1912
Straight,  R 1st August, 1907
Suter, R W B. A., B.  Sc October,  1902
Tanner, Rebecca 2nd August, 1900
Tanton,   Edna   G 1st April, 1911
Taylor,  Grace A Academic August, 1910
Templer, Mrs Jean 1st August, 1911
Thomas, Owen J B.   A August, 1911
Tompkins,  Ida B. A August, 1912
Truswell,    Mary 1st August, 1899
Turnbull,  John  R B.   A August, 1912
Van Blaricom, Ida M B. A. January, 1907
Van Wart,  Elsie B.   A , January,   1911
Vermilyea,  Beulah  1st May,   1911
Ward,   Blanche E 1st . January,  1912
Ward,  Edith 2nd November,    1912
Warner,  Mabel A 2nd August,    1912
Watson, Kathleen 2nd January,   1909
Wenborn, Myrtle 2nd January,    1912
Wickett,   Evelyn B.   A January,    1907
Wickwire,  Gladys 2nd January,   1911
Willett,  Jane T B. A ? February, 1912
Wilson,  F  C B.  A January,  1908
Wilson,  Grace A B.   A August,   1904
Wilson,   Jean B 1st January,   1912
Wilson,   May  D 2nd January,    1912
Wood, Berton J M.   A.,   B.   Sc ..October,   1906
Woodhead, Thomas W Academic August,    1908
Woods,   William B.   A August,   1910
Wyatt, J M M. A October,  1911
DOMESTIC   SCIENCE
Baird, Kate I	
Bell, Adna	
Berry, Elizabeth	
Creelman,  Minerva..
Cumming, Lucy	
Fonda,    Ethel	
Martin,  Mrs  Arkley
McLeod, Jean	
Rath, Martha	
Stevens,   Elsie	
Can tell, Albert	
Chippendale, Thos	
Fairey,   Francis	
Gardner, N H	
Hill. William A ...
Lister, J. George	
Lowes,   John  E	
McAdam,   Josiah  W.
McKeown,   William
Northrop, S	
Parker, A W...."—-i...
Parker, E W I	
Sievers,  George W...
White, Charles	
 February
 August,
 August,
 January,
 August,
..September,
1912
1912
1905
1909
1907
1909
1911
MANUAL   TRAINING
.August,
.August,
 January,
..September,
 March,
 January,
-September,
 October,
 August,
 January,
 August,
 August,
 January,
 January,
 March,
 August,
1910
1912
1912
1908
1910
1903
1912
1912
1903
1903
1909
1911
1912
1912 66
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
SUPERVISORS
Berry,  Elizabeth Supervisor of Domestic Science
Bundy, Albert C Supervisor of Physical Culture
Hicks, George P Supervisor  of Music
Northrop, S Supervisor of Manual Training
Trembath, Emily .1  Supervisor of Primary Classes
Weston, William P Supervisor of Drawing
OFFICERS
Brydone-Jack,  F W School  Medical   Officer
Hunter, A. W School Medical Officer
Breeze, Elizabeth    Nurse
McLellan     Nurse
Inglis, Jas Attendance Officer
Jensen, Nels Attendance Officer
Godfrey.  Wm Attendance Officer
Domestic Science Class SALARY SCHEDULE
Grade Teachers.
January, 1913.
8th and
Succeeding yrs.
. $95
1st yr. 2nd yr. 3rd yr. 4th yr. 5th yr. 6th yr. 7th yr.
$60 $65 $70 $75 $80 $85 $90
Senior Grade Teachers.
(Maximum $100.)
Teachers having had two years' successful experience in graded
schools, minimum salary, $65.
Salaries of substitutes to he paid in cases of illness of teachers up to
20 teaching days in the year, subject to Medical Certificate from doctor
in attendance or School Medical Health Officer.
1st yr.
$110
1st yr.
$140
Vice-Principal.
2nd yr. 3rd yr.
$120 $130
Principal—Small School.
4th and Succeeding yrs.
$140
2nd yr.
$150
3rd yr.
$160
4th yr.
$170
5th and Succeeding yrs.
Principal—Large School.
7th and
1st yr.      2nd yr.      3rd yr.      4th yr.      5th yr.      6th yr.    Succeeding yrs.
$150 $160 $170 $180  m  $190 $200 $210
High   School—Male  Teachers.
1st yr. 2nd yr. 3rd yr. 4th yr. 5th yr. 6th yr. 7th yr.
$130        $140        $150        $160       $170       $180      $190
High School—Female Teachers.
1st yr. 2nd yr. 3rd yr. 4th yr. 5th yr. 6th yr. 7th yr.
$110        $120        $130        $140       $150       $160      $170
8 th and
Succeeding yrs.
$200
8th and
Succeeding yrs.
$180
1st yr.        2nd yr.
$100 $110
Manual Training Instructor.
3rd yr.
$120
4th yr.
$130
5th yr.
$140
6th and
Succeeding yrs,
$150
1st yr.       2nd yr.
$70 $80
Domestic Science  Instructor.
3rd yr.
$85
4th yr.
$90
5th yr.
$95
6th and
Succeeding yrs.
$100
Schedule based on twelve monthly payments each year.
No schedule increase to go into effect without the same being recommended by the Municipal Inspector of Schools.
The salary of any teacher may be fixed at a sum not indicated in the
schedule by special resolution of the Board. 68 BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
EXPENDITURE ON REVENUE ACCOUNT
For the Year Ended December 31, 1912
Salaries—
Superintendent  and  Assistants $ 3,765.00
Secretary  and Assistants  6,305.30
Teachers    396,035.93
Caretakers  :  29,799.25
Solicitor  650.00
 $436,555.48
Maintenance—
King Edward High $ 6,119.06
Central    3,912.75
Dawson  2,373.41
Strathcona   2,831.67
Mount Pleasant   3,890.08
Fairview    2,1 60.88
Roberts   3,158.69
Seymour  3,1 90.97
Model  3,912.29
Kitsilano   2,380.48
Grandview  2,151.50
MacDonald  2,074.65
Simon Fraser   3,205.53
Aberdeen  1,883.01
Britannia High  2,775.79
Alexandra   2,865.97
Tennyson  2,287.63
Nelson     3,554.84
Cecil  Rhodes     2,114.15
Beaconsfield     55 1.07
North Hastings   1,066.91
Children's  Aid     429.95
D. L. 301...  394.04
Florence Nightingale   3,238.14
Henry Hudson   2,932.08
General Gordon   1,555.26
Block 44, Hastings.  310.02
Block 23, D. L. 301  75.65
Block 81, D. L. 301  28.96
 $ 67,425.43
Carried   forward    $503,980.91 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
69
Brought forward I $503,980.91
Cadet Corps  $ 4,302.86
Medical Department   901.12
Telephone Exchange   1,491.60
Car Fares   865.75
Manual Training         2,788.13
Domestic Science         2,865.49
Playgrounds           3,462.17
Sanitary Towels  66.41
Contingent         9,535.43
 $ 26,278.86
Night Classes      16,422.25
Interest  and  Sinking  Fund..    142,871.22
Total Expended, 1912 $689,553.24
Deduct amount chargeable to unexpended balance brought
forward   from   1911 $     2,133.21
Total expenditure chargeable to 1911  revenue $687,420.03
Add  unexpended  balance   of   1911    appropriations   carried
forward as per New Schools Act  $    2,737.76
$690,157.79
G. F. BALDWIN,
City Comptroller
C. W. MURRAY,
Secretary.
JOHN KENDALL,
City Auditor.
W. D. BRYDONE-JACK,
Chairman. TOTAL EXPENDI
Aberdeen	
Alexandra   	
Beaconsfield   	
Cecil Rhodes	
Central   	
Chas. Dickens	
(Successor to D.L. 301)
Children's   Home....
Dawson 	
Fairview    	
Flo.   Nightingale....
Franklin 	
Gen.   Gordon	
Grandview 	
Hastings 	
Henry Hudson	
Kitsilano   	
, Livingstone 	
(Successor to D.L. 301)
Macdonald 	
Model   	
Mt.    Pleasant	
Nelson 	
Roberts 	
Seymour 	
Simon  Fraser....	
Strathcona 	
Tennyson  	
Britannia   High	
King  Edward	
D.  L.  301	
Office  	
Teachers'
Salaries
$11,221.75
17,141.75
2,643.50
9,562.30
.  19,945.45
2,205.30
17,593.35
17,445.60
11,636.45
1,209.75!
4,230.25
12,266.26
6,586.05
9,097.30
12,363.05
10,180.70
18,740.58
20,348.75
11,722.03
19,495.36
20,585.65
16,179.08
19,391.55
11,498.00;
16,629.00
72,677.50
3,762.50
Janitors'
Salaries
900.00
1,139.00
313.00
1,043.00
1,064.50
148.50
35.00
1,341.00
1,243.00
1,120.87
175.00
765.00
1,052.00
720.00
866.00
888.50
96.00
949.00
1,010.50
1,224.00
1,172.25
1,176.00
1,569.25
1,452.75
1,434.00
1,031.00
1,566.00
2,078.00
300.00
955.00
Miscellaneous
347.19
882.90
47.00
341.34
575.20
19.50
390.62
213.48
728.59
22.50
164.31
320.38
156.36
555.29
386.59
203.40
772.03
699.41
940.19
710.02
526.60
565.47
487.83
580.64
660.70
1,271.24
32.00
69.02
Repairs
48.00|$  514.54
569.60
67.50
463.82
1,808.66
48.00
96.00
48.00
60.00
40.80
24.00
48.00
9.60
24.00
55.20
36.00
67.20
67.20
67.20
129.60
84.00
48.00
67.20
56.00
96.00
120.00
8.00
19.20
23.28
849.58
798.11
541.30
41.37
329.27
708.33
117.46
. 498.82
572.48
1.50
664.37
1,267.75
1,355.66
1,052.59
712.47
1,025.68
886.17
1,010.48
634.05
654.02
1,122.98
86.05
2.00
$396,358.89
$28,82S.1S rURE FOR 1912.
Qr-v«nni           Electric
Domestic
Manual         Play
Supplies
^ight and
Power
Gas
Expressage
Service
Training
Grounds
TOTAL
$     608.41     '
$   208.12
$  53.30
$     64.70
$   306.59 $          $    	
14,328.55-
1.000.76
156.60
33.70
449.30
219.70
199.99
21,933.30
1   421.26
....
33.71
15.00
6.08
3,547.05
1,152.05
52.09
42.10
27.75
76.01
12,821.96
1,006.58
193.91
40.45            105.36           54.25
76.20
25,031.85
24.02
172.52
1    273.72
3.00
12.95
15.00
5.00
16.88
2,609.71
•    883.37
18.77
30.70
80.05
192.30
14.60
21,583.59
.    717.08
88.56
66.47
60.25
143.89
87.00
21,002.69
1,637.19
31.S3
91.06
78.20
81.84
16,096.53
1    233.55
6.00
32.25
4.05
1,724.00
I    820.28
3.50
65.SO
56.70
4.05
6,554.66
1    714.34
236.78
5.05               72.57
48.55
78.61
15,630.87
1    6S5.14
18.20
35.10
34.72
8,480.83'
1,516.23             46.S2
79.30
59.90
251.16
113.43
13,218.32
731.48          115.06
3.55               26.95
32.30
35.08
15,592.79
72.50
9.40
190.65
1     734.64
47.47
44.01
36.35
90.78
13,303.68
1  1,103.87
174.40
S8.70               39.36
345.26
283.66
136.39
24,326.70
II 1,251.14
307.60
76.37
69.40
237.89
56.25
25,795.52
1,244.22
41.92
17.45
79.07
169.50
1S3.09
76.78
16,883.29
1   1.164.S9
194.63
31.20
30.86
171.88
244.26
104.68
24,231.85
■|   1,010.63
236.15
72.55
37.11
315.S5
174.42
91.28
25,772.42
-    1,062.00
125.56
43.51
33.75
277.47
148.18
67.24
21,310.96
904.31
20.26
34.04
36.50
31.20
219.87
45.05
23,900.74
834.97
|8.59-
25.21
52.65
164.40
12.05
23.68
15,031.24
1    1,182.37
34.14
8.85
70.40
127.75
298.78
64.83
21,613.04
|    1,783.89
367.35
113.25
110.65
255.61
321.02
473.28
80,921.77
193.27
127.50
1.45
15.05
15.00
30.76
4,442.63
1,287.42
$24,968.16
$2,946.61
$538.56
$1,411.00
$3,298.61
$2,935.27
$2,089.54
$499,341.60
Management   Salaries   	
 $      10,120.10
School   Desks   	
.,            8,656.07
         16,872.75
I
            9,640.03
Car   Fares   	
            ' 885.25
1,491.60
Medical Department   (Supplie
s)               983.12
Cadet Corps 	
            4,268.46
            4,574.65
72,551.95
         61,251.96
       951,469.99
Head Janitor 	
       1,180.00
$1,643,287.53 72 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
DETAILED   ESTIMATES  FOR   EXTRAORDINARY
EXPENSES FOR THE YEAR  1913
1. Block 38, West Kitsilano—
New 8-room school, arranged for 8-room extension
and future auditorium to seat 600...., $  68,000.00
2. Henry Hudson School, Block 196, D. L. 526—
New 8-room   extension—main   entrance,    principal
and teachers' room, library, etc      75,000.00
3. Block 6, S. 45 South Hastings-
New 8-room school, arranged for 8-room extension     68,000.00
4. Central, Hastings Townsite—
New 8-room school, arranged for 8-room extension
(site  to  be  acquired) 1     68,000.00
5. Block 74, D. L. 196—
New 12-room school, Strathcona School site,
arranged for 12-room extension and future auditorium to seat 600      95,000.00
6. Dawson School, Block 80, D. L. 541 —
Completion  of  auditorium  to   18-room school  now
under construction      25,000.00
7. Model, Seymour and Roberts Schools—
New lavatories for girls and boys        9,000.00
8. Janitors' Houses, etc.—
Six janitors' houses on various school sites, including
heating plants, at Britannia, Tennyson; Block 23,
D. L. 301; Block 81, D. L. 301; Block 39,
Hastings;  Lakewood and Broadway      12,000.00
9. King Edward, Britannia, Tennyson and Dawson—
Auditorium seats        8,500.00
1 0.     Schools  Generally—
Sanitary drinking fountains  and conveniences to all
schools, including cost of installation      10,000.00
1 1.     King Edward High, Dawson, and Strathcona Schools—
Grading  and  retaining   walls,    tree   planting    and
beautifying grounds, etc., to various schools, including King Edward High, Dawson, and Strathcona....     35,000.00
12.     Schools Generally—
Sidewalks  to various  schools,  including  Blocks  23
and 81, D. L. 301 ; Block 39, Hastings         5,000.00
1 3.     Schools Generally—
Manual Training buildings to schools and equipment
to Manual Training rooms, including General Gordon, Nightingale, Alexandra, King Edward and
Britannia High School       18,200.00

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcbooks.1-0221944/manifest

Comment

Related Items