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BC Historical Books

Sixteenth annual report of the British Columbia Board of Trade, together with various appendices, list… Victoria (B.C.). Board of Trade 1895

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  : " ■"I'lmffftfl,*^.
SIXTEENTH
ANNUAL REPORT
-OF T1IS—
British Columbia
oauo of tlraoe,
Together with Various Appendices, List of Members,
Office Bearers, Commercial Charges, Etc.
OFFICE:   BOARD OF TRADE BUILDING. VICTORIA, B. C.
OCTOBER, 1895.
EtTCSOTZE'£>,R*A.rrEil
Victoria. B. C. .
The Colonist Printing and Publishing & izlstidieix:.
PAGE
List of Officers, 1895-96          3
List of Past Officers 1 rom 1863     4
Membership Roll     5
ANNUAL  REPORT.
Membership  1 *
Meeting's  1 1
Harbors  11
Navigation  12
Ocean Trade and Mail Sen ice  13
Graving Dock ...   . *  13
Telegraphs  14
Nicaragua Canal  14
Trade with Japan   15
Railways  15
Public Works  17
Mining  17
Fisheries  21
Deep Sea Fisheries   2a
Fur Seal Fisheries  23
Lumber  24
Industrial Establishments  24
Agriculture  25-
Surveys  27
Immigration  27
Colonization  28
Education  28
Third Congress of Chambers of  Commerce of the Empire  29
Visit ot His Excellency the Gov.-General. 29
Trade and Outlook  29
Mining in West Kootenay  32
Output of the Mines  39
Mining Records  41
Mining in Alberni  42
APPENDICES.
LUt of Additions to the Library,  with
the Names of the Donors 43
Address to His Excellency the Gov.-Gen.. 46
Immigration  50
B. C. Salmon Pack, Seasons 1894-95 54
B. C. Sealing Catch for Season 1894  56
Summary of Sealing Catch, Season 1895.. 57
Imports into British Columbia 58
Exports from British Columbia  62
Recapitulation of General Returns from   ■
Province of British Columbia, 1894 63
Recapitulation   of  Returns  of Products
from Provinceof British Columbia, 1894 64
Forest Wealth of British Columbia      65
Timber Regulations 65
List of Trees of British Columbia  66
Strength of British Columbia Timber 67
Area and Amount of Timber Cut  68
B. C. Lumber Fleet, 1894  69
Meteorological Register for the year 1894,
Esquimau Station  70
Coal—Crow's Nest	
"      Queen Charlotte Islands	
Iron	
Educational	
Customs Statistics	
Imports into British Columbia for the year
ending 30th June, 1895 81
Inland Revenue, Canada, Divisions No.
37 and 38 . ,> 82
Exports from B. C. for 25 years	
Imports into B. C. for 25 years	
Shipping-	
Registered Sea-Going" Tonnage	
Scale of Commercial Charges	
Rates on Storage of Merchandise	
Port Charge*     Ictoria and Esquimalt
Nanaimo Pilot Ground 94
Code of Signals by Day or Night 94
Pilotage i district of Yale and New Westminster 95
Esquimalt Graving Dock 96
Esquimalt Marine Railway 97 OFFICERS, 1895-6.
D. R. KER,
GUS. LEISER,
F. ELWORTHY.
President
Vice-President
Secretary
COUNCIL:
T. S. Futcher,    A. H. Scaife,       Wm. Templeman,   R. P. Rithet,
A. B. Gray,        Joshua Davies,   T. M. Henderson, J. H. Todd,
H. Chapman,      John Piercy,        Ed. Pearson, Robt. Ward,
Thos. B. Hall, A. C. Flumerfelt.
BOARD OF ARBITRATION :
T. S. Futcher.    Wm. Templeman,    Ed. Pearson, 'Robt. Ward,
H. Chapman,       Joshua Davies,       R. P. Rithet, Thos. B. Hall,
A. H. Scaife,      Tohn Piercy, T. H. Todd, A. C. Flumerfelt.
STANDING COMMITTEES.
FISHERIES:
Ms T. Johnston,     J. H. Todd,     E. B. Marvin,     H. Croft,     R. Hall.
MANUFACTURES:
Thos. B. Hall, Gus. Leiser, J. L. Forrester,
W. J. Pen'dray, Wm. Templeman.
HAPBORS AND NAVIGATION:
R. P. Rithet,    John Irving,    R. H. Hall,    J. G. Cox,    B. W. Pearse.
PUBLIC WORKS AND RAILWAYS:
A. C. Flumerfelt, A. B. Gray, W. H. Ellis,
Tos. Hwjcter
A. L. Belyea.
W. C. Ward,
FINANCE:
A. 1 C. Galletly,
H. F. Heisterman.
MINING AND PROPERTY:
Toshua Davies, F. B. Pemberton, J. H. Brownlee.
C. E. Renouf,
AGRICULTURE AND FORESTRY:
G. L. Milne,
P. A. Paulson. Officers of the Chamber of Commerce of Victoria. Vancouver island.
FROM 1863 TO DATE OF INCORPORATION, OCT. 28th, 1878.
YEAR.
PRESIDENT.
VICE-PRESIDENT.         .
SECRETARY.
1863
1864
A. F. Main.
c w.
Wallace	
Tules David	
A. F. Main.
1865
Tules David	
James
Lowe	
A. F. Main.
1866
James
Lowe	
Henry
Rhodes	
A. F. Main.
1867
1868
1869
Henry
Henry
Henry
Robert
Robert
Rhodes	
Gusta\
Sutro	
Robert
Plummer.
1870
1871
1872
1873
Henry
Henry
Henry
Henry-
Rhodes. .. .fjig|
T. L.
Stahlschmidt....
Robert
Plummer.
1874
Henry
Rhodes	
T. L.
Stahlschmidt....
Robert
Plummer.
1875
Henry
Rhodes	
T. L.
Stahlschmidt.. ..
Robert
Plummer.
1876
Henry
Rhodes	
T. L.
Stahlschmidt....
Robert
Plummer.
1877
Henry-
Rhodes	
T. L.
Stahlschmidt....
Robert
Plummer.
1878
Henry
Rhodes	
T. L.
Stahlschmidt	
Robert
Plummer."
. Officers and Memhershin of the British Columbia Board of Trade,
FROM DATE OF INCORPORATION, OCT. 28th, 1878, TO JULY 12th, 1895
YEAR.
PRESIDENT.
VICE-PRESIDENT. •                SECRETARY.
Member, j
ship.
Oct. 28th, *!
1878, to    \
R. P. Rithet, J.P	
\\ illiam Charles ...   E. Crow Baker
83
July 3,' 80. J
1880-I....
R. P. Rithet, T.P	
William Charles ...   E. Crow Baker
69
1881-2....
R. P. Rithet, J.P	
William Charles ...   E. Crow Baker
67
1882-3..
R. P. R:thet, J.P	
Roderick Finlayson.   E. Crow Baker
83
1883-4.. . .
R. P. Rithet, J.P	
Roderick Finlayson.   E. Crow Baker
83
1884-5....
R. P. Rithet, J.P	
Matthew T.Johnston  E. Crow Baker
90
1885-6.. . .
Jacob H. Todd, 1.1'  .
Edgar Crow Baker.   Wm. Monteith
99
1886-7....
lacob H. Todd, J.P..
1 Thomas Earle    Wm. Monteith
97
1887-8.. . .
Robert Ward, 1 P	
T. R. Smith    Wm. Monteith
93
1888-9....
Robert Ward, |.P....
Thomas Earle .   ...   Wm. Monteith
67
1889-O...
Robert Ward, J.P....
Thomas B. Hall .   .   Wm. Monteith
99
189O-I.. . .
Robert Ward, J.P	
Thomas B. Hall ...   F. Elworthy ..
132
189I-2.. . .
Thomas B. Hall	
A. C. Flumerfelt.. .   F. Elworthy .
•54
1892-3....
Thomas B. Hall	
A. C. Flumerfelt.   . 1 F. Elworthy ..
170
1893-4.. • •
A. C. Flumerfelt	
C. E. Renouf...     .; F. Elworthy ..
161
I894-5....
A. C. Flumerfelt	
C. E. Renouf ; F. Elworthy ..
164
^^^1 Membership Roll,
JULY 12th, 1895.
NAME.
Anderson, W. J.
FIRM.
McKillican & Anderson
Builders.
Barnard, F. S., M.P . .. Victoria Transfer Company President.
Bullen, F. W., J.P Esquimalt Marine Railway. Manager.
Burns, Gavin H B'k British North America. Manager.
Byrnes, George Auctioneer and Com. Mer.
Baker, Hon. Col. James, M.P.P     Capitalist.
-Boggs, B Insurance and Gen. Agent.
Bone, W. H T. N. Hibben & Co Booksellers and Stationers
Beeton, H. C (London, England) Merchant.
Bodwell, Ernest V Bodwell & Irving Barristers-at-Law.
Belyea, A. L Barrister-at-Law.
Brownlee, J. H Insurance Agent.
Bennett, J ohn (New Westminster)	
Behnsen, H. F. W Kurtz & Co Manager.
Bostock, H Capitalist.
Bridgman, A. J. W A. W. Jones & Bridgman. Insurance and Fin. Agents.
Bryden,Jno, J.P.,M.P.P	
c
•Croft, Henry B.C. Cold Storage & Ice Co. Manager.
Crane  T. E Insurance and Gen.
-Claxton, Fred. J Dalby & Claxton Land Agents.
Carmichael, H Brit. Col. Paper Mfg Co. . Secretary.
Cox, Capt. J.  G   E. B. Marvin & Co Ship Chandlers.
Coigdarippe, J	
Crease, Lindley Barrister-at-Law.
Cuthbert, Herbert Auctioneer.
Cassidy, Robert Barrister-at-Law.
Courtney, Geo. L Canadian Pacific Railway.. Agent.
"Chapman, Hedley	
■Ooltart, John	
Aeent. BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
NAME. FIRM.
Davie, Hon. Theo	
Dunsmuir, James.... s^s- Union Collieries	
Dunsmuir, Alexander .. Esquimalt & Nanaimo R'y
Davies, Joshua	
Dupont, Major C. T '.	
Davidge, F. C Davidge & Co	
BUSINESS.
Chief Justice of B. C.
President.
President.
Auctioneer and Com. Mer.
Shipping Agents.
Ellis, W. H   Colonist P. & P. Co Manager.
Earle, Thos., M.P Merchant.
Eberts, Hon. D.M..M.P.P. .Eberts & Taylor Barristers-at-Law.
Erb, Louis E Vic. Brewing & Ice Co. ,Ld. Director.
Ewen, Alexander    Ewen & Co. (New Westm'r. Canners.
Erskine, R Erskine, Wall & Co Grocers.
Elworthy, F Brit. Col. Board of Trade. Secretary.
Flumerfelt, A. C Ames Holden Co., Ld
Foster, F. W  (Ashcroft, B. C.)	
Flint, A. St. G	
Fairall, H. S	
Futcher, Thos. S	
Forrester, J. L   Canada Paint Co	
Managing Director.
Merchant.
Insurance and Gen. Agent.
Brewer.
Japanese Wares.
Manager.
G
Grant, Capt. Wm	
Gray, Alex. Blair, J.P	
Goodacre, Lawrence..   . Queen's Market (Meat)  ...
Galletly, A. J. C Bank of Montreal (Victoria)
Gregory, F. B	
Gordon, J. B Bcadstreets	
Gowen, C. N Vic. Brewing & Ice Co., Ld.
GifHn, J. B R. G. Dun & Co	
Gillies, D. W B. C. Market Co	
Ship Owner.
Proprietor.
Manager.
Barrister-at-
Manager.
Director.
Manager.
Manager.
H
Heisterman, H. F Heisterman & Co	
Higgins, Hon. D. W., M.P.P	
Harris, D. R Lowenberg & Harris	
Hay ward, Chas	
Hall, Thos. B Victoria Flour & Rice Mills
Financial and Ins. Agents.
Financial Brokers.
Contractor and Builder.
Proprietor. MEMBERSHIP  ROLL.
NAME. FIRM. BUSINESS.
Holland, Joshua Insurance Agent.
Hutcheson. James Hulcheson & Co Dry Goods.
Hunter, Joseph, M.P.P. Esquimalt & Nanaimo R'y. General Superintendent.
Hendryx, A. B Kootenay Mining & Smelling Co. (Pilot Bay).President.
Helmcken, Hon. J. S., J.P Physician.
Hall, R. H Hudson's Bay Co In charge.
Helmcken, H. Dallas  M.P.P. .Drake, Jackson & H. Barristers-at-Law.
Hall, Richard Hall & Goepel General Agents.
Henderson, T. M Langley & Co Druggists.
Irving, Capt. John, M.P.P.Can. Pac Navigation Co. Manager.
Irving, P. /E Bodwell & Irving Barristers-at-Lav
Irving, Robert (Kaslo) Land Agent.
Irving, Robert, Sen       Capitalist.
Johnson, E. M    Financial Agent.
Johnston, Matthew T... Findlay, Durham & Brodie. Merchants.
Jones, A. W., Capt.... A. W. Jones & Bridgman.. Insurance Agents.
Jamieson, Robert iH. .' Books and Stationery.
Jensen, William Hotel Dallas Proprietor.
K
Ker, D. R Brackman & Ker Milling Co., Ld. .Man. Director.
Keefer, G. A Reefer & Smith     Civil Engineers.
Kirk, G. A Turner,  Be'eton & Co Merchants.
Langley, A. J., J.P Langley & Co Druggists.
Loewen, Joseph Vic. Brewing & Ice Co., Ld. Director.
Leiser, Simon Wholesale Grocer.
Lubbe, T j&: Furs and Skins.
Leiser, Gustav ..... Lenz & Leiser Wholesale Dry Good
Luxton, A. P Davie, Pooley & Luxton... Barristers-at-Law.
Langley, W. H Barrister-at-Law.
Marvin, Edward B., J.
Mason, Henry S	
Miller, Munroe	
Mara, J. A., M.P	
Munn, D. 1	
M
E. B. Marvin & Co Ship Chandlers.
B. C. Land felnv't Co., Ld. Director.
 Printer and Bookbinder.
(Kamloops) Merchant.
(New Westminster) Cannery Proprietor. 8 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
NAMI-:. FIRM. BUSINESS.
McQuade, E. A P. McQuade & Sons Ship Chandlers.
McAlister, John (San Jose, Cal.)	
McLellan, A. J	
Munsie, W Sealing Schooners, Owner.
Macaulay, H. C Spratt & Macaulay Coal Merchants.
Macaulay, W. J	
Macrae, J. E Dodwill, Carlill & Co Agent.
Macaulay, Norman Shallcross, Macaulay & Co. Manufacturers' Agents.
McLachlan, D	
Milne, G. L Physician and Surgeon.
Mitchell, James    Manufacturers' Agent.
McCandless, A.  G Gilmore & McCandless.... Clothiers.
Mason, C. Dubois Barrister-at-Law.
McMicking, R. B., J. P Electrician.
Muir, A. Maxwell Architect.
Morley, C Mineral Water Manf'r.
Morris, Walter Federation Brand Salmon Can. Co.. President.
N
Nicholles, Major John.. Nicholles & Renouf Hardware and Ag'l Impts.
Patterson, T. W Victoria & Sidney Railway. Manager.
Pooley, Hon. C. E., Q.C., M.P.P Barrister-at-Law.
Prior, Lt.-Col. E. G., M.P. .E. G. Prior & Co., Ld.. Hardware and Implements.
Pendray, Wm. J Pendray & Co Soap Manufacturers.
Pearson, Ed., J.P Clark & Pearson Hardware.
Pither, Luke  Pither & Leiser Wine Merchants.
Penny, John L	
Pearson, T. B T. B. Pearson & Co Wholesale Clothing.
Pearse, B. W	
Payne, Robert Home... Sperling & Co , 8 Austin Friars, London.
Paulson, P. A Sayward Mill Co President.
Piercy, J J. Piercy & Co Wholesale Dry Goods.
Pemberton, F. B Pemberton & Son Financial Agents.
R
Robins, S. M Vanc'r Coal Co., (Nanaimo) Superintendent.
Rithet, R. P., J.P., M.P.P. .R. P. Rithet & Co., Ld. Merchants & Shipping Agts
Redfern, Chas. E Manufacturing Jeweller.
Renouf, C. E Nicholles & Renouf Hardware and Ag'l I.mpt's.
Redmond, W. H Ames Holden Co., Ld.... Wholesale Boots and Shoes.
Ritter, Robert Ship Owner.
Robertson, J. R Financial Agent.
Robertson, Arthur Martin & Robertson Commission Agents. MEMBERSHIP   ROLL.
s
NAME. FIRM. BUSINESS.
Spring, Charles Trader.
Saunders, Henry Grocer.
Sayward, William P Capitalist.
Shotbolt, Thos., J. P Druggist.
Sears, Joseph     Contractor.
Smith, Thos. R Robt. Ward & Co., Ld Merchants and Shippers.
Sehl, Jacob Sehl-Hastie-Erskine Furniture Co., Ld.
Spencer, C David Spencer    Dry Goods.
Swinerton, R. H Land Agent.
Sargison, A. G Colonist P. iS; P. Co Secretary.
Spratt, C. J. V Spratt & Macaulay Coal Merchants.
Stemler, Louis Stemler & Earle Coffee and Spice Mills.
Scott, H. J Hamilton Powder Works.. Manager.
Sieward, H. F Ship Owner.
Scaife, A. H Journalist.
Turner, Hon. J. H., M.P.P., Turner, Beeton & Co.. Merchants.
Tye, Thomas H Matthews, Richards & Tye. Hardware, Iron and Steel.
Todd, Jacob H., T.P.   . J. H. Todd & Son Wholesale Grocers.
Templeman, Wm Times Printing Co Managing Editor.
Tugwell, Thomas	
VanVolkenburgh, B Butcher.
w
Williams, Robert T	
Ward, Wm. C, J.P Bank of British Columbia.. Supt. of B. C. Branches.
Ward, Robt., J.P Robt. Ward & Co., Ld Merchants and Shippers.
Wilson, William W. & J. \\ ilson  Clothiers.
Warren, Jas. D., Capt General Agent.
Williams, B Land Agent.
Wilson, W. Ridgway Architect.
Worlock, Fred'k H	
Wootton, E. E McPhillips, Wootton & Barnard. .Barristers-at-Law.
Walker, Walter	
Webber, Lionel H Financial Agent.
Weiler, Otto Weiler Bros Furniture Manufacturers.
Memo.—All members of the Board, unless otherwise herein shown, reside at
Victoria, B. C.  Sixteenth Annual Report
— OF THI
British Columbia Board of Trade
JULY 7th, 1894, to JULY 12th, 1895.
To the Members of the British Columbia Board of Trade :
Gentlemen,—We beg to submit for your consideration the
Sixteenth Annual Report of the Board.
Membership. Nineteen new members were  elected during
the period under review, the present number of
active members being 164.
Meetings. The regular  Quarterly  General  Meetings  of
the Board held during that time were more largely
attended than in previous years. This is an unmistakable indication that interest in the business of the Board is increasing.
Harbors. At the outer wharf at Victoria there are about
3,000 feet of wharfage, with freight sheds measuring 2,500 feet by 60 feet wide. This is sufficient for the immediate requirements of ocean steamships and sailing vessels
calling at the port. An official survey by the Dominion Government of the approaches to and alongside these wharves
gives a uniform depth of water at low tide of 30 feet.
The light on Behren's Island, at the entrance to Victoria
inner harbor, has been changed from a stationary blue to a quick 12
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE
white flash light, which is more satisfactory. The usual dredging has been continued in the inner harbor and vessels having a
draught of water of 14 feet can enter at lowest tides.
At Nanaimo harbor pile beacons have been erected and
lights are exhibited thereon, instead of on the buoys as formerly.
The change is approved by mariners. The Dominion Government has acquired Jessie Island for lighthouse purposes; and a
light will be erected to mark the entrance to Departure Bay.
A fog alarm was established at "Entrance Island" in October
last; the light at "Gallow's Point" has been transferred to a
beacon on the south of the entrance to the harbor. The depth
of water in Nanaimo harbor is sufficient for the largest vessel
afloat; and by extensive additions made this year to the wharves
the docking accommodation is sufficient for the present shipping.
The light at the entrance of Bayne's Sound is not satisfactory; it is understood, however, that the Dominion Government has under consideration other aids to navigation which
will meet the demands of the increasing trade of Comox.
The light and fog alarm recommended to be placed off
Prospect Bluff, entrance of Burrard Inlet, is still under consideration of the Dominion Government.
Improvements in deepening the channel of Fraser River
are being continued. Owing to the unusually high water in 1894
much damage was done to property on the banks of the river;
new channels were cut by the freshets and old ones were more
or less closed up. It is hoped that the Dominion Government
will take such action as may be necessary to confine the river to
its proper channel.
Navigation. In  addition to the usual repairs  to existing
aids to navigation, pile beacons have been established, about three miles apart, on Sturgeon and Roberts banks,
Gulf of Georgia. The wooden spar buoys at the entrance of
Metlakahtla and on Hodgson Reef have been replaced by steel
can buoys. ■ ■ iiU
ANNUAL  REPORT.
The Board has again urged the immediate construction of
a stone beacon, with electric light, at Fiddle reef; an iron buoy
on the west side of West rock, off Sidney Spit; and a lighthouse on Portlock Point, Prevost Island. The lighthouse will
be completed on September 30th next, but as no vote has been
passed by Parliament this session it is .improbable that the
beacon and buoy here mentioned, and other much needed works
previously recommended, will be proceeded with this year.
Ocean Trade        Trade with China and Japan shows satisfactory
and expansion.    The three steamships of the  Cana-
Mail Service   dian Pacific Steamship Company find full freights
"""""™~'""—"~ and passenger lists, and the regular sailings, one
ship every thyee weeks, have been maintained.
The vessels of the Northern Pacific Steamship Company
have also been fully engaged.
The Oregon Railway & Navigation Company have inaugurated a steamship service between the Orient, Puget Sound
and Portland, Oregon. These vessels call at this port on their
inward and outward voyages.
' The Board recommended over a year ago that mails for the
Orient be dispatched by the Northern Pacific Steamship Company's ships whenever a saving of time could be effected. The
recommendation was adopted, but instead of such mails being
dispatched from Victoria they are sent to Tacoma for shipment,
and in consequence there is still a loss of at least 24 hours.
The Board recommends this matter to the attention of the
incoming Council.
The direct steamship service between Canada and the Australasian colonies continues, and the trade between these countries is increasing.
Craving Dock.        Attention is directed to the  reduced scale of
charges for the use of the Graving Dock at Esquimalt,  to be found in the  Appendices.    This dock will admit
vessels 480 feet long, drawing 29 feet of water. H
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
The Marine Railway at Esquimalt is capable of hauling out
vessels 320 feet long, 2,500 tons dead weight, with 22 feet
draught of water.
A " way " similar to the Marine Railway, only on a smaller
scale, has recently been constructed at Victoria.
Telegraphs. No addition has been made to the telegraph
system, and Vancouver Island is frequently cut
off from the outside world in consequence of the only line being
out of order. With the increasing trade of the Island, which
customs returns show to be two-thirds of that of the whole
Province, interruptions to telegraphic communication become
year by year more serious, and the early construction and
operation of an alternative cable to connect with the United
States telegraph systems is imperative.
A cable to Australia, referred to in the last annual report,
is still under the consideration of the Imperial, Dominion and
Australasian Governments, with every prospect of early establishment.
The largely increased trade with China and Japan will
necessitate a direct cable to those countries in the near future.
Nicaragua In view of the great importance of the Nicar-
Canal. agua Canal to the trade and commerce of the
Pacific Coast, the following information is of interest M The entire length of the canal from the Atlantic to the
Pacific Ocean is i6g}4 miles. Of this distance, however, only
26^ miles will have to be excavated for the channel of the canal,
as the remaining 142^ miles are in lakes, rivers, and basins,
which will make part of the course. The elevation of the summit level of the canal above sea level will be no feet, to. be
attained by six locks, three, near either end of the canal. The
Nicaragua route will reduce the distance for a sailing ship
between England and Victoria by about 7,000 miles; and between
Halifax and Victoria about 10,000 miles. It is hardly possible
to over estimate the value of this great saving- of time and dis- jiBimnnn
ANNUAL   REPORT. 15
tance, and the consequent impetus it will give to the trade and
commerce of this Province.
Trade with A  Treaty  of Commerce  and  Navigation be-
Japan. tween Great Britain and Japan was arranged in
July last, securing to each of the high contracting
parties "most favored nation" privileges. The treaty does not
come into effect for five years from date of signature ; and it
provides that certain of the British possessions, including the
Dominion of Canada, shall not be subject to its stipulations,
unless notice of a desire that they should be party thereto be
given to the Japanese Government within two years from the
date of its ratification.
In view of the increasing associations of the Province and
of the Dominion generally with Japan, it is desirable that the
full bearing of the details of the treaty be well understood as
regards its possible effects upon this Province. The subject is
recommended to the consideration of the incoming- Council.
Railways. Although railway construction within the Pro
vince has been limited during the past twelve
months, that which has been undertaken is of much importance
to the mineral development of the Kootenay District.
The completion and operation of the Nakusp & Slocan
Railroad furnishes an outlet for the silver ores of that mining
section, and many thousand tons have since been shipped to the
United States smelters. This road is now being extended some
miles further, to reach the product of a rich group of mines
situate in the heart of the Slocan country.
The Kaslo & Slocan Railroad, running from Kaslo, on
Kootenay Lake, up the eastern slope of the Slocan range, is
now nearly completed. This railway will furnish an easy outlet
for many of the Slocan mines, from which the ore has hitherto
been teamed. It also reaches some of the mines served by the
Nakusp & Slocan Railroad, giving competitive transportation
rates. It is expected that both of these railroads will be further
extended to meet growing requirements. i6
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
Two. railways will shortly be constructed to reach the gold
mines at Trail Creek; one from a point on the Columbia River,
to be built by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company; the other
from the United States boundary line, connecting with the
Spokane & Northern Railroad.
The Crow's Nest branch of the Canadian Pacific Railroad
and the British Columbia Southern Railroad are not yet commenced, but it is understood that they will shortly be proceeded
with.
The operation of the railroads in Kootenay District constructed during the past three years has given the mining
industries a great impetus, but the completion of the lines
contemplated will greatly aid further developments.
The extension of the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railroad on
Vancouver Island has been deferred.
The projected British Pacific Railroad is a matter of much
importance to the Province, and it is hoped that a proposition
will be made to the Provincial Government with the view of
securing its early commencement. The opening up of the country lying between the coast and the eastern boundary of the
Province necessitates the building of this line, which would
develop the central and northern sections, where the agricultural
and pastoral resources are of immense extent.
Other proposed railways to open up various portions of the
Province, for which charters have been obtained, have not been
commenced, owing to the absence of required capital.
In view of the sparse population of the Province, and the
large extent of its area, a liberal railway policy on the part of
both Provincial and Dominion Governments is required to
develop the many resources of the country, especially as without governmental aid it is impossible to induce capitalists to
engage in the required undertakings, involving such extensive
outlay. ANNUAL  REPORT.
During the recent session of the Provincial Legislature an
act was passed which permits the construction of tramways to
mines, within certain limits, without applying for special legislation.
Public Works.
The   Parliament buildings,  mentioned in  the
Board's previous report, have progressed, and a
general idea of the outlines of the main structure can now be
obtained. The color of the stone used adds to the attractiveness of the design. The buildings will cost not less than $600,-
000 before they are completed.
The granite foundation of the Post Office is finished, and
the upper portions of the building are being erected. A Customs House, to adjoin the Post Office, is partly provided for in
Dominion Government estimates, and it is expected that there
will be no delay in commencing this much needed building,
is understood that these two buildings "will cost $250,000.
A substantial building for military stores is in course of
erection alongside the recently constructed Drill Hall. These
are the public buildings in course of erection.
The Provincial Home at Kamloops has been erected at a
cost of $25,832. The cylinder pier bridge over Thompson
River, at Ashcroft, will cost $11,288. Several smaller bridges
were built during 1894. The contract has been let for a Court
House at Nanaimo ; it is estimated that the building when completed will cost#$28,ooo. Existing roads were repaired and new
ones made, to increase means of connection in outlying districts.
Mining. The expectations in mining development out
lined in the Board's previous report have been
fully realized. The coal output during 1894 was 1,012,953 tons,
the second best year on record, disposed of as follows : Exported, 827,642 tons ; consumed at home, 165,776 tons ; with
less than two weeks' production on hand at the end of the year.
Shipments were made from Nanaimo, Departure Bay and Union
ports, on Vancouver Island, to California, of 649,110 tons, the
remainder being shipped to Washington State, U. S. A., Alaska, i8
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
Petropaulovski, and to the Hawaiian Islands. The coal taken
from the collieries at Union produces superior coke. At these
collieries are now being erected 100 coke ovens, for the product
of which there is a profitable market, both locally and in California.
Other beds of coal exist on Vancouver Island and adjacent
islands, but at present they are undeveloped. Boring operations are now being carried on near Port McNeil, at the north
end of Vancouver Island.
On Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group, from eight to
ten miles inland from a good harbor, three beds of bituminous
coal have been discovered and prospected. They range from
7J^ to 16 feet in thickness and are of superior quality. Two
large seams of anthracite have been also found near the east
shore of Yakom lake. Analyses will be found in the Appendices.
The deposits have attracted the attention of capitalists and
there is every prospect of this valuable coal being developed on
a large scale in the near future.
Dr. Dawson, head of the Geological Department of the
Dominion of Canada, has officially reported that the coal formation of Graham Island is less disturbed and older than that
of Vancouver Island, and is the only one on the Coast known to
contain both anthracite and bituminous coal.
The outcroppings of coal near the Crow's Nest Pass, on the
mainland of British Columbia, extend a distance of about 30
miles, and the superior quality is indicated by the analyses to be
found in the appendices. This coal produces excellent coke,
which will be in great demand in the mining districts. At
present coke costs in Kootenay $14 per ton ; but when the projected British Columbia Southern Railway is built it is expected
that better coke from the Crow's Nest collieries will be supplied
in Kootenay at about half present prices.
The smelter at Pilot Bay now uses about 30 tons of coke
per day, but its operations are very much retarded on account
of the lack of cheaper fuel, of which, when it can be supplied,   ANNUAL  REPORT.
*9
a very large quantity will be consumed. Other smelters in
Kootenay are contemplated, and when in operation will also be
large consumers of coke.
Exports of silver ore, from Kootenay commenced in December, 1893; the exports for six months, to May 31st, 1894,
being 586,361 ounces, valued at $415,368; the shipments have
increased since that date more than 100 per cent., the exports
during the month of May, this year, amounting to 251,302
ounces, valued at $.158,014, Some shipments from the Slocan-
subdivision averaged 214 ounces of silver to the ton of ore,
which also contained 71^ per cent. lead. Six hundred and
forty tons of ore shipped from the Nelson subdivision averaged
116 ounces of silver, 12}^ per cent.-of co.pper- and $2 in .gold
per ton.
In the Kootenay districts 1,215 mineral claims were recorded,
797 transfers made and 962 certificates of work issued in 1894.
From the smelter at Pilot Bay, which commenced operations as lateas March 9th last, 1,301 tons of bullion were shipped
to Aurora, Illinois, U.S. A., up to June 30th ultimo.
Activity in gold mining increases and much capital has
-recently been invested in hydraulic workings, principally in
•Cariboo. The success which attended the short runs made by
two companies during 1894 excited great interest. Last month
a clean up after a run of 172 hours gave 66-pounds 3 ounces of
gold, valued at $14,400. Several joint stock companies have
been formed to prosecute gold mining on a large scale, and a
great increase in the output is looked for this year.
That profitable investments may be made in the mining industries of this province may be judged from the following
result of the " War Eagle j mine in West Kootenay, near the
boundary line. The first cost and development work amounted
to $32,500. Shipments of ore commenced on January first last,
and $82,500 were paid in dividends up to June 1st ultimo.
Shipments of ore during June averaged 420 tons per week at
an average value of $37 per ton.    The ore is mined at $9.50 20 BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
per ton ; freight and smelter charges amount to $14 additional
per ton.
There were 97 placer claims recorded in the district of West
Kootenay during the past year, and there are 36 mining leases
in force.
In Yale district extensive work is being prosecuted. One
hundred and forty mineral claims were recorded, 77 transfers
made, and 125 certificates of work issued during 1894.
Prospecting continues on Vancouver Island. Assays of
ore found near Alberni gave $103 and $135 value of gold per
ton, with traces of silver.
Gold mining in the Yukon is at present restricted to workings in the. creeks and gulches. This country, although known
to be very rich in gold, is not yet thoroughly prospected, and is
very difficult of access. As soon as these difficulties are overcome it is anticipated that gold quartz mining will be prosecuted
on a large scale.
The total provincial output of gold during 1894 exceeded
that of each of the three previous years.
During the 12 months ending June 30th ultimo, forty mining
and smelting companies were incorporated in British Columbia,
to operate in precious ores, with nominal capital aggregating
$24,344,000.
Development work has been continued in the Cinnabar
mines in Yale district, some of the ore taken out assaying 20
per cent, of that metal.
In some of the small creeks of Barclay Sound, on the west
coast of Vancouver Island, native quicksilver has been found.
On the north side of this sound, rich Cinnabar ore has been
discovered of similar formation to that of the Almaden mines of
California. Owing to its proximity to the sea, and the local
abundance of wood and water, the facilities for cheap working
predict a hopeful outlook for this industry. ANNUAL   REPORT.
Rich deposits of iron ore have been found on Vancouver,
and smaller islands and on the coast of the mainland of British
Columbia. The best known deposits are extensive and accessible, and situated mostly near good harbors, with the necessary
fluxes for smelting conveniently at hand. The ore averages
from 60 to 70 per cent, of iron. There is an abundance of timber
for charcoal, also coal and limestone in the vicinity of the various
deposits of ore. The Canadian market for ore is protected, the
duty being $4 per ton, and there is a Dominion government
bounty of $2 per ton on all pig iron manufactured in Canada
from Canadian ore. These conditions, together with the availability of the United States, China, Japan and Australasian markets, with established steamship lines thereto, should be sufficient
inducements to warrant capitalists in operating iron works in
this province.
The Glen iron mine, at Cherry Creek, Yale district, has a
contract to supply the smelter at Tacoma, Wash. This iron
ore contains almost sufficient gold to pay the cost of transportation from the mine to the smelter.
It is expected that with the revival of trade the several
varieties of excellent building stone and white and gray marble,
in which this province abounds, will be in greater demand ; and
that more attention will be given to our cement materials and
pottery clays.
At the recent session of the legislature an act was passed
for promoting the provincial mining industry by the establishment of a Government Bureau of Mines. The collection of
general mining information, specimens of ore, assays, and
lectures are provided for, and the information will be tabulated
and published from time to time.
Fisheries. The total salmon pack during 1894 was 494,-
371 cases, valued at $2,362,714.
The Dominion Inspector of Fisheries for British Columbia,
in his report for that year states that " it is gratifying to note
that the rivers of the province, especially the Fraser, show no 22 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
signs of depletion, or of being overfished, being in this respect
unique amongst the great salmon rivers of the Pacific coast, if
not of the world."
In December last, Hon. Sir Charles H. Tupper, then Minister of Marine and Fisheries, visited British Columbia, and the
canners had conferences with him, but unfortunately Sir Charles
had to leave for Ottawa immediately upon receipt of the news
of the sudden and regretted death of Hon. Sir John Thompson,
late Premier of Canada, and the conferences were abruptly terminated before the complaints of the canners had been fully
considered. However, the Department of Marine and Fisheries
has since made reasonable concessions on lines desired by the
canners, and their operations are now much less restricted than
they had previously been, whilst the present regulations afford
protection to the fish.
Prof. E. E. Prince is now en route to this coast to act on a
joint Canadian and American commission to consider International fisheries questions, as well as the wasteful slaughter of
fish at Point Roberts, in United States territory, by trap, seine
and other destructive methods of fishing, which if not stopped
will surely very much deplete the run of salmon in Fraser river.
The salmon exported during 1894 realized low figures, but
the market is now firmer and prices have advanced.
Deep Sea
Our deep sea fisheries have received greater
Fisheries. attention during the past year, and halibut fishing
is now established on a firm basis. .This industry
is being conducted in a vigorous and systematic manner, and
gives promise of becoming of great value to the province and
profitable to its promoters. The shipments to Boston and New
York were made by three companies during the months of
September to April last. The fish was packed in ice but not
frozen, and reached its destination in good condition.
In previous reports the Board has directed attention to the
need of proper surveys of the halibut banks, but the Dominion
government has not yet taken action in the matter. ANNUAL   REPORT. 23
Fur Seal The Fur Seal industry is yearly becoming of
Fisheries, more importance to the Province, and especially
to Victoria. During 1894 53 vessels, averaging
66 tons each, sailed from this port, giving employment to crews
numbering 867 whites and 518 Indians. Although the catch
was large, amounting to 94,474 skins, the ruling low prices
gave results generally unprofitable to the owners of the sealing
schooners. The detailed statement of the catch by schooners,
which will be found in the appendices, is of more than ordinary
interest, it being the record of the first year of the industry
under the restrictions imposed by the Paris Tribunal.
The refusal of the Congress and Senate of the United States
to confirm the agreement between the Governments of the
United States and Great Britain for the payment of $425,000 as
compensation for the Behring Sea seizures, which sum is less by
nearly $200,000 than the amount claimed, has indefinitely delayed the final settlement of these claims, greatly to the loss of
the claimants.
No definite information has been obtained regarding the
claims for losses occasioned by exclusion from sealing in Behring Sea during the seasons of 1891, 1892 and 1893. It is hoped
that these claims will jointly with the seizure claims occupy the
attention of the two Governments in the negotiations now
taking place.
Her Majesty's Government has decided not to renew the
agreement with the United States respecting sealing up of arms
and implements.
The provisional agreement with Russia provides a protective zone of thirty miles around the Komandorsky Islands in
the North Pacific Ocean and Tulenew Island (or Robben Reef)
in the Okhotsk Sea, as well as a protective zone of ten miles
along the shores, of the Russian mainland, therefore all sealing
vessels found during the present season within the above mentioned limits will be liable to seizure by Her Majesty's ships or
those of the Imperial Russian government. 24
BRITISH   C
OLUMBIA   BOARD  OF  TRADE.
During the closing days of the Rosebery ministry, only a
week since, Her Majesty's Imperial Parliament passed an act
for the regulation of sealing in Behring Sea; the terms, however, are not sufficiently known here to forecast the effect upon
our sealing industry.
The sealers have this season experienced very rough
weather, involving considerable loss of life and property both on
this coast and in Japanese waters; the catch off the coasts of
this Province being about half that taken last year, and the
Japan catch is much reduced compared with that of 1894. The
short catch has probably affected the seal skin market, for
prices have advanced.
Lumber. The forest lands of this Province are very ex
tensive, and the quality of the timber is probably
not surpassed by any country in the world ; 524,573. acres leased
to mill owners are estimated to contain at least 20,000 feet of
timber per acre. During 1894 13>73°i7^4 fee^ were taken from
these leased lands, which, together with the timber taken from
Crown lands, timber limits, and private property, made the total
of timber cut during that year 67,499,277 feet. The exports
during the same period were 46,490,000 feet.
The export trade lias since largely increased and it is
worthy of note that the demand is not confined to any particular market; keen competition, however, has much reduced the
price, which has of late been scarcely remunerative.
The high grade of British Columbia lumber is well established abroad, and it is to be regretted that the recommendation
contained in the Board's previous report, that the lumber for
export should be graded to standard specifications, has not been
carried out. Such specific grading would protect our mill men
and simplify the work of purchasers when placing orders. This
matter is an all important one, and the owners of mills should
in their own interests give it their early attention.
Industrial The principal  new industry started since the
Establishments. Board's  previous report is the  smelter at Pilot
Bay, West Kootenay.    This smelter is equipped
with machinery of the most modern type, a battery of boilers of ANNUAL  REPORT.
200 horse power, smelter stacks capable of handling one hundred tons of ore daily, sampling works with a capacity of 150
tons per day, and concentrators of like capacity; it is intended
to erect a refinery in connection therewith as soon as cheap fue
can be obtained, when it is contemplated to enlarge the works.
In this district there is an almost inexhaustible supply of
ore for the enterprise, and it is probable that other smelters
will be operated there very soon. The completion of the contemplated smelters will be of great benefit to the Province, as
they will reduce, if not entirely stop, the exportation of ore;
and also admit -the mining of much low grade ore that cannot
now be profitably worked on account of transportation charge,
to distant foreign smelters.
The paint works which commenced operation at Victoria
about two years ago already control a considerable portion of
the Provincial trade.
The chemical works established in the same city in 1893 are
fully employed in filling orders received in the Province and
from the United States. The promoters of this industry are to
be congratulated upon their success, they having commenced
their operations at a time when some persons who professed to
know predicted failure.
The cold storage plants at Vancouver and Victoria are
availed of, and the future of these industries, new to the Province, is hopeful. The establishment of halibut fishing is to
some extent attributable to the cold storage plant for the supply
of ice used in transporting the fish to the Atlantic coast.
The prospects of the other industrial establishments operating in the Province, which suffered more or less from the depression of the last few years, are improved; the prices of
lumber, salmon, and seal skins have recently advanced, and it
is expected that a similar rise in the value of other products will
follow.
Agriculture. Reports from the agricultural districts through
out the Province are encouraging.    In the Okana-
gan and Spallumcheen districts an abundant harvest is expected, 26
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
and prospects in the sections west of the Cascades, on the
Mainland, Vancouver Island and the smaller adjacent islands
are equally promising. It is probable that the crops of oats,
hay and potatoes will this season meet the Provincial requirements. The'area under cultivation in 1895 exceeds that of
previous years.'
During the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1894, 60,642
bushels of wheat were imported into the Province, on which
duty was paid, $19,096.32 ; and a large quantity was received
from the Northwest; it is expected that this year's harvest will
cause a reduction in the imports of wheat.
Fruit is in good demand, and large quantities are being
produced ; preserved and canned, it finds a ready sale.
The area under hops has largely increased. The "Kentish"
hops grown in British Columbia are favorably known in the
London market. Samples sent to Sydney, N. S. W., were pronounced to be equal in value to good English hops, and worth
three to four cents per pound more than hops grown in California.
More attention has been given to dairy farming, but with
the view of further stimulating this industry,, the Board has
urged the Dominion Government to extend to British Columbia
aid similar to that granted to other provinces in the establishment of co-operative dairies, which have proved a success and
of great benefit to the agriculturist wherever inaugurated. The
Board has also urged that the Provincial Government should
bonus, by a specific amount per pound, for a limited number of
years, the output of such co-operative dairies. At the recent
session of the Provincial Legislature an act was passed for the
incorporation of Cheese and Butter Associations, under which
five or more persons may associate themselves together for the
purpose of manufacturing these articles.
It is expected that Professor Robertson, Dominion Government Dairy Commissioner, will visit British Columbia this
summer for the purpose of delivering a series of lectures and ANNUAL   REPORT.
m
instructing   the   farmers   in   the   most   improved   methods   of
dairying.
Surveys.            The extensive  surveys of Crown  lands  prosecuted during the years  1891-93  have  approximately met the requirements of intending settlers, consequently
 :.,~ i~„*. '  L   .__^>>'-.*._' i-_^.-1 .
The small holdings are conveniently nearthe cities, and it
is expected that an appreciably-increased supply of garden produce will soon result therefrom. Leases have been issued for
the majority of these holdings.
The sum of $25,000 has been placed in the estimates for
surveys to be made this year. The principal works will be in
the Chilcotin district, Where-a party of surveyors is seeking the
best outlets on the east and on the west, and in ascertaining
the amount of arable land along the route. Another party is
subdividing into 40 acre blocks Crown lands on the west coast
of Vancouver Island. ■
Full particulars are furnished ^t the Government Land
Office, Victoria, concerning the available lands of the Province,
and maps may be obtained free of charge on application.
The Surveyor-General in his report for 1894, directs attention to some rich specimens of magnitite, hematite, and
especially of coal produced near Nootka Sound, and recommends
that the geological examination of the west coast of Vancouver
Island should be undertaken and carried out as Was that of the
east coast, which was completed years ago.
Immigration.        The labor market is fully supplied in its professional,   mercantile,   mechanical   and   laboring
branches, and it is unwise for immigrants, unless provided with
means, to seek the  Pacific coast expecting to get immediate 28
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
employment. The mining districts of the Province, however,
offer 1 great and almost unlimited field to the prospecting miner,
as the precious metals abound from the southern boundary to
its most northern limits. An annual certificate costing $5.00
allows a prospecting miner of whatever nationality, to take up
50 acres of mining lands. Many United States miners during
the past two years have availed themselves of the privilege and
have realized on their discoveries by sales to capitalists from
$2,000 to $30,000. For the agriculturist, too, with small capital,
there are many openings; and domestic servants can find
situations at good wages.
Colonization. The system (referred to in last annual report)
inaugurated by the Provincial Government of
establishing settlements of industrial colonies in different sections of the Province, has been productive of most gratifying
results during the short period of its operations, and the success
which has attended the initial colonies has led to several enquiries
leading up to additional settlements with promise of most beneficial and far reaching results. The having our, hitherto,
unoccupied lands settled upon and developed by a population
of hardy, industrious immigrants, cannot but redound to the
permanent advantage of the Province, and the productions from
the labors of these settlers must in the near future tend largely
to stop the import of many supplies which is now so heavy
a drain upon this country. At the request of the Board,
the Honorable Colonel Baker, Minister of Immigration, has
kindly furnished a report of the referred to industrial settlements.
The report, together with copy of the agreement which the
government makes with colonist settlers, appears in the Appendices, and contains much valuable information.
Education. The Board has not  hitherto referred  to the
question of Education in the Province, but inasmuch as there are few matters of greater importance, it is
thought well to give the following particulars, which will doubtless be read with interest. ANNUAL   REPORT.
29
185 schools were in operation in British Columbia durin°-
1894, w'tn 12,613 pupils enrolled. The total expenditure on
education was $169,050.18, an average of $13.40 per pupil
enrolled, or $21.71, if based on the actual daily attendance.
Education is free in this Province and is provided as follows : Any settlement containing not less than fifteen children
between the age of 6 and 16 years may be created a school
district by the Council of Public Instruction, who have power
to set apart in such district a quantity of waste Crown lands,
and, with the sanction of the Lieutenant-Governor, to provide a
teacher and a suitable building for school purposes.
In some of the smaller settlements a teacher is provided by
the government.
In the Appendices will be found statistics showing the
growth of the public schools in the Province.
Third   Congress        The Board has received an invitation from the
of Chambers     London Chamber of Commerce to appoint a delegate to the Third Congress of Chambers of Com-
of Commerce of
merce of the Empire, to be held in London in
June, 1896.    The invitation has been accepted,
the Empire,
but a delegate has not yet been appointed.
Visit of His On the occasion of the visit to this city of
Excellency the   Lord   Aberdeen,   Governor-General of   Canada,
Gov -General     ^IS Excellency was presented with an address by
—————    your Board, a copy of which, together with His
Excellency's reply, will be found in the Appendices.
Trade and Commercial depression has been felt in British
Outlook Columbia in common with nearly every part of the
world, though in'a lesser degree than in some of
the older countries. There are, however, signs of a speedy
revival, in sympathy with the United States and Eastern
Canada, where steady and marked improvement has been noticeable for some time past. 3°
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
One good effect of the temporary embarassment has been
the greater concentration of effort on legitimate enterprises,
and general curtailment of the " credit" system. The outlook
for largely increased trade and commerce has never in the history
of the Province been more promising.
The exports during nearly a quarter of a century have
increased year by year, with almost unbroken regularity,
and the figures attained during the past twelve months are
the highest in the experience of British Columbia. The
imports too, which during 1893-4 showed a falling off, have
recently augmented.
While our imports swell the volume of trade and indicate
to some extent the measure of internal expansion, it will be
seen that they include many items which should be produced by
ourselves, and involve a contribution to the Dominion treasury
out of proportion to the amount received therefrom for public
purposes.
The increased area under cultivation and the excellent
prospects of good crops will this year leave less ground for
complaint as far as agricultural products are concerned, but the
supply will not meet the ever increasing demand until a greater
area of farming lands are in use and railway communication
gives direct connection between the coast and the various
mining camps and the agricultural sections of the interior.
The advance in the price of fish and the revival of the lumber trade, together with the inestimable wealth of minerals now
apparently on the eve of realization, have only to be approximately estimated to attract to British Columbia the capital
necessary for the further and effectual development of its
resources.
In regard to the position of the Board, it will be found that
the membership has been sustained, and the greater interest
now taken in its proceedings indicates that increased usefulness
may be expected. ,a
ANNUAL   REPORT.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Signed on behalf of the British Columbia Board of Trade
this 12th day of July, 1895.
A, C.  FLUMERFELT, President.
C.  E.  RENOUF,   Vice-President.
F.  ELWORTHY, Secretary. MINING IN WEST KOOTENAY.
To the Members of the British Columbia Board of Trade, Victoria:
Gentlemen,—Since the previous General Meeting twelve
members of the Board have visited Kootenay, and we now beg
to report the information acquired and impressions received by
them.
The tour included Trail, Nelson, Ainsworth, Kaslo and
Slocan mining divisions, and the principal properties in each
were inspected.
From Revelstoke south the country traversed is mountainous, the higher summits exceeding 8,000 feet, upon which snow
remains throughout the year. The timber line appears to be
7,000 feet above the sea; below this the growth is varied, in
places there is an abundance of well grown timber, whilst other
parts are inferior in this respect, and some of the mountains
are almost barren. Portions of the wooded area at high elevations are free of undergrowth and remarkably picturesque.
West Kootenay possesses many natural advantages, the
most important of which are the navigable waters of the rivers
and lakes, over 300 miles in length. On the Columbia River a
first-class steamer service is operated by the Columbia &
Kootenay Navigation Company as a feeder to the Canadian
Pacific Railway. On the Kootenay River and Lake the same
Company has other steamers connecting at Nelson with the
Kootenay & Columbia Railway, operated by the Canadian
Pacific Railway, and the Nelson & Fort Sheppard Railway. At
Bonner's Ferry the steamers connect with the Great Northern
Railway, thus giving the district competitive rates with the
Canadian Pacific Railway and the American transcontinental
railways.    There are several other steamers plying on the lakes ill«¥T-[T
■ ■MMfWl
MINING   IN   WEST   KOOTENAY.
and rivers. Short lines of railways have been constructed to
bring the products of the mines to these waterways, and to form
a connection between the Columbia River and the Kootenay
Lake. Considering how recently this countiy has been under
development it is well opened up.
The Town of Rossland, situated ten miles north of the
boundary, dates only from the early part of this year and is
now the headquarters and central trading point of the Trail
division. Over 200 well built frame houses, including stores
and hotels, have been erected on the townsite, and the population in and adjacent thereto numbers approximately 2,000 souls.
The Cliff was the first mine visited, distant about 15 minutes
ride from Rossland. The upper tunnel has been driven in 190
feet, and the ore averages $35.00 per ton in gold and copper.
Shipments have already commenced. Passing on to the Le Roi,
we found extensive works in operation upon which the sum of
$150,000 has been expended. T^he main shaft from which the
ore is taken is down 375 feet, and the present output is 100 tons
per diem. The average value of the ore is $40 per ton in gold,
silver, iron and copper. The vein is in no place less than six
feet in width and in the lower levels widens to 30 feet; the best
ore yet found was taken from the bottom of the shaft. Eighty-
five men are employed in connection with this mine the miners
and helpers being paid $3.50 and $3.00 per day respectively.
The ore costs to mine $3.00 per ton; transportation by wagon
to Northport, freight to the smelter and treatment an additiona
$13.50; it will thus be seen that there remains a good margin
of profit and at the date of our visit there was the sum of
$50,000 cash available for the payment of a dividend, this over
and above the repayment of all outlay on the mine by sale of
ore. The War Eagle adjoins the Le Roi and the character and
value of the ore are very similar to the last named. As this
mine is referred to in the annual report it is only necessary to
state that another dividend of $50,000 has since been declared,
making the total $132,000 paid within six months. Ore has
been shipped from other properties in this division, notably from
the Josie; and much development work  is  progressing at a 34
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
points. All around this centre the mountains are alive with
prospectors and miners; 1.600 new claims have been recorded
within the past six months, and there is reason to believe that
many of them, when developed, will reveal minerals in richness .
and quantity as great as any mine now in operation. Prior to
1890 very little was known of this division and the present
activity is due to the recent development of the Le Roi and War
Eagle mines both of which have paid ever since worked commenced on them. The fact that the veins of ore so far developed
increase in width and richness with depth is an unmistakeable
indication of permanency. A smelter is being erected at Trail,
on the Columbia River, for the treatment of the ore of this
district.
The next mine visited was the Poorman, on Eagle Creek,
near Nelson, where there is a 10-stamp mill in operation with a
capacity of 20 tons per day. The ore averages' about $20 in
gold per ton, the vein from which it is taken varying from ten
inches to two feet in thickness. Other veins have been found
on the claim and the development work has exposed a large
quantity of ore rich in gold. The Silver King is situated 5,000
feet above, and as the crow flies is about 4)^ miles from Nelson.
Here ore is already in sight to an estimated value of $3,000,000.
Six hundred and forty tons shipped carried silver, 116 ozs.;
copper, 12 per cent.; and gold, $2.00 per ton. The ariel tramway is nearly completed, it will connect the mine with a smelter
now in course of erection at Nelson. There are several other
rich mines on Toad Mountain, tributary to Nelson.
The Town of Nelson was laid out seven years ago; many
substantial buildings have since been erected and the principal
Government offices of the district are located there as well as
branches of the Bank of British Columbia and the Bank of
Montreal. The population of and tributary to Nelson is probably 1,000 souls.
The largest body of ore yet found in Kootenay is at the
Blue Bell mine, situated on the Kootenay Lake, about opposite
Ainsworth.    The tunnel, 1,100 feet in length,  entered almost Bnii-'i
MINING   IN   WEST   KOOTENAY.
immediately upon stepping- off the steamer, is at the far end
170 feet below the surface of the hill. Although ore has
been taken out in places to a width of over 70 feet the foot
wall has not yet been found, and the vein has been traced for
nearly a mile in length. It is composed of ores containing
silver, gold, galena and copper, value from $11 to $30 per ton.
The ore is treated at the smelter at Pilot Bay, some seven miles
distant, the mine being owned by the smelter company.
The Pilot Bay smelter is equipped with machinery of the
most modern type and the arrangements generally are such
that manual labor is reduced to a minimum in every branch.
At the time of our visit 100 tons of ore were being treated
daily.
Ainsworth, situated on the opposite side of Kootenay
Lake, is one of the oldest camps in the district. Some mines
tributary thereto are being worked and produce silver ore
proper, known as dry ore.
The Town of Kaslo, 10 miles north of Ainsworth, is a busy
mining centre. It has only been in existence about three years
and notwithstanding serious reverses by fire and flood, it stands
to-day on a more solid basis than ever. The Kaslo & Slocan
Railway is now being built from this point to Cody Creek,
distance about 30 miles, with a branch into Sandon. It will
probably be read}' for traffic at the end of October.
We left the train fifteen miles from Kaslo and proceeded to
Three Forks by way of the Jackson divide and Sandon. En
route the Northern Bell was visited a mine upon which considerable development work has been done. Five hundred tons
of ore have been shipped, averaging 90 ozs. of silver per ton
and 70 per cent, lead, and we found 200 tons more were nearly
ready for shipment. The vein of concentrating ore varies from
■6 feet to 20 feet in thickness. The ore vein of the Noble Five,
3 feet to 4 feet in width, has been disclosed to a depth of 300
feet and the bottom is not yet found, nor is the length known.
3,000 feet of tunnels have been   driven  in, and 20  men were 36 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
continuing the work in day and night shifts. The miners work
10 hours per day for which they are paid $3.50. There have
been shipped from this mine 1,800 tons of ore and we saw
several thousands of tons of concentrating ore on the dump,
worth probably $30 per ton. The shipping ore contains an average of 135 ozs. of silver per ton and 73 per cent, of lead. The
ore is steel, wavy and cube galena, and carbonates. Four-fifths
of this mine is still owned by the locators. The Deadman
Mine adjoins the last named and the ore is of similar character.
The vein is 4 feet wide and has been traced 200 feet deep.
About 300 tons of ore were stacked and ready for shipment,
quality being equal to a carload shipped which averaged 150
ozs. of silver to the ton, and 40 per cent, of lead. The Last
Chance, situated on the Noble Five Mountain, is also a very
promising mine; development, commenced in August, 1894,
having paid from the start. Two tunnels have been driven
aggregating in length 300 feet, also an adit level to tap the vein
150 feet below the croppings. The vein stands nearly vertical
with an average of twelve inches of solid ore and carbonates
scattered through the ledge up to 14 feet in width. One hundred and thirty tons of ore shipped gave 175 ozs. of silver per
ton and 75 per cent, of lead. The last mine visited was the
Slocan Star, located on Sandon Creek. Croppings in the creek
led to its discovery in October,- 1891. Extensive development
has been carried out and the vein has been exposed to a depth
of 450 feet; at some points the vein is 50 feet wide, 8 feet of
which has simply to be broken, sacked and shipped. Three
thousand four hundred tons of ore have been shipped from this
mine and averaged 100 ozs. of silver per ton and 70 per cent,
lead. There remains about 20,000 tons of concentrating ore on
the dump. In connection with this mine a concentrating mill is
being erected, also a gravity tramway for transporting the ore
from the mine to the mill. Twenty-eight mines have already
shipped ore, and in nearly every case arrangements are being
made to continue shipping on a larger scale; as there is much
development work progressing at numerous claims, the outlook of the Slocan division is very promising. The Nakusp
& Slocan  Railway affords several mines in this division  the MINING   IN   WEST   KOOTENAY.
advantage  of competitive rates  with  its   rival,  the  Kaslo &
Slocan.
At Three Forks, a mining town of very recent origin, there
is a concentrating mill in operation ; another concentrator is to
be erected immediately at the Washington mine.
Quite apart from the industry of mining proper West
Kootenay offers an excellent field for the investment of capital
in concentrators and smelters, the necessity for which is an inevitable consequence of mining developments. It cannot be
very long before the need of refineries will have to be met.
The trade of the district is already large and rapidly increasing. Through the courtesy of the Canadian Pacific Railway
Company, Mr. Wm. Brown, Assistant General Freight Agent,
accompanied the party, and we understand will recommend, as
occasion may require, the adoption of more advantageous
freight rates between Kootenay and other parts of the Province.
The route taken by the party lay through magnificent
scener)', that on the Columbia River being especially grand.
Few of the inconveniences so often met in travelling through
a new country were experienced and in this respect the tour
was particularly enjoyable. The streams afford excellent fly
fishing and trawling on the lakes can be engaged in with equa
success; big game, such as cariboo, bear, sheep and goats, ar
to be obtained on the mountains; indeed the facilities for sport
and travel are so great that they have only to become known to
attract considerable tourist traffic.
Even if no new discoveries were made it 'would not be too
much to say that the future of West Kootenay is assured. It
should, however, be borne in mind that but a very small portion of its area has so far received attention at the hands of
•prospectors. Scarcely a week passes without news being received of fresh finds all of a nature to encourage and strengthen
the belief that so far the merest fraction of the wealth of the
country has been ascertained. Within the limited time and
space at our disposal for the compilation of the foregoing report 38
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
it was impossible to do more than .refer very briefly to the wonderful resources of the district visited but we have endeavored
above all things to obtain and lay before you information which
may be relied on. This, we believe, we have accomplished and
would merely add in conclusion, each member of the party is
personally satisfied with the result of his trip as confirmatory
of the unlimited wealth of West Kootenay. '
D. R. KER, President.
GUS. LEISER, Vice-President.
F. ELWORTHY, Secretary.
Victoria, B. O, September 21st, 1895. Table showing the amount of ore actually shipped during the year ending
June 30th, 1895.
From Nelson
Silver King Min
From Ainsworth—
Number One  Mine (Concentrates)
"        "        "     (Carbonates)
Little Phil
Black Diamond
Highlan
King Solomon
From the Slogan—
Minnesota Silver Company (Concentrl||g|g
Alpha Mine
Slocan Star
Rueccau
Alamo
Idaho
Enterprise
Mountain Chief
Gold  Hill
Fisher Maiden
Noble Five
Cumberland
Last Chance
Payne Group
Good Enough
Ruth
Surprise
Ruby Silver
Sovereign
Dardanelles
Blue Bird
Northern Belle
Deadman
Cariboo
Mollie Hughes
Wonderful
Yakima
Antoine
From Trail Creek
Le Roi
War Eagle
Josie	
Nickel Plate
Cliffe	
Mines sending psb than ten tons each
From thf. Blue Bell Mine—
To the Pilot Bay Smelter, up to May 30th only 4°
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
NOTES ON THE FOREGOING.
Most of these figures have been obtained from shipping manifests corrected
in some few instances by returns from the mines. Circulars were addressed
to every mine asking for information, but many were not replied to. The
greatest possible care has been taken in compiling this table.
Silver King Mine.—Valued for Customs Entry j Silver, $61,501 ; copper,
$13,688 ; total, $75,189. The Manager writes : "In some cases the value realized exceeded the estimated values, in others it was below."
Last Chance Mine.—Amount shipped, 80 tons ; on hand, 30 tons; total,
no tons valued at $8,000 ; less cost of mining, freight and duty, $1,200 ; net
value, $6,800.
Good Enough Mine.—The owner writes : "Shipped 35 tons to Great
Falls. Returns amounted to $8,037.82, leaving a profit over all expenses of a
little over $5,500.
Alpha Mine.—The 1,000 tons of ore shipped contained 105 ounces of
silver and 64 per cent, of lead to the ton, and netted to the owners about $55 per
ton.
Ruth Mine.—Assays on samples from shipments give from 130 ounces to
374 ounces of silver and 20 per cent. lead. Previous shipments run from 115
ounces to 130 ounces in silver and 73 to 79 per cent, in lead.
Pilot Bay Smelter Returns.—The ore stack was put to blast on March
16, and with occasional stoppages, has produced up to Sept. 19, 1,921 tons of
silver lead bullion.
Table of Ore Exported as declared to H. M. Customs fcr year ending
June 30, 1895 :
Station.
Tons.
Value.
Nelson  ...
Revelstoke
Kaslo	
Rossland ..
Waneta ...
2,115
$186,332
6,450
637,744
1.245
178,340
4,013
180,770
4,215
308,625
Totals     18,038
Jl,491,811 MniHTm
■HOC
MINING   IN   WEST   KOOTENAY.
Mining Records
From June i, 1884, To May 31, 1895.
4i
Place.
I
Claims.         a    „	
t>                      Assessments.
Recorded
Crown Grants
Issued.
116                     102
312                  351
335                4io
664                  74
39                  52
1,466                989
4
6
12
8
0
Totals	
—
3°
The foregoing tables were compiled by Charles St.   Barbe, Editor,   "The
Miner," Nelson, B. C.
Place,
Claims
Recorded.
Assessments.      Transfers.
Trail Creek, Mar. 20 to Sept. 11,1895.       1,600 170
New Denver, Jan 1st to Sept 24, 1895.;        547 35$
640
339
L 42
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE
MINING   IN   ALBERNI.
The District of Alberni, on the West Coast of Vancouver
Island has, during- a long period, produced small quantities of
placer gold, but it is only in recent years that attention has
been directed to the quartz ledges of the district. The first
claims were staked off at the head of China Creek in 1892, and
in the following year numerous other claims were taken up.
In the early part of 1894, some claims on Mineral Creek,
a branch of China Creek, were to some extent developed, and
excellent returns have been secured from the various assay tests.
During the past few months, however, increased, interest has
been centered in this district, consequent upon the discovery of
many other promising lodes and the improved aspect of those
under development. The work done thus far has been sufficient to prove the width of the veins and obtain sufficient ore
for assay and mill tests. From surface indications there is
every probability of a number of paying mines being established
in the near future.
Hydraulic claims are being opened up on China and Mineral Creeks, with favorable prospects. The gold varies in
character from fine to coarse.
The mild climate makes it possible to continue work on these
mines the year round, while their proximity of the navigable
waters of Alberni Canal ensures cheap transportation of ores
to coast smelters.
The Provincial Government had a report made during the
summer upon the minerals of this district, which describes the
numerous gold quartz ledges, and gives the names of the various
rock formations in which the gold quartz appears ; a rough map
of the section accompanies the report.
The position of Alberni will be seen on the map on back of
cover of this report. APPENDICES.
List of Additions to the Library, with the Names of the
Donors (30th June, 1895.)
port
Annual Report, 1893.
Collingwood,      " "        1894.
Virden, " "        1894.
Montreal, " "        1894.
London, Ont.,   " "        1894.
Winnipeg, " "        1895.
Chamber of Commerce, Netherlands of London, Annual Re
" " -Melbourne, N. S. W., "
" " Adelaide, "
" " Antwerp, "
" " Durban, Natal, "
1 " Falmouth, Eng., "
& " Christchurch, N. Z., "
" San Francisco, Cal., "
" Auckland, N. Z., "
" " British, Paris, "
Dominion Government, by request of Thomas Earle, Esq., M
" " Census of Canada,
I " Inland Revenue,
" Auditor-General,
" Public Accounts, &c.,
" " Minister of Agriculture,
I Public Works, &c,
" " . Marine and Fisheries,
I " Steamboat Inspection, &c.,
" " Indian Affairs, &c,
" '•' Justice, Militia, &c,
" " Miscellaneous Reports,
" " Journals House of Commons,
" " Journal of the Senate,
" " Criminal Statistics,
" " Statistical Year Book of Canada,
" " Butter and Cheese, Prov.of Ontario,
" " Dominion Fisheries Commission,
" " Supt. of Insurance,
" " Department of Railways and Canals,
1893
1893
1894
1894
1894
1894
1894
1895
1895
P.
1890-91.
1893-
i893-
i893-
i893-
1893-
i893-
1893-
i893-
1893-
1893-
1893-
1893-
1893-
i893-
i893-
i893-
1893-
1893- 44
Dominion
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
iovernment, Atlantic Steamship Line, 1984.
"                I           Lachine Canal Bridges Enquiry, 1894.
I                "           Colonial.Conference, 1894.
I                  I            Public Accounts, 1894.
" I Journals of the Senate, 1894.
I                "           Public Works, Railways and Canals,       1894.
"                "           Marine and Fisheries, Marine, ^894.
"                 "           Marine and Fisheries, Fisheries, 1894-
"                "           Inland Revenue, (2 vols.) 1894.
"                I           Public Accounts, 1894.
I                "           Civil Service List of Canada 1894.
"                  "            Miscellaneous Reports, 1894.
"                 "           Agriculture and Colonization, 1894-
"                 "           Life Insurance Companies, 1894.
"                 "           Forest Wealth of Canada, 1894.
"                 "            Minister of Agriculture, 1894.
"                "           Journals House of Corhmons, 1894.
"                "           Department of Indian Affairs, 1S94.
"                 "           Tables of Trade and Navigation, 1894.
"                "           Manitoba School Case, 1894.
I                 "           Militia and Defence, 1894.
"                &           Auditor-General, 1894.
"                 "        •   Department of Interior, 1894.
"                 &           Minister of Justice, 1894.
Minister of Public Works, 1894.
"                 "           Postmaster-General, 1894.
"           Civil Service Examiners'Report, 1894.
"                              Experimental Farms, 1894.
"                 "           Report Mission to Australia, 1894.
I                "           Cattle Freight Rates, 1894.
Report of the Geological Survey Dept.,   1894.
"                  I            Public Printing and Stationery, 1894.
"                 "           Secretary of State, 1894.
" Unclaimed Balances in Chartered Banks, 1894.
Trade and Commerce, !895-
Provincial Government, Department of Agriculture, 1893.
Registerof Births, Deaths and Marriages, 1893.
" " Public Schools, 1893-94.
I           Sessional Papers, 1894.
Journals Legislative Assembly, 1894.
Chief Commissioner of Lands & Works, 1894.
Superintendent of Police, 1894.
"                 £           Public Accounts, 1894.
Insane Asylum Annnal Report, 1894.
Crown Land Surveys, 1894.
"           Minister of Mines, 1894. APPENDICES.
45
Provincial Government, Statutes of British Columbia, 1894-95.
Tacoma Chamber of Commerce, Commerce and Navigation of the U. S., 1893.
Minister of Trade and Commerce, Tariffs of Different Nations.
Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia, Notice to Mariners.
Department of Education, Manual of School Laws.
Hydrographic Office, Pt. Townsend, Wash., Monthly Charts of the Pacific Ocean.
St. John Board of Trade, St. John Directory and Hand-Book of the City, 1895-96.
The Seven Colonies of Australia, 1893.
The Wealth and Progress of N. S. W., 1893.
Purchased History of British Columbia.
Map's Manchester Ship Canal.
St. John, N. B., Directory and Hand-Book of the City, 1895-96.
Tourists Guide through the Hawaiian Islands.
LIST OF NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS ON FILE.
DAILIES.
Colonist " Victoria, B. C.      " Free Press i Nanaimo, B. C.
Times"  " " Columbian". .N. Westminster, B. C.
" Post-Intelligencer ". ..Seattle, Wash.
" World     Vancouver, B. C.
WEEK
" Bi C. Gazette " Victoria, B. C.   I
" Commercial Journal" "
"Province"  "
" Statistics, News-Advertiser*"
Vancouver, B. C.
"Inland Sentinel ". .Kamloops, B. C.
" Tribune " Nelson, B. C.
'• Miner "	
" Kaslo Claim " Kaslo, B. C.
" Vernon'News ".,... .Vernon, B. C.
" Golden Era " Golden, B. C.   I
" Miner " Rossland, B. C.
" Prospector "	
" Monetary Times " Toronto
" Trade Review "   Montreal
'• Commercial"   Winnipeg
" Spokane Miner ".. .Spokane, Wash.
"X. W. Mining Review "
LIE!
Century    	
" Harper's "	
" Scribner's    	
" Cosmopolitan "	
" North Amc'n Review
MONT
. New York
Dun's Review " New York
Bradstreet's "        "
Iron Age "        "
: Scientific American "        "
1 Frank Leslie's Weekly "..       "
1 Harper's Weekly "         "
1 Illustrated London News ".. London
1 Graphic "       "
1 Commerce "       "
'Punch "       "
'Truth"	
' Vanity Fair"       "
' London Times "	
' Engineering and Mining Journal "
J Pacific Coast Marine Record "
San Francisco
' Press 1 Christchurch, N. Z.
' Canterbury Times " Canterbury, N. Z.
1 Chamb'r of Com. Journal |.. London
' British Trade Journal "       "
'Imperial Institute Journal".     "
j Mining World-"'	
'Colliery Engineer ". ..Scranton, Pa. 46 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
Address to His Excellency the Governor-General.
To His Excellency the Ritfit Honourable Sir Tohn Campbell Hamilton-Gordon ;
Viscount Formartine ; Lord Haddo, Methlic, Tarvis and Kellie ; Viscount
Gordon, of Aberdeen ; Baronet of Nova Scotia ; Earl of Aberdeen, P. C
LL. D.,etc.,etc., Governor-General of the Dominion of Canada, and I'ice-
Admiral of the same':
May it Please Your Excellency : —
We, the members of the British Columbia Board of Trade, desire to take
advantage of the opportunity afforded by your presence in our city to express our
devotion to the person of Her Most Gracious Majesty and our loyalty to her
throne, and to extend to yourself and your honoured Countess a most cordial welcome to the capital of the most Western and largest Province of the Dominion,
over \\hose destinies, aided by your constitutional advisers, you now preside.
The magnitude of the territory comprising this great Dominion, the vastness
of her resources, her responsible government institutions, and the genius and
enterprise of her people, all point to this Canada of ours taking a most prominent
position in the Greater Britain in which the prestige and glorious traditions of the
mother empire shall in the future have their fullest development.
While rejoicing at being a portion of the great Canadian confederation, we yet
in a special degree take pride in our Province of British Columbia; in the grandeur of its scenery, the excellence of its climate, and the immensity of our natural
resources.
With a deep recognition of the deference which your constitutional advisers
attach to your matured judgment, and with a full assurance of your well wishes
towards this Province, we would on the present occasion depart from what may be
the usual routine of a merely congratulatory address and take advantage of your
presence to express ourselves on some matters of provincial moment, with the hope
that any subjects touched upon and requiring attention will meet with your kind
consideration.
Statistical returns show that this Province contributes per capita to the Dominion revenue a larger amount than does any other Province of the federation ;
also, that the Port of Victoria, in volume of contribution to the Dominion
exchequer, from inland revenue and customs sources, ranks third highest among
the ports of the entire Dominion.
It is to be hoped that these circumstances will ever have the consideration of
the central government when public expenditures are being appropriated.
Situated at the extreme western portion of the Dominion, Victoria is naturally
the first port reached by steamers coming from the Pacific ocean, and the last port
passed by outward bound vessels.    Desirable as it may be that subsidies of public APPENDICES.
47
monies be granted in order to foster the commerce of the Dominion, it is also important that no injustice be done to any section of our country when such assistance is given. In view of this, and of our supremacy in provincial commerce, it
is to be hoped that this port will have the justice extended to it of being recognized
as a port of call, and that our port's rights be duly protected in any existing and
in all future subsidized contracts. At present some steamship lines receiving subsidies merely call in passing, but do not berth for the landing of cargo and passengers, while other steamship lines not in receipt of subsidies afford greater
facilities for commerce with this port.
This Board has made representations through the proper channels asking that
the Postmaster General give instructions that mails to and from the Orient be forwarded by steamers other than those at present subsidized to carry mails, whenever the difference in the sailing dales of the two lines of steamers now on the
route would ensure quicker despatch, which would frequently occur ; and as a
frequent and efficient mail service is an important factor in the development of
trade, it is to be hoped that the suggested improvement in the mail service with
the Orient will be carried out.
The .recent Paris arbitration on the Behring Sea fur seal fisheries dispute,
with its successful issue, furnishes another precedent for an International Court of
Arbitration, which alike the well being of nations and the interests of humanity
demand should be permanently established.
An increasing interest is now being taken in our deep sea fisheries, and
enterprises have been formed to ship fresh halibut, cod and other fish to the
Eastern markets in large quantities. Your interest with your constitutional
advisers is requested to aid, by surveys of fishing grounds and otherwise, in the
further reaping the harvest of food wealth from our provincial waters.
The mining industries of the Province are perhaps of paramount importance.
The excellent quality of our coal is universally recognized, the productive
measures are practically inexhaustible, and the output is yearly increasing. Mining in the precious metals is being prosecuted with vigor backed by capital, and
in the near future the gold fields of Cariboo promise to exceed their former famous
prestige, while the development in the Kootenay district bids fair to reveal a silver
wealth that will rival the richest experience of the mines of Nevada. It is to be
hoped that the Dominion government will foster the development of our mineral
resources in every possible manner.
The floods which recently inundated some lands of the Fraser River valley,
brought out in a marked degree the energies of the sufferers in their efforts to
combat the disaster. It is to be hoped that a well considered scheme for the
future protection of these lands will be inaugurated and carried to completion
under the joint auspices of the Dominion and Provincial Governments.
Considering the vast area of this Province, it is necessary for its development
that we receive immigrants of a suitable class.    In view of the rights of the 48
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
Province, an immigration bureau should, we understand, be maintained by the
Dominion Government; but as this is not now being done, we would suggest that
some special allowance for such purpose be given to the Provincial Government,
which has instituted a system of placing settlers on the land.
The extensive seaboard afforded by Vancouver Island and the Mainland of
the Province suggests special attention to lights, beacons and buoys, so as to safeguard as far as possible the lives of passengers and the interests of the Imperial
navy and of commerce, and it is to be hoped that continuous vigilance will be
exercised in securing efficiency in these necessities.
The importance and desirability of an insolvency act has been generally recognized throughout the entire Dominion, and we trust that the legislation dealing
with this subject which was introduced into the Senate last session, will ere long
result in an act which will meet the exigencies of trade.
Railways must ever be prominent factors in opening up this Province alike to
mining and to agriculture. During the past few years considerable railway construction, in the limited way of short lines, has taken place in the Province.
Much, however, requires to be done in railway building to open up to settlement
great stretches of country now lying waste, and we trust that in view of our large
contributions to the federal revenue, the Dominion Government will by liberal
subsidies to railway lines in this Province, carry out the policy which has in the
East resulted in such excellent railway and canal systems.
The new quarantine station recently established at Williams Head, together
with the efficient plant and staff, will do much towards protecting our port, the
Province and the Dominion from the introduction of infectious diseases.
The buildings about to be constructed in this city for the post office and customs departments will furnish accommodation necessitated by our increased requirements. We trust that the efficient postal delivery service enjoyed by this
city will be maintained by extending a sufficient remuneration to the letter carriers.
The seething unrest which agitates a large portion of the labor element in the
large centres of population is happily comparatively unknown in the Dominion.
Our Provincial Legislature has provided councils of conciliation and arbitration
which, from a pleasing experience thereof, we are hopeful will promote cordial
relations between capital and labor.
We heartily endorse the opinion unanimously arrived at by the Colonial conference, recently held at Ottawa, as to the desirability of a Pacific cable to connect
the Dominion with the Australasian colonies; also of a fast Atlantic steamer mail
and passenger service, and we trust that the near future will witness the successful completion of these projects.
We feel assured that, with good results to our Provincial interests, Your Excellency will be pleased to piace before your government for their consideration,
the several representations we have ventured to make in this address. BKfiS
UUH
APPENDICES.
In conclusion we would repeat our expressions of cordial and respectful welcome to Your Excellency and to Lady Aberdeen, and we trust your visit to this
portion of the Dominion will be replete with pleasure.
With a renewed expression of loyalty to Her Most Gracious Majesty,
We have the honor to subscribe ourselves,
Your Excellency's most obedient and humble servants,
A. C. FLUMERFELT,
President.
Signed on behalf of the members of the \
British Columbia Board of Trade,  this 5th   I
day of November, in the year of our Lord one   ( F. ELWORTHY
thousand eight hundred and ninety-four. J
His Excellency replied :
Your Honor, Air.  President and Gentlemen of the Board of Trade :
I return you sincere and hearty thanks for this address, which, in its attractive and graceful binding and handsomely engrossed as it is, will furnish a most
significant and agreeable souvenir of this occasion. I appreciate not only the
characteristic loyalty and the kindly feeling betokened by your address and by
your action in coming here to-day, but I also value and recognize the importance
of the interesting statement which your address contains and which certainly
forms a very striking narrative of the position and history of the various questions
of far reaching importance because vitally connected with the commercial development of this Province, and therefore indirectly concerning the Dominion as a
whole. I can with grcr.t pleasure and without any hesitation assure you that I
shall lose no time in enabling my constitutional advisers to have before them a
the recommendations and suggestions which are here contained in order that these
may receive the full and careful consideration which they merit, not only on account of their intrinsic importance but coming as these suggestions do from a
body of such importance as that which you compose. As to that I may say that
it has been my fortune and advantage since coming officially to Canada, more
than thirteen months ago, to come in contact with several of the principal boards
of trade of the Dominion, and therefore I can all the more appreciate the advantage of meeting you on this occasion and of hearing your views upon different
questions with which you have dealt. Although you do me no more than justice
in attributing to me a very keen appreciation and keen desire to take advantage
of any opportunity for promoting the carrying out of any improvement in the commercial affairs or any extension of the prosperity of commercial affairs in the
Dominion, at the same lime I have no doubt that the influence of the Governor-
General is of a more indirect than direct character, owing to the fact to which you
appropriately refer that measures must emanate from the representative government of the country. This, of course, takes the shape of the ministry who are
the elective representatives of the people as a country. At the same time the
Governor-General, even in detail, may, though .unconsciously, take his part in the
promotion of the welfare of the country.    As for instance, in assisting to make JO BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
known the resources of the various districts. That feature of his functions was
one day brought before my mind with considerable force by the words of the
mayor of a small town in a somewhat remote part of the Dominion. When before leaving I remarked to him that Lady Aberdeen and I were glad to have had
the opportunity of visiting the town, he replied, "Yes, I am glad your Excellency
came. It will be an advertisement to our place." (Great laughter.) I think
that is a humble but very excellent function generally understood and not always
plainly expressed as'on that occasion. (Renewed laughter.) You may be sure,
gentlemen, that it is my earnest purpose to co-operate with those who have shown
and are showing such energy, enterprise and ability in assisting to develop the
great resources of this great country, and I appreciate all the more the tone of
your address because, as I observed on Saturday evening, as everybody knows, we
have been passing and are still passing through a period of great depression, and
it is just pr^Sble we allowed ourselves to speak in language of self-congratulation
regarding the immunity which happily Canada enjoyed to a large extent from that
financjpa disturbance which was so alarmingly prevalent in the United States not
long ago. I Say it is just possible that some of us' may have forgotten that such a
crisis could not fail to have a reflex influence on an adjoining country. I need
not enter into the question whether that is the cause of the present dullness in
Canada; I will only say that we have reason to be thankful that that depression
is less felt here than in some other places and still more that there is a prospect of
a revival of financial activity. Among the points here mentioned that should be
heartily recognized is that in which you refer to the establishment of a system of
arbitration. The chambers of commerce in the old countiy, corresponding to
your boards of trade, have more and more recognized that principle and have
taken their part in exercising influence in that respect. I am also aware, gentlemen, that you have not been slow in taking action in the direction of suggesting
calmness and patience under circumstances were some excitement may naturally
have been occasioned.
His Excellency concluded by expressing his best wishes for the success of the
Board of Trade of Victoria.
Immigration.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B. C, July 2nd, 1895.
For the information of the British Columbia Board of Trade on the subject
of immigration, I may mention that although the government discourages, as far
as possible, the entry into the Province of pauper immigrants, it gives every facility
for the establishment of colonies of settlers possessed of sufficient means to
develop their small farms. APPENDICES.
There are numerous localities in the Province • admirably adapted for the
settlement of colonies with profit to the settlers, while individuals sparsely scattered
over the same localities could not make a living on account of having no easy
access to a market.
When the colonists are established along the sea coast it is worth while for
a steamship to call periodically to pick up the produce and carry it to either Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster or Nanaimo, where it finds a ready market.
The very fact of immigrants beingsettled in colonies gives increased value to
their lands arid they obtain the advantages of schools, churches, roads, etc.,
which they otherwise would not have, probably for many years.
The extent of the market for farm produce may be imagined when it is stated
that the people of British Columbia import three-fourths of the food they consume.
Colonies have already been established with great success at Bella Coola on
the Mainland coast and at Quatsino Sound on the north of Vancouver Island.
The plan adopted is for the intending colonists to first communicate with me
by letter as Minister of Immigration in order to find out what locality is open for
settlement, then to select one or more of their number, in whom they have confidence, to go and look at the ground, and to give him or them written authority
<luly attested that he or they, as the case may be, are authorized to act on behalf
of the colonists in dealing with the government. The delegates have to produce
to the Minister of Immigration a written acceptance from at least thirty colonists
that they are ready to accept the terms of the government as contained in the
accompanying agreement.
On this being done, the government sends a surveyor with the delegates to
lay out the lands. When that is finished the settlers come in and the government
employs them at wages to build a road through their settlement.
It will be seen that the government makes a free grant of the land on condition of its development and that it also makes roads and provides schools, but it
gives no grant of money, either for travelling expenses, or any other purpose not'
mentioned in- the agreement. In fact the settlers are expected to have means of
their own and will not be nursed in any way. Certain localities are now being
surveyed for settlement and will be ready for location next autumn or the spring
of next year.
The colonies on the coast have the advantage of the fishing industry as one
of their occupations. It may be stated that the lands are rich, but usually covered
with timber, sometimes of heavy description, while in many places the alder land
is easily cleared and is the richest description of soil. Water power for mills is
generally available. The farming consists of dairying and the growing of grain,
roots and fruit, and in suitable Localities, hops.
JAMES BAKER,
Minister of Immigration. ^2 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
This Indenture made the day of A. D. 189   ,
Between the Honourable James Baker, Minister of Immigration for the Province
of British Columbia, acting under authority of an Order of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, approved on the day of 189    , (hereinafter
called the Grantor) of the first part, and
(hereinafter called the Grantee) of the second part ;
Whereas the Grantee is a member of a group of intending settlers in British
Columbia, which includes thirty or more families, who, with their families, are
hereinafter referred to as the "Colony," and the Lieutenant-Governor in Council,
for the purpose of encouraging immigration, has agreed to make a free grant from
the public lands of the Province to each head of a family in the said Colony, upon
the conditions hereinafter mentioned, which conditions have been accepted by the
Grantee, as well as by the whole Colony.
Now therefore this Indenture Witnesseth that in consideration of the performance by the Grantee of the covenants and stipulations to be observed and
performed by and on the part of the said Grantee, the said Grantor, acting herein
on behalf of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, as aforesaid, and as far as, the
Crown hath power to grant the same, but not further or otherwise, doth hereby
covenant and agree upon the termination of five years from the date hereof, that
the said Grantee shall receive a Crown Grant of all and singular that certain piece
or parcel of land, lying and being in the District of
in the Province of British Columbia, and being composed of lot
number in said District, containing by admeasurement
acres of land, be the same more or less, and which may be more particularly.described as follows :—
Which said grant shall be subject to and in the form provided by the Land
Laws of the Province for the time being in force.
And the said Grantee doth hereby for himself, his executors, administrators
and assigns, covenant with the said Grantor in manner following, that is to say :—
That the said Grantee possesses in cash the sum of three hundred dollars and
is worth that sum over and above what will pay and after payment of all just'
debts of the said Grantee.
That the said Grantee will, within from the date hereof, enter
upon the said land and bona fide occupy and improve the same to the satisfaction
of the Grantor, and will continue to reside thereon with his family and to occupy
and improve the same during the term of five years from now next ensuing.
That the said Grantee shall, at the termination of the said period of five
years from the date hereof, have made improvements upon the said land to the
value of five dollars per acre thereof. APPENDICES.
0.5
That the Grantor may at any time during the said five years, by himself, his
servants or agents, enter upon the premises and view the state of the property and
the improvements theretofore made.
That the Grantee will observe and obey all such reasonable rules and regulations as may be made by the representatives or managers of the said Colony for
its good government and internal administration, provided the said rules and
regulations have been first submitted to and approved by the Grantor.
That the Crown grant herein provided for shall be conditional upon the continued residence and performance of the conditions of similar leases, issued concurrently herewith, by the other members of the Colony to the number of not less
than thirty, it being the intention that the said Colony shall remain entire and be
of a number of not less than thirty at the conclusion of the period of five years
when the issue of Crown grants is provided for.
Provided that in case of non-performance by the Grantee or by the Colony of
the terms of this agreement to his satisfaction, the Grantor may, by notice published in the British Columbia Gazette, cancel this agreement and enter upon the
aforesaid premises.
And the Grantor hereby covenants that so soon as each member of the
Colony, to the number of thirty in all, has erected a dwelling house upon the land
comprised in the respective leases, or so soon as the said Grantor has satisfied
himself of the bona fide settlement of the Colony upon the lands allotted to the
members thereof, there will be made and constructed a wagon road through the
land occupied by the Colony.
In Witness Whereof the parlies hereto have
seals the day and year first above written.
« Signed, sealed and delivered by the "j
Honourable the Minister of Immigration |
for the Province of British Columbia, in
the presence of
hereunto set their hands and
Signed, sealed and delivered by the
within named
in the presence of 54 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
British Columbia Salmon Pack, Seasons 1894-95.
October ist, 1895.
This season's fishing and canning operations are closing with comparatively
satisfactory results, the total salmon pack being about 500,000 cases, valued at
$2,500,000.
As anticipated, in August last, the canners and fishermen had much pleasure
in meeting Professor E. E. Prince, whom they found most courteous and considerate in all matters connected with their industry, and it is expected that good
results, mutually advantageous to the Department of Fisheries, the canners and
the fishermen, will follow the knowledge obtained by the Professor during his
visit to this Province.
FRASER RIVER.
Name.
Anglo British Columbia Packing Co., Ltd.
Britannia Cannery	
British Columbia Cannery	
Wadham's Cannery	
British America	
Victoria Canning Co., of B. C, Ltd  ....
Bon Accord Fishery Co	
Ewen & Co	
Canadian Pacific Packing Co	
Short & Squair	
F. Boutillier & Co	
Lulu Island Canning Co  	
Terra Nova Canning Co	
Pacific Coast Packing Co	
Fisherman's Canning Co	
Beaver Canning Co	
Richmond Canning Co	
British Columbia Canning Co., Ltd	
Malcolm—Windsor Canning Co., Ltd....
Brunswick Canning Co	
Federation Canning Co., Ltd ..'....
Dinsmore Island Canning Co., Ltd	
Costello & McMorran	
Alliance Canning Co	
Atlas Canning Co	
Federation Canning Co., Ltd.
Naas Harbor Cannery	
Mill Bay Cannery	
NAAS RIVER.
Pack in Cases.
82,07;.
53,020
27.917
25,418
20,774
12,465
15,542
8,025
13.253
11,110
15,710
9.615
7 490
18,429
15.346
17.387
io.393
363,967
1895.
Estimated.
21,800
9,500
23,100
18,000
40,800
19,500
26,500
19,285
12,200
7.300
12,605
7,000
11,560
9,200
15,029
11,511
7,000
17,500
12,500
15,000
8,300
15,900
4,000
4.775
349.865 APPENDICES.
Salmon   Pack—Continued.
SKEENA RIVER.
Name.
Pack in Cases.
•
1894.
17.308
9.279
6,624
6,988
6,591
7,650
6,711
1895.
Estimated.
Anglo British Columbia Packing Co	
British America Cannery	
11,400
9,200
7.059
7,500
9,500
8,i6S
7,883
North Pacific          "         	
British Columbia Canning Co., Ltd	
Victoria Canning Co., of B. C, Ltd	
Skeena Packing Co., R. Cunningham & Son	
Balmoral Canning Co	
Inverness Canning Co	
1
61,151
67,710
RIVERS INLET.
Victoria Canning Co., of B. C, Ltd ....
Wannuck Cannery	
Anglo British Columbia Packing Co., Ltd
British Columbia Canning Co., Ltd	
12,433
26,918
39.351
OTHER NORTHERN POINTS.
Alert Bay Canning Co.  (Alert Bay
Namu Canning Co., R. Draney, (Namu Harbor)
Lowe Inlet Packing Co., (Lowe Inlet)	
Clayoquot Fishing and Trading Co., Ltd	
Grand Total	
Four Canneries destroyed by fire, 1895
THE ANNUAL PACK (since the beginning of the Industry.
CASES
1883  196,292
1884  141,242
I885  108,517
1886  l6l,264
1887  204,083
l888  l8l,040
1889  4I4,294
CASES
I876     9.847
1877   67,387
I878 II3,60I
1879   6l,093
l880   61,849
l88l  177,276
l882 225,061
10,320
9,2l8
19,000
IS9O  409,464
1891 3H.893
1892 228,470
1893	
1894	
1895  525.5l6 56 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
Sealing Catch for Season 1894.
Vessels.
Enterprise	
Rosie Olsen	
Umbrina B
Oscar and Hattie.
Diai
Crews.
Catch.
Brenda	
Arietis	
Casco .;	
Dora Sieward	
VV. A. Earl	
Fawn	
Agnes McDonald	
W. P. Hall	
Mermaid....	
City of San Dieg"o.   .
Mary Taylor	
Libbie	
May Belle	
Mary Ellen	
Viva	
W. P. Say ward	
Penelope	
Vera	
Carlotta G. Cox	
Triumph	
Otto	
E. B. Marvin	
Sapphire	
Annie E. Paint	
Geneva	
Teresa	
Ocean Belle	
Sadie Turpel	
MaudS	
Aurora	
F. M. Smith	
Beatrice	
Mascot	
Favourite	
Annie C. Moore....
Labrador...'	
Wanderer	
Pioneer	
Saucy Lass	
Borealis	
Catharine	
Ainokc	
Kate	
Shelby	
Venture	
Walter L. Rich
Mountain Chief.....
Fisher Maid	
Minnie	
San Jose	
Kilomeng"	
Henrietta	
C. D. Rand	
Beatrice	
Canoe catch by India
99!
Si
S°
ioo
86
63
94
68
Totals.
46
43
s
63
92
60
701
60
76
98
86
96
109
82
92
6;
83
56
97
+1
99
66
40
80
66
38
58
16
48
76
46
24I
«9|
26
26 .
8
6
26 .
34.
25 ■
16 ,
•9-
22 .
1 1
2.3
26 .
19
26
8
26
27
■ 6
37
14
' 7
Behring- Sea-
i>o«     S
535
309 ■
308
400
4.8
•254
:,o43 ■
1,588
:>733
.9641
■.3831
.'97 ■
,926 .
i.584 ■
:,47" •
911
,7°7
710 .
1,603
t.304
«74
[.010
925
1,909
t.437 •
606
[,306
',075 ■
[,947 •
425,       431
176
433
343
197 •
86
296.
1,014
!,m8 .
623
1,226
t>497
,092
1,783
',343
693
96
5S8'.
120 .
274 .
86 .
21
81
34*
299
752
938
i79
269 .
467.
79
34
691
175
S2
488!
290
90
490
1,092
303
232
417
1,000
679
256
307
427
3.989
866   888   578   266I 259'   11,703   48,993!  7,43
5'7
336
1,568
>,899
2,810
!.9°9
2,394
2,726
1,288
1,926
2,584
2,143
i,557 .
2,178
710
2,108
'•554
1,124
1,210
1,122
2,452
1,437
641
1,602
1,270
'•947
4,560
i,637
2,118
2,640
' 2,038
1,650
1,222
804
i,954
1,429
93i
177
1,518
1,103
1,846
2,256
868
400
1.681
838
1,452
1,328
2,124
946
411
909
2,440
175
92
2,151
869
634
1,082
357
1.703
'3-989
14,636 94.474
246
488
[,009
378
1,059
S671
565'
564
MS
492
479
593
327
340 \mm
APPENDICES.
Sealing Catch, 1894—Continued.
57
VALUE OF VESSELS AND BOATS.
59 vessels, 3,866 tons $386,600
266 boats and outfits        26,600
259 canoes, $25 each       6,475
Grand total.
SUMMARY OF SEALING CATCH, SEASON 1894.
British Columbia Coast catch.
Japanese Coast catch	
Vicinity of Copper Island	
Behrinsr Sea	
Grand total	
Catch of United States vessels landed at Victoria, 375 skins.
.$419,675
11,703
48,993
7,437
26,341
94.474
.   Summary of Sealing Catch, Season 1895.
British Columbia Coast Catch, approximate  9,258
Siberian Catch, approximate  26,409
B eh ring Sea Catch, approximate  36.747
Grand Total, approximate  72-4I4 58
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.    60
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE. APPENDICES. 62
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
Exports from British Columbia
To Countries outside of Canada of Products of Agriculture and its branches
for the three years ending 30th June, 1894.
The Exports to the other Provinces in the Dominion are not included.
Year ending    Year ending I Year ending
'30th June, 1892,30th June, 1893 30th June, 1894
c3 -
'  Live Stock.
Horses	
Horned cattle	
•Swine	
Poultry & other animals.
Meats, Etc.
(head)
24 $  8,781       23!$   2,955      282 $ 16,250
10 531 4 200 2 35
13 115 1 10	
303
Poultry  	
Hides, horns and skins (notfux)l
Bacon (fts.)i
Beef     "
Hams lii'...    "
Mutton     '■   I
Pork ■     I
Sheep pelts (No.)
Wool (lbs.)
Grain, Seeds, &c, Breadstuffs-
and Products of.
Bran (cwt.)
Barley 0. (bush.)
Beans Jj      "
Oats      "
Peas, split, ."il -ji£,.     "
Wheat       "
Flour.. M  (bbls.)
Biscuits and Bread (Bs.)
Oatmeal (bbls.)|
All other meal $&..     ''
Fruits and Vegetables.
Apples, green (bbls.)
Fruits, canned (S>s.)
Other fruit     "
Potatoes  (bush.)
All other vegetables ..'.«■ I
.403
425
360
43,596
1
1,687
271
6,501
2,450
61
Dairy Products.
Butter (lbs.)'
Cheese      1   I
5,050
440
Eo*0"**
Hay	
Trees and bushes
Hops	
.(doz.)
. (tons)!
HH
8,568
97       .. - ■
r2,276      49,383  35,995
55   3,813         655   2,343 393
 '       90             7      625 51
58'       214 34
....            150 16
18,566 45,110    21,613 15,833      4,566
493 64	
2i  1,323
648	
183
7,801
10,967
503   1,762 449
.... 2 1
180
85
31 3       35 18
4,946     21,279       48 173
cwt 30 10 cwt.-8 66
295
3,181
172
3|     567
1,001
1,177 .
926 .
398
1,472   7,507      2,246 3,320
'   6,851         9641 4,655
I
    34
589
811
$125,7911
60'
112!
.144,907
I$112,219
472
6,301
2,984
6
21
984
695
11
22
12,201
$82,049 Total Land owned—acres
Acres of cultivated land
Acres ol woodland or forest
Acres of swamp or marsh
Acres of roe'
Acres prairie or pasture (including hay mea
dows)	
Acres
Acres
Acres
Acres
Acres
Acres
Acres
Acres
Acres
Acres
Acres
Acres
Acres
Acres
of wheat !
of barley
of oats
of rye
of peas
of beans
of other grain
of potatoes
of mangolds
of eariots
of turnips
of other root crops and vegetables
of hay and clover cultivated
of hops	
Number of apple tree
Number of peur tree
Number of plum and prune trees
Number of cherry trees	
Number of other fruit tree;
Number of acres of small fruits
Livi
Number of horses of all kinds
Number of cattle of all kind
Number of sheep of all kinds
Number of pigs of all kinds
Number of poultry of all kinds
Other live stock	
Number of hives of bees
j   Value of Personal Property.
Value of agricultural machinery & impt's
Value of buildings and improvements	 64
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
Recapitulation of Returns of Products from Province of
British Columbia, 1894.
Yield of Grain, Crops, Etc.
Tons of Wheat	
"      Barley	
"      Oats	
"       hye	
"      Peas .. .JK	
|       Beans	
"'    Unspecified and other Cereals.
Yield of Root Cbops and Vegetables.
Tons of Potatoes	
"      Mangolds	
"      Carrots  	
"      Turnips	
"      Unspecified  and other Roots and
Vegetables	
Yield of Miscellaneous Crops.
Tons of Hay j™™;
Ensilage... ,;^^H
Hops	
Yield of Fruit.
Pounds of Apples	
■ Pears	
9 Plums and Prunes	
I Cherries	
" Unspecified and other Fruit.
Yield of Dairy Products.
Pounds of Butter.
SsSS-'s     Cheese
Miscellaneous Produce.
rounds of Honey.
Wool..
Dozens of Eggs...
Produce of Live Stock.
Number of horses marketed	
Number of cattle marketed and consumed..
Number of sheep marketed and consumed..
Number of pigs marketed and consumed	
Quantity of poultry marketed andcoDsumed
3,857
904
4,388
212
877
134
54
673
799
1,587
826
32,326
23,629
3
55
412,247
36,490
35,115
6,186
98,985
82,115
280
89
1,050
4,300
50
719
16,782
8,046
8,690
14,108
834
359
4,710
4
686
4
6!
,370
1,448
3,937
486
30,434
897
1,8*2
30
830,472
44,764
r.7,S- 34
12,411
125,444
I g «
532
70
2,612
15
392
o
10
3,594
980
2,801
13,593
456
19
497,836
76,146
101,729
19,849
54,340
258,120       169,779
21,625 200
231
2,282
2,338
5,388
21,090
126
1,483
6,115
4,245
26,147
11,701
231
1,955
140
127
15,696
3,190
3,004
8,325
1,899
76,353"
i 4,982
1,838
104
1,740,555
157,400
81J,678
38,446
273,769
510,014
22,105
12,402 142   I      13,594
5,935 41,414 81,649
.141,171       192,760        423,661
1,076
20,547
15,499
18,293
61,315 \mtmm
APPENDICES.
Forest Wealth of British Columbia.
WOODED AREA.
Province.
Total Area.
Forest and
Woodland.
British Columbia
sq. miles.
382,300
sq. miles.
285,554
Percentage
Woodland.
74.69
The wooded area is estimated from the maps and reports of the Geological Survey and the Department of the Interior. In the central plateau of
agricultural lands what wood is found is chiefly small poplar, &c, of little
value.
The white pine of eastern Canada (P. strobus) is notfound on the Pacific
Coast, the Douglas fir, the yellow cedar and the spruces being the chief trees
for timber and lumber.
TIMBER REGULATIONS.
Leases of surveyed, unpre-cmpted crown timber lands may be obtained for a
period not exceeding twenty-one years by those tendering the highest cash bonus,
Subject to the payment of an annual rental of 10 cents pe,r acre and a royalty of
50 cents per thousand feet on the scaled measurement of the logs. The lessee, if
not actually engaged in the manufacture of lumber, must to retain his limits, erect
a mill capable of cutting at least I,coo feet a day for every 4C0 acres of land
included in the lease, within two years, and give a guarantee equivalent to 10
cents an acre that he will do so before obtaining his lease.
A timber license may be granted for 1,000 acres for four years, on payment
$10 annually and 15 cents for each tree (except hemlock), and no person, not
licensed, may cut timber on crown lands except for farming and mining purposes.
Only one license at one time is obtainable, and is not transferable. A special
license for 1,000 acres for one year may be obtained by application in the Officia
Gazette, and the payment of $50 to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works. 66 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
LIST OF TREES OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Botanical Name.
English Name.
French Name.
Abies amabilis	
White Fir	
Sapin blanc.
"    grandis	
Western white fir	
Gros sapin.
"    subatpina	
Mountain balsam	
Sapin des nxonts.
Acer macrophyllum	
Large-leaved maple.  ..
Erable.
"    circinatum	
Vine maple	
Arbutus Menziesii	
Betula occidentalis	
Aune rouge.
Arbutus   	
Arbute.
Western birch	
Bouleau
''       papyrifera	
Cornus Xuttallii	
"        a canot.
Western dogwood	
Comouillier.
Juniperus Virginiana —
Red cedar   	
Cedre rouge.
Larix Americana .. :Hs5
Epinette rouge.
"     Lyalli   	
Mountain larch	
des monts.
"         rouge.
Petite epinette.
Epinette noir,
Picea alba...  	
"     Engelmannii	
White spruce	
Western black spruce...
Black spruce	
Grosse epinette.
"     Sitchensis	
Western white spruce...
Epinette blanche.
Pinus albicaulis	
White bark pine	
Pin blanc
contorta	
Scrub pine	
Cypres.
"      monticola	
White mountain pine...
Pin blanc.
•'      Murray ana	
Black pine	
Cypres.
"      ponderosa.	
Yellow pine	
Pin jaune ou rouge.
Pirns rivularis	
Balsam poplar	
Pommier.
Populus balsaniifera. ...
Baumier.
Cottonwood	
Liard.
|^H|    tremuloides ...
Aspen 	
Tremble.
''        trichocarpa ....
Cottonwood	
Liard.
Primus emarginata	
Cherry	
Cerisier.
Pseudotsuga Douglassii..
Douglas fir	
Pin d'Oregon.
Quercus Garryana	
Western white oak	
Chene.
Salix lancifolia	
Lance-leaved willow ....
Saule.
"    lasiandra   	
Willow     	
Taxus brevifolia	
Western yew 	
If.
Grand cedre.
Cedre jaune.
Pruche.
Yellow cypress or cedar.
Western hemlock	
Tsuga Mertensiana	
''      Pattoniana	
Alpine hemlock	 VANCOUVER  COURT  HOUSE.  APPENDICES. 68
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE. APPENDICES.
B. C. Lumber Fleet, 1894.
FH(
Am ship	
Nor ship	
•Am'seh r	
Amsch'-	
Ohilbark...,
Br hark	
'. Chit ship	
Br ship	
Ger bark.	
Am bkne	
Am bkue	
Br ship	
Br ship	
Br schr	
Br bkne	
Am bkne	
Br ship	
Br bark	
Am ship	
Am hark	
Nic bark	
Br ship	
Am bark	
Br bark	
Am bark	
Am schr	
Hal bark	
Nor ship	
Br. ship	
Am schr	
Am ship	
Am bark	
Italbark	
Br ship	
Br ship	
Am bkne	
Br bark	
Am schr	
Am brig	
Am schr	
Chilbark....
Am ss	
Am bark	
Am schr	
Am bkne	
Am ss	
NaMR.
,Tns Sailed.
From.
For.
Cargo Ft.
Eclipse	
Beacon sheld
Pioneer	
Aida	
Ilndia	
Thermopylae
Hindostan	
•\ storia 	
[Gurenberg	
Modoc	
Katie Flicklnger
East Croft	
Benmore	
Grace Harwar...
Xantippe	
Chehalis	
Largo Law	
Gainsborough...
Guardian	
Olympic	
lion Carlos	
Borcowdale	
Hesper	
Villalta	
Southern Chief..
[Wm. Bowden ... I
Elisa	
Dram nten	
Verajean |
Aida ,....!
Occidental '
S ewsboy |
Cavour	
Bullae hulish	
iLismore  	
Ilrmgard |
Alexandia	
R. W Bartlett.. j
Geneva	
Sadie	
India	
Lakme	
Colorado	
Beulah |
^Marion j
iCosmopolis |
11536 Jan. 20
11450 F«b.    5
j 397 Feb. 28
507 Mar. 25
953 A pril 7
948 Hay    2
1542 May 12
1335 June 24
627 May 12
452 May    5,
449:May    5
1312 May 25
|l460|Aug.   2
1750 June 27
909 June 14
656 May 31
1597 June 20
985 June 2ll
1073 July   3|
HlaJuly 12
694 July 14
1197 July 28
664 June 30
866 July   9
1219 July 12
728 July   8
915 Juiy 16
1347 Aug 24
1824 Aug. 25
507 Aug. 29,
1470Oct
'559 Sept. Ill
1389l>ct.     6'
1806Oct-
1598r>ct.
628 Oct.
1297.NOV.
495 Oct.
471|Nov.
295 Oct.
953lT>ee.
4041 Nov.
1039.Dec.
339,Nov.
348 Dec.
267jl)ec.
Vancouver
Vancouver
Victoria...
Moodyville
IMoodyville
N. Wfism'r.
iMoodyvillei
Vancouver
Moodyville
Victoria...
Vancouver
Moodyville
Victoria...
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Moodyville
Moodyville
Victoiia..
Vancouver
Vancouver
Moodyvillei
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Moodyville
Moodyvillei
Vancouver
Vancouver
Moodyville
Victoria.. .j
Vancouver
Vancouver!
Moodyville,
Vancouver]
Vancouver,
Vancouver,
Vancouver!
Vancouver
Westmin'r.]
Moodyville,
Vancouver
Vancouver,
Westmin'r.
Westmin'r.
Westmin'r.
Green ock  ;
Amsterdam	
Santa Kosalia..
Shanghai '
Valparaiso.... I
bhanghai	
Valparaiso	
Antwerp '
Valparaiso f o.i
Santa Rosalia..
Santa Kosalia .
Valparaiso f.o.
Adelaide	
Queensto'nf.o.
Queensto'nf.o.
Adelaide j
Valparaiso f.o.
Melbourne ....!
Santa Rosalia..
Callao	
Noumea 	
Caleta Buena .
Sydney 	
Melbourne	
Santa Rosalia.
Sydney	
Antofagasta.
Amsterdam ... j
Alexandria ...!
Shanghai	
b'anta Rosalia..
Sydney i
Callao '
Valparaiso
Buenos Ayre«..
Iquique j
Calais	
San'a Rosalia..
Iquique 1
8an Francisco.
Valparaiso ....;
San Pedro	
Sydney 	
San Francisco
San Pedro	
S.Francisco f.o
1,072,820
1,055,411
57,714
686,562
"61,104
581,853
1,207,562
740,684
591,766
101,*11
399,418
1,058,084
1,086,479
1,398,871
841,219
782163
1,358,471
740,860
170,357
1,86H.752
536,094
910,683
744,604
656,795
891,436
076,072
763 972
994,910
1,630,000
694,981
249,066
662,607
9?6,105
1,693,210
1,221,499
660,938
1,026,928
501,628
55L249
410,000
784,000
571,000
765,601
416,487
248,965
332,250 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE. APPENDICES. 72
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE. APPENDICES. 74
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE. APPENDICES.
Coal—Queen Charlotte Islands.
CAMP  ROBERTSON.
Sample No. 1 (Surface.)
Moisture    	
Loss on ignition     17.22
Total carbon	
Sulphur	
Ash	
CAMP WILSON.
Sample No. 2.
Moisture	
Loss on ignition.
Total carbon	
Sulphur	
Ash	
79.18
.91
19.49
1.91
35.81
93.665
.659
4.425
NEAR YAKON LAKE.
Sample No. 3.
Moisture '      2.01
Loss on ignition      9.13
Total carbon  95.19
Sulphur 909
Ash M..r.       2.8   •
Sample No. 4.
Moisture	
Loss on ignition  17.19
Total carbon  93.43
Sulphur      1.17
Ash .-      4.25 76
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF   TRADE.
IRON.
Pittsburg Analysis of Barclay Sound Iron
Number of Samples.
Ore.
Silicic Acid	
Alumina	
Magnetic Oxide of Iron..
Per Oxide of Manganese
Carbonate of Lime	
Carbonate, of Magnesia ..
Titanic Acid	
Copper	
Sulphur	
Phospheric Acid.
Arsenic	
Metalic Iron	
Sulphur.. -.	
Phosphorous	
I
II
Ill
1.79
2.61
2.10
.14
.25
.75
91.13
88.40
89.57
.84
.71
.63
.96
5.70
4.61
2.08
2.24 .
2.34
Mere traces
Mere traces.
None.
None.
None.
.060
.091
Traces.
.007
.009
.007
None.
None.
None.
66.32
64.10
64.92
.06
.091
Traces;
.003
.004.
.008
Seattle Analysis of Barclay Sound Iron Ore.
Metals.
Iron. Metalic	
Sulphur	
Phosphorous	
Lime	
Manganese       J1,%'
Silica and Gange       ^7.30
63.73
.0054
.0049
3.84
Iron Oxide P	
Sulphur	
Phosphoric Acid...
Carbonate of Lime
Manganese	
Silica and Gange...
Alumina	
Titanium	
Arsenic	
Copper	
Cleveland Analysis of Barclay Sound Iron Ore.
Iron.   Mangan.   Lime.  Sulphur
1. Magnetic Iron(Sechart) 66.00
2. Sample B (Sarita)  64.50
3. 4 Pieces "Vancouver Ore 63.00
9. Ground Ore in   Sacks
(Sechart)  63.50
10. West Coast Vancouver
Island (Sarita) ...... 67.00
44
4.00
.02
.01
2.00
48
4.20
.01
.01
2.50
46
4.50
.05
.016
4.00
28
8.00
1.05
.01   !
5.33
36
2.00
.06
.01
3.00
i.01
.0054
.0112
!.84
7.30
.52
None,
None.
None.
99.6856%
Phos.     Silica. APPENDICES.
IRON—Continued.
Glasgow Analysis of Sooke Mine Magnetic Iron Ore
A
Peroxide of Iron •  54.89
Protoxide of Iron  23.61
Oxide of Maganese  .23
Lime  .47
Magnesia  .52
Phosphoric Acid  .015
Sulphur  .02
Iron combined with Sulphur  .02
Alumina  7.90
Titanic Acid  .60
Silica  11.70
Water   .10
100.075
Iron, pure, per cent        56.80
Pig Iron, per cent        61.0
cwt.
Pig Iron, per ton      12.1.5
Ore required to make a ton of Pig Iron        32.5
No. 1—San Francisco Analysis of Sooke Mine Magnetic Iron
No. 2— " " " "
No. 3— ■ " " " "
No. 4—Cornwall, JEng.,     " " "
No.  6—San Francisco,      " "        "
No.   7—Dom. Gov't Mineralogist, Analysis Sooke Mine Magnetic Iron
No.   8— " " "
No.   9— I " "
No. 10—
No. 11—
No. 12       " " "
No. 13— "
65.36
65.00
18.36
31.50
.62
Trace
.33
.42
1.15
.20
.03
Trace
Trace.
.08
Trace.
.07
5.19
.94
None.
.70
8.50
1.40
.10
99.64
100.31
-60.03
70.07
65.0
75.9
cwt.
cwt.
13.0.0
15.0.20
30.8
26.3
ron	
.    72.40
57.80
I
.    57.30
"
.   48.9
..   68.5
.    64.04
ignetic Ire
n   59.06
"
'    52.03
"
1    58.49
"
'    55.83
"
'    63.64
K
'    63.57
a
'    48.94 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
Educational.
Statement of Lands and Buildings held in Trust by Corporation of
the City of Victoria for Educational Purposes.
High and Central'School
Consists of High School and Boys' and Girls' Central School
and the Pemberton Gymnasium Building.
Totalnumber of Class Rooms '.     22
Area of Grounds     7}& acres
South Park School.
Number of Class Rooms       8
Area of Grounds 150x203 feet
Nokth Ward School.
Number of Class Rooms       S
Area of Grounds     2 acres
All the foregoing Schools are built of brick, and those following of wood.
James Bay Ward School.
Number of Class Rooms      4
Area of Grounds     120x120 feet
Hillside Ward School.
Number of Class Rooms .....       4
Area of Grounds •     100x133 feet
Rock Bay Ward School.
Number of Class Rooms      2
Area of Grounds     120x120 feet
Spring Ridge Ward School.
Number of Class Rooms       5
Area of Grounds     135x119 feet
Victoria West School.
Number of Class Rooms       4
Area of School Grounds         .... .d-SsML     1 acre   appendices. 79
Names and Value of School Buildings and Grounds.
Names of School
Buildings,
Victoria, B. C
1875
Brick
Central	
High	
Girls' (wing added 1888).
1882
1885
7% acres'.
$ 5,500
$90,000
$65,000
$160 500
Pemberton Gymnasium
1894
Q
South Park School	
1894
H
8
150x203 ft
2,000
9,000
33,500
44,500
North Ward ochool	
1894
s
8
2acres...
2,000
14,000
33,500
49,500
James B. Ward (ad'n '89) 1883
Wood
3
120x120 ft.
750
3,000
4,500
8,250
Hillside Ward     "
1884
M
3
100x133 "
75C
2900
5,000
8,650
Rock Bay Ward "
1886
B
2
120x120 "
500
2,300
3.20C
6,000
8p. Ridge Ward  "'89,'93
1887
B
4
135x119 "
1,000
2,600
5.250
. 8,850
Victoria'West     "     'S9
1888
"
4
1 acre	
1,000
3,000
5,000
9,000
Baptist Mission House..
ren'd
1
2o0
$13,750
250
$126,800
$154,950
$295,500
Statement showing Average Attendance of Pupils at the Victoria
Schools for the last Ten Years.
1885-
1886-
1887-
1888-
1889-
1890-
1891-
1892-
1893-
1894
86.
87.
88.
89.
90.
91.
92.
93.
94.
Average Monthly Salaries.
Average monthly salary per Teacher  $71 97
" •' '"      Monitor     35 55
Total Gross Cost of Schools.
For Maintenance J    $49,318 62
Receipts from Provincial Government per capita
allowance    $16,413 20
Provincial Revenue Tax    $12,351 00
Less collection, 8 per cent  988 08
The Citv of Victoria.
11,362 92
21,542 50
$49,318 62 80
BRITISH COLUMBIA BOARD OF TRADE. APPENDICES. 82 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
Inland Revenue, Canada, Divisions No. 37 and 38.
Entered   for   Consumption,   July   1st,   1894,   to   June   30th,   1895,
No. 37,
Victoria, B. C.
Spirits proof gallons.. 52,229.67
|     exported        "      I 1,152.38
Malt lbs 1,315,382
Manufactured Tobaccos  j 171,982^
I                   I      exported... " ~M8}4
Raw Leaf               "         " 9,098
Cigars, ex-Warehouse No. 163,750
■      ex-Factory..    " 1,367,925
Malt Liquor j gallons 19,316
Petroleum      " 212.75S
Total Receipts  $155,053.26
No. 38,
Vancouver, B. C.
32,536.99
327.91
559,423
128,369
7,781
51,650
863,625
237,870
209,925.50
$99,323.94
Exports the Produce of Canada, from the  Province of British
Columbia, for 24 Years ending June 30th, 1895.
Animals
and their
Agric'L
Miscel
Year.
The Mine.
Fisheries.
Forest.
Produce.
Products.
laneous.
Total.
1872
$1,389,585
$    37,707
$214,377
$214,700
$    142
$   1,540
$1,858,050
1873
1,224,362
43,361
211.026
259,292
2,885
1,197
1,742,123
1874
1,351,145
114,118
260,116
320,625
5,296
443
2,051,743
1875
1,929,294
133,986
292,468
411,810
9,727
2,777,285
1876
2,032,139
71,338
273,430
329,027
3,080
68
2,709,082
1877
1,708,848
105,603
287,042
230,893
3,083
1,500
2,346,969
1878
1,759.171
423,840
327.360
257,314
462
2,768,147.
1879
1,530,812
633,493
'273,366
268,671
2,505
57
2,708,848
1880
1,664,626
317,410
258,804
339,218
3,843
100
2,584,001
1881
1,317,079
400,984
172,647
350,474
248
22
2,231,554
1882
1,437,072
976,903
362.875
300,429
946
2,616
3,080,841
1»83
1,309,646
1,332,385
407,624
287,394
6,791
443
3,345,263
1884
1,441,052
599,371
458,365
271,796
1,745
1,413
3,100,404
1885
1,759,512
727,672
262,071
414,364
2,324
5,948
3,172,391
1886
1,720,335
643,052
194,488
329,248
1,907
2,811
2,891,811
1887  '
1,832,827
910,559
235,913
380,126
10,265
1,911
3,371,601
1888
1,889,805
1,164,019
411,957
318,839
27,631
85,826
3,928,077
1889
2,377,052
993,623
419,026
397,685
14,831
102,089
4,331,306
1890
2,375,770
2,374,717
325,881
346,159
9,>23
113,271
5,545,621
1891
2,930.229
2,274,686
374,996
294,646
5,017
20,434
6,257,158
1892
2,979,470
2,351,083
425,278
390,854
25,018
31976
6,574,989
1893
2,898,947
1,5'J1,831
454,994
310,621.
30,173
446,231
5,642,797
1894
3,521,543
3,541,305
411,623
149,269
23 323
196,895
7,843,958
1895
4,615,452
3,264,401
457,373
21,774
754,998
9,114,058 APPENDICES.
83
Imports into the Province of British Columbia for 24 Years
ending 30th June, 1895.
Goods Entered fob Home Consumption.
Value of
Total
Imports.
To 30th June, 1872 $1,790,352
From Canada       22,215
To 30th June, 1873 2,191,011
From Canada       75,604
To 30th June, 1874  2,085,560
From Canada       66,104
To 30th June, 1875    2,543,552
From Canada     117,654
To 30th June, 1876  2,997,597
From Canad a      129,735
To 30th June, 1877  2,220,968
From Canada      163,142
To 30th June, 1878  2,244,503
From Canada      144,754
To 30th June, 1879  2,440,781
. From Canada      184,951
To 30th June, 1880  1,689,394
From Canada     208,072
To 30lh June, 1881  2,489,643
From Canada     387,111
To 30th June, 1882  2,899,223
From Canada      449,768
To 30th June, 1883 " 3,937,536
From Canada      624,207
To 30th June, 1884  4,142,486
From Canada     789,287
To 30th June. 1885 4,089,492
From I anada .d.    927,054
To 30th June, 1886  3,953,299
To 30th June, 1887  3,547,852
To 30th June, 1888  3,509,951
To 30th June, 1889  3,763,127
To 30th June, 1890  4,379,272
To 30th June, 1891  5,478,883
To 30th June, 1892  6,495,589
To 30th June, 1893 3,934,066
To 30th June, 1894  5,320,615
To 30th June, 1895  4,403,976
■Dutltirae
Goods.
$1,600,361
Free
Goods.
$  166,707
22,215
1.569,112
507,364
75,604
1,676,792
371,544
66,104
1,924,482
566,111
117,054
2,237,072
707,906
129,735
1,820,391
. 346,318
163,142
1,9J5,201
367,926
144,754
1,997,125
320,326
184,951
1,614,165
122,451
. 208,072
2,214,153
242,963
387,111
2,472,174
404,287
449,768
3,331,023
550,833
624,207
3,337,642
702,693
789,287
3,458,529
t64,923
927,054
2,951,379
1,060,347
3,065,791
560,348
2,674,941
729,266
2,002,645
. 807,140
3,357,111
1,030,375
4,261,207
1,074,983
4,423,414
1,803,005
3,662,673
1,255,495
3,582,333
1,738,282
3,131,490
1,236,935
Total.
$1,767,06S
22,215 ,
2,076,476
75,604
2,048,336
66,104
2,490,593
117,054
2,944,978
129,735
2,166,709
163,142
2,273,127
144,754
2,317,454
184,951-
2,457,116
208,072
1,736,616
387,111
2,875,461
449,768
.3,866,856
624,207
4,040,335
789,287
4,023,452
927,051
4,011,726
3,626,139
3,401,207
3,809,786
4,287,486
5,336,190
6,226,419
4,918,168
5,336,961
4 368,425
Duty
Collected.
$342,400 48
302,147 65
336,494 47
413,921 50
4SS,3S4 52
403,520 21-
426,125 14
484,704 04
450,175 43
589,403 62
678,104 53
907,655 54
884,076 21
966,143 64
8S0 226 65
883,421 53
861,465 14
974,675 69
1,075,215 20
1,346,059 42
1,412,878 00
1,367,250 32
1,308,631 23
1,137,727 49 SHIPPING.
The Board is indebted to the courtesy and kindness of Mr. A. R. Milne,
Collector of Customs, for the following Shipping information :
PORT OF VICTORIA, B. C.
Statement of Vessels, British and Foreign, employed in the coasting trade
of the Dominion of Canada, arrived at or departed from this Port, during the
fiscal year ending 30th June, 1895 :
Vessels Arrived. Vessels Departed.
No.                                No.            No. No.
British Steamers.                  Vessels.   Tonnage.     Crew.       Vessels. Tonnage. Crew.
Screw    1028      267637      22857         1031 263898 22747
Paddle      116        86564        4220          117 87108 4254
Sternwheel       53        35848        1538            52 35817 1534
H97      390O49     28615        I2°° 386823 28535
British Sailing Vessels.
Ships '.           ....         ....               3 4706 82
Barques         1            944            13              3 4101 71
Schooners       59            610          174            67 793 230
Sloops     101            518         217          108 441 247
Barges, etc       89         6671            19           84 6532 17
250         8743         423         265 16573 647
Grand Total    1447      398792      29038        1465 403396 29182
Foreign Steamers.
Screw         4         2671          143             2 3467 55
Foreign Sailing Vessels.
Ships -         1          1072            16             3 4148 46
Barques          1           1438            16              3 2920 39
Grand Total         6         5181          175             8 10535 '4°
RECAPITULATION.
British •    1447       398792       29038          I465 403396 29182
Foreign    6   5181   175     8 10535 140
r453  403973  29213   1473 413931 29322 lum
APPENDICES. 85
PORT OF VICTORIA, B. C.
Annual Return, showing the description, number and tonnage of vessels
built and registered at this Port during the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1895 :
Class of Vessel. Built. Registered.
No.    Tonnage. No.    Tonnage
Steamers :
Screw     183 311
Stem wheel     2 250
Total Steamers I...    3         258             3 311
Sailing Vessels :
Schooners     3           56             1 20
Barquentines.          ....              1 447
Total Sailing Vessels     3           56             2 467
Grand Total     6         314             5 778
PORT OF VICTORIA, B. C.
Statement of Vessels, British, Canadian and Foreign, entered outwards
(for sea) at this Port during the year ending 30th June, 1895 :
With Cargoes.
Quantity of Freight.
Countries to which                           No. of        Tons Tons            Tons          Crew
Cleared                                     Vessels.    Register. Weight.      Meas'mt.        No.
British :
United Kingdom         4           4492 6930         255             80
Australia        11          23133 1141          7Qi            880
China       10          18653 lfil          H8           76z
Total         25         46278 8232        1104          1722
Canadian :
United States         3 338 123          28
Foreign :
United States     701        486698 13301        2840       27433
Mexico         4 4408       6800          61
Total     705        491106 20101        2840       27494
In Ballast.
British :
United States       19 3r364          Io8°
China        17 47'°2          3r33
To Sea Fisheries         1                75 • —         • • • •              3°
Total       37 78541          4243 86
BRITISH   COLUMBIA    BOARD   OF   TRADE.
Countries to which
Cleared.
Canadian :
United States...
To Sea Fisheries
Total
Foreign :
United States. ...
To Sea Fisheries.
Total
No. of
Vessels.
Tons
Register.
Tons
Weight.
Tons
Me3.s'mt,
Crew
No.
51
7668
786
84
5494
2424
	
	
—__
	
	
'35
13162
3210
381
220089
10896
2
Il8
39
383
220207
1093 s
recapitulation.
With Cargo:
British.,.
Canadian
Foreign..
Total
25
46278
8232
1104
1722
3
338
123
28
705
491ic6
20101
2840
27494
733
537722
.28456
3944
29244
In Ballast :
37
78541
4243
135
13162
3210
383
220207
....
10935
5SS
31191°
18388
1288
849632
28456
3944
47632
British	
< Canadian	
Foreign     383
Total      55
Grand Total   1288
PORT OF VICTORIA, B. C.
Statement of Vessels,  British,  Canadian and Foreign, entered inwards
(from sea) at this Port, during the year ending 30th June, 1895 :
With Cargoes. In Ballast.
Quantity
Freight.
No. of      Tons       Tons       Tons        Crew     No, of     Tons       No.
Whence arrived.      Vessels. Register. Freight. Measm't.     No.    Vessels. Register. Crew.
British :
United Kingdom...      9 11910    10986      1475       217
United States       1        1735          27                 64 12 21342 805
Chin!1     13 23552     2349       944       738 18 50J05 3194
Australia     12 25466       398       469      ico6 j 860 18
Other Countries            j 885 12
Total     35      62663    J376o     2888     2025        32    73192     4029 IfiUH
APPENDICES.
With Cargoes.
Quantity
Freight.
No. of      Tons       Tons       Tons
Whence arrived.       Vessels. Register. Freight. Measm't.
Canadian:
United States  6 1077 482 ....
China  1 947 1030 11
From S. Fisheries. 78 3071 368      	
Total     85 5095      1880 11
Foreign :
United States   914 537547    22271      8066
Japan  	
Other Countries  	
Total  914      537547    22271      8066
recapitulation.
With Cargoes.
British     35      62663    !376o 2888
Canadian     85        5095      1880 11
Foreign  914   537547   22271 8066
Total 1034    605305    37911    10965
Grand Total. 1286    843878    37911    10965
87
In Be
•Mast.
Crew
No. of
Tons
No.
No.
Vessels.
Register.
Crew
99
32
54IO
547
19
I
948
19
1944
2
37
9
2062
35
6395
575
3H98
182
1533H
6939
1
2193
28
2
3479
42
31498 185 158986  7009
InB
allast.
2025
32
73192
4029
2062
35
6395
575
31498
185
158986
7009
35585
252
238573
11613
47198
PORT OF VICTORIA, B. C.
Statement exhibiting the number of Vessels, with their tonnage and crews,
which arrived at and departed from this Port (seaward) during the fiscal year
ending 30th June, 1895, distinguishing the countries to which they belong.
Not including vessels trading between Ports within the Dominion :
Arrived. Departed.
Crew Crew
Under what Flag.           No.             Tons.           No. No. Tons.- No.
British       187        147345        8691 200 138319 9203
United States     1096        691025      38426 1086 708825 38396
Norwegian           1            2193           28 —.              ....
Nicaraguan           1            1274           30 1 447 10
Hawaiian           I            2041            23 1 2041 23
Total........     1286       843878     47198 1288       849632     47632 88
BRITISH  COLUMBIA   BOARD  OF TRADE
Under what Flag. No.
British Steamers       91
British Sailing Vessels.      96
Total British..
Foreign Steamers ..
RECAPITUL
ATION.
Arrived.
Departed.
Tons.
Crew
No.
No.
Tons.
Crew
No.
124856
6391
103
120198
6534
22489.
2300
97
18121
2669
187     147345     8691
1054       679248      38081
17285       426
Foreign Sail'g Vessels.     45
Total foreign....  1099       696533     38507
T'l British & Foreign.  1286       843878     47198
200   138319  9203
1057
31
701459  38181
9854   248
1088  7"3i3  38429
1288  849632  47632 APPENDICES.
89.
Registered Sea-Going Tonnage
Employed in carrying cargo in and out of the Province of British
Columbia, by five year periods, with yearly averages
and percentages of increase:
Year.
Total
Tonnage.
1874-78  1,439,817
1879-83  2,358,885
1884-88   4,089,788
1889-93 ! 8,927,979
1894  ••••  	
Yearly
Average.
287,963
471,777
817,958
1,785,596
1,979,969
Per Cent
+ 63
+ 73
+ 11S
+ 10
8
4
3
9
Registered Sea-going Tonnage carrying cargo into the Province, etc.
1874-78.
1879-83
1884-88.
1889-93
1894  .
Year.
Total
Tonnage.
735,936
1,058,566
i,935,o85
3,928,138
Yearly
Average.
H7,i87
211,713
387,017
785,628
830,408
Per Cent.
+ 43-8
+ 82.8
+103.0
+    5-7
Registered Tonnage carrying cargo out of the Province, etc.:
Year.
Total
Tonnage.
Yearly
Average.
Per Cent.
1874-78 1       703,881 140,776
1879-83      1,300.319    ! 260,064
1884-88      2,154,703 430,940
1889-93      4,999>84l 999,968
1894       '   1,149.561
85
0
65
7
132
0
15
0
British Columbia continues to advance, having in 1894 a total sea-going tonnage, in and out, of 1,979,969 tons, an increase of 194 373 tons over the average
of the period 1889-93, which latter period showed an increase over 1884-88 of
over 118 per cent. SCALE OF COMMERCIAL CHARGES
ADOPTED BY THE
British Columbia Board of Trade.
Whenever no special agreement exists, the following shall be collectable :
i. On the purchase of stocks, bonds and all kinds of "securities, including the drawing of bills for payment of the same 7.% per cent
2. On sale of stocks, bonds and all kinds of securities, including
remittances in bills and guarantee 2%
3. On purchase and sale of specie, gold dust and bullion 1
4. On sale of bills of exchange with endorsement 3^4
. On sale of bills of exchange without endorsement I
6. For endorsing bills of exchange when desired 2^
7. On sale of produce, etc., from California, Oregon, Washington
State, Sandwich Island Ports, and other Pacific Coast Ports,
with guarantee 7^s
8. On sale of merchandise from other Ports with, guarantee 10
9. On goods received on consignment and afterwards withdrawn. ..3)4
10. On purchase and shipment of merchandise, with funds on hand,
on cost and charges 5
11. On purchase and  shipment of merchandise, without funds, on
cost and charges 7 W
12. For collecting and remitting delayed or litigated accounts 10
13. For collecting freight by vessels from foreign ports, on amount
collected     5
14. For collecting general claims , 5
15. For collecting general average,  on   the first $20,100, or any
smaller amount 5
16. For collecting general average, on any excess over $20,000 2}^
17. On purchase and sale of vessels 5
1-8. For " Port Agency " to'vessels with cargo or passengers'from
foreign Ports, as under:
On vessels under 200 tons register $ 50 no
"       of 200 to 300 tons register    100 00
"       of 300 to 500        "     15000
''       over 500 tons    200 00
19. For disbursements of vessels by consignees with funds on hand. 2% jftiiBWn
21.
22.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
i1-
32.
33-
34-
35-
SCALE   OF  COMMERCIAL  CHARGES.
For disbursements of vessels by consignees without funds on
hand.-. 5
For procuring freight or passengers 5
For chartering vessels, on amount of freight, actual or estimated,
to be considered as  due  when  the   "charter parties,"  or
memorandum of their conditions, etc., are signed 5
On giving bonds for vessels under attachment in litigated cases,
on amount of the liability 2%
For landing and re-shipping goods from vessels in distress on
invoice value, or in its absence, on market value 5
For receiving and forwarding goods on invoice amount  2%
For advancing on freight to be earned 5
For effecting marine insurance on the amount insured    l/z
The foregoing commissions to be exclusive of brokerage, and
every charge actually incurred.
Vessels to pay clerk hire and the labor on wharf, sorting and
delivering cargo.
The receipt of Bills of Lading to be considered equivalent to
receipt of goods.
Guarantee or security for contracts or liabilities 5
Acting as Trustee on assignments 5
On investments made on mortgage or otherwise I
N. B.—Auctioneers' commission and brokerage to becharged when
Land agents for commission on sale and purchase of real estate. .5
Interest on advances for duty, freight and  lighterage, and on
accounts current, per annum 1 per cent, over current bank
overdraft rates.
91
per cent.
incurred,
per cent.
RATES ON STORAGE OF MERCHANDISE.
STORAGE per month.
On measurement goods 50 cents per ton of forty cubic feet (40 c. ft.) On
heavy goods 50 cents per ton of 2240 lbs. Or in either case the amount actually
paid if more. The consignee to have the option of charging by measurement or
weight.    Any fraction of a month to be charged as a month.
REGULATIONS.
(a.) Concerning the delivery of merchandise, payment of freight, etc.: When
no express stipulation exists per bill of lading, goods are to be considered as deliverable on shore.
{b.) Freight on all goods to be paid, or secured to the satisfaction of the
captain or consignee of the vessel, prior to the delivery of the goods.
(c.) After delivery to the purchaser of goods sold, no claims for damage,
deficiency or other cause, shall be admissable after goods sold and delivered have
once left the city. 92
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
(d.) When foreign bills of lading expressly stipulate that the freight shall be
paid in a specific coin, then the same must be procured if required, or its equivalent given, the rate to be determined by the current value at the time at the banks.
WHARVES.
(I.) The proprietor or occupant of the adjoining property may " overlap '* by
using the outer berth, or may use the inner berth if not required.
(2.) Not more than two vessels shall be allowed to lie abreast of any wharf
at the same time, unless they can do so without occupying a greater depth (or
space) than 60 feet from the water front.
The foregoing Bye-Laws, Rules and Regulations, were submitted to the
members present at the Annual General Meeting of the British Columbia Board
of Trade, held July 3rd, 1891.
Approved, July 12th, 1895.
PORT CHARGES.
PORTS  OF  ESQUIMALT AND VICTORIA,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA.
Vessels bound to other Ports, and coming to an anchor in Royal Roads,
the Pilotage is free, except the services of a Pilot are employed, when Pilotage
to the following graduated scale shall be payable :
Inside or North of Race Rocks to Royal Bay $0 75 per foot
Beachy Head to Royal Bay    1 50       "
Pillar Point to Royal Bay    3 00       "
Cape Flattery to Royal Bay     6 00       "
For Vessels entering into or clearing from undermentioned Ports, the rates
shall be as follows :
Victoria and Esquimalt Harbors (under sail) $3 00 per foot
"     (under steam or in tow) 2 00       "
" "     (steamers)    1 50       "
Half of said rates when vessel is spoken to and services declined.
$10.00 for removal to either harbor.
Foreign Tugs pay half pilotage outwards, whether spoken or not.
Vessels proceeding from Victoria to Esquimalt, and vice-versa, and having
discharged or received a portion of their cargo in either harbor, if proceeding with
the assistance of steam, shall pay $1.50 per foot.
Towage from Royal Roads or Esquimalt to Victoria Harbor, from $50.00 to
$75.00. SCALE   OF   COMMERCIAL   CHARGES. 93
Vessels registered in Canada of not more than 120 tons register tonnage are
now free.
Regular line ocean steamers, using the outer wharf of Victoria harbor only,
have a special round trip rate as follows :
On the inward voyage $1 00 per foot.
On the outward voyage    o 50      "
So that the maximum pilotage of the Empresses, Australian and San Francisco
steamers is now reduced from $4.50 to $3.00 per foot as an aggregate.
Towage from Victoria, Esquimalt Harbor, or Royal Roads, to Sea, outside
Cape Flattery, from $100 to $150.
Towage from Victoria and Esquimalt Harbor, or Royal Roads, to Burrard
Inlet and Nanaimo and back :
For Vessels 400 tons and up to 500. tons $350 00
"             500        "                 600    "     40000
"             600        "                 700    "     425 00
"             700        "                 800    "     45000
"             800        "                 900    "     47500
"             900        "                1000    "     525 00
"            1000        "                1100    "     550 00
"           1100        "                1200    "     575oo
Over 1200 tons  600 00
SIGNALS.
One Whistle, Trim Yards.
Two      "        Set Fore and Aft Sails.
Three    "        Square Sails.
Four     "        Let go Hawser.
Ships to supply their own hawser.
Ballast—(Shingle)—From $1.00 to $1.25 per ton.
Fresh Water (at Esquimalt)—60 cents per 1,000 gallons.
" (at Victoria) " " "
Wharfage Free.
Hospital Dues—Two cents per ton register. Sick mariners are provided
with medical attendance and board free of charge at the Government Marine
Hospital, Victoria.
Stevedore Charges—For stowing Salmon, 50 cents per ton weight of
2,240 ms. For stowing Lumber, from $1.15 to $1.50 per thousand feet. For
discharging general cargo, 50 cents per ton of 2,240 lbs.
Ballast to be discharged in not less than 20 fathoms of water. This applies
also to the harbors of Nanaimo and Burrard Inlet, B. C g4 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
NANAIMO PILOT GROUND.
The limits for speaking vessels bound for Nanaimo shall be at or outside a
line drawn from Schooner Point, Gabriola Island, to Lighthouse Island, and from
Lighthouse Island to Horsewell Bluff, Vancouver Island.
Vessels entering by way of Dodd's Narrows (it not being a ship channel) will
be charged haif pilotage whether spoken or not, if the pilot boat be on the cruising ground.
DUES.
The rates of pilotage both inward arid outward shall be as follows :
{a.) For all vessels, irrespective of draught, $3 per foot.
(b.) For all vessels in tow of a steamer, $2 per foot.
(c.) For all steam vessels, other than foreign tugs or tug boats or steamers
employed as such, whose master or mate has not a pilot's license,
one-third (l/$) less than the above rates if a pilot be employed.
Any fraction of a foot not exceeding six (6) inches shall be paid for as half a
foot, and any fraction of a foot exceeding six inches shall be paid for as one foot.
Vessels spoken by a duly licensed pilot shall pay the sum of one dollar ($1)
per foot if his services be declined.
The Pilotage Authority may remit pilotage dues to steamers carrying Her
'Majesty's mails between San Francisco and the Province of British Columbia, in
whole or in part as to them may appear fit, provided such steamers call at the Port
of Nanaimo for the purpose of coaling.
Gulf of Georgia and Straits Navigation : —The pilotage rates for vessels
bound between Nanaimo and Royal Roads, either way, shall be ten dollars ($10)
per day or fraction of a day of twenty-four hours, if assisted by steam, in addition
to port pilotage; but for vessels similarly bound, under canvas, the rate shall be
four dollars ($4) per foot inclusive of port pilotage.
Any vessel arriving at Nanaimo or Departure Bay without being spoken
inwards by a pilot shall not be exempt from outward pilotage ; and the first pilot
offering his services and being refused employment, shall be entitled to demand
and receive the legal pilotage dues, except on the written complaint of the master,
owner or agent of the said vessel, the Pilotage Authority shall direct otherwise.
CODE OF SIGNALS BY DAY OR NIGHT.
THE TUG.
One short whistle   Going Slow
Two short whistles  , p0It
Three short whistles  Starboard SCALE   OF   COMMERCIAL   CHARGES.
SIGNALS   OF   VESSELS   TOWED   BY   DAY.
95
Arms extended Go slow, shortening tow rope and stand by and let go
One arm to port     Port
One arm to starboard Starboard
BY   NIGHT.
Two lamps exhibited from foreO ("Go slow, shorten and stand by
castle, bell rung rapidly.:. . . J \    to let go.
One bright light over red light Port
One bright light over green light Starboard
PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF YALE AND NEW WESTMINSTER.
The ports of the Pilotage District of Yale and New Westminster shall be
as follows:
Port of Vancouver;
Port of New Westminster ;
Port of Yale and the several landings on the Fraser River.
(i.) The limit of the Port of Vancouver shall be inside a line drawn from
Point Atkinson to the red buoy on Spanish Bank.
(2,) The limit of the Port of New Westminster shall be inside a line drawn
between the outer buoys and north and south sand heads, at entrance of Fraser
River.
DUES.
For vessels entering or clearing* from the Port of Vancouver, the rates of
pilotage shall be as follows :
Vessels under sail $4 oo per foot.
"      in tow of a steamer   2 oo      "
"     under steam    I 5°     "
The pilotage from Cape Flattery or Royal Roads to a line drawn from Point
Atkinson to the red buoy on Spanish Bank and vice versa is not compulsory, but
if the services of a pilot are required, he shall be paid the following rates, viz.:—
From Cape Flattery $6 oo per foot.
"    Callum Bay '    5 °°      "
"    Beachy Head    4 °o      "
"    Race Rocks or Royal Roads    3 oo      "
And for vessels under steam or in tow of a steamer the following rdtes shall
be paid :— 96 BRITISH  COLUMBIA  BOARD  OF TRADE.
From Cape Flattery $3 00 per foot.
"    Callum Bay    2 50
"    Beachy Head    200     "
"    Race- Rocks   or   Royal   Roads,   vessels
under steam   2 00
"    Race Rocks or  Royal Roads, vessels   in
tow of a steamer    1 5°
NEW WESTMINSTER.
From the lighthouse on Fraser sand heads to New Westminster :- -
For vessels under sail $4 00 per foot.
"     in tow of a steamer    2 00      "
"     under steam    I 50      "
From the lighthouse to Cape Flattery or Royal Roads and vice versa, the
pilotage is not compulsory, but if the services of a pilot are required he shall be
paid the following rates :
For vessels under sail—
From Cape Flattery  $o"~oo per foot.
"    Callum Bay   5 °°      "
"    Beachy Head    4 00      "
"    Race Rocks or Royal Roads    3 00      "
For vessels under steam or in low of a steamer, the following rates shall be
paid :—
From Cape Flattery $3 00 per foot.
"    Callum Bay    2 50 "
"    Beachy Head ".    2 00 "
"    Race  Rocks   or   Royal   Roads,   vessels
under steam    1 00 "
"    Race Rocks or Royal Roads, vessels in
tow of a steamer        1 50 "
Any fraction of a foot not exceeding six inches shall be paid for as half a
foot, and any fraction of a foot exceeding six inches shall be paid for as a foot.
ESQUIMALT GRAVING DOCK.
1. Length of Dock on blocks 430 feet, can be made 480 feet
2. Width of Gates  65 feet.
3. Depth of Water, varying from 27 feet to 29 feet 6 inches at springs, according
to season of year. SCALE  OF   COMMERCIAL  CHARGES. 97
,    SCALE OF CHARGES  FOR  USE OF  DOCK.
The use of the Dock'will be subject to the following tariff, viz.:
For the For each following
first day of day  including the
Gross Tonnage of Vessel. docking. undocking day.
For all vessels up to 1,000 tons   ..    $300 00 5     cents per ton
From 1,000 to 2,000 tons   350 00 4^    "        "
(■  400 00 4        "        "
For all vessels above 2,000 tons J Up to 2,000 tons and 2 cents per
I    ton on all tonnage above 2,000.
All fractional parts of 50 tons to be counted and paid for as 50 tons. Cargoes
to be charged at the same rates as tonnage, and no charge for ballast. Each day
to be counted from 7 a.m. to'7 a.m., and each fractional part of a day will be
charged as one day.
No reduction will be allowed for Sundays and holidays.
N. B.—No vessel will be admitted into the Dock until she has been duly
entered in accordance with Rule and Regulation No. 1, on the entry books in the
Dock Master's Office, nor until after the sum of two hundred dollars ($200.00)
shall have been paid to the Dock Master as an entrance fee.
ESQUIMALT MARINE RAILWAY.
For scale of charges for the use of the Esquimalt Marine Rail .vay, apply to
W. F. Bullen, Managing Director, Victoria, B. C.  

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