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BC Historical Books

Twentieth annual report of the British Columbia Board of Trade, together with various appendices, list… Victoria (B.C.). Board of Trade 1899

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Full Text

 Twentieth Annual Report.
British
Columbia
Board
OF
Trade
1899
Victoria, b. c  AND YUKON GOLD FIELDS. 
6.    Steamers Arriving at Dawson.
7.    Recent View of Atlin.
Re-Produced from Photograph by Vogee, of Atlin.  TWENTIETH
ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
British Columbia
Board of Trade 
Together with Various Appendices, List of Members,
Office Bearers, Commercial Charges, Etc.
OFFICE:   BOARD OF TRADE BUILDING, VICTORIA, B. C.
OCTOBER, 1899
C2SrCO:ES:E>©E&-A.TEI3   OCTOBBE   2Stli,   1873.
Victoria, B. C.
The Colonist Printing and Publishing Co., Ltd.
1899. CONTENTS.
PAGE
Officers, 1899-1900  3
Council  3
Board of Arbitration  3
Standing Committees     3
Officers Chamber of Commerce 1863 to
1878  4
List of Past Officers from 1878 to 1899 . 4
Membership Roll  5
ANNUAL  REPORT.
Mining1     «... n-18
Lumber  18
Wood Pulp  19
Fisheries....     19
Sealing:     2°
Agriculture  21
Railways  2>
Ocean Trade  23
Expansion of Foreign Trade  24
Navigation  24.
Public Works  25
Telegraphs     25
Pacific Cable   26
Quebec Conference  26
Trade and Outlook  26
APPENDICES.
Mining Statistics  29~37
Kxport of Lumber  38
List of Trees in B. C  39
Strength of Timber  40
Salmon Pack by Canneries     41
Salmon Pack by Districts  42
Salmon Shipments in Detail  42
B. C. Salmon Fleet, 1898  43
Recapitulation  43
B. C. Sealing Catch, 1898  46
Exports from B. C  47
Imports into B. C 48-51
Customs Statistics.   Imports for   year
ending 30th June. 1S99	
Customs  Statisticst  Exports for  year
ending 30th June, 1899	
Imports into B. C. for 28 years ending
June 30th, 1899	
Exports the Produce of Canada from
B. C. for 28 years ending June 30, 1899
Exports for each year from 1872 to 1899,
inclusive	
Shipping......;.._.	
Progress of Shipping	
Inland Revenue, Canada, Divisions No.
37 and 38.. ;	
Area of British Columbia	
Capital Invested   	
Game Protection Act of B. C, 1898....
Climate   	
Average Monthly and Annual Rainfall
and Snowfall	
Comparative Table of Average Rainfall
Meteorological Register for one year at
13 Stations in B. C 	
Postal Statistics	
Land Return     	
Education	
Educational Statistics of B. C, 1877-98.
Province of B. C, Statement of Debts
and Assets	
Scale of Commercial Charges	
Rates of Storage pf Merchandise	
Pilotage and Port Charges	
Pilotage   District   of  Yale  and   New
Westminster	
Port Charges	
Esquimalt Graving Dock	
Esquimalt Marine Railway	
Mining Regulations	
Klondike, North-West Territories	
Atlin Lake, B. C	
58
58
59
60
62
63
63
64
65
66
67
68
74
74
75
76
84
84
LIST  OF   ILLUSTRATIONS.
PAGE
Panoramic View of Route to British Columbia and Yukon Gold Fields..Frontispiece
A Suburban Hotel          10
Salmon Canning in British Columbia...      19
Esquimalt Harbour       28
The Lumber Industry of B. C        3c
Farming and Fruit Growing in ]
Esquimalt Graving Dock	
Smelting in British Columbia...
Esquimalt Marine Railway	
Public Buildings and a Residenc
6a
67
75
87 BRITISH COLUMBIA BOARD OF TRADE.
OFFICERS, 1899-1900.
W. A. WARD,
L. G. McQUADE,
F. ELWORTHY,
G. A. Kirk,
S. Leiser,
A. G. McCandless,
H. HlRSCHELL-COHEN,
D. R. Ker,
COUNCIL:
F. C. Davidge,
C. A. Holland,
C. E. Renouf,
J. J. Shallcross,
C. F. Todd,
BOARD OF ARBITRATION
D. R. Ker, L. Crease,
A. G. McCandless, H. M. Grahame,
T. W. Patterson, J. G. Cox,
L G. McOuade,   .   . F. C. Davidge,
President
-  Vice-President
Secretary
J. G. Cox,
A. C. Flumerfelt,
T. W. Patterson,
R. Erskine,
Jas. Thomson.
C. Hayward,
G. Gillespie,
E. G. Prior,
C. F. Todd.
STANDING COMMITTEES.
FISHERIES:
G. A. Kirk,        M. T. Johnston,       E. B. Marvin,       Walter Morris,
D. J. Munn.
MANUFACTURES:
D. R. Ker, Chas. Hayward, W. J. Pendray, Ed. Pearson,
J. A. Sayward.
HARBOURS AND NAVIGATION:
F. W. Vincent, J. D. Warren, J. G. Cox, ' F. C. Davidge,
Geo. L. Courtney.
PUBLIC WORKS AND RAILWAYS:
B. W. Pearse,     A. C. Flumerfelt,     T. S. Futcher,     W. H. Langley,
H. F. Bullen.
FINANCE:
Geo. Gillespie, Gavin H. Burns, A. J. C. Galletly.
MINING AND PROPERTY:
H. Hirschell-Cohen, F. B. Pemberton, Lindley Crease.
AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY:
C. E. Renouf, M. Baker,
Wm. Templeman.
*mMHm»an»»IHWMHMWWm Officers of the Chamber of Commerce of Victoria, Vanconyer Island,
FROM 1863 TO DATE OF INCORPORATION, OCT. 28TH,  1878.
YEAR.
PRESIDENT.
VICE-PRESIDENT.
SECRETARY.
j 863
1864
1865
1866
1867
1868
R. Burnaby	
C. W. Wallace	
Henry Rhodes	
Jules David	
Jules David	
Henry Rhodes	
Gustav Sutro	
Gustav Sutro	
E. Grancini	
T. L. Stahlschmidt..
T. L   Stahlschmidt. .
T. L   Stahlschmidt..
T. L. Stahlschmidt..
T. L. Stahlschmidt..
T. L. Stahlschmidt..
A. F. Main.
A. F. Main.
A. F. Main.
A. F. Main.
Robert Plummer.
Robert Plummer.
1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
Henry Rhodes	
Henry Rhodes	
Robert Plummer.
Robert Plummer.
Robert Plummer.
Henry Rhodes  	
Robert Plummer.
Robert Plummer.
Henry Rhodes        ....
Robert Plummer.
Robert Plummer.
Henry Rhodes	
Robert Plummer.
Robert Plummer.
Henry Rhodes  	
Robert Plummer.
Officers and Membership of the British Columbia Board of Trade,
FROM DATE OF INCORPORATION, OCT. 28th,  1878, TO JULY, 1899.
YEAR.   '
Membership.
Oct.  28th, "I
1878, to
•  R. P. Rithet, J. P.
William Charles ...
E. Crow Baker .
83
July 3. 'Soj
l88o-1  . .
R. P. Rithet, J. P..
William Charles ...
E. Crow Baker .
69
I88I-2 ..
R. P. Rithet, J. P..
William Charles . ..
E. Crow Baker .
67
J 882-3..
R. P. Rithet, J. P..
Roderick Finlayson.
E. Crow Baker .
83
1883-4 . .
R. P. Rithet, J. P..
Roderick Finlayson.
E. Crow Baker .
83
1884-5 . .
R. P. Rithet, J. P.
Mat. T. Johnston ..
E. Crow Baker .
90
1885-6 . .
Jacob H.Todd,J.P.
Edgar Crow Baker..
Wm. Monteith  .
99
1886-7 . .
Jacob H. Todd, J. P.
Thos. Earle	
Wm. Monteith..
97
1887-8 . .
Robert Ward, J. P..
T. R. Smith	
Wm. Monteith  .
93
1888-9    .
Robert Ward, J. P..
Wm. Monteith..
67
1889-90
Robert Ward, J.P..
Thomas B. Hall . . .
Wm. Monteith..
99
189O-I . .
Robert Ward, J. P. .
Thomas B. Hall . . .
F. El worthy....
132
189I-2 . .
Thomas B. Hall ...
A. C. Flumerfelt. .
F. Elworthy	
'54
1892-3 . .
Thomas B. Hall . . .
A. C. Flumerfelt...
F. Elworthy	
170
1893-4 • •
A. C. Flumerfelt.. .
C. E. Renouf	
F. Elworthy....
161
1894-5 • ■
A. C. Flumerfelt. . .
C. E. Renouf	
F. Elworthy	
167
1895-6 . .
D.  R. Ker	
F. Elworthy	
173
1896-7 . .
D. R. Ker	
G. Leiser, G. A Kirk
F. Elworthy	
174
1897-8 . .
G. A.   Kirk	
W. A. Ward	
F Elworthy	
175
1898-9 . .
G. A. Kirk	
W. A. Ward	
F. Elworthy	
175 MEMBERSHIP  ROLL.
NAME.
Aikman. H. B. W
Anderson, W. J..
Andrews, W.   T..
FIRM.
Drake, Jackson & H	
British America Paint Co.
B
BUSINESS.
Barrister-at-Law.
Builder.
Manager.
Commission Agt.
London.
Baker, M    R. Baker & Son   Hay and Grain.
Barnard, F. S    B. C. Elec. Ry. Co., Ld..  Managing Director.
Beckwith, J. L	
Beeton, H. C   33 Finsbury Circus. .   .
Bell, H. P   Civil Engineer.
Belyea, A. L ,. ]   Barrister-at-Law.
Bethune, J. T J. T. Bethune & Co    Mining Broker.
Billinghurst, E. E    B. C. Development Co. ..  Agent.
Bodwell, Ernest Y    Bodwell & Duff   Barrister-at-Law.
Boggs,   B    Insur. and Gen. Agt.
Bone,   W. H     T. N. Hibben & Co    Bookseller & Statn'r.
Bostock, Hewitt, M.P	
Brenchley, A *...  F. R. Stewart- & Co   Manager.
Brown, George McL   Canadian Pacific Ry    ....  Executive Agent.
Bryden, Jno., J.P., M.P.P. Albion Iron Works    Director.
Bullen, H. F    B. C. Marine Ry Co   Ship Builder.
Bullen, W. F., J.P Esquimalt Marine Ry....   Manager.
Burns, Gavin H   Bk. Brit. North America. .   Manager.
Carmichael, H....
Cassidy, Robert..
Challoner, W. L.
• Christie, Wm....
 ^ Assayer.
  Barrister-at-Law.
Challoner, Mitchell & Co. Jeweler.
C. P. R. .Telegraph Co... Manager.
Clarke, Chas.  E  Harbour Master.
Claxton, Fred. J  Land Agent.
Clearihue,  J J. & A. Clearihue  Merchant.
Cohen, H. Hirschell   Cassiar Central Ry  Man. Director.
™ Jfffr^yTOWtyW^yPW^W
HMMiiSS,
fwvNHNfmmmKmwm^^m BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
NAME.
Coigdarippe, J....
Courtney, Geo. L.
Cowell, W.J. R..
FIRM.
BUSINESS..
   Retired.
Esq. & Nanaimo Ry   Traffic Manager.-.
Assayer	
Man.   Director.
Crease, Lindley   Crease & Crease   Barrister-at-Law.
Croft, Henry   Mining Broker.
Cuthbert, Herbert   Auctioneer.
Davidge, F. C   Davidge & Co., Ltd  Shipping Agent.
Davies,  Joshua  Auctin'r & Com. Mer
Day, Robert S  Architect.
Dewdney, Hon. Edgar	
Dunsmuir, James, M. P. P.  Union Collieries  President.
Dunsmuir,   Alex   Esquimalt & Nan.  Ry.... President.
Dupont, Major C. T  Nel. & Ft. Sheppard Ry.. Vice-President.
Earle, Thos., M. P.
Earsman,  John....
     Merchant.
Earsman & Co   Commission Agent.
Eberts, Hon.D.M.,M.P.P. Eberts & Taylor   Barrister-at-Law.
Ellis, W. H Colonist P. & P. Co., Ld..  Manager.
Elworthy, F   B.C. Board of Trade....   Secretary.
Erskine, R   Erskine, Wall & Co ■.  Grocer.
Escolme, John H   B. C. Development Co.. . Agent.
Ewen, Alexander    Ewen & Co. (Westminster) Canner.
Flint, A. St. G...
Flumerfelt, A. C.
Forrester, J. L. .
Foster, F. W	
    Insurance & Gen."Agt.
Ames H olden Co.,Ld., of Mil., Managing Director.
   Paints, etc.
(Ashcroft,   B. C.)   Merchant.
Futcher, Thos.   S     Merchant.
Fraser,  A. B   Merchant.
Galletly, A. J. C   Bank of Montreal	
Giffen.J    B 'R. G. Dun & Co	
Gillespie.   George   Bk. of British Columbia
Goodacre, Lawrence   Queen's Market (.Meat).
Gordon, B   Hiram Walker & Sons Agent
Gowen,  C. N   Vic. Brew & Ice Co., Ld.  Director.
Grahame, H. M   Real Estate.
Grant, Capt. Wm   ship Owner.
..  Greenwood, Smith & R... Printer.
Manager.
Manager.
Supt. of B. C. Branches..
Proprietor.
Greenwood, A. E.. BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
NAME. FIRM.
'Greer, B. W   C. P.  Ry	
Hall, R.  H    Hudson's Bay Co	
Hall, Richard, M.P.P....  Hall & Goepel	
Hall, John A.. >   Victoria Chemical Wks...
Hanna, W. J	
Hardy, Norman   Dodwell, Carlill & Co	
Harvey, J. S   F. C. Davidge 6k Co , Ld.
Hayward, Charles	
Helmcken, H. D., M.P.P. Drake, Jackson & H	
Henderson, A  Vic. Transfer Co., Ltd	
Henderson, T. M   Henderson Bros	
Higgins, Hon. D. W	
Hinton, Geo. C	
Holland, C. A   B. C. Land & Invt. Agy..
Holland, Joshua	
Hunter, Joseph, M. P. P...  E. & N. Railway	
BUSINESS.
Agent.
In charge.
General Agent.
Managing Director.
Contractor and Builder.
Agent.
Vice-President.
Contractor and Builder.
Barrister-at-Law.
Superintendent.
Electrician.
Managing Director.
Insurance Agent.
General Supt.
Irving, Capt. J., M.P.P..  Can. Pac. Nav. Co
..  Manager.
. Jamieson,   Robert	
Jensen, William    :.   Hotel Dallas    Proprietor.
Johnson, E. M Financial Agent.
Johnston, M. T   Findlay, Durham & B....   Merchant.
Jones, A. W   Insurance Agent.
Jones, Stephen    Dominion Hotel   Proprietor.
K
Ker, D. R     Brackman & Ker Mill Co., Ltd.  Man. Director.
King, Chas. R   Manfg. Agent.
Kirk, G.  A   Turner, Beeton & Co   Merchant.
Langley, W. H  Martin & Langley   Barrister-at-Law.
Leiser, Simon    S. Leiser & Co   Wholesale Grocer.
Lenz, M  Lenz & Leiser   Wholesale Dry Goods
Loewen, Joseph  Vic. Brew. & Ice Co., Ld.  Director.
Lubbe, T   Furs and Skins.
Lugrin, C. H  Daily Colonist   Editor.
Luxton, A. P  Davie, Pooley & Luxton..  Barrister-at-Law.
■MmmHHPIWWMWWHiH»UWHmWBt 8 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
M
NAME. FIRM. BUSINESS.
Macaulay, H. C     Spratt & Macaulay  Coal Merchant.
Macaulay, Norman   Merchant.
Mara, J. A   (Kamloops)    Merchant.
Marvin, E. B., J. P   E. B. Marvin & Co...   .'.  Ship Chandler.
Mason, C. Dubois   Mason & Bradburn  Barrister-at-Law.
McAlister,  John   (San Jose, Cal.)	
McCandless, A. G   McCandless  Bros   Clothier.
McGregor,   M   McGregor & Jeeves...'...  Contractor.
McMicking, R. B., J. P   Electrician.
McQuade, L. G   P. McQuade & Sons  Ship Chandler.
Mess, Bernhard C    Findlay, D. & Brodie Assistant Manager.
Milne, G. L   Physician and Surgeon-
Mitchell, James -   Manufacturers' Agent.
More, A. W   A. W. More & Co   Ins. and Mining Broker-
Morris,  Walter  Federation Brand Salmon Can; Co. . . President.
Munn, D. J   (New  Westminster)   Cannery Proprietor.
Munsie, W   Shawnigan Lake Lum. Co.  Manager.
N
Nicholles, Major John...
Norris, Fred'k	
Nicholles & Renouf, Ltd., H'dw'r. and Ag'l. Imp's-
   Saddler & Harness Mkr
Palmer, E. J	
Patterson, T. W	
Payne, Robert Plorne	
Pearse, B. W	
Pearson, Ed., J. P	
Pemberton, F. B	
Pendray, Wm. J	
Peters, Hon. Fred	
Piercy, J	
Pike, M. Warburton	
Pither,  Luke 	
Pooley, Hon. C. E., Q.C.,
Prior, Lt.-Col. Hon. E. G.
Vic. Lum. and Mfg. Co., Ld., (Chemainus), Mgr-
Victoria & Sidney  Ry....   Manager.
Sperling & Co., 8 Austin Friars, London.
Clarke & Pearson    Hardware.
Pemberton & Son   Financial Agent.
Pendray & Co   Soap Manufacturer.
Tupper, Peters & Potts.. .  Barrister-at-Law.
Ji Piercy & Co  Wholesale Dry Goods..
   Explorer.
Pither & Leiser   Wine Merchant.
M.P.P , Barrister-at-Law.
, M.P., E. G. Prior & Co., Ld., Hardware, etc.
Redfern,  Chas. E    -Manufacturing Jeweler..
Renouf, C. E   Nicholles & Renouf, Ltd.. Hardware and Ag. Imps-
Rithet, R. P., J. P   R. P. Rithet & Co., Ld...  Mer. and Shipping Agt- BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
NAME.
Robertson, Arthur	
Robertson, A. Stuart..
Robins, S. M.
FIRM. BUSINESS.
Martin & Robertson  Commission Agent.
Globe Can. & Mill. Co. (Claxton, B. C).. .Manager.
  Van. Coal Co. (Nanaimo).  Superintendent.
Sayward, J.  A      Lumber Merchant.
Scott, H. J  Hamilton Powder W'ks     Manager.
Seabrook,   R  R. P. Rithet & Co   Vice-President.
Sehl,  Jacob  B.C. Furniture  Co     Manager.
Shallcross, J.J  Shallcross, Macaulay & Co.  Merchant.
Shotbolt, Thomas, J.P   Druggist.
Smith,  H  M. R. Smith & Co   Biscuit Manufacturer.
Smith, Thos. R  Robt.  Ward & Co., Ltd..  Merchant and Shipper.
Spencer, C  David  Spencer   Dry Goods.
Stemler, Louis    Stemler & Earle   Coffee and Spice Mills.
Strickland, G. A  Klondyke M'g & Tr'd Co., Ltd... .Manager.
Swinerton, R. H  Swinerton & Oddy   Land Agent.
Taylor, Geo. A ......... -Mer. Bank of Halifax.... Manager.
Temple, Ernest    Hickman Tye Co., Ltd. .. Manager.
Templeman, Hon. Wm...  Times Printing Co., Ltd.. Managing Editor.
Teskey, R. W   Bradstreet Co  Manager.
Thomson,  Jas   Hudson's Bay Co  Manager.
Todd, C. F   J. H. Todd & Son  Wholesale Grocer.
Todd, J. H., J. P J. H. Todd & Son  Wholesale Grocer.
Tupper, Sir Chas. H   Tupper, Peters & Potts.. . Solicitor.
Turner, Hon. J. H, M.P.P., Turner, Be'eton & Co. .. Merchant.
Vincent,   F. W
Voss,  J. C	
C. P. N. Nav.   Co     Manager.
Victoria and Queen's Hotel, Proprietor.
w
Walker, Walter    Coal Merchant.
Ward, W. A  Merchant and Shipper.
Ward, Robt., J. P    70 Basinghall Street  London, E. C.
Warren, Jas. D., Capt    General Agent.
Weiler,   Otto    Weiler Bros  Furniture Manufacturer.
Welsh,   E. E   B. C. Market  Manager.
Wilkinson, C. H   53 New Broad St  London.
Williams, B  Land Agent.
Williams,   Robert T  Publisher.
in BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
NAME. FIRM. BUSINESS.
Wilson, William W. & J. Wilson   Clothier.
Wilson, John  John Wilson & Co   Commission Merchant.
Wilson, H. B   Molson's Bank   Manager.
Woolley, Clive Phillips   Barrister.
Wootton,  E. E   McPhillips, Wootton & B.  Barrister-at-Law.
Memo.—All members of the Board, unless otherwise herein shown, reside at
Victoria, B. C.
A SUBURBAN  HOTEL,   VICTORIA,   B. Twentieth Annual Report
The British Columbia Board of Trade
JULY 1st, 15Q5, TO JUNE 30th, 1399.
To the Members of the British Columbia Board of Trade
Gentlemen,—In accordance with the established custom,
we have the honour of presenting' a summary showing the progress made by the various industries, trade and commerce of
British Columbia during the past twelve months.
Mining. Whilst the increase in the output ot lode mines,
valued at only $4,000 in 1890, and amounting to
$6,529,420 in 1898, is an excellent result, disappointment has
been expressed in consequence of the output of last year being
slightly under that of 1897. One of the conditions which caused
this decrease was the price of silver, which was unusually low
towards the end of 1897 and early in 1898. This following an
increase in the duty on lead entering the United States, where
nearly all such ores mined in British Columbia are treated,
deterred some mine owners from continuing their operations and
some contemplated new ventures were effectively stopped. The
price of silver increased late in 1898, but not until too late for
mine owners to profit by the changed conditions. The result of
the foregoing was a decrease in the silver output $896,995, and
HBWUMijuyya
MWWMWUMMWWWWWWW1WIIIHI BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
the output of lead shows a falling off of $312,936 compared with
that of the previous year.
The output of the copper-gold mines was increased, whilst
work on many producers was confined to development and
blocking- out new ore bodies.
It is unfortunate that the mining industry should now be
disturbed by a recent Act of the Legislature reducing the time
of miners working underground in metalliferous mines from 10
hours to 8 hours per day. It is too early to even forecast the
ultimate result of the new regulations, but at present a most
undesirable sense of uncertainty is experienced, not only in the
mining districts, but also affecting the coast supply centres.
Trail Greek. In dealing more specifically with the different
mining districts, Trail Creek may be referred to
as the principal producer. The shipments were nearly double
that of 1897, 111,282 tons of gold-copper ore, which also contains some silver.
Although two mines contributed about 90% of the quantity
named, it would be misleading to judge the Trail Creek district
from that aspect. There were issued 1,110 certificates of work,
which is evidence of improvements to the value of not less than
$100 each having been done on that number of mines and prospects. Great reductions have been made in transportation and
treatment charges, and there is no reason to believe that the
lowest point-has yet been reached.
Nelson. In the Nelson division there was much activity
in prospecting and development, the  number  of
properties certified to have been improved exceeding those in
the Trail Creek division, and the ore shipped more than that
of the previous year.
Ainsworth. The Ainsworth division, producing almost ex
clusively silver-lead ores, was not a large shipper
during 1898, but prospecting and development work continued
on a larger scale than formerly. ANNUAL   REPORT.
J3
Slocan. Only   eighteen   mines  in  the   Slocan  division
shipped ore during the period under review. The
whole of this division lying east of Slocan Lake and River is
mineralized, staked off into claims upon most of which surface
work has been done. Many quartz veins, characteristic of this
granite area have been stripped. The work done in the Slocan
shipping mines encourages confidence in the value of the ore
bodies and their permanency.
Revelstoke,
Over a large area comprising the Revelstoke,
Lardeau, &c. IHecillewaet, Lardeau and Trout Lake divisions of
West Kootenay considerable desultory prospecting and developing works progressed satisfactorily, but no
shipments of importance were made, better transportation facilities being urgently needed. Placer and hydraulic mining also
is prosecuted here, and another company which has spent
$100,000 on their plant, were to have commenced hydraulicing
this year.    Particulars of the result are not yet to hand.
East Kootenay. The completion of the C. P. R. Crow's Nest
branch to Kootenay Lake acted as a stimulus to
the prospecting and development of mineral deposits in the portion of East Kootenay tributary to that line. Further north
similar works were carried out, together with placer and
hydraulicing without, however, anything sufficiently noteworthy
to be embodied in this brief report.
Boundary
Creek.
The Boundary Creek division undoubtedly has
a great future. Immense bodies of low grade
copper ores are in evidence, but it has not been
possible to profitably mine these deposits owing to transportation difficulties. The Canadian Pacific Railway extension into
this district is almost completed, and increased activity in
mining will quickly follow the improved facilities.
Osoyoos. In the adjoining division of Osoyoos system-
~' atic work has been done on free milling quartz.
In one mine 7,530 tons of ore were crushed, which produced
$132,000, the 262 tons of concentrates giving $20,800 additional.
Other mines in this division will probably be paying dividends
very soon.
wwwwwwwiwwwwhwbw 14 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
Cariboo. There is nothing new to report about Cariboo.
It is a district of big schemes, requiring large
•capital, and it is satisfactory to find that many of the smaller
properties heretofore held and worked by individual miners have
recently been purchased by strong companies and amalgamated
into large enterprises. The Go!d Commissioner states that
although "the number of men employed in mining did not
materially differ from that of previous years, probably not more
than one in four was actually engaged in the work of gold production." Notwithstanding these conditions the output exceeded
that of several previous years. The number of free miners'
certificates issued, 1373, indicates to some extent the work
which progressed last year.
Atlin. Considerable excitement was caused last year
by the discovery of placer gold at Atlin Lake,
district of Cassiar. The news reached Victoria on August 13th,
and although the mining season closed a few weeks later, it is
estimated that the total wash-up amounted to $75,000. With
the crude appliances used an average of $20 per diem to the man
resulted. The gold, which is characterized as fine "coarse
gold0" appears to be very evenly distributed, and in the shallower
diggings it is stated there is pay dirt almost from the grass roots
down. At bedrock as high as an ounce of gold per hour was taken
in several well authenticated cases. The influx of miners and
others now numbers several thousand, but mining is not progressing as it should, through the confusion as to ownership of
the claims that has arisen in consequence of the first discoveries
being recorded under the laws of the North-West Territories.
When it became known that Atlin is in British Columbia, these
claims were re-staked. The Alien Act has further complicated
matters and many claims have now been staked several times,
and are locked up pending decision as to ownership. A Judge
of the Supreme Court is on the spot straightening out matters
and has made considerable progress in settling disputes. It is
hoped that matters will be settled in time to allow miners to
take full advantage of the season, in which case highly satisfactory results may be anticipated, as the latest reports are
very encouraging. ANNUAL   REPORT. 15
Many specimens of galena ore, rich in gold and silver, have
been received from Atlin,
Mainland Coast. Mineral claims are recorded on the numerous
inlets and arms of the sea on the coast of the
Mainland. The most important development works are at.
Phillipps Arm, where one company have improved their property
by driving 1,200 feet of tunnels.
Vancouver The development work carried put on claims-
Island. situated-on Vancouver Island was conducted almost exclusively by the locators, backed by the
funds of so many of their friends as could be interested. Although
the indications, in a great number of cases, are most favorable,
much additional work is necessary to establish values and
permanency. Some shipments of ore were made but only in
small quantities, and before outside capital is likely to be-
attracted to these camps something more noteworthy must be
established. There is no lack of good prospects, and as soor»
as one good mine is in operation the opening up of many others,
may be expected. Prospecting is confined principally to lands-
on the south and west coast, outside the railway belt.
Other Islands.       The principal development work performed on,
adjacent  islands   was   at Texada, where several
hundred people now reside and are engaged in mining or callings,
dependent on that industry. -
The foregoing summary embraces a large portion of British
Columbia, but by no means includes all that is mineralized.
Many parts known to be rich in both precious and base metals
are too remote for the locator to even stake a claim, knowing as.
he does, that it would be hopeless to expect to work it profitably
until better terms of communication are provided. No one can
fail to be impressed with the magnitude of this wealth after
even a cursory glance at the large area over which it is distributed and the value of that which has been proven.
The laws of British Columbia are very liberal to claim
■owners, requiring improvements to the value of only $100 per
year on a claim 1500' x 1500' (about 50 acres) to hold it.    After
HWWWuw
»nmww»mm l6 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
five such annual improvements, the surveying of the claim being
reckoned an improvement worth $100, a Crown grant is issued;
or it can be secured at any time after the locator has improved
the claim to the value of $500. The result is that thousands of
claims which show excellent indications are in first hands held
by men who have not the means to properly prospect them.
Such claims are often held at high prices and likely investors
on visiting them and finding the limited amount of work done
invariably express-disappointment.
In the Board's previous report attention was called to the
prevalence of claims being re-staked by friends of the first
holder without any improvements being carried out. It is to be
regretted that it is possible for such proceedings to continue.
Coal. The output of 1,135,865 tons of coal was the
largest on record. The exports were principally
to California, 752,686 tons, but other shipments went to Alaska
and the Hawaiian Islands. The Vancouver Island coal maintains its hold in the Californian market, and still represents
about one-third of the imports into that State. The total number of hands employed in coal mining in 1898 was 2841.
That year will be remarkable as the first during which shipments were made from the Crow's Nest Pass mines. During
the few months this was possible about 10,000 tons were placed
in the hands of consumers. The coal is of excellent quality as
will be seen from the following analysis by the Provincial
Assayer:
Water  1.80
Volatile matter  18.70 " Total fuel " = 90.78.
Fixed carbon  72.08 Ratio of fixed carbon )
Ash  6.70 to vol. comb, matter /
Sulphur  o. 72
100.00
"The above analysis, on a commercial sample,' representing as it does coal
taken from comparatively near the surface and from a shipment made before the
colliery was in regular working order, must certainly be considered very good.
It cannot but be so considered by practical men, who know what the difference is
between a commercial sample and those usually taken for analyses." ANNUAL   REPORT. 17
Coal from this colliery has been used on H. M. warships;
the official reports are not yet public, but are believed to be favorable. This fuel is a great boon to the Kootenay mines ; it is taken
as readily as the Vancouver Island coal and costs little more
than half, the price at Nelson being $5.75 per ton against $10
for that from the coast. The Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company's grants were issued conditional upon the sale of coal at
the mine not exceeding $2 per ton, thus giving a guarantee of
cheap fuel for all time.
Coke. Coke, the product of this coal, is of excellent
quality and meets the requirements at the smelters.
The per centage of ash is remarkably low, and the " total fuel "
correspondingly high.    A recent analysis was as follows :
Water  0.45
Volatile matter  0.95
Eixed carbon ;  94-5°
Ash  4.10
100.00
Sulphur     o 72
The output in 1898 was 361 tons. The Vancouver Island
collieries produced about 35,000 tons of coke, which was mostly
used for smelting purposes.     3167 tons were exported.
Other Minerals. Other minerals found in British Columbia but
not yet developed are gypsum, asbestos, plumbago, mica and iron. It is unfortunate that the iron prospects
are not properly developed. An iron capping to copper veins is
prevalent, and it is believed that some properties offered as iron
will be found to be copper when thoroughly exploited. There
have been enquiries for iron recently and it is important that the
owners of properties with the iron indications should prove
them ; this will certainly have to be done before capitalists can
be interested. Anthracite coal was found years ago on Queen
Charlotte and other islands off the coast, but has not yet been
marketed.
It has been deemed advisable generally to keep the foregoing within the scope of the report of the Hon. the Minister of
4U>W*MHHW»MMH'*WMWmWWH»W|IH 18 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
Mines. That excellent work, containing the reports of the
Commissioners and Agents of the Department of Mines throughout British Columbia, deals specifically with all the mines and
very many prospects.
Smelters. The smelter at Trail is now operated by the
Canadian Pacific Railway. The copper plant has
been improved and lead furnaces added; the total capacity
being about 1,000 tons per day. This plant, which is the
largest in Canada, includes a copper refinery, and it is intended
to add a lead refinery. Three different powers can be used ;
namely, steam ; water, developed from the neighboring streams
and electric power supplied by a Company whose power plant
is located at Bonnington, on the Kootenay River.
The Hall Mines Smelters, at Nelson, was originally constructed for the treatment of the product of the mines of that
company but its capacity has since been increased, and " custom
smelting " has gradually been taken up. Both copper and lead
ores, carrying gold and silver, are now purchased, and the
capacity of the existing plant is about 300 tons per day.
A smelter has been erected at Texada Island and will be
" blown in " immediately.
Concentrators.       Five concentrating plants are in operation in
the Slocan division.    Another large concentrator
and  a  cyanide plant is in operation   at  Phillips  Arm, on  the
Mainland Coast.
Water Power. Advantage has been taken of the water falls
at Bonnington, on the Kootenay River, to generate electric power for furnishing light and operating machinery.
The plant recently'erected there is said to have a capacity of
2,900 horse power, and power is already supplied at Rossland,'
32 miles distant. The company operating this plant expect to
supply light and power at the mines cheaper than the same can
be developed by any private steam and engine plants.
Lumber. The lumber cut during 1898 exceeded that of
the previous year by about nineteen million feet.
The demand for export was fairly good and has continued to SALMON   CANNING IN  BRITISH COLUMBIA.
1      Trap Fishing.
2.    Loading Salmon for Export.
3. Net Fishing.
4. Salmon Cannery Wharf.
iwwwiwwmuwMHimnwwHWMmuti'WHWMHMMJ im
K
n—  ANNUAL   REPORT.
19
date, but unfortunately freights have lately become higher, and
this is now militating against the industry.
The forests of British Columbia are a very substantial asset
and year by year will increase in value with the depletion of the
forests in eastern Canada and the United States. About two-
thirds of the Province is wooded but the timber is not all merchantable. Twenty thousand feet .per acre is considered a conservative estimate on over half a million acres leased to mill
owners. The quantity of timber cut annually is scarcely appreciable when the extent of the supply is considered.
A strict enforcement of the law for the prevention of forest
fires is recommended, as a great waste of timber has already
been caused by the careless or wilful starting of conflagrations
by prospectors and others.
The high grade of British Columbia lumber is well established already and an Act for specific grading was passed. It
is regretted that it is not yet operative.
Wood Pulp. An enquiry for wood pulp was recently received
from Japan, the demand for this article is also
rapidly increasing in the United States and 'Great Britain.
British Columbia can furnish an abundance of the proper kind
of wood for its manufacture, and this Board will gladly furnish
any capitalist with full particulars regarding the prospects for
engaging successfully in this enterprise.
Fisheries. The year 1898 will long be remembered as re
markable in the history of salmon canning on the
Fraser River, the pack being only about one-fourth of that of
the previous year and again prepared for. Various theories
have been advanced for this shortage, but those who have
studied fish life and are best able to judge are not yet able to
. explain the cause.
The shortage had the effect of stimulating prices, although
the pack at other points in the Province was up to the average.
For several years past this Board has urged that additional
salmon hatcheries be erected on the Fraser River and that the
Skeena and Naas Rivers and Rivers Inlet be similarly provided. BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
It is gratifying to learn that the Dominion Government has at
last become alive to the importance of carrying out these recommendations and are about to erect a new hatchery on the Fraser
and another on the Skeena. There appears no good reason
why the Naas River and Rivers Inlet should remain neglected
in this respect, as for some years the fisheries of British Columbia have been contributing annually to the Federal exchequer
about five times the amount the department has spent upon
them.
The frequent changes in the regulations governing this
industry are a source of continued embarrassment to the canners
and fishermen which it is believed would be overcome to a great
extent if a resident fish specialist were provided. Such an
officer would not only make a complete study of fish life in these
waters but would soon be in a position to advise the Ottawa
authorities upon the best means for conserving the salmon canning industry and upon lines which would probably satisfy all
concerned.
Deep Sea Deep sea fishing has not reached any degree of
Fisheries,     importance on account of the United States tariff
which closes the best market.    There are several
varieties of cod, excellent halibut and herring.
Other Fish. Sturgeon,   oolachan,   anchovy,   smelt,    crab,
prawn, shrimp, clam, cockle, mussel and oyster
are supplied to the local markets.
Fish Oil and The dog fish furnishes a valuable industry in
Guano.       the production of lubricating oil which is extensively used throughout the Province and is also in
demand   in  eastern   Canada.    Guano  is   manufactured   from
salmon offal on the Fraser River.
Sealing. The sealing catch of 1898 totalled only 28,898
skins, which is considerably less than that of any
season during the past ten years. This serious falling off was
chiefly due to restrictions imposed on the industry by the
Behring Sea Arbitration, but some schooners were not fitted out
as it was feared that sealing in the Behring Sea would be pro- ANNUAL   REPORT.
21
hibited altogether ; bad weather also was experienced.    Prices
ruled somewhat higher.
The catch this year off the coast of British Columbia is
satisfactory, and prices continue to improve.
Agriculture. The year 1898 was favourable to agriculture
and crop's of all products were good. These were
disposed of at remunerative prices and, excepting hay, no stocks
were carried over. Wheat growing west of the Cascades has
almost ceased owing to corn being now admitted duty free. In
the Okanagan Valley, east of the Cascades, the area under
wheat has increased, and now furnishes a supply sufficient to
keep three mills running steadily.
Fruit crops also were good and prices ruled high. Fruit is
now shipped to all points east as far as Winnipeg, but unfortunately the system of packing has not been perfected, which
resulted in considerable loss last year. There are two fruit canneries in operation and supplying goods which are supplanting
the highest grades of jams, etc., heretofore imported. The
cheap grades of preserves brought into the Province require
proper inspection under the Adulteration of Food Act. It is
interesting to note that raspberries have been shipped to
England during the past three years, and that the shipments
would be largely increased if the berries were offering.
The rapid strides made in butter making are very encouraging. Only a few years ago nearly all the butter was imported
or received from Eastern Canada; now the supply from the local
creameries is nearly equal to the demand ; notwithstanding increased consumption. New creameries have recently been
established and the industry is fast approaching the position
which this Board long since predicted.
During the present season the weather has been unfavourable and,crops generally are not so well advanced as usual.
Wheat in the Okanagan Valley will probably be equal to an
average year, and the indicatious are that root crops will be
good.    Fruit crops will be under average.
wawaws
tl&UXKJi&HSd
MUMiyiMMBiiMMBiiaBiHaiiiMBi 22 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
The duties paid on imported agricultural products, which
could be raised in British Columbia, still aggregate a very large
sum. The Province contains sufficient good agricultural lands
to support a population many times larger than the present and
it is believed that when the advantage of small mixed farms are
better known a largely increased quantity of such products will
result.
Railways. The cost ot   railway  construction   in   British
Columbia  has  amounted   to   about  ten   million-
dollars during the past eighteen months.    Two hundred miles
of the Crow's  Nest   Pass  line   are  completed   and   Kootenay
Lake reached.    Short branches are now being built and others
located to furnish transportation to the adjacent mines.
Grading is completed and several miles of rails laid on the
Columbia and Western Railway between Robson and Midway,
a distance of about ioo miles. It is .expected that the track
will be completed within two months. This line will open up
the Kettle River and Boundary Creek country, as short branches
are located to all the mining centres in that division. Its construction is a very costly undertaking.
The Arrowhead and Kootenay Railway is being built
through the Lardeau and Duncan divisions of West Kootenay,
and connection with the Canadian Pacific Railway main line will
soon be provided.
Railway connection between Kuskonook, south end of
Kootenay Lake and Bonner's Ferry, Idaho, distance about 50
miles, will be completed within three months. This is an important line as direct communication with the Great Northern
Railway will now be possible all the year round when the rivers
are frozen.
These railway works have not given that impetus to business in British Columbia which might be expected. The operations have been mostly carried out by eastern or foreign
contractors who have drawn their supplies, men and materials
from points outside the Province. aaS
^M^^My'"'T;"' x\MB^K^BSm^ssssm^siM^isiB^^^^
ANNUAL   REPORT.
23
Construction of the Cassiar Central Railway between
Glenora and Dease Lake, distance 99 miles, is now proceeding
and it is expected that a considerable portion will be graded
this season, as a large force of men are now employed.
For some years past this Board has urged the building of a
direct railway from the Coast into Kootenay, as such a line
would reduce the distance by about one-half of the present
circuitous routes. The Provincial Government recognizing the
necessity of this, made a grant in aid of $4,000 per mile and it
was expected that the Dominion Government would give additional assistance. In consequence of their refusal to do so,
construction could not be proceeded with, although considerable
money had been spent on surveys, etc. At the last session of
the Legislature the Provincial subsidy was withdrawn'and there
appears no immediate prospect of this much needed line being
built. This is a great disappointment to those who are desirous
of seeing the necessary transportation facilities provided to
ensure the proper development of the resources of the Province,
especially as it is felt that the assistance asked from the
Dominion was.no more than might reasonably be expected in
view of the large amount contributed by British Columbia to the
Federal exchequer.
Ocean Trade. Ocean trade continues to increase.    The Can
adian Pacific Railway " Empress " steamships
engaged in the China-Japan trade continue their regular service
every three weeks in the summer and monthly during the winter,
and it has been found necessary to put two additional steamships
on the route. The Northern Pacific Steamship Company have
four vessels and the Japan Mail Steamship Company, running
in connection with the Great Northern Railway, three engaged
in the same trade. All these call at Victoria on both inward
and outward voyages.
The Canadian Pacific Railway Company have three steam-,
ships on the Australasian route, giving a monthly service, and
calling at Honolulu,   Suva (Fiji),  Brisbane  (Queensland)  and
Sydney (New South Wales). BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
Expansion of The markets of Mexico and west coast of
Foreign Trade. Central and South America, offer an outlet for
" many Canadian products, but have not yet been
supplied as they should. Excepting lumber, the shipments to
those points have been nominal,' which is due to the want of
direct steamship communication. The desired service would
require government aid, and the great success which has
attended the subsidizing of the steamships on the China-Japan
and Australasian routes should furnish sufficient encouragement
to warrant the aiding of this line also.
Siberia is being watched as a probable market for Canadian
goods.
Navigation. Aids to navigation have been increased during
the past twelve months by the establishment of
six additional lights. The lights at Prospect Point, entrance
of Burrard Inlet, and at Cape Mudge were first operated in
September last, those at Egg Island and Irving Island a month
later. The light on the Sisters was established in December
and the light at Garry Point, entrance of Fraser River, has
been operating since August last. A beacon has been erecttd
at Gabriola Reef, and additional buoys have been placed at
different points.
The erection of three more lights has been promised this
year, namely : at Start Point, Lama Passage ; Lawyer's Island
or Green Top Island, Chatham Sound, and at Ballanac Island.
A pole light also is to be erected at Turn Point, Seaforth
Channel.
These important works are absolutely necessary to the
safety of the greatly increased shipping engaged in the Northern
trade.
The waters north of Dixon Entrance, controlled by the
United States, are also receiving the attention of that government. A new lighthouse district is to be created to include the
waters of the State of Washington and Territory of Alaska.
Certain specified lighthouses and other aids to navigation will
be established. ANNUAL   REPORT.- 25
Public Works.        The principal public works undertaken by the
Provincial  Government consisted of repairs and
improvements to buildings, roads and bridges.
The Dominion Government spent about $12,000 upon a
new wharf and other requirements at the Quarantine Station,
Williams Head. No new works of importance were undertaken
but a drill hall at Vancouver, $80,000, and a public building at
New Westminster, $45,000, have been provided for. A public
building will also be erected at Kamloops, at a cost of about
$6,000. The old post office at Victoria has been altered and is
now rented for stores and offices. The old custom house is
occupied by the Indian and other Federal departments, which
have been removed from rented premises.
Harbour improvements have been carried on in Nanaimo
and Vancouver Harbours.
River improvements, consisting of dredging, bank protection, draining, etc., have been carried on in the Columbia River
from Golden to Lake Windermere, Columbia River above
Revelstoke, Columbia River between the Arrow Lakes,
Kootenay River, below Fort Steele, Stikine River, Skeena
River, Fraser River and Duncan River flowing into Kootenay
Lake.
Telegraphs. British   Columbia   is   served  by two   strong
telegraph companies, the Canadian Pacific Railway and Great Northwestern. The recent inauguration of the
latter service resulted in a lowering of rates.
The new line between Alberni and Cape Beale, constructed
by the Dominion Government, will be open within a month.
The old line between Victoria and the Cape is to be kept up,
and it is hoped that in future there will be no break in communication with that important point for reporting shipping.
Weather forecasts have been published regularly twice
daily during the past year.
It is expected that the telegraph between Lake Bennett and
Dawson will be completed this season.
WH^^ibsS
MUUHWHBBWWH WIHWMWWffl ■MUM
26
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
Pacific Cable.. The Pacific Cable has been provided for by an
arrangement between the Imperial, Canadian and
Australian governments. Great interest has been taken in this
cable by the merchants of British Columbia, and the Government offered to subscribe $1,000,000 toward the cost of its
construction. The cable will now be constructed without the
assistance offered by the Government of British Columbia.
Quebec It is hoped that the Conference which opened
Conference. at Quebec in September last and adjourned at
—"""~""""""" Washington in January following, will meet again
and frame an agreement for a freer exchange of commodities
between Canada and the United States. British Columbia more
than any other Province in the Dominion will be affected by such
an agreement. Compensation for the loss of the sealing industry
\a hich appears to be threatened with extinction, would be found
in admitting into the United States, free of duty, the product of
the deep sea fisheries. It is considered most unfair that lumber
manufactured in the United States should be admitted into
Canada free of duty while similar advantage is not granted
Canadian manufacturers. In a communication dated September
27th last, this Board addressed the Dominion Government upon
the subjects of special interest to British Columbia which would
probably be discussed at the Conference.
Trade and After reviewing the vast natural resources of
Outlook. British Columbia and their initial stage of development one cannot fail to be favourably impressed
with the possibilities of the future. These resources are gradually becoming better known abroad, and capital for their
development is coming in more freely ; it cannot therefore be
too strongly impressed upon the holders of privileges, and
especially of mining properties, to put them in such condition as
will enable approximate values to be readily determined.
The population is rapidly growing, the increase being principally in the mining centres in the interior, but also extended
to the coast cities.
The trade accruing to the coast cities in consequence of
these changed conditions has been materially effected.    It is ANNUAL   REPORT.
27
considered hardship, however, that Winnipeg, distant about
150 miles further from the Eastern boundary of the Province
than Vancouver and Victoria should enjoy more favourably
freight rates, thus giving an Eastern city an advantage in supplying important mining camps in British Columbia.
The Provincial stocks and Municipal debentures maintain
their high standing, and some mining properties are now
quoted on Eastern Canadian and London Exchanges.
The Provincial contribution to the Federal exchequer continue to increase, the customs and inland revenue collections
alone amounting to $2,867,667.10 during the past twelve months.
Victoria Duty
Vancouver	
New Westminster	
Rossland -JR-	
Nelson	
Kaslo	
Nanaimo	
961,980.00
764,142.37
218,267.02
144,271.68
128,607.43
51.724-95
81,745.42
$2,350,738.87
Vancouver (all outports in B. C. except Vancouver Is.) Inland Rev. 295,157.59
Victoria (Vancouver Island only)         " 221,770.64
$2,867,667.10
It would be very difficult to ascertain even approximately the
additional contributions from imported goods upon which duty
has been paid in the East and excise upon goods manufactured
there. Large sums are also contributed through the Fisheries
and other Federal departments. That there should exist a
growing feeling of dissatisfaction in consequence of the absence
of proportionate expenditures upon public works, already
referred to, is not surprising.
Attention is directed to the statistical information appended
hereto, which as far as possible has been brought down to date.
Before concluding it is fitting to mention, the unabated
interest which members of this Board have taken in the various
subjects referred to.    It is desired, however, to impress upon
IKMJIMWilWHHMMMIUllWtMWWBHWWIHWWWfflIB!!! BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
them the necessity of increased vigilance and activity. Such
are required in order to attain a full degree of strength and
usefulness, and it is gratifying to state that the twenty-first
year since incorporation will be entered upon with a larger
membership than ever before.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
G. A.  KIRK, President.
W. A. WARD, Vice-President.
F.  ELWORTHY, Secretary.
Victoria, B. C,
July 14th,  1899.
ESQUIMALT HARBOR,   VICTORIA,   B. C.
-I APPENDICES.
Mining Statistics.
Report of Minister of Mines, December 31st, 1898.
TABLE I.
Total Production for all Years up to and including 1898.
Gold, placer $ 59,960,819
Gold, lode  6,501,906
Silver  9,676,901
Lead • 4,049,199
Copper  1,395,841
Coal and Coke  40,306,160
Building stone, bricks, etc  1,500,000
Other metals  26,500
Total $123,417,326
TABLE II.
Production for each Year from 1890 to 1898 (inclusive).
Year. Amount.
1890    $ 2,608,803
1891  3,521,102
1892.....  2,978,530
1893  3.588,413
1894  4,225,717
1895  5,643,042
1896  7.507.956
1897  10,455,268
1898  ■•• 10,906,861
Table III gives a statement in detail of the amount and value of the different
mineral products for the years 1897 and 1898. As it has yet been impossible to collect the statistics regarding building stone, lime, bricks, tiles, etc.,
these are estimated for 1897 and 1898.
BM
IB BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
TABLE III.
Amount and Value of Mineral Products for 1897 and i5
Customary
Measure.
i897-
1898.
Quantity.
Value.
Quantity.
'Value.'
Tons, 2,240 lbs..
25,676
106,141
5'472»97i
5,325,180
38,841,135
882,854
17,832
$     5*3*5*°
2,123,820
3,272,836
266,258
*>39°«5I7
2,648,562
89.155
151,600
32,*&7
110,061
4.292,401
7,271,678
1.135.065
35>°°<>
$   643,346
2,201,217
2>375>84t
Lead	
Coal	
874,78!
1,077,581
3.407.595
175,000
$10,455,268
$10,906,861
TABLE IV.
Production of Metals by Districts and Divisions.
Name.
Divisions.
Districts.
1897
1898
1897
$   325.000
1898
$      94.5°°
37,000
28,000
214,860
$   389.360
, $     65,000
25,000
35,000
200,000
'37,060
163,796
6.765.703
107,300
13-5,368
Kootenay West	
440,545
789,215
3,280,686
2,097,280
I57»977
159,801
694,880
2,619,852
2,470,811
97>63r
6,042,975
39,840
226,762
47,814
432.512
142,982
25,100
58,680
364,112
7.560
60,840
Yale	
9.390
I9.437
I
$ 7.S67.S51
$ 7,172,766
Placer Gold.
Table V. continues the yearly production of placer gold to date, as determined
by the returns sent in by the banks and express companies of gold transmitted by
them to the mints, and from returns sent in by the gold commissioners and Mining Recorders. To these yearly amounts one-third was added up to the year 1878,
from then to 1895 and for 1898, one-fifth,  which proportions are considered to APPENDICES.
3*
represent, approximately, the amount of gold sold of which there is no record.
This placer gold contains from 10 to 25 per cent, silver, but the silver value has.
not been separated from the totals, as it would be insignificant.
TABLE V.
Yield of Placer Gold per Year to Date.
858.
859.
860.
861.
862.
705,000
1,615.070
2,228,543
2,666,118
2,656,903
863   3.913.563
864   3.735.850
865    3,491,205
866.
867.
868.
869.
870.
871.
872.
873
874
875.
876.
877.
878.
2,662,106
2,480,868
3.372,972
1,774.978
1.336,956
1.799.44°
1,610,972
1.305.749
1,844,618
2,474,004
1,786,648
1,608,182
1,275,204
1879.
1880.
1881.
1882.
1883
1884.
1885.
1886.
1887.
1888
1889
1890.
1891.
1892
1893.
1894.
1895.
1896.
1897.
1898.
290
013
046
954
794
736
713
903
693
616
588
490
429
399:
356
405
481
544
513
643
,058
827
737"
085
252
,165
738-
651
709.
73'
923
.435-
811
526
131
516
,683.
026
,520
.346-
Total    $59,960,819-
TABLE VI.
The information as to production in the earlier years is obtained from the-
Mineral Statistics and Mines for 1896," Geological Survey of Canada.
Production of Lode Mines.
1887..
1888..
1889..
Gold.
Silver.
Oz,      Value. Oz.        Value.
1,170     23,404
6,252
mm
1894.. I   0,252:   125,014
^s- 39-264   785.271
1896.. 62,259 1,244,180
1897.. 106,14l 2,122,820
1898..|iio,o6i 2,201,217
746,
1.496,
1.13s,
i.472,
t.292.
r,6qo
>.78o|
i,i92
..4271
i,S°°
.,160
r,ooo
379
<343|2,
971 3-:
,40!   2,_
4
66.
195
470
977
Lead.
Pounds.
204,
674,
165,
Nil.
Nil
808,
800
Valu
I 16.
24,
75.464
99.977
;4Li35
93.559
$
9,'.
29,813
6.498
Nil.
Nil.
33.064
78,996
169,875
532,255
721.384
■ l^S^
.077.581
Copper.
Pound?.    Value.
324
952
3,818
5.32-
680
.840
i556
;,i8o
.678
16,234
47.642
190,926
266,258
874,781
325,147 6,501,906 15,673,36519,676,901 i20,86o,50i|4,049,199 17,692,934 1,395,841
Total
Values,
$
26,547-
104,813
54.371
73.948-
4,000
99.999
297,400
781,342
2.342.397
4,2.57. J79-
7.052,431
6,529,420-
21,623,847
W«L*lSBM»a
M»i*»cwawsaonwwmi>mmum BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
TABLE VII.
. Production in Detail of the Metalliferous
Tons.
Gold—
Placer.
Gold
—Lode.
District.
Ounces.
Value.
Ounces.
Value.
$
$
Barkerville        Division	
1897
1898
1897
1898
T897
1898
.897
1898
1897
1898
3,250
4,725
1,250
1,850
1.750
1,400
10,000
10,743
65.O00
94.5°°
25,000
37,000
35,000
28,000
200,000
214,860
	
Quesnelle Forks, Keithley Creek
Omineca (Land Recd'g; Division)
750
15,000
180-7
<8o8
3.75o
',853
1,615
75,000
37,060
32.300
1897
1898
1897
1898
2.497
J.971
600
850
12.000
*x7,ooo
1897
1898
1897
1898
1897
1S98
1897
1898
1897
1898
1897
1898
5,556
1,738
50,014
52,762
33.567
30,691
68,804
111,282
1,781
621
755
900
2,076
3,823
193
60
97,024
87,343
9
346
n8
260
41,520
'/6.459
3,860
Slocan                "
1.194
1,940,480
1,746,861
180
6,923
2,360
5,200
Others (Trout Lake, Revelstoke)
300
552
1,874
2,130
6,000
11,040
37.480
42,614
Osoyoos,   Kettle   River,  Grand
1897
1898
t8n
1898
1&97
1898
1897
1898
1897
1898
1897
1898
6,098
14,820
290
1,159
440
382
1,175
378
2,934
3,042
250
8,800
7.632
23,500
7,560
58,680
60,840
5,000
I	
6,674
17,824
133.480
356,480
Yale	
47
405
940
S, 100
Building* stone, bricks, etc	
Totals	
169,362
215,944
25,676
32,167
$513,520
643'346
106,141
no,o6i
$2,122,820
2,201,2x7
* Estimated.
t 100 ounces Platinum in 1898 = $!,50 APPENDICES.
33
{Mines for 1897 and 1898.
Silver.
■ Copper.-
Lead.
Totals for
Divisions.
Ounces.
Value.
Pounds.
Value.     Pounds.
Value.
1897.
1898.
1897.
1898.
•$
1
$
$
$
$
325,000
	
$
389,360
	
65,000
	
94,5oo
25,000
35.000
".::.::.:
37,000
28,000
214,860
	
200,000
15,000
37,060
107,300
	
75,000
32,300
37,o6o
163,796
133,368
116,657
69,780
69,760
38,623
2,291,451
2,286,603
82,036
77*745
163,796
133,368
6,765.703
524.578
167,147
961,124
692,367
3,641,287
3,068,648
110,068
170,804
116,657
121,510
3'3-697
92,5x5
574.572
383,225
2,177,490
1,698,496
65,821
94,538
69,761
67,256
3,543,237
1,978,297
7,291
126,848
67,262
261
44o,545
789,2x5
203
3,453,644
i,95S,o83
24
172,682
235,196
159,801
694,880
2,6x9,852
30,707,705
27,063,595
1,099.336
920,462
3,280,686
2,097,280
90,979
629,411
1,819,586
5,232,011
2,470,811
2,291,451
365,064
82,036
12,4x2
157,977
39,840
97,631
47,814
39,840
47,8i4
226,762
e
432,512
1.174
702
142,982
	
364,112
25,100
7,560
58,680
1,426
853
1,187
Si,950
84,381
2,597
10,150
9,39°
9-39°
19,437
19,437
2,145
150,000
150,000
5.472,971
4,292,401
$3,272,836
2,375,841
5,325,180
7,271,678
$ 266,258
874.781
38,841,135
3',693.559
$i,39°.5>7
1.077.581
    $7,322,766
$7,717,551
$7,322,766
BWHWHMB"<W*P'i'Miim I ■■mi «n *IUWM»W*tHllM|lMHHHWWHH«HBlllWlBI 34
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
TABLE VIII.
Coal and Coke Production per Year to Date.
Years
1836-
1852-
1859
i860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1S65
1866
1867
1868
1S69
1870
1871-
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888
1889
1890
1891
1892
1893
1894
1895
1896
1897
1898
COAL.
Tons (2,240 lbs.)
52	
59	
(2 months).
10
25
I.
14:
13^
i8:
21.
28,
32
25
3'
44.
35:
29:
I48.
8l,
no,
139:
154.
170,
241,
267:
228.
282,
213.
394:
265,
326:
413:
489
579:
678
,029
826
978
,012
939
896
882
.JJ5
Value.
,000  $  40,000
,396  101,593
,989  7.956
246 56.988
774    55.096
118  72.472
345  85,380
632  115,528
819 ." 131,276
115  100,460
239  124.956
005  176,020
802  143,208
843  119.372
549  493.836
547  244,641
H5  330,435
192   4'7.576
052  462,156
846  512,538
301  723,903
595  802,785
357  685,071
133  846,417
299  639,897
070  1,182,210
596
636.
796,788
979 908
360  1,240,080
301  1,467,903
830   1.739.490
140   2,034,420
097  3,087,291
335  2,479,005
.294  2,934,882
.953  3.038,859
654-
2,818,962
222  2.688,666
.854
,865.
Total.
Years.
1895-96	
1897 	
1898 (estimated) .
Total.
••'3.217.552 tons.
COKE.
Tons (2,240 lbs.)
1.565	
17,831
35.0oo	
54,396 tons.
2,648,562
3.407.595
$40,034,080
Value.
7.825
89.155
175,000
$271,980 THE LUMBER INDUSTRY OF BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
mmm  appendices. 35
Table Showing Source of California's Coal Supply for 1898.
British Columbia  651,208 tons.
Australia  201,931 "
England and Wales  75 115 "
Scotland   5)OSg .1
Eastern (Cumberland anthracite)  3'',56o "
Seattle (Franklin, Green River, etc.)  283,963 "
Carbon Hill, South Prairie, etc  348,474 "
Mount Diablo, Coos Bay and Coral Hollow  172,506 1
Japan and Rocky Mountains (by rail)  26,560 "
Total coal 1,802,373    "
In the matter of coke imports California is credited with 41,630 tons for 1898,
as against 30,320 tons in 1897, of which over one-half was derived from England,
and the remainder from British Columbia, Belgium and Australia.
The above considerations taken as a whole seem to indicate an abundant
market for the yearly output of our mines, and the indications are that 1899 will
not only prove a very prosperous year for the coal trade of the Pacific Coast, but
that the collieries of the Province will be called upon to increase their present
■output.
Analyses of Vancouver Island Coal.
From samples of coal delivered by the managers of the collieries named,
analyses were made by the Provincial Assayer by "fast caking" process, with
the following results :—
No. 1.—Lower seam, Union Mine. No. 4.—Alexandria Mine.
No. 2.—Top seam, " No. 5.—Wellington Coal.
No. 3.—Lower Seam, Extension Mine.        No. 6.—Top seam, Extension Mine.
No. 7.—Union coke.
No. 1.
No. 2.
TVT
No. 3.
No. 4.
No. 5.
No. 6
■75
33-25
5804
7.96
No. 7.
Volatile matter. .
Fixed carbon....
Ash	
1-43
25-57
65.00
8.00
.80
28.00
57.60
13.60
1.00
32.80
60.80
5.40
1 15
31-85
58.70
8.30
1.90
32.10
56.40
9.60
.60
2.60
80.00
16.80
100.00
100.00
100.00
ICO.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
Caking quality...
Very fair.
Very fair.
Medium
Medium
Partial.
mm g6 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
Foreign Shipments of Coal, 1898.
January	
February	
March	
April	
May 	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
Total Tons
New Vancouver
Coal Mining- &
Land Co., Ltd.
Tons.
28
25
34
30
38
35
32
43
38
36
27
m
061
,556
765
074
,650
,540
,638
,827
,627
,689
,9°7
.201
403.535
R. Dunsmuir
& Sons.
Tons.
22,037
25,071
l8,III
13.870
23-541
27,434
15.961
18,520
15.843
15.399
16,029
20,829
232,642
Union Colliery Co-
of B. C, Ltd.
Tons.
14,948
II,O08
11,873
12,500
IO363
21,670
9-703
13.207
4,522
2,882
17,008
129,684
Summary of Foreign Shipments, 1897 and 1898.
.     1897.
1898.
Tons.
233.349
188,139
180,282
601,770
Tons.
403.535
232,642
129,684
Wellington	
765,861
Of the above foreign shipments for 1898,  752,686 tons were, according to-
Customs returns, exported to ports of the United States.
San Francisco and the southern ports of California have been the chief markets for Vancouver Island coal, with Alaska, the Hawaiian Islands and the steam- -
ships engaged in the China and Australian shipping trade, important and steadily-
increasing secondary consumers.
The following analysis of the source of the coal supply of California for 1898^
is interesting as showing our relative importance in that market. APPENDICES.
Coal Mining Industry.
Si
Locality.
Pennsylvania	
Virginia I "
Indiana  "
Illinois  "
Iowa  "
Missouri  "
Newcastle    England.
Staffordshire  "
Derbyshire  "
Yorkshire  "
North Wales | Wales...
Pictou ,
Sydney 	
U. S. A.
Nova Scotia
Cape Breton
Volatile
Matter.
"9 5°
33-68
39.00
36.59
44.00
34.06
37 60
il
35
35
36
29
34
.86
. 10
■67
•56
■63
■07
Fixed
Carbon.
64.40
57-76
52.OO
59-47
48.50
50.81
57-oo
59.64
61.65
62.08
57-49
56.98
61.43
Ash.
6.10
8.56
9.00
3-94
7-50
i5-'3
5.40
2.50
3-25
2.25
6.25
13-39
4-50
Total
Fuel.
93
9'
91
96
92
84
94
97
96
97
93
86
95
90
44
00
06
50
87
60
50
75
75
75
61
50
Crow's Nest Coal, taken on same basis as above.
No. 2 Tunnel—Coal Creek.
Peter Seam- -Martin's Creek
Jubilee Seam, "
21.02
25.00
34-70
31-70
76
25
72
SO
58
30
68
30
2-73
2.50
7. CO
4.20
97.27
97.50
93.00
95.80
Output of Coal, 1897 and 1898.
1897.
New Vancouver Coal Mining and Land Co., Ltd	
R. Dunsmuir & Sons	
*Union Colliery Co. of B. C , Ltd. (Union Colliery)....
" " " (Alexandria Colliery)
1898.
Tons. Tons.
319,277  I      520,222
232,255
246,926
232,255 3'5.738
Total Tons       798.458
236,395
45.56o
i,u7>9i5
I
*Output of "Extension Mine" not given separately.
URmtHHwmiwBiwiaa  APPENDICES.
List of Trees of British Columbia.
BOTANICAL name.
Abies amabilis	
''     grandis	
"    subalpina	
Acer macrophyllum.
"    circinatum	
Alnus rubra	
Arbutus Menziesii	
Betula occidentalis	
"     papyrifera	
Cornus Nuttallii	
Juniperus Virginiana...
Larix Americana	
"    Lyalli	
"    occidentalis	
Picea alba	
''    Engelmannii .	
"    nigra	
"    Sitchensis	
Pinus albicaulis	
- ''    contorta	
''   monticola	
"    Murrayana	
''    ponderosa	
Pirus rivularis	
Populus balsamifera....
''     monilifera	
'' Lremuloides ...
"     trichocarpa  ...
Prunus emarginata	
"    mollis	
Pseudotsuga Douglasii .
Quercus Garryana	
Salix lancifolia	
"    lasiandra	
Taxus brevifolia	
Thuya gigantea	
"     excelsa	
Tsuga Mertensiana ....
"    Pattoniana	
ENGLISH  NAME.
White fir	
Western white fir	
Mountain balsam	
Large-leaved maple....
Vine maple	
Red alder 	
Arbutus	
Western birch	
Canoe birch	
Western dogwood	
Red cedar	
American larch	
Mountain, larch	
Western larch	
White spruce	
Western black spruce...
Black spruce 	
Western white spruce...
White-bark pine	
Scrub pine	
White Mountain Pine...
Black pine	
Yellow pine	
Western crab-tree  	
Balsam poplar	
Cottonwood	
Aspen  	
Cottonwood	
Cherry	
Douglas fir	
Western white oak	
Lance-leaved willow	
Willow	
Western yew	
Giant cedar	
Yellow cypress or cedar.
Western hemlock	
Alpine hemlock	
FRENCH  NAME.
Sapin blanc
Gros sapin
Sapin des monts
Erable
c(
Aune rouge
Arbute
Rouleau
"       a canot
Cornouillier
Cedre rouge
Epinette rouge
P        des monts
" rouge
Petite epinette
Epinette noir
Grosse epinette
Epinette blanche
Cin blanc
Cyprus
Pin blanc
Cypres
Pin jaune ou rouge
Pommier
Paumier -
Biard
Lremble
Tiard
Lerisier
Pin d Oregon
Chene
Saule
cc
If
Grand cedre
Cedre jaune
Pruche
Statement showing the timber cut during  1898, not including that from the
Dominion and the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway lands :
FEET.
On Crown lands      70,755.866
On timber leaseholds      42,192,178
On private property       l '.598.614
Total '.     124,546,658
^H  APPENDICES.
41
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HBBKHBaB?!
*r-"iif 1—TTrr4-1-^*^ 42 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
Pack of British Columbia Salmon—Continued.
Cases.
Fraser River 256,101
Skeena River  81,234
Rivers Inlet 104,711
Naas River    18,953
Lowe Inlet   10,312
"Narnu Harbor	
Alert Bay     8,500
West Coast, V. I..    4,350
484,161
SHIPMENTS IN DETAIL.
I                             1898. 1897. 1896.
England—                             Cases. Cases. Cases.
London direct 79.598 325,966 182,253
I     overland      5.687 4,957 9.°76
Liverpool direct 242,437 407,738 322,364
I        overland...    8,050 38,373 11,405
Overland (former yrs.)   	
Via other ports    19,862   	
Eastern Canada  87,881 130,815 51,041
Australasia     9,644 28,579 11,609
Other destinations        439 226 2,128
Local sales     1,183 4.823 3,844
Stocks on hand  29,380 74,000 7,850
484,161 1,015,477 601,570
K BY DISTRICTS.
1897.
1896.
x895-
1894.
Cases.
Cases.-
Cases.
Cases. 1
860,459
356,984
400,368
363.967
65,905
100,140
67.797
61,151
40,207
107,468
58,579
39.351
20,847
14,649
19,550
19.587
10,666
10,395
8,68l
8,315
4.357
3.987
3,000
.8,602
2,840
5.IOO
2,OCO
4.434
5.107
3.320
i,oi5,477
601,570
566,395
494.371
1895.
Cases.
96,459
566)395
B. C. SALMON FLEET, SEASON 1898.
Br.   ship Celtic Race Sailed Dec. 1 ith.
1804.
Cases.'
94.203
56,301
222,345
65,647
20,424
29.590
59,296
79,288
76,009,
8,832
15,078
4.326
2,642
25.952
4.374
494,371
Cases.       Cases*
79.598
To London direct	
Br.   ship Acamas Sailed Oct.  10th  88,315
Br.   ship Blythswood      "     Oct. 21st  66,457
Br.   ship Ilala       "     Oct. 27th  54,326
Ger. bark Atalanta      "     Nov.   4th  44-945
79.598
To Liverpool direct	
Total by sea to England
254.043*
333.641
* This includes half cases reported as cases APPENDICES.
43
RECAPITULATION
Of the Yield and Value of the Fisheries of British Columbia, for the Year 1897.
Kinds of Fish.
Salmon, in cans    	
"       fresh	
''       smoked 	
"       salted ,	
'(       dry salted	
Sturgeon, fresh	
Halibut        "    	
Herring       "    	
''       smoked	
Oolachans, fresh	
" smoked	
" salted	
Trout, fresh	
Fish, assorted or mixed	
Codfish, fresh	
Smelt, fresh	
Skill, salted	
Fur-seal skins ,
Hair-seal   **        	
Sea Otter   "    	
Caviare	
Fish oil	
Isinglass    	
Oysters	
Clams and mussels	
Crabs and abelonies	
Shrimps and prawns    • - -	
Estimate offish consumed in province not included
Lbs.
Brls.
Lbs.
Brls
Lbs,
Brls.
No.
Lbs.
Galls,
Brls.
Grand total
Quantity.     Price. Value.
49,274,188
1,814,500
85,969
5,011
600,000
1,137,696
1,967,500
430,000
51.650
420,000'
21,500
i»875
64,300
439,000
287,500
70,000
io5
30,410
5,000
30
38,397
95*500
1,600
$0
o 10
xo OO
o 03
o 05
o 05
o 03
o 10
10 OO
o xo
o 05
o 05
o 05-
10 OO
XO OO
0 75
$4,927,
181,
8,
5°,
18,
98,
4l8    80
450 OO
596 90
HO  OO
,000 00
,884 80
•375 °°
,900 00
,165 00
,000 00
,150 00
,750 00
,430 00
,950 00
•375 °°
,500 00
,050 00
,100 00
,750 OO
,000 OO
,679 40
,650 OO
500 00
,000 OO
,080 OO
,000 OO
,000 00
-,ooo OO
$6,138,864 90
Capital invested in Fishing Plant  and   Material, including the Fur-seal Fleet,
Boats, etc., of British Columbia, for the Year 1897.
Vessels, Boats, Canneries, Nets. etc.
Valu
4,917 boats
Scows and flat boats	
608,800 fathoms gill nets	
7,250       "      seines	
Lines, hooks, etc	
65 salmon canneries, at $20,000
4 cold storage and freezers ...
Oil factories	
Salteries ,	
Total.
140 vessels      $282,630 00
228,030 OO
8,500 OO
4°4»475 °°
1.300,
35-
9-
4.
750 00
,000 00
000 00
000 00
,000 00
41 vessels em
149 boats
288 canoes
ployed in fur-seal fishing I-. $i35>IO° °°
'* "        j     14,900 OO
H       "          14,400 001
Grand total
164,400 00
$2,514,660 00
Hands employed in connection with fisheries       19.850
Sailors and hunters in sealing fleet (whites)  495
•' g " "    (Indians)  587
Total.
20,932
MMHWW
IWVWWPttlWWWWMMmm 44
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
Return showing the Number, Tonnage and Value of Vessels and Boats, and
Materials, Kind and Quantities of Fish, etc., in the
DISTRICTS.
Vessels and Boats Employed.
Vessels.
Boats.
Fraser River	
Rivers Inlet	
Skeena River	
Naas River-	
West Coast Queen Charlotte Island.
East Coast Queen Charlotte Island.
Cape Scott to Comox	
Comox to Victoria	
Victoria to Cape Be le	
Cape Beale to Cape Scott	
Totals.
$
193100
44480
28000
12000 180
1800 20
750        12
282630
433
$
3477
I3908O
13481
650
260OO
2600
520
22000
239°
95
380O
39°
20
25000
70
25
375°
no
25
2500
65
05
3900
'35
25
I250
X20
'5
750
60
49x7
22803O
I942I
Kinds of
T3
•£ X
"rt
DISTRICTS.
Xi
to
c —
W
e
jO
—
m
£
|
0
m
m
u
3
'rt
OJO
"C
■rpf
U    —
0 w
all
id
Eg
X
g
X
0
1137696
1525000
20000
5000
10000
15000
20000
10000
350000
2500
10000
East Coast Queen Charlotte Island	
Totals	
1137696
1967500
100000
35000
350
275
5000
500
45°
25000
650
20000
2500
15000
35°
245000
12000
5°
10000
500
10000
1000
430000
5l65°
1875 APPENDICES.
45
the Number of Men engaged 'in the Fisheries, Quantity and Value of
Province of British Columbia, for the Year 1897.
;hing
Fishing Materials.
Gill Nets.
Seines.
Lines.
CO
™
c
s
<u
If
-c
a
d
*
>
m
>
>
Kinds of Fish.
Eb
347700
105000
120000
19500
2600
2500
2500
4000
3000
2000
608800
268275    "•- 	
78750	
90000 IOOO          1500
.14625     .... •■ ■
1950 300    450
2500 250   375
*875 5°°,   75o
30c o 4000   6000
2000 1000   1500
1500 ]     200    300
464475 7250 I 10875
1500
IOO
250
2500
2000
200
600000
1886
1472000
48469
42197516
750
20000
1500
2x16440
800
I00000
10000
333747a
125
10000
IOOOO
q6oooo
2500
3000
IOO
30000
6000
423000
260
200
150000
25000
5000
8000
750
5000
3000
239760
5011
1814500
85969
49274188
Fish and Fish Products.
*
J£
en
t "■
u .
4J
O
H
je.
J£
m
I/)
"j3
u
u O
0 0
•sz
V)
to
0
Total
Value.
250000
IOOO
20000
30000
300
I 2000
500
150000
IOOO
IOOO
.25000
12000
IOOOO
225000
8000
7000
£1X0000.
30000
450
800
250
500
IOOO
IOOO
500
200
50
250
50000
50000
IOOOO
2500
IOOO
150000
8000
6000
5000
35000
60
35
10
IOOOO
j15000
1 5000
1500
60000
500
420000
21500
64300
439000
2S7500
70000
IQ5
5000
7500
8000
5000
8000
IOOOO
25000
55°° I
15000
$  cts.
4,583,480 80
228,624 00
361,684 70
111,825 00
10,665 °°
14,975 00 1
56,275 00 I
74,250 00 I
7.562 ,
955°°
Catch of Canadian fur seal fl.et (30,410) , $&§&&
Caviare 	
Isinglass   	
Oysters	
Cla   s and mussels	
Crabs and abelonies	
Shrimps and prawns i \	
Estimate of Fish consumed in Province not included in above..
37>l63 50   10
Grand total
5,486,505 50
304,100 00
7,679 40
500 00
8,000 001
9,080 00
18,000 00.
5,000 00
300,000 00 j
$6,138,864 90,
IWPMMUWFMfHgp 46 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
British Columbia Sealing Catch, 1898.
c
H
Particulars of Catch.
Vessels.
•   British
Columbia
Coast.
Japan
Coast.
Vicinity
Copper
Island.
Behringf
Sea.
Totals.
1
JX)
H
s
JO
§
"rt
"i3
m
2
S
2
Abbie M. Deering"...
Ada....	
96
97
75
75
86
66
92
51
49
5°
i
93
60
69
80
93
72
69
93
63
43
76
46
83
55
86
7°
73
38
63
99
63
92
84
66
54
80
402
70
167
xos
■51
97
343
3°4
i59
163
83
9'
240
59
319
420
378
185
20-X
2X1
'25
167
438
20I
Carrie C. W	
C. D. Rand
City of San Diego...
126
- 3°2
58l
657
242
961
x86
126
201
'59
20
30
16
89
84
89
'79
39°
179
117
204
129
200
52
123
66
79
217
102
'  85'
42
117
169
14
220
257
220
X53
502
85
90
57
147
33«
l6i
148
61
69
242
430
440
1,114
341
9OI
769
892
1,024
64.
491
276
1.257
••473
664
702
485
1.249
444
275
250
36l
317
188
Doris	
Enterprise	
338
236
116
442
I98
114
....
Libbie	
25 i
396
233
3°4
468
860
160
271
I44
414
295
Oceai Belle -
	
Otto	
tif.
Penelope ....    	
210
453
416
626
77
256
169
168
109
x55
654
1.004
191
I
"45
173
1,028
764
459
263
423
1.968
Viva	
"
650
636
1.045
W Iter L. Rich
Zillah May	
X44
95
86
86
......
1
20
	
Total    	
2»553
3°
7.595
9.348
28 TW
«
The Sealing Catch for the Past Nine Years has Been :
       35,310
890 ••• 43.325
89X  52,365
'892  1 49.743
l893     70.592
X894.
1895.
1896.
1897.
  97.474
   74.'24
     55.677
 50,410
1898  28,552;; APPENDICES.
47
Exports from British Columbia
Outside of Canada of Products of Agrici
ihes, for Three Years ending 30th June,
(The Exports to the other Provinces of the Dominion are not included.)
To Countries Outside of Canada of Products of Agriculture and its
Branches, for Three Years ending 30th June, 1898.
Live Stock.
Horses      head
Horned Cattle     I
Swine     l'
Poultry and other animals    "
Meats, Etc.
Hides, horns & skins (not fur).
Bacon lbs.
Beef	
Hams    "
Pork      I
Sheep pelts No.
Wool lbs.
Grain, Seeds, Breadstuffs
and Products of
Bran cwt.
Barley bush.
Oats     |
Peas.:     |
Wheat     "
Flour bbls.
Biscuits and Bread   cwt.
Oatmeal and all other.... bbls.
Fruits and Vegetables.
Apples (green) bbls.
Fruits (canned) lbs.
Other fruit    "
Potatoes bush.
All other vegetables	
Dairy Products.
Butter lbs.
Cheese    "
Eggs doz.
Hay    tons
Straw     "
Trees and bushes	
Hops   lbs.
Bones cwt.
Tallow   lbs.
Honey lbs.
Malt bush.
Other articles	
Total I	
Year ending June
30th, 1S96.
Year ending June
30th, 1897.
Quantity.
I>15°
170
1.275
ISO
49,238
150,770
812
810
3°
28
62,965
2,520
1
124
"Value
580
250
11
351
86,131
167
15
173
7
17,618
Quantity.
Year ending: June
30th, 1898.
86,385
984
1,419
-,347
xr 1 Qxxan-     Tr ,
Value.        t;tv        Value.
4,395
30
260
86,385
118
"=53
12,958
I4,759l66,m 15,561
42
1,379
12,828
io,935
11
15
16
67,391
443
18,235
92
33
229
456
'3
3i
37,900
8,447
4
790
189
19
42
444
15
3,659
1,239
19
77
13
6
n,757
341
634
27
82
4-4°5
190,900
63,471
19,880
157
1
516
4
254
211
4421
3,172
6,845
29
4
34
45
15,264
98
37,920
22
23,97o
76,548
1,140
7
956
4
254
151
442
979
969
13
25
161
1,924
20
824
6
104
i,74i
2,062
1,989
457
32,005
3,886
4,673
769
4,380
9,39i
24
3
85,556
271
148
286
39
i2,3H
224
6
39o
264
7,732
6,532
280
130
82,193
2
22,146
228,407
4,966
52,449
151
17
421
77
208
56
177
1,869
918
39
2,394
37
11,762
1
665
180,274    FARMING AND FRUIT  GROWING  IN  B.  C    APPENDICES british columbia board of trade.
Imports into the Province of British Columbia for Twenty-eight Years:
ending June 30th, 1899.
Value of
Total
Imports.
Goods
Entered for
Home Consumption.
Dutiable
Goods.
Free.
Goods.
.    Total.
Duty
Collected.
To 30th June, 1872.
 $1,790,352
$ 1,600,361
$ 166,707
$ 1,767,068
$  342,400 48.
From Canada
....       23,215
22,2x5
22,215
To 30th June, 1873
.... 2,191,011
1,569,112
507.364
2,076,476
302,147 65
From Canada
        75*604
75.604
75.604
To 30th June, 1874
.... 2,085,560
1,676,792
377.544
2.048,336
336,494 47"
From Canada.
....      66,104
66,104
66,104
To 30th June, 1875.
.... 2,543,552
1,924,482
566, in
2,490.593
413,921 5<>>
From Canada.
      ii7>°54
117.054
117.054
To 30th June, 1876.
 2,997,597"
2,237,072
707,906
2,944.978
480,384 52
From Canada.
       129.735
'29.735
129.735
To 30th June, 1877.
.... 2,220,968
1,820,391
346.318
2,166,709
403,520 20 ■
From Canada.
....     163,142
163,142
163,142
To 30th June, 1878.
 2,244,503
1,905,201
367,926
2,273,127
426,125 14.
From Canada
       144,754
"44.754
144.754
To 30th June, 1879.
.... 2,440,781
1,997,125
320,326
2,3r7.454
484,704 04.
From Canada
      184,951
i84.951
184,951
To 30th June, 1880
   1,689,394
1,614,165
122,451
2,457,116
45°.'75 43^
From Canada.
....     208,072
208,072
208,072
To 30th June, 1881
 2,489,643
2,214.153
242,963
1,736,616
589,403 62?
From Canada.
....     3«7.» 1
387.111
387,1x1
To 30th June, 1882
.... 2,899,223
2.472,174
404,287
2,875,461
678,104 53^
From Canada.
      449,768
449,768
449,768
To 30th June, 1883
••   • 3.937.536
3.33".023
550.833
3,866,855
907.655 54-
From Canada.
....     624,207
624,207
624,207
To 30th June, 1884
.... 4,142,486
3.337,642
702,693
4.040,335
884,076 2R
From Canada-
....  789.287
789,287
789.287
To 30th June, 1885
— 4,089,492
3.458,529
564,923
4,023,452
966,143 54-
From Canada.
927,054
927.054
927,054
To 30th June, 1886.
 3.953>299
2.8sx,379
1,060,347
4,011,726
880,266 65;
To 30th June, 1887
 3.547>8.5»
3,065,791
560,348
3,626, x39
883.421 53;
To 30th June, 1888
 3,509,951
2,674,941
729,266
3,401,207
861,465 14
To 30th June, 1889.
.  .. -i.763.127
2,002,646
807,140
3,809,786
974.675 69-
To 30th June, 1890.
 4.379.272
3.357.lI1
1.030,375
4,287,486
1,075,215 20.
To 30th June, 1891.
...    5,478,883
4,261,207
1.074,983
5.336.190
'.346,059 42
To 30th June, 1892.
 6,495,598
4,423,414
x, 803,005
6,226,4x9
1,4x2,878 00.
To 30th June, 1893.
 3.934.o66
3,662,673
1 255-495
5,918,168
1,366,250 32.-
To 30th June, 1894.
.... 5,320,6x5
0 ,-fi.. ......
3»5°2"333
1.738.282
5.336.961
1,308,631 23
To 30th June, 189,5.
 4,403,976
3,131,490
•■236.935
4,368,425
I.X37.727 49"
To 30th June, 1896.
 5.56.1.095
3.993.650
1.532.840
5.526,490
1,406,931 91
To 30th June, 1897.
 7,130,381
5.048.755
2,028,653
7,087,048
1,701,507  16-
To 30th June, 1898.
• - • • 8,548,375
6,493.'23
2,024,749
8,517,872
2,064,527 76-
To 30th June, 1899.
■■■■ 8,7X4.733
7,063,647
1,612,998
8.376.645
2.350.738 87- APPENDICES.
Exports the Produce of Canada, from the Province of British
Columbia for 28 Years ending June 30th, 1S99.
"Year.
1872
1873
1874
•'875
1876
xx 877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
■1885
1886
1887
1890
1891
1892
1895
1896
1897
1898
1899
The Mine.
$1,389,585
1,224,362
x.35i.'45
1,929,294
2,032,139
1,708,848
i.759.i7i
'.530.812
1,664,626
'.3'7.o79
1.437.072
1,309,646
1,441,052
1.759.5X2
x',832',827
1,889,805
2,377.052
2,375.770
2,030,229
l'X°
3.521.543
4.615.452
5.763.253
8,909,592
11,973,671
10,467,502
Fisheries.
$ 37.707
43.36x
114,118
133.986
7'.338
105,603
423,840
633.493
3x7,410
400,984
976.903
1.332.385
899,371
727.672
643,052
9»o,559
1,164,019
993.623
2,351.083
1,501,831
3.541.305
3,264,501
3.288,776
3.567.8.5
3,846,951
2,740,124
Forest.
$214,377
211,026
260,116
292,468
273". 430
327,300
as
172,647
362,875
407.624.
458.365
235.9'3
441.957
449,026
325.881
374.996
425.2/8
454.994
411.623
500,080
685.746
742.173
425.751 ■
527,820
Animals?;
and their
Produce.
$214,700
259.292
320.625
411,810
329,027
230.893
«
339,218
350,474
.300,429
287.394
414,364
329.248
380,126
3'8.839
397.685
346.159
294,646
390.584
310,621
149,269
457.373
437.864
307.845
285,007
Agric'l
Products.
$    142
2,885
5.296
9.727
3,080
3.083
462
2.505
3.843
248
946
6.79'
1.745
2,324
1,907
10,265
27,631
■14,831
9.823
^3.323
2'.774
61,414
104,744
78.977
61,239
Miscellaneous.
$   1,540
'.'97
443
68
1,500
2,616
443
1.413
5.948
2,811
1,911
85,826
102,089
113,271
20,434
31,976
446,231
196,895
261,918
338,47'
552,539
262,834
420,689
Total.
$ 1,858,050
1,742,123
2.051,743
2.777.285
2,709,082
2,346,969
2,768,147
2,708,848
2,584,001
2.231.554
3,080,841
3.345.263
3,100,404
3,172,391
2,891,811
3,371,601
3,928,077
4.334.3o6
5.i45.62i
6,257,158
6,574.989
5.642,797
7.843.958
9,121,098
10,576,524
14,0x7,568
16,919,717
14,748,025
Exports for Each Year from 1872 to 1899,  Inclusive.
Scale—$1,000,000.00 — }£ inch.
372-$
1,858,050
J73—
1,742,123
J74—
2,051,743
87s—
2,777,285
S76-
2,709,082
?77—
2,346.969
578—
"2,768,147
S79—
2,708,848
58o—
2,584,001
38i—
2,231,554
S82—
3,080,841
B83—
3.345»236
384-
3,100,404
885-
3.172.39'
886-
2,891,811
887-
3.37'.6ox
888-
3,928,077
889-
4.334.306
890—
5.545.621
891—
6,257,158
892—
6,574.989
893-
5,642,797
894—
7.843.958
895—
9,121,098
896-
10,576,524
897—
14,0x7,568
898-
16,919,717
899—
14,748,025 56 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
Shipping.
The Board is indebted to the courtesy and kindness of the Collectors of Customs at the ports mentioned, for the following information :
Vessels employed in the coasting trade of the Dominion of Canada arrived at
and departed from the undermentioned Ports during the year ending 30th June,
.1899.
Vessels Arrived. Vessels Departed.
•  N        f ~    N
No. No. No. No.
Vessels. Tonnage. Crew. Vessels. Tonnage. C:ew.
Victoria    1,612 494,897 33.333 '>6oi 496,765 33>i°3
Vancouver   2,266 474,715 31,877 2,266 499,209 33,726
Nanaimo   1,263 3°3>°92 '4,635 x>323 3°9.OI3 15.189
New Westminster     561 103,210          6,577 568 103,986          6,643
Vessels entered inwards from sea during year ending June 30th, 1899.
With Cargo. In Ballast.
No.                                        No. No.                                       No.
Vessels. Tonnage. Crew. Vessels. Tonnage. Crew.
Victoria       670 510,986 30,487 401 396,559 20,023
Vancouver      361 34*.772 17,908 175 H9-33I 5.54°
Nanaimo        54 78,076          1,345 269 289,226 6,132
New Westminster       23 582              106 45 13,803             447
Vessels entered outwards for sea during the year ending June 30th, 1899.
With Cargo. -       In Ballast.
r~~ "-, '       -.
No.                                        No. No. No.
Vessels. Tonnage. Crew. Vessels. Tonnage. Crew.
Victoria       561 476,469 28,373 534 417,828 22,522
Vancouver       387 386,559 19,135 169 71,811 4,240
Nanaimo       301 364,570 7,387 4 7,365 708
New Westminster       23 11,872            274 47 1,553 159
Number and tonnage of vessels built and registered during year ending June
30th, 1899.
Build. Registered.
No.             Tonnage. No. Tonnage-
Victoria      20                 1,962                        8 826
Vancouver     14 2,195 21 3,002
Nanaimo    ■> 16J&;
New Westminster     17 797 17 707 ^^^^^^^^^^^^x^ffi^r^^a^p^^^^!^^^^^
APPENDICES.
Progress of Shipping.
57
Registered sea-going tonnage carrying cargo into and out of the province, by
five-year periods, with yearly averages and percentages of increase or decrease :
Period.
1874-78.
1879-83.
1884-88.
1889-93.
1894-98
Total Tonnage. Yearly Average.        Per cent.
1.439,817
2,358,885
4,089,788
8,927,979
11,052,109
287,963
471.777
817,958
1.785,596
2,210,422
+   63-8
+ 73-4
+ 118-3
+   23-8
Registered sea-going tonnage carrying cargo into the Province, etc.
1874-7*.
1879-83.
1884-88.
1889-93.
1894-98.
735.936
1,058,566
i.935.085
3,928,138
4,561,815
147,187
211,713
387,017
785,628
912,363
+ 43-8
+ 82-8
+ 103-0
+  16.1
Registered sea-going tonnage carrying cargo out of the Province, etc.:
1874-78.
1879-83.
1884-88.
1889-93 •
1894-98.
Period.
703,881
I,30O,3'9
2,154.703
4,999 841
6,490,294
140,776
260,064
430,940
999,968
1,298,059
Per cent.
+ 85"0
I 65-7
+ I32-0
+   29.8 58 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
Inland   Revenue,  Canada,   Divisions  No.   37  and 38.
Entered for Consumption July 1st, 1898, to June 30th, 1899.
No. 37, No. 38,
•Victoria, B. C. tVancouver, B. C.
Spirits proof galls. 79,55°- *4 9i,9i3-I8
Spirits, exported  944.61 333-95
Malt   lbs. 1,394,823 2,179,312
Manufactured Tobacco  " 143,728^ 230,303^
I                 "        exported " 652>.*' 392
Raw Leaf Tobacco " 33,i63X 68,032^
Cigars, ex-warehouse No. 250,650 329,250
I      ex-factory    " 1,228,800 2,651,100
Malt Liquor   galls. 519,407 889,353
Petroleum  47,518.92 132,325
Total receipts  $221,770.64 $295,157-59
* Vancouver Island only.
t All outports in British Columbia except Vancouver Island.
This Board is indebted to the kindness and  courtesy of the Collectors of
, Inland Revenue at Victoria and Vancouver for the above information.
Area of British Columbia.
Land 382,300 square miles.
Water         1,0^0      "        "
Total 383,300      "
Wood area, estimated 285,554      "        " Sttfefifo,
APPENDICES.
Capital Invested.
59
Under this head an estimate has been based on most comprehensive and,
• generally speaking, very complete data contained in the numerous returns from
all over the Province and from information obtained from a variety of sources.
These have been carefully compiled and the results arrived at, after taking into
account every business interest in the Province—involving labour of such magnitude—will be surprising to even those familiar with the affairs of the Pravince.
It is not claimed that the figures are absolutely correct, as in some instances,
where actual returns were not available, they are based on estimates, which, however, are approximately correct, and a complete return would probably modify the
total to some extent. Nor do they include by any means all that has been invested
in the Province in various ways, but only what may be regarded as in the main
live and productive capital.
The figures are :—
Description.
Amount.
Miscellaneous Industrial Establishments	
Electric Light and Railways	
Telephone  	
Waterworks	
Railways and Telegraphs	
Steamships and Navigation	
Mining Plant and Smelters	
Coal Mining	
Sealing, Salmon Canning and Fish Curing	
Churches and schools II
Bank Deposits	
Municipal Assessments i
Municipal Public Works and Buildings	
Pro\ incial Public Works and Buildings	
Provincial Assessments  	
Dominion Public Works and Buildings '
All Commercial Establishments    	
Timber, leases and privately owned (value estimated)	
Private wealth, less public assets and values assessed in
above	
; 16,260,
2,000,
200,
2, too.
47.5°°:
3,ooo.
10,500
3,000
3,25°
1,850
6,500
45,000
925:
5,500,
51,500
2,800
5,50°
100,000
000 00
000 00
000 00
000 00
000 00
oco 00
000 00
000 00
000 00
000  00
000 00
000 00
coo 00
,000 00
000 00
000  00
000 00
000  00
.5307.385.000 00
£280 000,000 00
By the census of 1881 it was shown that there was $2,952,835 invested in
industries, and in 1891 that amount had increased to $7,246,662. The wages
paid was $929,213 and $5,119,258 respectively, and of the hands employed 2,871
and 11,507 respectively.
Inm?
gynmgwi   BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
Climate.
No general description will serve the purpose in speaking of the climate of
British Columbia. On the coast it varies considerably, while in the interior the
variations are yet more plainly marked.
Dr. Bryce, in "The Climate and Health Resorts of Canada," says: " In
all this country," from the south of Vancouver Island to the Queen Charlotte
Islands, " the fruits of temperate climates grow well, and farm animals live out
doors the year round. The rich bottoms of the Fraser delta have long been
famous for their great hay crops and pasture lands ; but here the extreme of rainfall is met, the mean for six years being 59-66 inches at New Westminster. The
climate of the great Island of Vancouver, running north-west across two degrees of
longitude and two degrees of latitude, presents every variety from that at the sea
coast, with as at Esquimalt, a very low daily range, and no annual extremes—the
lowest temperature in two years being 8 degs. F., the lowest monthly average
being 20 degs. F., and the highest in summer being 82 degs. F. —to that as above
Alberni on the west coast, where the Vancouver range rises first into a plateau to
4,000 feet, and even to 7,500 feet in Victoria Peak."
" Apart from the mineral wealth of Vancouver Island, its climate, with every
variation possible, becomes most attractive. Its seashore climate is milder than
many parts of England, with less rain and less seasonal variations."
Attention is directed to the following tables :
Esquimalt Graving Dock, Victoria, B. C. APPENDICES. 63
AVERAGE MONTHLY AND ANNUAL RAINFALL AND SNOWFALL
In inches at ten principal stations in British Columbia, derived from a
group of years.
Upper Mainland A.
-Lower Mainland  B.
North-West Coast C
Vancouver Island    D.
Gulf Islands E,
January ..
February..
March	
April	
May	
line   .-	
July	
August .
September
October...
November.
December.
Year
/Rainfall  4,
\ Snowfall  t2
/Rainfall  2
1 Snowfall  10
/ Rainfall  2
1 Snowfall  1
J Rainfall   2
\ Snowfall  o
( Rainfall  1
\ Snowfall	
J Rainfall  I I
( Snowfall	
/ Rainfall  o
\ Snowfall  .
1 Rainfall   o
I Snowfall	
- ( Rainfall    2
1 Snowfall  .
j Rainfall  3
Snowfall  o
Rainfall  ; 6
Snowfall  I 3
Rainfall  8
\ Snowfall  2
J Rainfall  37
\ Snowfall -■     '.. 31
8.5
3X-4
4 5°
2.0
2.2'
6.0
1.68
1.64
0.88
4 5°
[6.0
2   IQ
9-6   I)
3-24
iS-3
.86
'-3   '
85
B3
*X3
(fl
Si
SI
<
N
'»
V)
&
bo
<
5-13
1   22
7 »
2O.7
3-76
5-42
q-4
12.6
5.22
m»
I <
m   §>
4-57
O. X
4-38
0.72   0.38
4.8     9 2
0.20   0.00
6-5 |f3'°
0.89   o.oz
0.6  I   I - o
0
1
O.66
0
9 7
26
0.05
0
5-4
24
0.63
0
5 45
o 4
4-85
0.94
2.1 j
1.64
-80
4-56| 3-96I 3-97   °-74   °-93   g
1.35   0.361 0.22   1.02   2.
{I
•56
9-7
8 41
°-44   7 79   '-33
2.76x0.02   5.X2
2.46112.71   5.50
4 6213.61   7.81
6 6     1.7     2.8
5 20 10 90   7.51
3 8 Us-4     6-4
31.46 96.28 56.32
36.9 {60.00 28.6
1.62
0.40 ° 5x x-°5
1.92 3.1s
x-3
6.56-0.68 0.65 0.62 1 45
 I 0-4  9-7
o 51 °-37 °-9° '■<"
8.3 "-5 I12 2 25 9
0.44 o 28 0.59 o 07
8.60I25.0 7.2 36 8
6.87 5 52 11.30 17 04
-.8.8 597 '40.00 161.2
8.24
4-5
8.67
7.6
61.96
489
I
COMPARATIVE TABLE OF THE AVER.VGE RAINFALL
In inches at ten principal stations in British Columbia in the months April to
September, derived from a group of years.
W       Q       O
Upper Mainland A.
Lower Mainland B
North-West Coast ...... C.
Vancouver Island D.
Gulf Islands E.
April :.--..
May	
June   ....
July	
August ..
September
M
—
'
H
T3
.M
jj
flj
u
*3
(fl
O
g
u
JZ
'3
4)
c
w
fa
2   98
1.68
sis
I.94
1.64
2.60
I. 19
0.88
i-37
O.36
0.27
0.80
O.52
0.17
0.44
2.5O
x.23
2.76
5-68 5
4-57 4
4-56 3
5.20 1
7-79 >
5-45
38 4-85
96 3-97
29
33   '-°2
0.74
0.36
o 48
0.94
1.64
1.32
o 51
1.02I 2.76
1-°5 3-°2
x-95   3-lS
mm  APPENDICES.
Postal Statistics.
65
Statement showing the accounting offices in operation, the gross postal
revenue ; the number and amount of money orders issued and paid; the amount
of commission thereon, during the year ending 30th June, 1898 :
Name of Office.
Gross
Postal
Revenue.
$52,620 31
49.754 73
14,588 51
13-130 54
10,436 35
6,231 90
5»5X9 6l
95,000 22
Number of
Money
Orders
Issued.
Total Amount
of Money
Orders Issued.
Total _
Commis'n
Received j
from
Public.
Total
Amount of
Money
Orders
Paid.
Vancouver            	
$ 13.421
11,809
5>372
4,788
4.947
4,964
1-779
43.594
$162,018 50
182,906 51
$I>7°5 3°
1,763 40
$ 174,202 55
"67,097 54
80,646 90    j         683 46
63,113 06             560 02
65,380 28             595 96
26,780 74             224 49
743,978 99           5-644 76
26,643 62
56,625 60
37.846 58
9.597 47
I99.S77 26
New Westminster
Total, 1898	
$247,282 17
$ 90,674
$1,396,604 69       $11,839 13
$705,468 40
I     1897	
$204,218 61
$ 77.991
$1,142,973 60       $10,361 98     $606,239 95
Table showing the number of post offices in operation, estimated
letters and other articles of mail matter posted in  British Columbia
years endiDg 30th June, 1896, 1897 and 1898:
1896.     1897.
Number of offices in operation on 1st July.. . 274 293
Estimated number of letters and other articles
of mail matter posted in British Columbia
during the years ending 30th June, 1896,
1897 and 1898 :
Letters    4,175,000     4,850,000
Post Cards      398,000        505,000
Registered Letters        118,000        142,000
Free Letters         129,800        148,5°°
Number of transient Newspapers and Periodicals, Packets, Circulars, Samples, Patterns,
etc ,      461 ,ooo        400,000
Number of Packages of Printers' Copy, Photographs, Deeds, Insurance Policies, etc...       88,000        100,000
Number of Packets of Fifth Class Matter, Ordinary Merchandise, open to examination      43>S°° 46,500
Number of Parcels by Parcel Post  30,000 16,000
Number  of Closed   Parcels for  the  United
Kingdom and other countries  2,100 1,850
number of
during the
1898.
3"
6,700,000
525,000
165,000
156,000
625,000
145,000
48,000
15,100
2,900
■ ^H^^ffTOP^l
IWfflB^IHI
mm  SMELTING IN   BRITISH   COLUMBIA.
1 and 3.    Trail Smelter, Capacity 1000 Tons per Day.
2.   Texada Island Smelter—First Erected on the Coast,  APPENDICES. 67
Education.
The Province of British Columbia possesses a free, non-sectarian system of
public schools, which is admirably suited to meet the needs of a sparsely settled
- country. Any settlement containing not less than twenty children of school age
(between 6 and 16 years of age) may be created a school district by the Council of
Public Instruction. A commodious building for school purposes, together with
the salary of a teacher, is provided from the Provincial treasury. In smaller
settlements, where an enrollment of ten pupils of school age is assured, a teacher
is supplied by the Government on condition that the parents of the locality provide a suitable school-room.
The total number of pupils under instruction in British Columbia during 1898
was 17,648, and the number of schools in operation, 261. The total expenditure
for education was $247,756, distributed as follows :
Amount paid for teachers'salaries $168,599 15
" "       incidental expenses      11,838 43
" "        per capita grants to cities      52,92264
Education office      14.396 15
. There was, moreover, expended by the Lands snd Works Department for the
construction of school houses, furniture and repairs, $42,498.89, making the total
cost to the Provincial Government during the fiscal year 1897-98, for all purposes
of education, $290,255.26.
The amount expended from the Provincial treasury for education in British
Columbia is larger in proportion to population than that expended in any other
Province of the Dominion. The average cost per pupil enrolled lor 1898 was
$14.03, or $22.40, if based on the actual daily attendance.
rm.
1
OUTER WHARF,   VICTORIA,   B.   C.
BHMfflMiMsgegaMWHMBBM'' 68 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
EDUCATIONAL STATISTICS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1877-98.
Common Schools.

of
.2S«
Schools


Number
of
Pupils.
53
52
49
46
49
64
7i
79
83
93
100
105
124
140
157
172
190
213
228
56
56
S3
x;6
60
60
5°
64
7i
79
83
93
105
109
130
r5°
164
183
199
223
241
2,
938
137
225
380
495
579
632
59i
777
188
413
542
871
928
135
137
S23
193
081
743
332
177
Boys.
Girls.
Average
Attend-1
1,072
I.I9S
1,209
1,292
1,404
i,452
1.483
892
983
1,183
1,289
I>373
1,518
i.5°3
1,650
2,116
2,346
2,692
2,655
3,061
3,322
3,732
866
942
1,016
1,088
1,091
1,127
1,149
699
774
1,005
1,124
1,169
J>353
1,425
1,485
2,021
2,177
2,541
2,426
2,682
3,010
3,445
1,210
i,345
1,272
i,239
1,367
i,358
i,345
75°
919
1,198
1,322
i,3°9
1,392
1,529
1,614
2,209
2,446
2,890
2,883
3,°87
3,808
4,°7S
Graded Schools.
7
22
7
24
9
26
10
33
J3
37
H
42!
13
5°
19
7°
21
89
22
107
24
119
26
124
26
139
27
149
29
169
i,745
1,013
732
1,001
2,136
1,137
999
1,156
2,285
1,333
952
1,226
2,766
1,486
1,280
1,494
3,637
i,954
1,683
1,678
3,738
1,927
1,811
2,117
4,890
2,515
2,375
2,654
S,869
2,962
2,907
3,360
6,324
3,i96
3,128
3,8i3
6,640
3,279
3,36i
4.452
6,986
3-494
3,492
4.603
7.886
3,955
3,93'
5.39*
8,257
4,164
4,093
5,879
9,005
4.572
4,433
5,912
10,012
5>°73
4,939
6,704
schools are included in common schools from 1877 to 1883, appendices.
High Schools.
69
1877-
1878.
1879.
1880.
1881.
1882.
1883.
1884.
1885.
1886.
1887.
1888.
1889.
1890.
1891.
1892.
1893-
1894.
1895.
1896.
i897-
1898.
Year.
No.
of
Schools
Teach's
and
Asstn's.
3
4
4
4
4
6
6
9
10
12
12
12
12
12
Number
of
Pupils.
60
6l
76
82
76
74
61
84
r34
157
166
193
187
244
256
312
333
434
515
460
461
459
Boys.
Girls.
47
	
14
54
22
51
31
37
39
39
35
34
27
45
39
58
76
73
84
68
98
78
"5
87
IOO
in
J33
"3
143
125
187
139
194
198
236
238
277
212
248
211
250
178
281
Average
Attend--
49
50
44
54
53
45
38
57
78
102
i°5
106
112
150
154
205
213
293
33r
288
280
276
Expenditure.
Year.
Teachers' Incidental   Edxication
Salaries.   Expenses.    *Offii
I    Total
Education
Proper.
On School
Houses.
Furniture,
Repairs,
1877	
1878	
1879....
1880....
l88l	
1882	
1883....
1884	
1885....
1886	
1887....
1888	
1889	
1890  II I
1891    I
1892   I
1893   I
1894.....  I
1895   I
1896  I
1897  2
1898  I
$
36,315
39,732
36,892
40,215
41,169
49,642
44,457
50.763
62,204
70,337
78,572
88,287
95.in
°7,574
19,927 j
48,377
74,847 I
50,826
69,448
85,998
00,637
68,599
2,864
3-39°
1,783
2,910
3,448
3,43i
3,°S8
4,610
6,085
5,833
6,489
7,091
8,039
9,463
io,943
5,206
6,374
7,061
7,701
8,672
10,157
11,838
4,008
4,269
2,062
2,834
2,641
2,905
3,477
2,989
2,863
3,358
3,46o
4,524
5,°40
5,948
6,032
7,o45
9,337
11,163
i 1,888
10,260
10,016
14,396
43,187
47,39i
40,737
45,959
47,258
49.642
5o,992
58,362
71,152
79,528
88,521
99,902
108,191
122,985
136,902
160,628
190,558
169,050
189,037
204,930
220,810
247,756
2,163
1,020
2,575
1,047
2,589
8,873
9,411
10,592
6,913
16,613
14,286
10,842
26,178
31 555
23,555
43,497
20,960
22,853
15,146
26,425
10,923
34,438
2,475
3,419
2,935
2,795
3,52i
10,854
3,695
3,538
4,009
3,8i7
2,980
4,948
8,061
Total Expenditure
by Gov't.
45-35°
48,411
43,312
47,006
49,847
58,515
60,403
68,954
78,065
98,616
106,226
"3,679
137,164
158,061
I7I,3H
207,820
215,056
195,912
208,000
234,335
236,681
290,255
♦Including school requisites, globes, maps, expenses of teachers' examinations,
&c.
' ^5*7T^^Bfl*™~
lumunum 70 BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
Province of Brit. Columbia—Statement of Debts and Assets.
Year Ended 30th June.
1882.
1883.
1884.
1885.
1886.
1887.
1888.
1889.
1890.
1891.
1892.
I893-
1894.
1895-
1896.
1897.
1 Debt.
Dominion Gov'tl
Debt Allowance
Other Assets.
$
$
$
800,566
499,913
116,653
961,778
499,913
133,263
770,812
499,913
272,895
800,258
583,021
267,000
976,911
583,021
206,808
1,157,001
583.021
214,144
1,780,125
583,021
699,972
1,772,871
583,021
583,230
1,797,820
583,021
542,293
1,843,154
583,021
558,715
2,876,036
583,021
1,259,403
3,187,456
583,021
909,713
3,904,807
583,021
923,018
6,499,688
583,021
2,492,990
6,469,768
583,021
1,798,456
6,586,004
583,021
1,718,968
7,425,262
583,021
1,996,827
Total Assets.
$
616,566
633.176
772,808
850,021
789,829 ■
797,165
1,282,993
1,166,251
1,125,314
1,141,736-
1,842,424
1,492,734
1,506,039-
3,075,°! 1
2,38i,477
2,301,989-
2,579,848'
* Not including public buildings.    Value of public buildings and grounds in,
British Columbia, $1,875,000.
y^Ms.
JIW
OAK  BAY  BEACH,  VICTORIA,   B.   C. APPENDICES.
71
SCALE  OF  COMMERCIAL  CHARGES.
12
13
14
15
16.
17
18
19-
20.
•21.
22.
24.
Whenever no special agreement exists, the following shall be collectable :
On the purchase of stocks, bonds, and all kinds of securities,
including the drawing of bills for the payment of the same. 2>£ per cent.
On sale of stocks, bonds, and all kinds of securities, including
remittances in bills and guarantee 25^
On purchase and sale of specie, gold dust and bullion 1
On sale of bills of exchange with endorsement    .... 2^
On sale of bills of exchange without endorsement 1
For endorsing bills of exchange when desired 2.%
On sale of produce, etc., from foreign ports, with guarantee . 1%
On goods received on consignment and afterwards withdrawn. 2^
On goods received on consignment and afterwards returned by
the consignee No charge.
On purchase and shipment  of merchandise, with funds on
band, on cost and charges   5     per cent.
On purchase and shipment of merchandise, without funds, on
cost and charges 7JS^
For collecting and remitting delayed or litigated accounts.... 10
For collecting freight by vessels fiom foreign Ports, on amount
collected 5
For collecting general claims 5
For collecting general average on the first $20,000,  or any
smaller amount  5
For collecting general average, on any excess over $20,000. .. 2^
On purchase and sale of vessels 5
For " Port Agency " to vessels with cargo or passengers from
foreign Ports, as under :
On vessels under 200 tons register $ 50 00
"        of 200 to 300 tons register    IOO 00
of 300 to 500
150 00
''        over 500 tons    200 00
For disbursements of vessels by consignees with funds on hand 1%,
For disbursements of vessels by consignees without funds on
hand 5
For procuring freight or passengers 5
For chartering vessels on amount of freight, actual or estimated, to be considered as due when the "charter, parties," or
memorandum of their conditions, etc., are signed 5
On  giving bonds for vessels under attachment  in  litigated
cases, on amount of the liability lyz
For landing and re-shipping goods from vessels in distress on
invoice value, or in its absence, on market value 5
-.   2J<
25.    For receiving and forwarding goods on invoice amount 26.
27-
28.
2g.
32.
33-
34-
35-
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
For advancing on freight to be earned 5
For effecting marine insurance, on the amount insured     yi
The foregoing commissions to be exclusive of brokerage, and
every charge actually incurred.
Vessels to pay clerk hire and the labour on wharf, sorting and
delivering cargo.
The receipt of bills of lading to be considered  equivalent to
receipt of goods.
Guarantee or security for contracts or liabilities 5
Acting as Trustee on assignments 5
On investments made on mortgage or otherwise I
N. B.—Auctioneer's commission and brokerage to  be charged
when incurred.
Land agents for commission   on  sale  and  purchase  of real
estate 5
Interest on advances for duty, freight and lighterage, and on
accounts current, per annum, I per cent, over current bank
overdraft rates.
per cent.
RATES ON STORAGE OF MERCHANDISE.
STORAGE PER  MONTH.
On measurement goods, 50 cents per ton of forty cubic feet (40 c. ft.) On
heavy goods, 50 cents per ton of 2,240 pounds. Or in either case, the amount
actually paid, if more. The consignee to have the option of charging by measurement or weight.    Any fraction of a month to be charged as a month.
REGULATIONS.
(a.) Concerning the delivery of merchandise, payment of freight, etc.: When
no express stipulation exists per bill of lading, goods are to be considered as
deliverable on shore.
(b.) Freight on all goods to be paid, or secured to the satisfaction of the
captain or consignee of the vessel, prior to the delivery of the goods.
(c.) After delivery to the purchaser of the goods sold, no claims for damage,
deficiency or other cause shall be admissable after goods sold and delivered have
once left the city, -
(d.) When foreign bills of lading expressly stipulate that the freights shall be
paid in a specific coin, then the same must be procured if required, or its equivalent given, the rate to be determined by the current value at the time at the
banks.
The foregoing scale of Commercial Charges and Rules and Regulatious were
approved at the Quarterly General xVTeeting of the British Columbia Board of
Trade, held October 21st, 1898. APPENDICES. 73
Pilotage and  Port Charges.
NANAIMO PILOT GROUND.
The limits for speaking vessels bound for Nanaimo are at or outside a line
drawn from Schooner Point, Gabriola Island, to Lighthouse Island, and from
Lighthouse Island to Horsewell Bluff, Vancouver Isbnd.
Vessels entering by way of Dodd's Narrows (it not being a ship channel) will
be charged half pilotage, whether spoken or not, if the pilot boat be on the cruising ground.
DUES.
The rates of pilotage both inward and outward are as follows :
(a.) For all vessels, irrespective of draught, $3 per foot.
(b.) For all vessels in tow of a steamer, $2 per foot.
(c.) For all steam vessels, other than foreign tugs or tug boats or steamers
employed as such, whose master or mate has not a pilot's license, one-
third (}4) less than the above rates if a pilot be employed.
PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF YALE AND  NEW WESTMINSTER.
The Ports of the  Pilotage District of Yale and New Westminster are as
follows :
Port of Vancouver;
Port of New Westminster;
Port of Yale and the several landings on the Fraser River.
(1.) The limit of the Port of Vancouver is inside a line drawn from  Point
Atkinson to the red buoy on Spanish Bank.
(2.) The limit of the Port of New Westminster is inside a line drawn between
the outer buoys and north and south sandheads, at the entrance of Fraser River.
DUES.
For vessels entering or clearing from the Port of Vancouver the rates of pilotage are as follows:
Vessels under sail $4 °o per foot.
"     in tow of a steamer    2 00
"     under steam    '  5° 74 BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
PORT CHARGES. /
PORTS  OF   ESQUIMALT  AND   VICTORIA,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA.
Vessels bound to other ports, and coming to an anchor in Royal Roads, the
pilotage is free, except the services of a pilot are employed, when pilotage according to the following graduated scale shall be payable :
Inside or north of Race Rocks to Royal Bay $o 75 per foot.
Beachy Head to Royal Bay    15°     "
Pillar Point to Royal Bay   3 00     "
Cape Flattery to Royal Bay ,   6 00     "
For vessels entering into or clearing from the undermentioned ports, the rates
are as follows :
Victoria and Esquimalt Harbours (under sail) $3 00 per foot.
"                   "               "      (under steam or in tow) 2 00     "
" " "       (steamers)    I 50     "
When a vessel is bound to or from any other port in the Province, either
laden or in ballast, and does not discharge or receive any cargo, passengers or
mails, but simply enters it as a harbour of refuge, such vessels shall be exempt
from pilotage into and out of Esquimalt, excepting in cases where a pilot is
actually engaged by the master for such services.
ESQUIMALT GRAVING DOCK.
1. Length of dock to gate, 450 feet, level with the keel blocks.
2. Width of gates, 65 feet.
3. Depth of water varying from 27 feet to 29 feet 6 inches at springs, according to season of year.
The use of the dock will be subject to the following tariff, viz.:
Gross Tonnage of Vessel.
For all vessels up to 1,000 tons..
From 1,000 to 2,000 tons	
"    2,000 to 2,500    "  	
For all vessels above 2,500 tons..
Entrance
Fee.
$ 75 OO
IOO  OO
125 00
200 00
For the first
For each following day
day of
including the
docking1.
undocking- day.
$150 CO
$50
200 000
5°
250 00
5°
400 OO
50 and 2 cents per
ton  additional on
all  tonnage above
2,500.
J ^^^^^^^^W^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^t^^^BiiSS^S^^
APPENDICES.
75
All fractional parts of 50 tons to be counted and paid for as 50 tons.   Cargoes
to be eharged at the same rates as tonnage, and no charge made for ballast.
Each day to be counted from 7 a. m. to 7 a. m. and each fractional part of a
•day will be charged as one day.
No reduction will be allowed for Sundays and holidays.
ESQUIMALT MARINE RAILWAY.
Cradle, length      300 feet.
Beam        60    "
Capacity   3,°°5 tons, d. w.
For scale of charges, apply to the Manager, W. F. Bullen, Victoria, B. C.
ESQUIMALT MARINE  RAILWAY,  VICTORIA, B. C. BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF  TRADE.
Mining  Regulations.
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The mining laws of British Columbia provide, with respect to coal mining,
that a prospector for coal or petroleum on leased Crown lands in which the min-.^
erals are reserved, before obtaining a license, shall place a post at one angle of.,
the land with his name and the initials of the angle, and shall post a notice of his
application on the land and on the government office of the district for thirty I
days, and shall advertise it in the British Columbia Gazette and some local news-g
paper for thirty days.
Security for damages must be given if the Crown lands in question have been
leased or are covered by a timber license.
After the expiration of thirty days, and within two months from the application in the Gazette, an application in duplicate (with a plan and a fee of $50 for
each and every license) must be sent to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a prospecting license for not more than one year, when the Chief Com- I
missioner may grant the license. Such lands must be in one rectangular block
with sides running north, south, east and west, and of area not exceeding 640
acres.
The license shall cease at its expiration, and a new license may be granted to
a new applicant.
On proving that he has bonajide explored for coal during the year he shall be
entitled to an extension for a second year on payment of $50, and a further exten- I
sion for third year  may be granted.    License holders of adjoining lands, not
exceeding ten, may work in partnership, when they need not prospect separately,
provided the Chief Commissioner is satisfied with the prospecting done on the land -
of one of them.
The licensee may use the timber and stone on. the land for the purpose of
buildings on the land. Dispute as to the right of title shall be decided in the
county court. No transfer for a prospecting license may be made without written
notice to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works.
The Lieutenant-Governor in Council may grant to a prospecting licensee a
lease for five years at a rent of ten cents on proof that he has discovered coal on
the land; and if during this term, or three months hereafter, he can show that he
has continuously and vigorously carried on coal-mining he shall be entitled to pur-1
chase the land at $5 an acre, in one payment at time of sale.
Before the lease Is issued, a survey must have been made by the applicant.
Besides the ten cents rent a royalty of five cents a ton on coal and one cent a barrel
on petroleum must be paid. The lessee must carry on coal mining contiuously.
Any number of persons, not exceeding ten, may work in partnership on adjoining
lands, when it shall not be necessary to work each leasehold separately, provided
work on one is done to the satisfaction of the Chief Commissioner. ^^SaSfc^SkalSiagfi&ajjtla&SSssiS
ierSKiaajaS
APPENDICES.
77
(Cons. Act, l888, chap. 83, and amending acts; 1890, chap. 32; 1892, chap.
31; 1895, chap. 37, and acts of 1897, 1898 and 1899.
Proprietors of coal mines may acquire such portion of any Crown lands, or
lands held under pre-emption or Crown grants, or lease or lictxise, as may be
necessary for a right of way to the sea shore, a river or public highway, together
with a block not exeeding five acres on the shore, river or highway. Minerals
are not to be conferred by the conveyance without the consent of the grantor.
Compensation shall be paid by agreement or arbitration. (Cons. Acts, 1888, chap.
83J amendment Act, 1890, chap. 32, and chap. 137, Acts of 1897.)
Regulations of coal mines.—No boy under twelve, no woman or girl of any
age, and no Chinamen or Japanese shall be employed under ground in coal mines.
Boys from thirteen to fourteen shall only be employed underground in exceptional circumstances to be allowed by the Minister of Mines.
There are various other regulations as to the employment of young persons.
No wages shall be paid to employees of a coal mine in a public house or contiguous office or place.
Coal getters must be paid by weight, unless exception is allowed by the
Minister of Mines ; and a check weigher may be appointed by them.
There are a number of regulations to secure safety. (Cons. Acts, 1888, chap.
84; amending acts, 1890, chap. 33 ; 1894, chap. 5 ; 1895, chap. 38; and in
1897, chap. 138.)
Mining, other than coal.—Persons over 18 years of age and joint stock companies may become " Free Miners " on taking out certificates (which are not
transferable) for one year in case of joint stock companies, and for one or more
years in case of individual miners.
Every person or joint stock company mining (except for coal) must take out
a free miner's certificate under a penalty of $25. Owners and contractors shall
pay the free miner's fees of their employees, deducting amount from them and
giving a list to the Mining Recorder, under penalty of $too.
No person unless he has an unexpired free miner's certificate can hold any
mineral claim, minerals or mining property.
Free miners may prospect and mine (except for coal) upon any Crown lands
or lands where minerals are reserved to the Crown provided they may not locate
or mine on land uncovered by hydraulic mining works for six months, and pro-
- vided they must give security for damages to any occupier.
FEES.
For every free miner's certificate issued to an individual... $    5 00
For every free miner's certificate issued to a joint stock
company—
(a.) Having a nominal capital of $ioo,oco or less      5° °°
-(b.) Having a nominal capital exceeding $ioo,coo    100 00 78
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BOARD   OF   TRADE.
Free miners may cut timber necessary for their mining upon Crown lands,
even if covered by timber lease or reserved, and they may kill game for their own
use at any time.
A free miner may locate a mineral claim measuring 1,500 feet square as nearly
rectangular as possible, marking it by two posts, 1 and 2, on the line of the vein
not more than 1,500 feet apart, or a fractional mineral claim can also be marked
out. On No. 1 post of a mineral claim shall be written the names of the locator
and the claim, the date, the compass bearing of No. 2 post and the number of^
feet (of the 1,500) lying to the right and left respectively of this line; these particulars are to be furnished also to the Mining Recorder. He must mark the line
by blazing trees or post-planting, and place a post where he found rock "in place,"
and as near as possible to four corners of the claim. He is entitled to all the minerals within the claim. The claim is not to be recorded without an affidavit that
mineral has been found "in place " on the claim, that the legal notes and posts
have been put up, that ground is unoccupied, etc. A location made on Sunday or
a holiday is not invalid. Where from the nature of the ground, the location cannot be thus marked, posts may be set as near as possible, and the direction and
distance recorded,. The free miner shall record his claim with the Mining Recorder within 15 days, if his office is within 10 miles, with an additional day for
every additional 10 miles. A claim recorded by error in the wrong district may
be recorded anew in the right district with the original date. If left in the Recorder's absence the applicant is entitled to a record of that date. The claim may.
be held from year to year on a certificate by the Gold Commissioner, or Mining
Recorder that work has been done on it to the value of $100. Assessment work to
be counted in certificate. A free miner or partners having adjoining claims may
work them together, and may obtain certificates for all the claims for sufficient
work done on one. A free miner may, in lieu of work pay $100 to the Mining
Recorder.    Disputes as to titles are determined by priority.
No free miner can hold (except by purchase) more than one claim on the
same vein or lode, but he may hold by location a claim on any separate vein or
lode. He may abandon his claim by notice in writing to the Recorder and may
remove his machinery and extracted ore; he cannot re-locate the same claim (or
one which he has not recorded in time) without written permission from the Gold
Commissioner.
Lodes discovered in a tunnel to develop a lode may be marked out as a mineral claim and recorded by the owner. The interest of a free miner in his claim
is deemed a chattel interest.
The lawful owner of a mineral claim is entitled to a Crown grant on payment
of $500 to the Government in lieu of expenditure (assessment work to be considered a part of $500) and after having obtained a certificate of improvements from
the Gold Commissioner. With a certificate of improvement the owner need not
take out a free miner's certificate, or work on the claim to hold it. *3afegrt«iB^JMtJHBaf»BflMflttlB^
APPENDICES.
79
With a certificate of improvement the owner of a claim outside the railway
belt is entitled to a Crown grant, and inside the railway belt on payment of $5 an
acre to the Mining Recorder.
The claim for the grant must be made within three months. The issue of
the grant does not invalidate any previous lien. The grant covers all minerals
except coal.
Conveyances, mortgages, etc., of mineral claims shall be recorded or shall
not be good against third parties, and transfers must be in writing. A free miner's
claim shall not be open for location during his last illness, nor for twelve months
after his death. The Gold Commissioner and official administrator administer
miners' estates.
A mill site may be located by a free miner, not over five acres in extent, on
unoccupied and unreserved-Crown lands not known to contain minerals. He may
obtain a lease for one year, during its continuance, on proof of having expended
$500 on machinery, and shall be entitled to a Crown grant for $5 an acre. This
applies to former leases also.    Minerals are not included in the grant.
Tunnels or drains may be run for a free miner to work his claim by license
from the Gold Commissioner. Water rights may be granted to him by the Gold
Commissioner, and must be recorded, rights of miners working on the streams
being safe. He may not sell the water, and the grant shall cease when the mine
is no longer worked. Work must be begun within 60 days; and there must be no
waste of water, and an outlet must be provided for superfluous water.
Mining partnerships and limited liability companies are regulated by a number of clauses.
The duties of Mining Recorders and Gold Commissioners are fully laid down.
Free miners may elect by a two-thirds vote a Recorder, where there is none.
County Courts have mining jurisdiction which is fully provided for.
Any person contravening the Act or refusing to obey the lawful order of a
Gold Commissioner or Judge is liable to a fine of $250 or three months'
imprisonment.
An annual lax of 25 cents an acre is payable on every claim held under Crown
grant. The tax shall be remitted on proof that the sum of $200 has been
expended on the claim within the year.
Mines and moneys invested in them are not exempt from provincial taxation.
The Lieutenant-Governor in Council may make orders to carry out the Act.
(Cons. Act, 1888, Chap. 82, and amending Acts, 1889, Chap. 16 (repealed,;
1890, Chap. 31 (repealed); 1891, Chap. 25; 1892, Chap. 32; 1893, Chap. 29;
1894, Chap. 32, and 1895, Chap. 39; 1896, Chap. 34; 1897, Chap. 45; and Acts
of 1898.)
gBBBBi^wewWiBBBjWjWg
wm BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
Placer Mining Act.—Every free miner holding a certificate may mine for
gold or other precious metals on any land except Government reserves for town'
sites, lands occupied by buildings, curtilages and orchards, or for placer mining
or Indian reserves.    He must give security for damages.
He may locate a placer claim on each separate creek, ravine or hill, but not
more than two in the same locality, and only one a creek claim, but he may hold
any number for purchase. A creek claim shall be 100 feet long, and in width from
base to base of the hills; a bar diggings claim shall be a strip ioo feet long, and
in width, from high water mark to the lowest water level; a dry diggings claim
shall be ioo feet square, and the same for bench diggings and hill diggings. Discoverers of new mines shall be allowed : If one, a claim 300 feet long; if a party
of two, 600 feet; if three, 800 feet; if four, 1000 feet; if more than four, ordinary '
claims.
Placer claims shall be as nearly rectangular as possible. Posts shall be placed
at the corners, and the initial post shall bear names and description. Locations
on Sundays and holidays shall not be invalid. Placer claims must be recorded
with the Mining Recorder. The removal of posts entails forfeiture. Records of
placer claims may be renewed on payment of the fees, $2.50 a year.
A placer claim gives no right to a vein or lode unless the ground is located
and recorded as a mineral claim.
A placer claim must be worked continuously by the holder or his employee,
and shall be held abandoned and forfeited if unworked for 72 hours, except for
reasonable cause, satisfying the Gold Commissioner. A years'leave of absence
may be given if the sum of $1,000 has been expended without reasonable return, or
if all holders of the set of claims sign the application.
Provisions as to the tunnels and drains, water rights (see 1879, Cap. 45)
partnerships, mining recorders, gold commissioners, county courts, penalties, paying free miner's fees for employees, are much the same as those regarding mineral
claims.
Provisions are made for "bed-rock flumes."
Free miners may obtain a lease of placer mining ground for 20 years as follows :—Before application for lease, legal posts to be placed, with names and descriptions, and plans, etc., to be deposited with Mining Recorder; creek diggings,
or abandoned or unworked creeks, half a mile in length; any other placer mining
grounds, 80 acres; precious stone diggings, 10 acres. The lease may be renewed.
The ground must be already occupied (without consent of occupiers) nor immediately available for agricultural purposes; and only placer-mining must be carried'
on. Consolidation of holdings infto one not to exceed 640 acres is provided for by
Act of 1898, amending the Placer-mining Act, 1891.
Water may be granted by the Gold Commissioner for hydraulic workings on
bench lands. APPENDICES.
8r
Leases may be granted for twenty years of the bed of the river for dredging
for a distance not over five miles.
(Act, 1891, Chap. 26, and amending Acts, 1894, Chap. 33, and 1895, Chap.
40; 1896, Chap. 35; 1897, Chap. 29; 1897, Chap. 45.)
A Bill intituled "An Act to repeal an Act to aid the Development of Quartz
Mines," and amending Act has been passed (1896, Chap. 36.) An Act to amend
the Placer-Mines Act (1891) was passed in the session of 1898.
Counting the consolidated Acts of 1888 and subsequent amending Acts to
1898, there have been twenty-four British Columbia Acts relating totmining, without reckoning several special Acts concerning hydraulic mining companies.
The Mineral Act, 1896, Chap. 34, as amended by 1^897, Chap. 29, has been
consolidated for convenience only.
The Placer-mining Acts have been also consolidated.
A Bureau of Mines was established in 1895, under the Minister of Mines,
with a Provincial Mineralogist, whoscduty it is to collect information relating to
the mining industry and publish it. Besides a museum there are to be lecture
rooms, an assay office and laboratory, where assays and tests may be made according to a schedule of fees. Arrangements may be made for giving instructions to
prospectors and others, and societies of arts and other sp_cieties may affiliate with
the Mining Bureau for the instruction and examination of students.
An Act intituled the " Inspection of Metaliferous Mines Act, 1897," amended
in 1899, provides for the appointment of an Inspector, and contains rules and
regulations for the safe working of mines other than coal.
DOMINION.
The Dominion government have provided regulations for the disposal of coal
lands the property of the Dominion in Manitoba and the North-west Territories.
These regulations provide that locations of an area not exceeding 320 acres, may
be reserved for an applicant for a period of sixty days to prospect for coal, on payment of a fee of $10 and an expenditure in prospecting of $2 a day. A location
may be sold at the rate of $10 per acre (cash) unless the coal is anthracite, in
which case the price is $20 per acre.
Settlers at a distance from coal mines worked by purchasers may secure permits authorizing them to mine for domestic purposes, on payment of a royalty of
20 cents for anthracite, and 15 cents for bituminous, and 10 cents for lignite coal.
The regulations provide that the location shall be marked on the ground, that the
frontage shall not exceed three chains, and the length ten chains; that the applicant shall within thirty days after marking his location, file application with the
lUiililiilMUmjMUH
^^BS 82
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BOARD   OF  TRADE.
agent, who is to issue a permit at the rate of $5 an acre or fraction of an acre per
annum.
In the Yukon Territory all applications for coal lands are to be made to the
Crown Timber and Land Agent, who is empowered to sell such lands at $40 an
acre (cash) if the coal is anthracite, and $20 for any other coal.
GOLD  QUARTZ  CLAIMS.
Persons of 18 years and over, and joint stock companies holding a free
miner's certificate, may obtain entry for a mining location.
A free mfner's certificate (non-transferable) is granted for one year. The fee
for an individual is $10, and to a joint stock company $50 to $100, according to-
capital.
The holder of a free miner's certificate who has discovered mineral in place,
may locate a claim 1,500 feet by 1,500 feet, by marking it with two legal posts,
one at each end, on the line of the lode or vein, and marking out the line between.
Upon each post shall be marked the name of the claim, the person locating and
date, and the number of feel lying to the right and left of line.
The claim shall be recorded with the Mining Recorder of the district within
15 days, if located within io miles of the office; one additional day allowed for-
every additional 10 miles or fraction. If a claim is more than 100 miles from a
recorder's office and situated where other claims are being located, five free
miner's may appoint a Free Miner's Recorder; but if the latter fails within three
months to notify the nearest Government Mining Recorder of his appointment, the
claims will not hold good.    Fee for recording a claim is $5.
At least $100 per year must be expended on the claim, or paid to the Mining
Recorder in lieu. When $500 has been expended or paid, the locator may upon
having a survey made and upon complying with certain other requirements, purchase the land at $5 per acre, cash, but if the surface rights have already been
disposed of, at $2 an acre.
A location for mining iron and mica not exceeding 160 acres may be granted,-
but if therein other valuable mineral is discovered the miner's right is limited to
the area  prescribed  for  other  minerals, the remainder reverting to the Crown.
The Minister of the Interior may also grant 160 acres for copper mining in the
Yukon Territory.
The patent for a mining location reserves forever whatever royalty may hereafter be imposed on the sales, such royalty to be collected on sales made prior to
issue of patent.
PLACER MINING—YUKON TERRITORY.
Claims are creek, gulch, river and hill claims. Two hundred and fifty feet
in length in the general direction of the creek or river, and from 100 lo 2,000 feet
wide according to ground. 
PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND A RESIDENCE   VICTORIA,. B. C.  APPENDICES.
83
Claims are marked by two legal posts, one at each end. Entry must be
obtained within ten days if within ten miles of Mining Recorder's office. One
extra day allowed for every additional ten or fraction. If the claims exceeds
100 miles from a Recorder's office, the same rule applies as in the quartz mining.
The person or company must hold a Free Miner's certificate.
Every alternate ten claims is reserved to the Crown.
The discoverer of a claim is entitled to 500 feet in length. If the party
consists of two, 1,000 feet, the rest ordinary claims only.
Entry fee $15. A royalty of 10 per cent, on the gross output of the gold
mined. The sum of $5,000 will be deducted from the gross annual output of the
claim. The holder of a creek, gulch or river claim may within 60 days after staking, obtain entry for a hill claim, adjoining it for the sum of $100. This permission is also given to the holder of a creek, gulch or river claim who prior to January, 1898, obtained an entry therefor, provided the hill claim is available when an
application is made. No miner shall receive a grant of more than one mining
claim in a mining district, the boundaries of which shall be defined by the Mining
Recorder; but the same miner may also hold a hill claim and any number of
claims by purchase, and miners may unite to work their claims in common.
A claim shall be deemed to be abandoned when the same shall have remained
unworked for three consecutive working days of 24 hours each, unless sickness or
other reasonable cause be shown to the satisfaction of the Mining Recorder.
It shall not only be necessary for a person or company working a quartz or
placer claim to hold a Free Miner's certificate, but every person in his, or its
employment shall have a Free Miner's certificate unexpired.
The regulations in force for dredging in Manitoba and the North-west Territories provide that a free miner can obtain two leases of five miles each for a term
of 20 years renewable. The lessees right is confined to the submerged beds or
bars of the river below water mark. The rental is $10 per annum for each mile
leased: The royalty to be paid is 2% per cent, on the output after it exceeds
$10,000.
In the Yukon Territory a free miner can obtain a lease of five miles of a river,
but not more than six such leases can be given to one person or company. The
rental is $100 per annum for each mile of river leased. The royalty to be paid is
10 per cent, on the output in excess of $15,000 for each five miles of river leased.
Other regulations are similar to those of the other Territories and Manitoba. 84 BRITISH   COLUMBIA
Klondike,  North-
Via YBon River.
Miles.
Victoria to Dawson City (Klondike) via St. Michael about .   4,425
Via Dyea.
Victoria to Dyea  1,000
Dyea to Tagish Lake  72.25
To Head of Marsh Lake        4 90
Foot of Marsh Lake  19.06
Head of Miles Canon  25-73
Foot of Miles Canon 62
Head of White Horse Rapids    1.39
Foot of White Horse Rapids      .38
Taheena River  14-59
Head of Lake La Barge.... 13.15
Foot of Lake La Barge  3 r. 15
Teslintbo River  3L66
Big Salmon River  31-45
Little Salmon River  36.21
Five Finger Rapids  59- 29
Pelly River  58.46
White River  95 82
Stewart River      9 80
Sixty Mile Creek  21.50
Dawson City    .. 45.29
Total 1,575-70
BOARD   OF  TRADE.
West Territories.
Dalton Trail.
Miles.
Victoria to head of Chilcat Inlet 1,000
Head  of Chilcat Inlet to Fort
Selkirk  300
Fort Selkirk to Dawson City... 140
Total      1,44°
Via Skagway.
Victoria to Skagway       995
Skagway to Tagish Lake  .... 7°
Tagish Lake to Dawson City...      502
Total    1 567
Via Stickine River.
Victoria    to    Wrangel    (ocean
steamship)         750
Wrangel   to   Telegraph   Creek
(river steamers)        15°
Telegraph Creek to Teslin Lake  -
(trail)        150
Teslin   Lake   to   Dawson  City
(Klondike), (boat)       584
Total    1,634
Atlin Lake,  British Columbia.
Miles.
Victoria to Skagway, ocean steamship       995
Skagway to Lake Bennett, railway         41
Lake Bennett to Atlin Lake, water and trail          120
UNIVERSITY OF
BtlTISH COLUMBIA
AUG 2 9 1952
THE LIBRARY PANORAMIC  VIEW   OF   ROUTE  TO   BRITISH   COLUMBIA  AND  YUKON   GOLD   FIELDS
1. Steamer Leaving Victoria.
2. Skagway, Showing 40 Miles of Lynn Canal.
3. Scene on White  Pass Railway.
4. Bennett, Head of Inland Navigation.
5. Steamer En Route to Atlin or Dawson.
6*    Steamers Arriving at Dawson.
7.    Recent View of Atlin.
Re-prodticed from Photograph by Vogee, of Atlin. 
SKETCH MAP
BRITISH COLUMBIA
AND
KLONDIKE IN THE CANADIAN YUKON
SHOWING THE GOLD FIEIDS OF THE
NORTHWEST TERRITORIES ani!
AND   ROUTES THERETO
COMPILED AND  ENGRAVED FROM THE LATf
AND PUBLISHED BY
BRITISH COLUMBIA BOARD OF TRADE
VICTORIA,   B.   (}.
BRITISH  COLUMBIA

1ST OFFICIAL  REPORTS FOR
T°       SYDNEY    6602  MILES — " "
VICTORIA TO  SAN FRANCISCO  736 MILES,

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