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Ninth annual report of the British Columbia Board of Trade from 7th July, 1887, to 6th July, 1888 Victoria (B.C.). Board of Trade 1888

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Array NINTH
Annual Report
BRITISH COLUMBIA
E
A. V J.
m
From 7th July, 1887, to 6th July, 1888.
OFFICE:   BANK OF B. C.  BUILDING, VICTORIA, B. C.
INCORPORATED OCTOBER 28, 1878.
VICTORIA,   B.   C. /
THE  COLONIST"  STEAM   PRINTING  HOUSE,
1888. INDEX.
* PAGE.
List of Officers  3
List of Members  °
Annual Report  9
Financial Statement r  22
Secretary's Account Current  23
Audit Report •  24
Appendices—
1. Additions to Library  25
2. San Francisco and Victoria Mail Steamship Subsidy  26
3. China and Japan Mail Steamship Line  37
4. Telegraph Cable from Victoria to Puget Sound  42
5. Improvements to Victoria Harbor  44 '
6. Immigration  46
7. Insolvency Law  47
8. Smuggling by Indians  49
9. Fisheries of British Columbia  50
10. Report of Special Committee re Upper "Sukou Country.. . . 55
11. Address to the late Hon. Thos. White (Minister of the
Interior) ,  57
12. Navigation of Fraser River  61
13. Shipping Statistics  62
14. Customs Statistics  69
15. By-Laws  75
16. Customs of the Port  78
17. Port Charges  80 OFFICERS
ROBERT WARD, Esq., J. P.
THOS. EARLE, Esq.,
WILLIAM MONTEITH, Esq.
- .   President
Vice President
Secretary
COUNCIL.    (8)
R. P. RITHET, Esq., J. P.
M. T. JOHNSTON, Esq.
E. C. BAKER, Esq., M. P.
E. G. PRIOR, Esq., M. P.
A. A. GREEN, Esq.
T. B. HALL, Esq.
J. H. TURNER, Esq., M. P. P.
E. A. McQUADE, Esq.
ARBITRATION BOARD.   (12)
R. P. RITHET, Esq., J. P.
M. T. JOHNSTON, Esq.
E. 0. BAKER, Esq., M. P.
E. G. PRIOR, Esq., M. P.
A. A. GREEN, Esq.
T. B. HALL, Esq.
J. H. TURNER, Esq., M. P. P.
E. A. McQUADE, Esq.
THOS. R. SMITH, Esq.
JOSHUA DAVIES, Esq.
H. F. HEISTERMAN, Esq.
J. H. TODD, Esq.  MEMBERS.
NAME.
OCCUPATION.
RESIDENCE.
Alexander, R. H.
Manager Sawmill
Hastings
Baker, E. C, M.
P.
Conveyancer & Notary
Victoria
Bales, Jas. Chesti
iey
Public Accountant
Victoria
Barnard, F. S.
Victoria Transfer Co.
Victoria
Bullen, W. F.
Accountant
Victoria
Burns, Gavin H.
Manager Bank B. N. A.
Victoria
Boyd, John
Merchant
Victoria
Byrnes, Geo.
Auctioneer and Com. Mer.
Victoria
Caton, J. A. T.
Merchant
Victoria
Clarke, Wm. R.
Harbour Master, &c.
Victoria
Croasdaile, H. E.
J. P.
Land Agent
Victoria
Cowan, M. H.
Merchant   -
Victoria
Drake, M. W. T.
Barrister-at-Law
Victoria
Dunsmuir, R., M.P.P.
Prop. Wellington Colliery
Departure Bay
Davies, Joshua
Auctioneer & Com. Mer't
Victoria
Drake, Wm. T.
Merchant
Victoria
Devlin, J.'C.
Produce Merchant
Victoria
Duponfc, C. T.
Capitalist
Victoria
Eliis, W. H.
Printer
Victoria
Earle, Thomas
Merchant
Victoria
Eberts, D. M.
Barrister-at-Law
Victoria
Erb, Louis.
Brewer and Maltster
Victoria
Ewen, Alexander
Salmon Canner
New Westminster
Fell, James
Grocer
Victoria 6
MEMBERS-CONTINUED.
Ferguson, J. B.
Flummerfelt, A. C.
Finlaysou, Roderick
Foster, F. W.
Grant, John, M. P. P.
Green, Alex. Alfred
Gray, Alex. Blair
Goodacre, Lawrence
Gordon, William
Heisterman, H. F.
Higgins,D. Vf.,M.P.P
Hibben, T. N.
Harris, D. R.
Hayward, Charles
Heathorn, Wm.
Hall, T. B.
Irving, John
Johnson, E. M.
Johnston, Matthew T.
Jackson, Robert E.
JoneB, A. W.
Langley, Alfred J., J.P.
Laidlaw, Jas. A.
Livoek, Wm. Thos.
Loewen, Joseph
OCCUPATION.
RESIDENCE.
Bookseller & Stationer
Merchant
Lloyd's Agent
Merchant
Merchant
Banker
Merchant
Butcher
Commission Merchant
Fire Ins. & Land Agent
Editor "Daily Colonist"
Stationer
Civil Engineer
Contractor & Builder
Manufacturer
Mill Owner
Manager C. P. N. Co.
Land Agent
Merchant
Barrister-at-Law
Agt. Canada Life Ins. Co.
Chemist & Druggist
Salmon Canner
Factor H. B. Co.
Brewer & Maltster
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Clinton
Victoria .
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria'
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
New Westminster
Victoria
Victoria MEMBERS-CONTINUED.
NAME.
OCCUPATION.
RESIDENCE.
Leiser, Simeon
Merchant
Victoria
Lumby, M.
Farmer
Spallumcheen
Lubbe, T.
Engineer
"Victoria
Marvin, Edgar
Merchant
Victoria
Marvin, Edward B.
Ship Chandler
Victoria
Mason, Henry S.
Barrister-at- Law
Victoria
Miller, Munro
Printer
Victoria
Monteith, William
Ins. & Com. Agent
Victoria
Morison, George
Druggist
Victoria
Mara, J. A., M. P.
Merchant
Kamloops
McQuade, E. A.
Ship Chandler
Victoria
McAlister, John
Master Shipwright
Victoria
McDowell, W. J.
Printer
Victoria
Nelson, Hon. Hugh
Lieut.-Gov. B. C.
Victoria
Nicholles, John
Merchant
Victoria
Pitts, Sidney J.
Merchant
Victoria
Pooley, C. E.,M. P. P.
Barrister-at-Law
Victoria
Prior, E. G., M. P.
Merchant
Victoria
Pendray, Wm. J.
Soap -Manufacturer
Victoria
Rashdall, G. H.
Flour Mill Owner
Spallumcheen
Robins, S. M.
Supt. V. C. M. & L. Co.
Nanaimo
Redon, L.
Hotel Keeper
Victoria
Rithet, Robert P.
Merchant
Victoria
Redfern, Charles E.
Watchmaker, &c.
Victoria
Strouss, Carl
Merchant
Victoria MEMBER S-Continued,
NAME.
Strouss, Morris
Saunders, Henry
Sayward, William P.
Shotbolt, Thomas, J. P.
Shears, Walter
Stelly, George
Sears, Joseph
Springer, Benj.
Smith, T. R.
Sehl, Jacob
Tye, Thomas H.
Todd, Jacob H.
Turner, J. H., M.P.P.
Van Volkenburgh, B.
Vowell, A. W.
Williams, Robert T.
Ward, William C.
Ward, Robert, J. P.
Wilson, C.
Wilson, William
Weiler, John
Warren, James D.
Wright, G. B.
. Wood, W. F.
Yates, James S.
occupation.
Merchant
Grocer
Lumber Merchant
■Chemist and Druggist
Draper
Contractor
Contractor, &c.
Manager Sawmill
Asst. Comm'r H. B. Co.
Manufacturer
Merchant
Merchant
Merchant
Butcher
Gold Commissioner
Bookbinder
Banker
Merchant
Barrister-at-Law •
Clothier
Furniture Manufacturer
Steamboat Owner
Merchant
Commission Merchant
Barrister-at Law
RESIDENCE;
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Moodyville
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Donald
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Victoria
Illecillewaet
Victoria
Victoria Ninth Annual Report
ia Board of Trade.
(7th July, 1887, to 6th July, 1888.)
Victoria, B. C, 6th July, 1888.
To the Members of the British Columbia Board of Trade:
Gentlemen,—As customary at this season, your Committee, appointed by the Council, beg to present the usual
Annual Report in which are briefly reviewed the proceedings
of the Institution during the past 12 months and to which is
appended, as in former years, statistical and other information
regarding, the trade of this Province.
MEMBERSHIP.
At date of the last Annual Report there was a total
Membership of     97
To which during the past 12 months have been added
(new members)       2
Making together !     99
But during the same period there have been 5 resignations and 1 death, say together       6
Leaving on the roll an Active Membership of     93
Being 4 short of the total number at date of last Annual Report.
This falling off will however be more than equalized by
the new members about to be'balloted for, 10
NEW MEMBERS.
The new members elected during the past year were as
follows, viz:
Strouss, Morris Merchant Victoria.
Lubbe, Theo        "        	
RESIGNATIONS.
The resignations of the following gentlemen were tendered
and accepted within the same period, viz.:
Mansell, Henry Boot and Shoe Merchant Victoria
Short, Henry Gun Maker	
Charles, Henry Late Chief Factor H. B. Co. . ..
Shakespeare, Noah... .Late M. P for	
Neufelder, E. C Merchant	
MEETINGS.
During the period in question there have been held in
all 24 meetings, of which 4 were general and 20 meetings of
Council.
Your Committee would draw attention to the fact that
the aggregate number of Council meetings exceed by many
that of any previous year, which clearly demonstrates the
increasing utility of the Board.
DEATH.
By the demise of Mr. Joseph Spratt the Board has lost
an old and valued member and the community one of its most
energetic and enterprising citizens. Mr. Spratt had been connected with the Board from its foundation.
MAIL AND TELEGRAPH  COMMUNICATION.
The withdrawal by the Dominion Government of the
subsidy heretofore paid for the maintenance of an efficient
steamship service between Victoria and San Francisco, in
accordance with the terms of Union, has caused widespread
dissatisfaction amongst our mercantile community, and the
matter has been energetically taken in hand by the Board 11
whose representations to the Dominion Government on the
subject have been met by an assurance that the service will
be strictly maintained. At the present moment negotiations
are about being consummated which will provide for an immediate resumption of the service with every possibility of
the number of trips per month being largely increased. A
temporary contract has meanwhile been completed which
provides for the carrying of mails by steamer direct, at least
once a week, commencing to-morrow, July 7th.
The Board has also been engaged in making representations to the Dominion Government regarding serious irregularities and delays in connection with the mail service between
Victoria and Puget Sound and between Victoria and points in
Oregon and California via Puget Sound. In the opinion of
your Committee the inefficient character of the overland
service makes it all the more necessary that the alternative
service by steamer between this place and San Francisco
should be maintained.
The efforts of the Board in connection with the non-
calling at this port of the mail steamers to and from China
and Japan, have not been productive thus far of very satisfactory results, inasmuch as the steamers in question do not
yet call off Victoria regularly on the inward and outward
passages for the purpose of landing and embarking mails,
passengers and freight.
Pending construction of the new steamers which are
destined for the service in question, the present means of
transport can merely be looked upon as provisional, and there
is ample room for the expectation that upon the replacing of
the present temporary conveyances by the vessels which are
to form the nucleus of a permanent service the claims of this
port (Victoria) as the commercial centre of the Province will
be fully recognized. In the meantime arrangements are in
progress with a view to meeting any possible objection which
might be urged on the ground of insufficient harbor  and
" 12
wharf accommodation by providing all necessary requisites
for the safe berthing of the larger vessels.
This Board has also received the assurance of Sir Arthur
Blackwood, of the General Post Office, London, who on the
occasion of his recent visit to this city was interviewed by
the President, to the effect that a subsidy from the Imperial
Government would only be granted to the steamers upon
various conditions, inter alia, that of landing and receiving
mails at such ports as would insure the quickest despatch in
distribution.
A copy of the Board's petition to the Chancellor of the
Exchequer in connection with this matter will be found in
the Appendices, as also copies of various communications exchanged with the Dominion Government, all relating to the
foregoing subject.
* * * *        ' f      * ' *
The refusal of the Dominion Government to sanction
the formation of a private Company to construct, maintain ,
and operate a line of telegraph between the City of Victoria
and some point on Puget Sound, has been the means of; depriving the Province of a commercial necessity, the absence
of which exercises a detrimental influence upon its trade.
Copies of correspondence exchanged upon this subject with<
the authorities at Ottawa will show that the Board has been
quite unable to elicit from them any reason for their ' refusal .
to grant the permission asked for.
VICTORIA HARBOR  IMPROVEMENTS.
The continued efforts of the Board to secure spme sufficient appropriation from the Dominion Government for the
improvement of Victoria Harbor, have not met with that
success which the importance of the case demands; but the
matter has been taken up by the Department of Public
Works. Mr. Perley, the Chief Engineer of the Department;
having visited Victoria during the past year and ordered the"
necessary examination of the harbor, with the view of ascer- 13
taining the approximate cost of such work as may be deemed
necessary. A small sum, $12,500, has been appropriated for
the dredging of the channel, but no permanent improvements
can be effected without the removal of existing obstacles to
navigation, and it is to be hoped that the Dominion Government may yet realize, and take steps to remedy, the disadvantages accruing to the Port of Victoria from the delay in
proceeding with this necessary work. It will be seen from
the Appendices' that steps have been taken to deepen and
otherwise improve the outer harbor with a view to facilitating
the entrance and accommodation of deep draft vessels, and
that the permission of the Dominion Government to make
use of the Government dredging appliances has been sought.
BONILLA POINT  SIGNAL  STATION.
It is gratifying to learn that this much felt want will
shortly be supplied, the Dominion Government having decided upon proceeding at once with the work. The existence
of such a station will doubtless prove of the utmost value to
shipping frequenting these waters and remove a source of
danger which has hitherto been productive of many casualties.
The Board has for several years past been unceasing in its
efforts to have this work commenced, and it is satisfactory to
find that in this instance their recommendations have been
acted upon by the Government.
PILOTAGE AND  TOWAGE.
Your Committee regret being unable to record any mitigation of the difficulties which were alluded to in the last
Annual Report of the Board, and which have for some years
past tended to render the ports of this Province extremely
unpopular with ship owners. Any regulations which may
have the effect of unduly inconveniencing shipping, or of
' enhancing the cost to vessels of visiting our ports, must of
necessity operate to the detriment of the commercial interests
of the Province, and your Committee sincerely trust that the
repeated and urgent remonstrances of the Board may ulti- 14
mately prove effectual in bringing about a much needed change
by the establishment of uniform Rules and Regulations for the
management of Pilotage matters, which will be applicable to
the entire Province, in lieu of the present unsatisfactory system.
The unreciprocated facilities afforded by our Shipping
Laws to foreign tow boats—referred to in the Board's last
Annual Report—still continue to be extended, greatly to the
disadvantage of our local tow boat owners. Your Committee
can merely express the hope that the continued representations of the Board may induce the Dominion Government to
give the matter the attention it deserves.
RAILROAD  CONSTRUCTION.
Although the Parliamentary Session at Ottawa has just
closed without any appropriation having been made for the
purpose of assisting railroad construction within this Province, the promotion of which would be of the greatest benefit
in colonizing the country and developing its resources, it is
satisfactory to learn that assurances have been given by the
Government which will enable the Shuswap and Okanagan
Railway Company to proceed with the construction of that
line so that the subsidy applied for may be fairly expected to
be granted during the next session of Parliament. It may be
here mentioned that no new subsidies to Railway Companies
were granted during the recent session.
It is to be hoped that other projected lines may in the
near future be also commenced. Mining and agricultural
enterprise in the interior of the Province must remain at a
comparative stand-still in the absence of such necessary
facilities for transport.
The extension of the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railroad
northward from Nanaimo to Comox and the branch of the
same line to a point on the Straits of Fuca, where it will connect by means of a Steam Ferry with the American system
of railroads on the opposite shore, will, it is confidently ex- 15
pected, be commenced at an early date, and when completed
will afford a means of transporting to markets hitherto unattainable the output of our coal mines as well as the other
natural products of Vancouver and adjacent Islands. The
line in question will doubtless in the near future be carried
even beyond the point to which it is about to be extended
and in all probability will shortly traverse the entire length
of the Island from North to South. As a means of bringing
under settlement remotely situated districts and developing
the resources of the country, the existence of such a line
cannot be too highly valued, as it is hoped that the Dominion
Government may see fit to promote the rapid completion of
the extension by granting a liberal subsidy. The Board has
constantly advocated the work in question.
IMMIGRATION.
From statistical information kindly furnished the Board
by the Provincial Immigration Agent, Mr. John Jessbp, (see
Appendices) it will be observed that immigration continues
on an increasing scale.
^With a view to ascertaining whether some further
impetus might not be given to immigration by a more general
circulation of printed information regarding the Province and
its resources, the Board procured from the Portland Board of
Trade full particulars as to the character of the. information
compiled and distributed by the Oregon State Board of
Immigration. It appears that by such means immigration
into Oregon has been largely induced. The facilities which
under this system are afforded immigrants, immediately upon
• arrival, for procuring easily and without expense the fullest
and most reliable information relative to available land, its
cost, capabilities, &c, also appear to be productive of excellent
results and in the opinion of your Committee it would be
highly beneficial to this Province were a similar Board to be
formed here under the direction and control of .the Local
Government.    It may be here mentioned that the Board has 16
had frequent applications from competent persons in Eastern
Canada who are desirous of acting as immigration agents for
this Province.
INSOLVENCY  LAW.
The continued absence of any practical legislation on the
part of the Federal Government, whereby an equitable distribution of insolvent estates might be depended upon, has
exercised an adverse influence upon the commercial anvance-
ment of this Province in common with the rest of the
Dominion. The Board having been requested to give an
expression of opinion relative to a petition of the Toronto
Board of Trade (see Appendices) praying for the passage of a
suitable bill by the Dominion Government, or, failing this,
that a measure be passed giving to each Province liberty to
deal with the matter, subject to any Federal law which might
thereafter be enacted, was unanimously in favor of the latter
alternative and replied accordingly. Since then, however,
nothing further has been heard upon the subject and another
session has terminated without the matter having been
brought to a satisfactory issue. There is hardly any need to
repeat here what was emphatically stated in the last Annual
Report of the Board, viz.: That until such necessary legislation
be enacted it is useless to hope for the restoration of that
confidence, the absence of which must tend to hamper and
discourage commercial enterprise.
A draft of a proposed Provincial Act for abolishing
priority amongst execution creditors was submitted to the
Board by the Local Government with the request that the
Board might give an expression of opinion as to its provisions.
At a special meeting of Council held on 4th April last it was
. unanimously agreed that the proposed act would not meet
the requirements of the trading community. In the Appendices
will be found a copy of: the resolution then passed.
SMUGGLING BY INDIANS,
The delay, in providing the necessary means of prevent-
mm* 17
ing the wholesale smuggling into Canadian territory of
American products purchased by British Columbia Indians
while on their periodical visits to ports on Puget Sound, has
been the cause of serious loss not only to a large portion of
our trading community but also to the revenue of the country.
It is generally believed that the permanent services of an
efficient revenue cruiser and the establishment of Customs'
stations at convenient points along the coast will be necessary
in order to put a stop to this illicit traffic, and the Board has
energetically advocated the adoption - of such measures, and
'has urgently pressed upon the Dominion Government the
necessity of at once commissioning such a vessel, as also of
stationing preventive officers at such ppints as may be selected
tor the purpose. These suggestions have been favorably received by the Government, and the Board understands that
.active steps are being now taken to procure a suitable vessel
'for the service.in question. Reference to the Appendices is
requested for full information on the subject.
FISHERIES.
The delay in adjusting the difficulties which have grown
out of the seizure last year of British sealing schooners in
Behring's sea by United States cruisers has tended to greatly
disturb and curtail the operations of our sealing fleet.
It had been hoped that the provisions of the new treaty
between Great Britain and thf. United States would have
dealt with this matter and the deferred settlement of existing
differences must operate to the detriment of this particular
branch of our Fishery interests.
It is to be regretted that some decided action has not
been taken by the Imperial authorities to prevent a reoccur-
ence of the outrages committed on our sealing fleet and to
secure proper compensation for the losses already inflicted.
It is hoped that the result of the surveys undertaken by
the Dominion Government for the purpose of locating the 18
positions of the various Cod banks which are said to exist off
the west coast of Vancouver Island and in the vicinity of
Queen Charlotte Islands may be such as to justify an early
and extensive development of this profitable industry. In.
the event of the removal by the United States of the duty
upon imported fish we can look forward to the initiation and
rapid growth of an extensive trade in dried and salted fish.
Your Committee feel constrained to direct attention to the
fact that but slight efforts have been made to discover
markets for the large quantities of sea fish which the waters :
of this Province are capable of yielding.
The question of licensing Salmon canning establishments
and of the best mode of- doing so in order to protect our rivers
from the danger of over fishing is a matter that has recently
again engaged the attention of the Board, and in the Appendices will be found a copy of a report made by a special Committee appointed to consider the subject, as also of correspondence exchanged thereupon with the Department of Fisheries.
It is satisfactory to note that the suggestions made by the
Board have been practically carried into effect.
The usual statistical information relating to the salmon
catch for 1887 will be also found in the Appendices. This
important branch of our export trade continues to make
steady advance. In the Appendices will also be found a copy
of a.minute of Council of the Board having reference to the
Fishery provisions of the treaty with the United States and
to the Behring's Sea seizures.
MINING DEVELOPMENTS.
The increasing activity in mining operations noticed in
the Board's last Report has continued during the period
under review.
The opening of new collieries in the Comox district of
Vancouver Island will have the effect of not only materially
adding to our export trade but of bringing under settlement 19
the lands available for the purpose situate in the vicinity of
new mines, and the extension of Railroad construction northward on Vancouver Island will now doubtless be commenced
without delay.
On the mainland quartz mining operations are in certain
localities being pushed forward with energy, but lack of
facilities for transporting machinery and supplies, as also the
output of the mines themselves, must necessarily retard the
development of this, one of our chief resources.
The continued failure to secure from the Dominion
Government a subsidy for any of the projected lines of railroad, which would render possible the extensive development
of our mining interests, has virtually the effect of restricting
operations to mere " prospecting."
In the opinion of your Committee there can be no doubt
as to the great results which- would be derived from the construction of such a line as the proposed Ashcroft and Cariboo
Railroad. The present cost of sending supplies into or of
transporting ore from the region in question renders successful
.mining on an extensive scale simply impossible.
Reference is asked to< the Appendices for the usual
Statistical information regarding the"output of our mines.
UPPER YUKON  COUNTRY.
In the Appendices will be found a copy of a report made
by a Special Committee of the Board containing valuable
information regarding this remote and almost unknown
district of the Province. In view of the natural resources of
this region it is to be hoped that Government assistance may
he extended in order to provide facilities for opening the
country to prospectors and traders.
ADDRESS TO THE LATE HON.  THOS.  WHITE.
On 10th August last the Board had the honor of presenting an address to the late Hon. Thos. White, Minister of
the Interior, &c, a copy of which is contained in the Append- 20
ices. The address embodies a brief digest of various matters
which at that time were engaging the attention of the Board.
and which it was desired should be brought under the notice
of the Dominion Government. The advent of Mr. White, a
member of the Cabinet, and a gentleman who had always
evinced a warm interest in the progress and welfare of this
Province, was considered a favorable opportunity for bringing
to the notice of the Government the matters touched upon in
the address.
The Board has since learned with deep regret of the.
death of this gentlemen, and desires to place on record its
high appreciation of the Hon. gentleman's worth as a public
officer and statesman.
FRASER RIVER NAVIGATION.
The Board has on several occasions used its best efforts
in urging upon the Dominion Government the necessity for
improving the navigation of the Fraser River by dredging
the channel and removing obstructions, and it is satisfactory
to learn that this important work is receiving attention with
a prospect of existing difficulties being effectually overcome. I
Meanwhile sea going ships have safely ascended the river and
are now loading lumber at New Westminster.
FINANCE.
From the Secretary's account current and statement,
copies of which are Appended hereto, it will be seen that the
finances of the institution continue in a satisfactory condition.
The Board is now possessed of $2,833.73 (including cost of
furniture and maps, &c, in Board Room.)
The net surplus for the past year appears small in comparison with former exhibits, the apparent shrinkage beinc
due to the fact of the Board's operations durino- the past 12
months having largely exceeded in volume those of any pre-
vious year, which necessitated a correspondingly greater
expenditure. 2i
In respectfully submitting for the consideration of the
Board the foregoing brief digest of the proceedings of the
Institution during the past year, your Committee take
pleasure in pointing to the fact that the trade of the Province
has within the period reviewed continued in a satisfactorv
condition. Business failures have been few and of trivial
importance. Marked progress has been made in the development of our mining and other resources and with increasing
facilities for travel and transport the capabilities of the
country as a field for settlement and enterprise are becoming
more widely known. Your Committee are of opinion that
still greater progress can be looked forward to during the en-
O J- o o
■ suing 12 months, and do not doubt that the good which has
resulted from the labors of the Board in the past will continue
to form an incentive to prosecute the work with equal success
in the future.
We are, Gentlemen,
Your obedient servants,
ROBT. WARD, President. ^
THOS. R. SMITH, Vice-President, t Committee.
WM. MONTEITH Secretary.        J
i 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA BOARD OF TRADE.
STATEMB1TT.
Slio-wing'  I^in.a.m.elsi.l Fositioaa. on tla.e 30tli o£ Tune, 1BSS.
ASSETS.
Cash in Savings' Bank at 4% per annum $   109 62
Cash in hand per account current  7 46
    $   117 08
Funds invested on Mortgage at 8%    1,350 00
1 " " 9%       800 00
  2,150 00
Dues not collected (good)  257 00
Furniture and Maps in Board JRoom  309 65
$2,833 73
LIABILITIES.
  Nil
MEMORANDUM.
Total assets as above      $2,833 73
Total assets on 30th June, 1887       2,787 27
Net gain for year  $46 46
Victoria, B. C, 30th June, 1888.
W. MONTE1TH,
?.. Secretary.
Examined and found correct:
H. F. HEISTERMAN, \     Audit
MATTHEW T. JOHNSTON, J Committee. 23
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AUDIT  REPORT.
To the President and Members of the B. C. Board of Trade:
Gentlemen,—We, the undersigned Audit Committee,
appointed by your Board to examine the books of the Secretary-Treasurer, beg leave to report, that we have examined
the Books and Vouchers, together with the account in
Savings' Bank and Cash on hand in possession of the Secretary, and find the same true and correct in every particular
and briefly enumerated as follows :
Cash in Savings' Bank $109 62
Cash on hand 30th June       7 46
Amounts due by Members   257 00
Total $374 08
In accordance with the recommendation of your Audit
Committee last year the sum of $800 has been invested on
Mortgage at 9% per annum, and making with the previous
Mortgage of $1,350.00 invested at 8% per annum, a total
investment on Mortgage of $2,150.00.
Tour Committee have also examined the Mortgages and
documents belonging- to said Mortgages, and would like to
O O O     O '
have the Mortgages made to the Board of Trade officers and
their successors in office in lieu of the form adopted in the
case of the larger one, which is made in the name of the
former Secretary individually and not as Secretary to the
Board; and we would suggest that the Mortgages be sub-
oo o   o
mitted to the Solicitor of the Board with a View to having
our suggestion carried out.
All which is respectfully submitted.
H. F. HEISTERMAN, )     Audit
MATTHEW T. JOHNSTON, J Committee,
Victoria, B. C, 4tb July, 1S88.
WiPPW APPENDICES.
APPENDIX No.   1.
LIST OF ADDITIONS TO LIBRARY (30th JUNE, 1888.)
1. Annual Report of the Board of Trade, Portland, Oregon.
2. Oregon as it is—Information for Immigrants.
3. Report of State Board of Immigration—State of Oregon.
4. Annual Reports of Harbor Commissioners of Montreal, 1883-86.
5. By-Laws of " " "
6. Acts relating to " " •'
7. Official Documents and other information relating to Improvement of Ship Channel between Montreal and Quebec.
8. Articles of Association  and By-Laws—Dominion  Chamber of
Commerce.
9. Act of Incorporation, Rules and Regulations and Proceedings
of the Royal Society of Canada (4 volumes).
10. Debates in Dominion House of Commons—Second Session, 6th
Parliament.
11. Supplementary Estimates for fiscal year ending 30th June, 1888.
12. Consular Report (1886) on Trade of Hyogo and Osaka (Japan.)
13. Statistical Record and Abstract (Canada) for 1886.
14. Johnson's Graphic Statistics.
15. Annual Report Corporation of Victoria, 1887.
16. Statement of Expenditure Dominion Election, 1887.
17. Budget Speech, Sir Charles Tupper, April, 1888.
18. Public Accounts (Canada) 1887.
19. Report on Canadian Archives, 1887.
20. Report on Hudson's Bay Expedition, 1886.
21. Tables of Trade and Navigation, 1887.
22. Annual Report and Supplement,  Minister of Pulil'c Works,
1886-87.
23. Report Minister of Justice, 1887.
24. Report Minister of Agriculture, 1887, and Appendix.
25. Annual Report Department of Interior, 1887.
26. Report of Secretary of State, 1887, 26
27. Annual Report of Department of Militia and Defence, 1887.
28. Report of Auditor General, 1887.
29. Annual Report of Department of Indian Affairs, 1887.
30. Annual Report of Department of Marine, 1887.
31. Report on Canadian Archives, 1887.
32. Report of Commissioner of North West Mounted Police, 1886-87*
33. Lists  of Shareholders in  Chartered   Banks   of   Dominion  of
Canada, 1887.
34. Colonial and Indian Exhibition, 1886—Report.
35. Antwerp International Exhibition, 1885—Report.
36. Census of Manitoba, 1885-86.
37. Report of Commissioners upon Lobster and Oyster Fisheries om
Canada.
38. Report of Select Committee on Existing Natural Food Products
of North West Territories.
39. Report on Adulteration of Food, 1886.
40. Special Report on Fisheries Protection Service (Canada) 1886.
41. Report of Superintendent of Insurance (Canada) 1886.
42. Returns of Mortuary Statistics, 1886.
43. Copy of Fishery Treaty with United States.
APPENDIX No.  2.
RE SUBSIDY TO- SAN FRANCISCO AND VICTORIA MAIL STEAMERS.
On 6th January, 1888, Mr. E. C. Baker, M. P., was requested by
the British Columbia Board of Trade to wire Dominion Government'
protesting in strongest possible manner against withdrawal of Subsidy.
Telegram from E.  C. Baker, M. P., to Postmaster General, 6th
Jan., 1888 :
" Great consternation here regarding summary withdrawal of San
Francisco Mail Subsidy. Regarded here as breach of Terms of Union.
Please wire intention of Government."
Telegram from Postmaster General to E. C. Baker, M. P., 7th
Jan., 1888:
" San Francisco mails continue by same route as for months past..
No summary change.    Wish of Government that British Columbia-should
have benefit improved modes of Mail Service both via Vancouver wd*
San Francisco," 27
Resolutions of Council of Board of Trade, 12th Jan. , 1888 :
"That Mr. Baker be asked to reply to the telegram of Postmaster
General with reference to the Victoria and San Francisco Mail Service
and call his attention to the fact that notwithstanding the, statement of
the Minister that no summary change had been made in the conveyance
of mails, the steamers had fliscontinued taking the mails on account of
the Subsidy provided for in the Estimates havine been withdrawn.
Further, that the President be requested to call the attention of the
Postmaster General to the matter by telegram."
"Whereas by the Teifais of Union between the Colony of British
Columbia and the Dominion of Canada it was agreed under Clause 4 of
the Terms as follows :
' The Dominion will provide an efficient Mail Service fortnightly by
Steamer communication between Victoria and San Francisco and twice a
week between Victoria and Olympia ; the vessels to be adapted for the
conveyance of freight and passengers.'
"And Whereas it has been reported to this Board that the Dominion Government has discontinued the Subsidy to the line of Steamers
now running between this Port and San Francisco, and this Board is not
aware that any other line of Steamers has been subsidized ;
" And Whereas in the opinion of this Board notwithstanding the
existence of other mail facilities, necessitated by the increased demands
of Commerce, it is of the utmost importance to the Commercial interests
of British Columbia that regular steamer communication as provided for
by the Terms of Union, should be maintained between Victoria and
San Francisco ;
"Resolved,—That this Board call the immediate attention of the
British Columbia Senators ; Members in the Dominion Parliament and
the Government of British Columbia to the breach of agreement made
by the Dominion Government in discontinuing the service provided for
under the Terms of Union above quoted and that they be requested to
protest in the strongest manner possible against the action taken by the
Dominion Government as herein set forth."
Telegram to Postmaster General from British Columbia Board of
Trade, 12th Jan. , 1888 :
"British Columbia Board of Trade strongly protests against withdrawal of Subsidy to Steamships between Victoria and San Francisco,
and considers such withdrawal a breach of Terms of Union and calculated
to jeopardize to trade and commerce of the Province."
(Signed),       ROBT. WARD, President. 28
Telegram from Postmaster General, Ottawa, to President British
Columbia Board of Trade, 16th Jan. , 1888 :
" Mail Service by Steamer had ceased and contract expired.    Commercial service is subject  for consideration.    Government recognizing
Terms of Union."
(Signed), .A. J. McLELLAN.
Postmaster General.
Letter from Provincial Secretary to British Columbia Board of
Trade, 16th Jan., 1888.
Sir,—A copy of the Resolution passed by the Board of Trade, -re the
withdrawal of the Ocean Mail Subsidy between this Province and San
Francisco, was duly received, and the matter having been before the
Executive, a Minute strongly protesting against such a step being taken
without the concurrence of the Province, was passed, and the following
telegram was dispatched to the Honorable the Secretary of State by His
Honor the Lieut. -Governor :
" The Government of British Columbia protests against discontinuance of the Subsidy for the Steamship Mail Service between this Province and San Francisco. That service was intended as much for trade
and commerce as for the carriage of mail matter. Canada, in the Terms
of Union, undertook to maintain .the service in • perpetuity -and has no
right to discontinue it without the concurrence of the Province, one of
the high contracting parties."
I have the honor to be,
&c, &c,
(Signed),       JOHN ROBSON,
W. MONTEITH, Esq., Provincial Sec'y.
Secretary B. C. Board of Trade,
Victoria.
Report op Special .Committee to Council of Board of Trade, and
Resolution, 19th Jan., 1888 :
" The Committee appointed by Council of the Board of Trade, to
whom was referred the question of the discontinuance of the Mail Service
between this Port and San Francisco, by steamer, as provided for by the
Terms of the, Union, and t-he reply of the Honorable the Postmaster
General to the telegram from this Board, beg to report as follows :
"1. That the position taken by the Honorable the Postmaster
General appears to be entirely unjustifiable, and your Committee are at
a loss to understand how the Government could disregard the Treaty
Agreement between the Dominion and this Province, bearing upon thjs. 29
important matter, without first conferring with the representatives of this
constituency in the Federal Parliament, and with the Provincial Government, which we are informed has not been done.
"2. That from the printed returns of the Post Office Department
it would appear that the subsidies now paid by the Dominion Government for Mail services within and to this Province, after deducting the
Revenues, are less than they were immediately after Confederation by
nearly $30,000.00, as the following comparative figures between the
returns for the year 1874 and 1887 shew, viz. :
1874—Cost for Mail service by Rail.... nil
" " "     Land...$ 34,469 25
" " "     Water..    19,033 79
"     Ocean...    54,000 00
 $107,503 04
Less Revenue for Stamps, &c  13,655 53
Net expenditure for 1874	
1877—Cost for Mail service by Rail...
"     Land..
"     Water.
" "     Ocean..
Less Revenue for Stamps, &c.„
$ 24,809 94
41,677 86
37,790 55
17,640 00
$93,847.51
$121,918 35
57,420 00
Net expenditure for 1887  $ 63,498 55
The difference being  - 29,349 16
"less in 1887 than in 1874, in the face of which it seems not only unjust
but most unreasonable to deprive this Province of any of the existing
Mail service and the attendant facilities for regular communication
between this Port and San Francisco, which is the principal market and
shipping port on the Pacific coast.
"3. That this Province since confederation has yearly largely
increased its contribution to the Revenues of the Dominion Government
for duties, etc., as shewn by the Customs Returns, the collections under
this head at this Port having been increased from $342,400.89 in 1872 to
$918,972.15 in 1887, which in the opinion of your Committee fairly
entitles this Province to all the additional Mail facilities extended since
confederation and also to such further facilities as the demand for comr
mercial intercourse and the interests of trade and commerce from time to
time may demand.
"4. That the determination of the Honorable the Postmaster
General to cancel the Mail contract by Steamer between San Francisco
and Victoria, apart from the fact that it is a breach, of a Treaty agree- 30
ment between the Dominion Government and this Province, appears, in-
striking contrast with the policy of the Dominion Government in advo-1
eating a Subsidy for the China-Japan line of Steamers ; and in thej
opinion of this Board the Victoria-San Francisco service is of as great^
and perhaps greater importance to this Port and Province.
"5. That the contention of the Honorable the Postmaster General
that the Overland Mail Service via Puget Sound meets all the requirements of this Province is not correct and shews that he has either been ;
misinformed, or has a misconception of the facts, and your Committee*
are prepared to point out several cases since the Steamers have discon-y
tinued carrying the Mails in which the non-arrival of letters by steamer j
has caused merchants here serious loss and inconvenience.
"6. Be it therefore resolved,—That this Board in adopting the
foregoing report reiterates the opinion expressed at a previous meeting
that a protest be made against the discontinuance of the Mail service by -
Steamer between Victoria and San Francisco as a breach of the Treaty^
agreement between this Province and the Dominion, and that the-
Representatives of the Province in Parliament, and the Provincial Govern- ^
ment be requested to insist upon the renewal of the said Mail service in the^
interest of the trade and commerce of this Port and the Province at large. J
"And that a copy of this Report and Resolution be sent to the.
Honorable the Postmaster General, the Representatives of this constituency in the Dominion Parliament, and the Provincial Government.
"And further that the members and Provincial  Government be
requested to take immediate action to give effect to the wishes of thisX
Board upon the matter referred to herein."
Letter from British Columbia Board   of   Trade   to  Provincial^
Secretary, 20th Jan., 1888.
"Sir:—I am directed by the President and Council of the British
Columbia Board of Trade tq acknowledge receipt of your letter of 16th
inst., and to convey to you the thanks of the,Board for the prompt action
taken by the Provincial Government in reference to the recent withdrawal of the Ocean Mail Subsidy.
" 1 am further directed to hand you the accompanying copy of a report
made by a Committee of the Board with relation to the same matter."
I have the honor, &c.,
(Signed),
The Hon. the Provincial Secretary,
James Bay.
W. MONTEITH,
Secretary. 31
Reply to Above from Provincial Secretary,' 21st Jan. , 1888 :
Victoria, 21st January, 1888.
"Sir:—I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your letter of
•the 20th instant, and enclosures.
" The excellent Report of the Board of Trade will be laid before the
Executive at the earliest possible date, when decisive action thereon will
doubtless be taken, the Government being fully alive to the vital importance of the matter therein referred to."
I have the honor to be,
Sir,
Tour obedient servant,
(Signed),
W. MONTEITH, Esq.,
Secretary B. C. Board of Trade,
Victoria.
JNO. ROBSON,
Provincial Secretary.
■ Letter from British Columbia Board of  Trade  to Postmaster
General, 24th Jan. , 1888:
"Sir:—By direction of the President and Council of the British
Columbia Board of Trade I have to acknowledge receipt of your telegram
of 16th inst. having reference to the withdrawal of the subsidy to the
. Sau Francisco and Victoria Mail Steamers, and to transmit herewith a
copy of a Report made by a Committee of the Board in connection with
this matter."
I have the honor to be,
&c, &c.,
(Signed),        W. MONTEITH,
The Hon. A. J. McLellan, Secretary.
Postmaster General,
. Ottawa.
Letter to Postmaster General, Ottawa, from British Columbia
Board of Trade, 26th Jan. , 1888 :
"Sir:—In connection with the matter of the withdrawal of the
subsidy to the San Francisco and Victoria Mail Steamers, regarding
which I had the honor of addressing you on the 24th instant, I am now
directed to further- point out that snow blockades, such as that which
recently caused such serious interruption to traffic, and delay to mails,'
between Portland, Oregon, and Tacoma, W. T., tend to make the land
route very uncertain in winter, and should form another reason for main- 32
taining the Ocean Mail service between this place and San Francisco
as formerly."
I have the honor to be,
&c, &c,
(Signed),       W. MONTEITH,
The Hon. A. W. McLellan, Secretary:
Postmaster General,
Ottawa.
Letter from Postmaster General to British Columbia Board of
Trade, 14th Feb., 1888:
Post Office Department, Canada,
Ottawa, 14th February, 1888.
"Sir:—I have the honor to acknowledge your letter of the 24th
ulto., enclosing copy of a Report made by a Committee of the Victoria
Board of Trade with reference to the termination of the contract for the
conveyance of Mails by the steamships running between Victoria and
San Francisco, and the withdrawal of the Subsidy heretofore paid therefor.
"In reply I beg to say that I have given the views and statements
contained in the documents which you enclose my most careful consideration, but am unable to see that any valid reasons are therein adduced
for the continuance of the Mail service to which reference is made.
" The question of the maintenance of the Steamship line in question
for general purposes of traffic is one with which the Post Office is not
called upon to deal. My own action has been limited to the discontinuance of a Mail .service, which, considered as a means of Postal communication, has ceased to have any value at all commensurate with its cost.
"The Committee of the Board of Trade, I observe, seem to be of
opinion that the present time is very ill-chosen for affecting an economy
in this direction, inasmuch as the the total cost of mail conveyance in
the Province of British Columbia, according to the latest printed return
only exceeds the total revenue from the sale of Postage Stamps by
$63,498; the figures standing $121,918 for expenditure and $57,420.00 as
an offset of revenue ; whereas, in the year 1874 there was a balance
against the Province upon a similar comparison, of nearly $94,000.
" Upon this I have to remark :—
"1. That the figures quoted by the sub-Committee embrace only
three-quarters payment for Railway service, and that to get a correct
estimate of the annual outlay under this head- one third, or something
over $8,000 has to be added to the printed figures, and that with this
addition the deficiency referred to, for the year ended 30th June last,
must be placed at about $71,500. 33
" 2. That the expenditure for Mail conveyance within the Province
does not represent the whole outlay for Postal service, which also includes
the important item of Postmasters' salaries and various miscellaneous
disbursements. Comparing the total postal revenue from the Province
with the total expenditure and estimating for a full years' payment for
Railway service, it appears that the Department collects in the Province
very little over one-third—something under 35 per-cent—of what it expends. This being far the lowest ratio of revenue to expenditure to be
found in any Province of the Dominion there would seem to be strong
reasons for trying to establish a more satisfactory balance.
"3. That the figures for the year 1874, to which the sub-Committee
appeal as a standard of comparison are altogether too exceptional in their
character to be fairly used for such a purpose. In that year the Province
yielded in Postal Revenue only about 19 per cent, of the amount
expended for Mail service ; and manifestly that was a condition of things
which could only be regarded as temporary and provisional. Manitoba
and the North West Territories were, for a time, in a somewhat similar
position, but the Revenue from the Province and the Territories now
amounts to 53 per cent, of the expenditure for Mail purposes therein.
'' In conclusion I would only say that there is no intention on the
part of ihe Government to disregard the obligations created by the Terms
of Union between British Columbia and the Dominion, and that the
withdrawal of the Mails from the Steamers plying between Victoria and
San Francisco must only be regarded as an act of Departmental policy
grounded on reasons which have appeared not only satisfactory, but
cogent."
I have the honor to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
(Signed),       A. W. McLELLAN,
W. MONTEITH, Esq., Postmaster General.
Secretary Board of Trade,
Victoria, B. C.
Minute of Council and Resolution of Board of Trade re Subsidy to
San Francisco and Victoria Mail Steamers, 5th March, 1888':
"The Council of the Board of Trade having considered the letter
from the Honorable the Postmaster General, dated Ottawa, 14th February, beg to express their appreciation of the courtesy shewn , by him in
giving so fully his views upon the withdrawal of the Mail Subsidy to the
Steamship line between this Port and San Francisco and Postal matters
generally in this Province, and now report thereon as follows, viz. : 34
"That while the Board has every disposition to allow the greatest
possible latitude in the discussion of the subject of the withdrawal.of the
Ocean Subsidy referred to, they cannot admit the conclusion arrived at
by the Hon. the Postmaster General, viz. : ' That his action has been
limited to the discontinuance of a Mail service, which, considered as a
means of Postal communication, has ceased to have any value at all commensurate with the cost,' for the following reasons, viz. :
"1. It is in the public interest that regular communication by
steamer between this Province and San Francisco should be maintained
in accordance with the Terms of Union as well for mails as for the conveyance of mails and passengers.
" 2. -The overland service has been and is likely to be irregular and
very uncertain during the fall, winter and ear?y spring.
"3. Invoices and documents relating to shipments by Steamer
which are now sent by overland mail, do not as a lule reach the Post
Office here when they , arrive on regular schedule time until 24 hours
aiter the arrival of the goods, and during the last two months the mails
per overland have frequently been from five to ten days behind time,
which causes much hiconvemence and unnecessary delay in obtaining the
delivery of goods arriving by steamer.
" 4. Without a subsidy, the Government have no control over the
sailing of the Steamer, and it is an important point in the service that it
should be regulated to meet the convenience and requirements of the
public who may wish to avail themselves of the ocean service in travelling
to and from San Francisco, and which control could only be established
by a subsidy being granted.
'' That, with reference to the portion of the letter from the Hon.
the Postmaster General 'referring to the cost of conveying Mails in this
Province, this Board is much pleased to learn that the Revenue shews a
gratifying increase from 19 per cent, of the total expenditure on this
account in 1874 to 35 per cent, in 1887, and although the comparison
made with other Provinces may not be favorable, this Board has the
fullest confidence that it will only be a question of a few years until the
Revenue of the Province will compare as favorably with the expenditure
as that of any other Province in the Dominion, and this Board views
with alarm any action which may be taken for the purpose of economy
alone (whether taken by the Government or the Post Office Department)
to curtail in any way mail communication either within or without the
Province, as tending to retard its advancement commercially as well as
its material development.
" That in the opinion of this Board the ocean service between this 35
Province and San Francisco is of as great importance and perhaps greater
than the proposed service between the Province and Japan and China
which it is openly reported the Dominion Government is prepared to
subsidize, and if the San Francisco overland service can be pleaded as an
excuse for discontinuing the former, it can with equally good reason be
used for refusing a subsidy to the latter, as at present the mails from
China and Japan reach this Province more quickly and more frequently
via San Francisco than direct by the C. P. R. Steamship line.
" Resolved,—That the foregoing Minute be adopted and that a copy
of same be forwarded to the Hon. the Postmaster General for his consideration in conjunction with the previous reports forwarded to him
upon this subject."
Lettkr from the'Hon. the Postmaster General to British Columbia
Board of Trade, 16th March, 1888 :
Post Office Department, Canada,
Ottawa, 16th March, 1888.
"Sir:—I am directed by the Postmaster General to acknowledge
the receipt of your communication of the 5th inst. enclosing a memorial
from the British Columbia Board of Trade, setting forth objections to
the discontinuance of the Mail service by water between Victoria and
San Francisco and, in reply, to inform you that the subject to which you
refer will receive due enquiry and consideration."
I have the honor to be.
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
W. MONTEITH, Esq.,
Secretary B. C. Board of Trade,
Victoria, B. C.
WM. WHITE,
Secretary.
Telegram from British Columbia Board of Trade to Mr. E. C.
Baker, M. P., 4th May, 1888 :
"Board of Trade very anxious to learn decision regarding Victoria
.and San Francisco Steamship Subsidy. Nothing short of renewal satisfactory. Board anxiously awaiting definite reply with view to further
action if unsatisfactory."
(Signed), ROBT. WARD,
President. 36
Telegram from the Hon.  the   Postmaster   General   to   British
Columbia Board of Trade, 5th May, 1888 :
" Mr. Baker submits your message of yesterday.    I will lay it before
Council to-day and answer."
(Signed),
A. W. McLELLAN.
Telegram from the British Columbia Board of Trade to Hon. the
Postmaster General, 11th May, 1888 :
"British Columbia Board of Trade anxiously awaits definite reply to
their communication relative to San Francisco and Victoria Steamship
Subsidy in accordance with Terms of Union."
(Signed), ROBT. WARD,
President.
Telegram from British Columbia Board of Trade to Mr. E. C.
Baker, M. P., 14th May, 1888:
" Postmaster General wired me fifth acknowledging receipt my
message to you and promised to submit matcer to Council same day! No
reply arriving wired him eleventh asking definite decision. Cannot get
reply.    Kindly advise Board actual position of matter."
(Signed), ROBT. WARD,
President. I
Resolution of Council British Columbia Board of Trade, May:<
18th, 1888:
"Resolved,—That copies of the Correspondence and Minutes of
Council of this Board, whioh have been passed relative to the San Fran-"
cisco-Victoiia Mail Steamship Subsidy, be forwarded .to the Provincial'
Government, and to the Municipal Council of Victoria, asking them to;
take prompt action to resist by all lawful means the course adopted by
the Dominion Government in deliberately breaking one of the Terms of ■
Union entered into at Confederation, without the full consent of this
Province, one of the High Contracting parties thereto."
Telegram from Mr. E. C. Baker and Mr. E. G. Prior, M. P.'s :
Ottawa, 21st May, 1888.
"British Columbia'members have assurance of Government that
Sah Francisco mail service shall be strictly maintained according to
Terms of Union."
MM E. C. BAKER.
(Signed), | E   G   pRI0R> 37
APPENDIX No. 3. •
RE CHINA AND JAPAN MALL STEAMSHIP LINE.
Letter from the British Columbia Board of Trade to the Right
Hon. the Secretary of State for the Colonies :
Victoria, 20th August, 1887.
Sir :—By direction of the President and Council of the British
. Columbia Board of Trade, 1 have the honor to transmit under separate
cover, a Petition addressed by the members of the Board to the Right
Hon. the Chancellor of the Exchequer, in reference to the subsidizing of
a line of Mail Steamers between this Province and China and Japan, and
the Board respectfully requests that you may be pleased to direct that
the Petition in question be duly forwarded to its destination.
I have the honor,
&c., &c.,
(Signed),       W. MONTEITH,
• To The Right Hon. Secretary.
Sir Henry Holland.
Secretary of State for the Colonies,
London, S. W.
To the Right Honorable George   Joachim   Goschen,   Chancellor   of  the
Exchequer, Etc., Etc.
The Petition of the British Columbia Board of Trade of Victoria,
British Columbia, one of the Provinces of the Dominion of Canada,
having special reference to the application of the Canadian Pacific
Railway Company for a Subsidy from the Imperial Government for a
line of Steamships from Vancouver, the Terminus of the Canadian Pacific
Railway, to China and Japan.
Humbly Sheweth :
1. That the Town of Vancouver is hot situated on Vancouver Island
as the name would indicate, but on the Mainland of British Columbia,
and is separated from Vancouver Island by the Gulf of Georgia, about
fifteen miles in width.
2. That Victoria, the capital of British Columbia, is situated on
Vancouver Island, and with the Harbor of Esquimalt, which adjoins and
forms part of the Port of Victoria, is the first Port on British Territory
inside the Straits of San Juan de Fuca.
3. That Esquimalt is the Naval Station for Her Majesty's Fleet on
the North Pacific, the site of the recently completed Graving Dock and 38
the proposed Government Fortifications, and in the immediate vicinity of
where Battery'C is to be stationed by the Dominion Government.
4. That Victoria since the first settlement of the country has been,
and still is, the 'principal Commercial Centre for the whole of British
Columbia, having regular communication with all other parts of the
Province and daily communication by steamer with Vancouver and the
United States of America.
5. That the direct commercial relations of Victoria with Great
Britain constitute a very large proportion of the commerce of that Port.,
both in imports and exports.
6. That the Port of Victoria is still deeply interested in continuing-
its direct commercial relations with Great Britain, and, as the carrying
trade to and from Great Britain is principally via Cape Horn, it would
appear to be antagonistic to the interests of the Canadian Pacific Railway
Company that this connection should continue. For this and other
similar reasons the Canadian Pacific Railway Company have shewn a
desire to ignore this Port.
7. That the Canadian Pacific Railway Company since establishing
this line of steamers have so far refu&ed to acknowledge the just claims
of this Port and Esquimalt, by declining to allow the said steamers to
call at this Port to land and receive mails and passengers.
8. That the contention of the Railway Company that the transcontinental mails would be seriously delayed by the Steamer calling at this
Port is not correct, as the daily steamer from Victoria makes close connections with the daily trains from Vancouver, and any mails arriving
after the departure of the daily train are held for the following day.
9. That if the Mails were landed at Victoria, those for the Naval,
authorities and local districts would be distributed twenty-four hours
earlier, and transcontinental mails would be forwarded by first daily
Steamer from Victoria, to connect with the first daily train from Vancouver, which would cause no detention whatever in their delivery at
destination.
10. That the delay of the Steamers and expenses of calling at
Victoria would be inconsiderable as the Steamers pass within a short
distance (not exceeding one. mile) from the Port.
Your Petitioners Therefore Humbly Pbay :
That before granting any subsidy to the line of steamers referred to,
the Imperial Government will be pleased to make it a condition in the
contract that the Steamers shall call at Victoria both on the inward and
outward passage to land and receive mails, passengers and freight. 39
And your Petitioners as in duty bound -will ever pray, &c.
Signed on behalf of the Members of the Board of Trade of British
Columbia, this 26th day of August, A. D. 1887.
ROBT. WARD, President.
W. MONTEITH, Secretary.
Letter from Secretary to Governor-General to British Columbia
Board of Trade, 11th October, 1887.
Ottawa, 11th October, 1887.
Sir :—I am directed by His Excellency the Governor-General to
forward to you the accompanying copy of a despatch addressed to him by
the Secretary of State for the Colonies, in reference to a Petition from
the members of the British Columbia Board of Trade on £he question of
subsidizing a line of Mail Steamers between British Columbia, China
- and Japan.
The Petition, as you will learn from  the despatch, has been duly
forwarded to the Chancellor of the Exchequer.
I have the honor,
.&c., &c,
(Signed),        HENRY STREATFIELD,
The Secretary, Gov. -Genl's Secretary.
B. C. Board of Trade.
(Copy.)
Sir Henry Holland to the Marquess of Lansdowne :
Downing Street,
22nd September, 1887.
My Lord :—I have the honor to inform you that I have received
from the British Columbia Board of Trade a letter dated Victoria 26th
of August 1887, enclosing a Petition addressed by the members of the
Board to the Chancellor of the Exchequer upon the subject of the question of subsidizing a line of Mail Steamers between British Columbia,
China and" Japan.
I request that you will inform the Secretary of the British Columbia
Board of Trade that this Petition has been duly forwarded to the Chancellor of the Exchequer.
I have, &c.,
(Signed),       H. T. HOLLAND, 40
Letter from British Columbia Board of Trade to Sir Wm. Pearse,
14th Jan., 1888:
Victoria, 14th January, 1888.
Sir :—By direction of the President and Council of the British
Columbia Board of Trade, I have the honor to transmit herewith a copy
of a Report made by a Special Committee of this Board in reference to
alleged difficulties in connection with Custom requirements which have
led to the ignoring of this place as a calling point by the Steamers of the
Canadian Pacific Steamship line, under instructions from the Superintendent, Capt. H. Webber.
I am, Sir,
&c., &c,
(Signed),
Sir Wm. Pearse, Bart., M. P.,
Govan,
Glasgow, N. B.
W. MONTEITH,
Secretary.
Report of Committee re China and Japan Mail Steamship Line,,
12th Jan., 1888.
To the President and Gou/iicU of the British Columbia Board of Trade:
Gentlemen :—Your Committee appointed to confer with the Collector of Customs with the view of ascertaining what facilities would be
extended to the Steamers of the Japan-China line in connection with the
Canadian Pacific Railway, beg to report as follows :—
1. That your Committee had an interview with the Hon. W.
Hamley, Collector of Customs at this Port, on Monday, the 9th instant, .
and full information regarding the difficulties alleged by Captain Webber,
the Resident Agent for the Steamers, to have been put in the way to
cause detention of the Steamers at this Port by the Customs, was laid
before your Committee by the Collector.
2. That from the information and documents laid before your Committee it would appear that every facility had been extended to Captain I
Webber, and the other officers of the Steamer, which could reasonably
be expected, and that the Collector had given instructions and arranged'
for the entering and clearing of the Steamers on arrival, whether on
Sundays or after Custom House h6urs, immediately the Master or Purser
applied for the same, without causing any unnecessary detention.
3. That in the opinion of your Committee, Captain Webber had
made demands for greater latitude in connection with the entering and
clearing of these steamers than the Law warrants, or the Collector would
have been justified in acceding to. 41
4. That the contention of this Board that the steamers should land
the mails, passengers and freight for this Port on the inward voyage is
nothing more than its importance as the principal commercial centre for
the Province reasonably demands; and that the delay necessary to
accomplish this (if proper arrangements were made) would not affect in
any serious degree the delivery at destination of other local and through
mails, passengers and freight.
5. That under the existing arrangement the mails and passengers
for this Port have not reached here until two days after the Steamer
touched here on the inward voyage, and freight has generally been delayed several weeks before reaching the consignees in this city.
6. That other steamer lines calling here with freight on board for
different points in this Province and the neighboring territory, experience no difficulty and very little delay in landing cargo, mails and passengers for this Port, when on their inward voyage, and in the opinion of
your Committee the same arrangements could be applied to the Japan-
China Steamers were the Agent desirous of complying with the wishes of
this community.
7. That there seems to be no disposition on the part of the Agent
of the Japan-China Steamers to fulfil the repeated promises of those
claiming to have the authority to deal with this matter, to wit:—E.
Frazer, Esq., of New York ; H. Abbott, Esq., representing the C. P. R.;
and Captain Webber himself.
Your Committee therefore recommends that this Board bring the
attention of the owners to this matter with the view of ascertaining from
them what arrangements would be necessary to secure the landing and
despatching of mails, passengers and cargo to and from this Port on the
inward and outward voyages each trip ; and that it is desirable that this
Board should use its influence to secure such additional facilities and
accommodations as may reasonably be required by the owners.
R. P. RITHET.
Victoria, B. C, 12th Jan., 1888.
(Signed), \ THOS. EARLE.
I J. H. TODD.
W. MONTEITH, Secretary.
Fairfield Works, Govan,
Near Glasgow, 10th February, 1888.
W. Monteith, Esq.,
British Columbia Board of Trade,
Victoria.
Sir :—I am desired by Sir Wm, Pearse to acknowledge receipt of your esteemed favor of 14th ulto., and the copy of the report made by a
Special Committee of your Board, respecting the calling at your Port of *
the steamships "Abyssinia," "Batavia" and "Parthia."
I have given this question the most careful consideration and have
had the advice of Captains who have had personal knowledge of the
locality, as well as a thorough investigation of the Admiralty Charts, and;'
have been compelled to conclude that in the present absence of shelter,",'
calling at Victoria to land Mails, Passengers and Freight from  large
Ocean Steamers, drawing 24 feet, cannot be done without incurring anj
amount of danger, which I do not consider justifiable.
As soon however as Victoria is rendered eligible to receive such
large Steamers as the " Abyssinia," the owner will be very glad indeed,
to send them.
I am, Sir,
Yours very faithfully,
DONALD R. MACGREGOR,
Manager of the Steamew.j
APPENDIX No. 4.
re telegraph cable from victoria to puget sound.
Letter from,British Columbia Bo.<rd of Trade to the Hon. the
Minister of Public Works :
Victoria, 23rd August, 1887.
Sir :—By direction of the President and Council of the British
Columbii Board of Trade, I have the honor to refer you to a letter addressed by you to Mr. E. C. Baker, M. P., dated 4th inst.. in which you
inform him, in reply to a request made through his medium by this
Board, that the Government cannot grant permission to a private Company to construct and operate a telegraph and cable line from Victoria
to Puget Sound.
I am desired to respectfully inquire of you upon what grounds the
permission asked for is refused.
I have the honor,
&c, &c.,
(Signed),       W. MONTEITH,
To the Hon. Secretary.;
The Minister of Public Works,
Ottawa. 43
Letter from the Hon. the Minister of Public Works to British
Columbia Board of Trade :
Ottawa, 2nd September, 1887.
Sir :—I have to acknowledge the receipt of your communication
dated the 23rd ulto., asking on behalf of the British Columbia Board of
Trade to be advised upon what grounds permission is refused to a private
Company to construct and operate a telegraph and cable from Victoria to
Puget Sound.
Your obedient servant,
(Signed),       A. GOBE1L,
W. MONTEITH, Esq., Secretary.
Secretary B. C. Board of Trade,
Victoria, B. C.
Letter from British Columbia Board of Trade to the, Hon. the
Minister of Public Works :
Victoria, 21st September, 1887.
Sir :—I am instructed by the President and Council of the British
Columbia Board of Trade to acknowledge receipt of your letter of 2nd
inst., and to say that the Board had hoped you would have seen fit to
vouchsafe a reply to the question asked in their communication of 23rd
ulto., in reference to the refusal of the Government to grant to a private
Company permission to construct and operate a telegraph and cable line
from Victoria to Puget Sound.
I am directed to again respectfully inquire upon what grounds this
permission is denied, and to add that responsible parties here are prepared to construct and operate the line should the requested permission
be forthcoming.
I am, Sir,
Your obedient servant,
(Signed),       W. MONTEITH,
Secretary.
The Minister of Public Works,
Ottawa.
To the Hon.
Letter from the Hon. the Minister of Public Works to British
Columbia Board of Trade :
Ottawa, 31st September, 1887.
Sir :—I am directed \y the Minister to acknowledge the receipt, of
your communication dated the 21st inst., asking on behalf of the Board
of Trade of British Columbia for reasons, why Government will not gran^ 44
permission to a private Company to build a telegraph line from Victoria
to Puget Sound.
I have the honor,
&c., Ac,
(Signed),       A. GOBELL,
W. MONTEITH, Esq., Secretary.
Secretary B. C. Board of Trade,
Victoria.
APPENDIX No. 5.
re improvements to victoria. harbor.
Letter from British Columbia Board of Trade to the Hon. the
Minister of Public Works :
Victoria, 14th December, 1887.
Sir :—The President and Council of the British Columbia Board of
Trade direct me to respectfully call your attention to the varjlous reports
and recommendations which have been furnished your Department in
reference to the projected improvements to Victoria Harbor.
The Board have had the benefit of learning Mr.  Perley's views in
reference to the matter, and the report of that gentleman will doubtless •
have placed the Department in possession of the necessary information.
I am directed to respectfully request that you will kindly recommend,
a sufficient appropriation to be made in the estimates next Session to
admit of this necessary work being speedily commenced and promptly
finished.
I have the honor,
&c., &c.,
(Signed),       W. MONTEITH,
To The Hon. Secretary.
The Minister of Public Works,
Ottawa.
Letter from Department of Public Works to British Columbia
Board of Trade :
Ottawa, 23rd December, 1887.
Sir :—I am directed by the Minister to acknowledge the receipt of
your communication dated the 14th inst., calling attention or behalf of
mm* 45
the British Columbia Board of Trade to the improvements required at
the Harbor of Victoria, B. C.
I have, &c.,
(Signed),       A. GOBEIL,
W. MONTEITH, Esq., Secretary.
Secretary B. C. Board of Trade,
Victoria.
Minute of Council of British Columbia Board of Trade re Outer
Harbor :
Victoria, B. C, 21st June, 1888.
The Board having again had under its consideration the question of
affording facilities for the China steamers to touch and discharge mails,
passengers and freight at this Port regularly, and having had before
them the report of Mr. F. C. Gamble, Resident Engineer, Public Works
Department, showing the present depth of water available at the mouth
of the harbor in the neighborhood of the Outer Wharf, from which it
would appear to be possible to make the depth of water sufficient to
admit of these steamers going alongside the wharf at low water, if increased by dredging an average of about six feet, and as the matter is one
of great importance to the interests of this Port, the Board respectfully
recommends that some further steps be taken in this matter with the
view of accomplishing the object indicated, and advises the following
action, viz:—
That the Dominion Government be applied to for the services of the
Government dredger to dredge the entrance of the harbor up to and in
the neighborhood of the Outer Wharf, as soon as it is available for that
purpose, after completing the dredging now in hand in Esquimalt harbor,
for the purpose of making the water up to and alongside the Outsr Wharf
at least 25 feet, and that the City Members be asked to use their influence to obtain compliance with this request.
In connection with this application, the Board would represent as
follows :—
1. That as the piles at the Outer Wharf are driven to a depth of
from 9 to 14 feet in the mud, there appears to be no difficulty in dredging
to'the required depth.
2. That the time and expense to be incurred in doing the work
would not be large and the immediate benefit to this port would be
very great.
3. That although the continuous dredging of the harbor and widening of the channel at its mouth are necessary and of the utmost import- 46
ance, it is the-opinion of this Board that the work recommended in the
foregoing report will result in an immediate advantage to this port, and
should be taken in hand at the earliest moment, and if possible during
the months of July, August or September, to obviate the delays which
would be caused by bad weather if deferred until a later period.
N. B.—The Board has'since been advised that the services of the
Government Dredger will be given at an early date.
APPENDIX No. 6.
RE IMMIGRATION.
Particulars Furnished by Mb. J. Jessop, Prov. Immigration Agent :
For the half year ending 31st December, 1887, the population of
British Columbia was increased, as nearly as could be ascertained, by
about 5,000. Of these probably two-thirds settled on the Mainland and
one-third on Vancouver Island.
One half of the total' value of settlers' effects for the year 1887
amounted to $29,500.
During the half year ending 30th June last the estimated increase to
the population of Vancouver city is about 2,000. New Westminster city
and district have increased nearly if not quite 1,000. It may reasonably
be assumed that 1,000 additional new settlers have been added to the
great interior of the Mainland east and north of New Westminster district ; while close upon 2,000 have been absorbed in Victoria, Nanaimo,
Wellington, the East Coast districts, from Sooke to Comox, including
Alberni, and the coast of Mainland north-west of New Westminster
district. This will give a vaguely approximate total of 6,000 as an
increase for the half year.
Total value of settlers' effects entered in the different Customs'
Houses for the same period, as follows :—
Victoria  $23,013
• Vancouver     15,653
New Westminster       4,597
Nanaimo       1,450
Total  $44,713
Total value of settlers' effects for the year ending 20th June, $74,213.
This is largely in excess of any preceding year.
Supposed increase of population in British Columbia for the year 47
ending 30th June, 1888, 11,000.    Of this number probably 8,000 were
added to the Mainland population, and 3,000 to that of Vancouver Island.
For the half year of 1888 just expired 185 Chinese have each paid
the $50 tax in Vancouver, and 24 in Victoria ; total, 209.
Victoria, 30th June, 1888.
APPENDIX No. 7.
re insolvency law.
Letter from the British Columbia Board of Trade to the Hon. the
Secretary of State, Ottawa :
Victoria, 4th January, 1888.
Sir :—By direction of the President and Council of the British
Columbia Board of Trade, I have the honor to transmit herewith a copy
of a resolution passed at a recent meeting of that Institution in reference
to the urgent need of an Insolvency Law, which matter the Board has on
several former occasions had the honor of laying before the Government.
1 have the honor,
&c, &c,
(Signed),       W. MONTEITH,
The Hon. Secretary.
The Secretary of State,
Ottawa.
^Resolution Passed by Council of British Columbia Board of Trade,
30th Dec. , 1887, re Insolvency Law :
Resolved,—That a communication be addressed to the Secretary of
State calling his attention to the continued necessity for an Insolvency
Law, this necessity having been frequently brought to the attention of
the Government from.time to time by the-Board ; and that the Dominion
Government be respectfully urged to legislate on this matter without
further delay, "the non-existence of any Bankruptcy Law being considerably prejudicial to the commercial interests of this Province."
Letter from the Hon.  the Secretary of State to the British
Columbia Board of Trade :
Ottawa, 12th January, 1888.
Sir :—-I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of 4th inst. transmitting a copy of a resolution passed at a 43
recent meeting of the British Columbia Board of Trade, with reference
to the urgent need of an Insolvency Law which it is alleged exists- in'
the Province of British Columbia, and to state that the matter will
receive attention.
I have, &c., &c.,
(Signed), G. POWELL,
W. MONTEITH, Esq., Under Sec'y of State.
Secretary B. C. Board of Trade,
Victoria, B. C.
Petition of the Toronto Board of Trade to the House of Commons* J
To the Hon&rable the House of Commons of the Dominion of Canada, in
Parliament assembled:
The Petition of the Board of Trade of the City of Toronto, humbly
sheweth :
1st. That since the year 1880 there has been no Law on the Statute
Books of the Dominion governing the equitable distribution of the
Estates of Insolvent Debtors.  ■
2nd. From time to time since then the various Boards of Trade
and Commercial organizations representing the mercantile classes of the
Dominion, have spent a great deal of time and labour, and have incurred
great expense in framing a measure on the subject referred to, and have
used every effort to induce the Government to facilitate the enactment^
of the same.
3rd. At the Session of the Dominion Parliament held in 1886, a
Select Committee of the House was appointed, who, after much arduous
labour and careful consideration of all the measures on the subject which
had been proposed in various quarters, hearing evidence and suggestions,
etc., framed a Bill, which was presented to the House by the Chairman,
the Hon. J. J. C. Abbott, Q. C, and which embodied substantially the
provisions considered essential by this and other Boards of Trade, with
great unanimity for many years.
4th. The Bill referred to, however, was never discussed in the
House, nor was it pressed farther than its initial stages.
5th. Upon representations being made by the respective mercantile
bodies to the Provincial Governments of the Provinces of Ontario and
Quebec, measures were passed by them dealing with the subject, as far
as it was possible in connection with civil rights, without assuming to
trench upon the jurisdiction of the Federal Parliament, to whom the
subject of Bankruptcy and Insolvency has been assigned by the British -
North America Act. 49
6th. Much as these measures have been appreciated by the business
men of both the Provinces and those doing business therein, the scope of
them is necessarily limited, and many of the powers and remedies which
creditors ought to have in dealing with the Estates of Insolvent Debtors
are wanting, while no provision is made for the discharge of Insolvents.
The measures themselves are quite different, aud the operation of them
is rendered difficult where the Debtors and .Creditors each reside in
different Provinces.
7th. In the Provinces other than tfiose of Ontario and Quebec, no
enactments whatever .exist providing for the equitable distribution of the
Estates of Insolvent Debtors, aud gross frauds and preferences are consequently perpetrated by dishonest Debtors, who are at liberty to deal
with their Estates as they please, setting their Creditors at defiance,
thereby injuring the credit of Canada abroad, and tending seriously to
restrict that interprovincial trade which the people of Canada have contributed so liberally in the building and operation of vast lines of transcontinental Railways, etc., to encourage.
Wherefore Your Petitioners Humbly Pray :
1st. That your honorable body would be pleased to facilitate the
passage at the present Session of the Bill reported by the Select Committee referred to, or some such measure.
2nd. Failing this, that in the public interest a measure be passed
giving to each Province liberty to deal with the matter, subject to any
Federal law which may thereafter be passed, so that there may be no
doubt as to the jurisdiction of the Provincial Legislature in legislating
upon the subject, in a thorough and comprehensive manner.
And your Petitioners as in duty bound will ever pray, etc.
Signed on behalf of the Toronto Board of Trade,
W. D. MATHEWS, President.
EDGAR A. WILLS, Secretary.
Toronto, March 7th, 1888.
APPENDIX No. 8.
RE SMUGGLING BY INDIANS.
Resolution of British Colombia Board of Trade, 7th Oct. , 1887 :
Resolved,—That as attention of the British Columbia Board of
Trade has been called to the systematic smuggling by Indians who are
regularly employed in various capacities in the neighboring territory of
the United States during certain seasons of the year, which Indians are 50'
in the habit of investing their earnings in articles of merchandise of
American manufacture liable to duty when imported into the Province,;,
by which the Government are defrauded of a large amount of revenue,
and the legitimate traders deprived of their business. This Board recommends that the attention of the Federal Government be immediately
called to the matter thiough our members of Parliament, and that they
be requested to urge upon the Government the necessity of taking immediate action to prevent the continuance of this illicit traffic, and further
that some provision be made for preventing the landing of such goods by
Indians by publishing a notice that such goods will be seized, in order
that during next month, when the Indians will be returning to their,
homes in British Columbia, the traffic may be prevented.
Resolution of British Columbia Board of Trade, 6th Jan. , 1888 :
Resolved,—That in the opinion of the Board, one of the best means
of stopping the practice of smuggling by .Indians from the United States
would be to appoint several preventive officers and station them at
certain points along the coast at the time of the year when such
smuggling is chiefly carried on.
N. B.—Copy of above resolution was forwarded to the Minister of
Customs 10th January, 1888.
Reply Dated 18th January, 1888, was Received as Follows : ,
Ottawa, 18th January, 1888 :
Sir :—I am in receipt of yours of 10th inst. with resolution of the
Board of Trade, suggesting the best means of stopping the practice of
smuggling by Indians from the United States into British Columbia.
This matter shall have the best consideration of the Department.
Yours truly,
(Signed), M. BO WELL.
W. MONTEITH, Esq.,
Secretary B. C. Board of Trade,
Victoria, B. C.
APPENDIX No. 9.
re fisheries of british columbia.
Minute   of Council of British   Columbia   Board   of   Trade   re
Behrtng's Sea Seizures :
In view of the great importance to the Province of the Seal fishing
industry, the large amount of capital invested therein, the annual outlay
mm 51
for outfits, and wages of the various persons engaged in the business •
and the recurrence of so many seizures of British Columbia vessels in
Behring sea whereby widespread loss and distress have resulted to those
engaged in the industry and to their families ; besides affecting most
disastrously the commercial interests of the Province ; and considering
also that the matter of the seizures above referred is still in abeyance
this Board strongly urges upon the Dominion Government the advisability of referring the entire question relating to the Seal Fisheries in
Behring Sea to the International Commission appointed or about to be
appointed in connection with what is commonly termed the Fisheries
question, and suggests that the matter of Seal Fisheries in Behring Sea
and the seizures of vessels already referred to, should be dealt with by
the said Commission. The Board also recommends that in view of the
large number of persons directly interested in the industry residing
within the Province, the Commission should hold sitting at Victoria to
enable them to obtain more ready access to persons and papers.
ROBT.  WARD, President.
W. MONTEITH, Secretary.
Victoria, B. C., 30th Sept., 1887.
Minute of Council of British Columbia Board of Trade Suggesting
Best Means of Protecting the Interests of British Columbia
on Questions Relating to Fisheries :
In the event of a renewal in substance of the Treaty of Washington,
1871, the Board is of opinion that if British Columbia is included therein
it would be advantageous to the Province.
The taking of Seals should be included with the conditions set forth
in Article XVIII of said Treaty, and, as provided therein, the liberties
granted should continue to apply solely to the Sea fisheries, and that the
Salmon and Shad fisheries, and all other fisheries in rivers and the mouths
of rivers should continue to be reserved exclusively for British fishermen.
The Board would advocate the free interchange of the products of
the Fisheries, including fish oils and fish guano, and that provision
should be made for the free admission on both sides of tins and packages
containing fish and fish oils. The Board also advocates the free interchange of coal, coke, lumber, timber, spars and other products of the
forest; also turpentine, rosin, wool and hops.
The Board is opposed to any Treaty discriminating in favor of a
foreign country as against the Empire of Great Britain.
ROBT. WARD, President.
W. MONTEITH, Secretary.
Victoria, B. C, 29th-Sept., 1887.
■•— 52
Minute of .Council of British Columbia Board of Trade re Regulation of Salmon Fisheries :
1. That this Board acknowledge the receipt of the letter of the
Deputy Minister of Fisheries, dated Ottawa, 15th inst., and convey to
the Department the gratification felt by the Board at the action proposed.,
to be taken with the view of restricting to some extent the fishing for.
Salmon in the rivers and waters of British Columbia.
2. At the same time, in the opinion of the Board it is desirable
that some further representation be made to the Department upon the ;
matter, and the urgent necessity for additional restrictions more plainly,
pointed out, as it is yearly becoming more apparent that the supply of
Salmon on the Fraser River and elsewhere in the Province, on account!
of over-fishing, is threatened by exhaustion, or at least so great a dimuni-o
tion as would virtually put a stop to this most important industry in'
British Columbia and the consequent loss to the Province of the large;J
annual expenditure for labor and material, besides affecting in a very^
material way the food supply of the Indian population.
3. The Board would therefore again direct the attention of the
Department to the urgent necessity that exists for further immediate^
action to restrict in some material way the taking of Salmon for export'
in the waters of British Columbia, with the view, if possible, of making?
the industry a permanent one to the Province, and beg respectfully to';
submit the following suggested regulations, which, in the opinion of this
Board, would advance the end in view while not causing any hardship to
those who have invested large sums of money in the Canning business,
or others who may follow the business of Salmon fishing for a living.
4. In support of the contention of this Board that the permanency
of this industry is endangered we would respectfully call attention to the
steadily decreasing supply of Salmon on the following Rivers on this
coast, viz. :
Sacramento River from 126,387 cases in 1882 to   53,900 cases in 1887
1883 " 373,800     |
1882 " 128,800     "
'       1882 I     3,000     "        "
1882 "    11,100     "
1883 "      rajj I
Being a decrease of 72% in a period of six sjeasons, while in nearly
every instance the number of Cannery establishments and of hands
employed have largely increased.
The Board readily admits that it is difficult to suggest a soheme for
the limitation of Canneries applicable to all rivers and places in British
Columbia River	
"   629,438
Fraser River, B. C...
"   196,300
Alert Bay, B. C	
4,500
Rivers Inlet, B. C....
"     20,382
Smith's Inlet, B. C...
5,000
BSPP 53
Columbia, but thinks it is most desirable that some steps be taken immediately, and should hardships arise in carrying out the regulations in any
special cases they can be dealt with by the Department on their merits
,as they occur.
The Board suggests the following Regulations for limiting Salmon
Canneries :
a. That applicants for a new Cannery or other licenses for packing
Salmon for export shall give notice of their intention to make such
application to the Resident Inspector, giving full particulars and shall
publish same for thirty days.
That no license shall be granted until after the expiry of thirty
6.
days.
c. That the Resident Inspector shall forward all applications to the
Department and receive their instructions before granting any application.
d. That the number of licensed boats to each Cannery shall not
exceed forty.
e. That the total number of boats for the whole of Fraser River
shall not exceed 500 boat§ employed in taking fish for Cannerj purposes
or for export beyond the Province.
/. That no Cannery shall be allowed to use the fish from more than
40 boats, but may employ " outside boats," and such " outside boats " so
employed shall be counted as part of the licensed boats belonging to the
Cannery employing them, and the number of the said Canneries' licensed
boats shall be reduced accordingly. •
g.    That no restriction shall apply to any boats fishing for local
consumption, for sale when fresh, or for salting for local market, but all
^fishing establishments,  whether for freezing  or  salting, or otherwise
preserving the Salmon for shipment beyond the Province, shall be regulated and. treated in the same way as provided for Canneries.
ROBT. WARD, President.
W. MONTEITH, Secretary.
Victoria,.B. C, 22nd March, 1888. r~
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<3© >■© 55
APPENDIX No. 10.
Report of Special Committee of British Columbia Board of Trade
re Upper Yukon Country:.
To the President and Members of the British Columbia Board of Trade :
Your Committee appointed to report on matters relating to the
Region known as the Upper Yukon River, beg to report:—
They have had several interviews with Captain Wm. Moore, who
. has submitted to them Maps of the Upper Yukon River, and from whom
they have obtained much interesting information of that comparatively
unknown Region.
It is represented that the Upper Yukon, of which River several
; thousand miles of navigable water flow through British territory, is rich
in gold deposits, and that during last year some 350 miners were engaged
in those parts, and found profitable diggings, and as high as §140 was
taken to the hand in a single day.
Gold bearing quartz has also been found.
The Region also abounds with fur bearing animals.-
From the information afforded the conclusion is, that a large and
valuable mining region exists, and which in t-he near future will, attract
an important mining population.-
The existing means of getting to that Region are attended with great
expense and absolute hardships and deter all but hardy adventurers and
explorers from attempting to reach it.
It appears, however, from Maps and notes which have been laid
before the Committee that a short route has been discovered which if
opened up by the construction of a Trail, would make it possible to reach
that Region in the short time of about 6 days after leaving Victoria.
The Route is described briefly as follows:—At the head of Lynn
Canal (in Alaskan Teiritory) there is a Bay, named Shagna Bay, which
is accessible to sea-going vessels of the largest size, and is perfectly protected from winds, and besides having good anchorage, affords excellent
facilities for the erection of wharves.
From that Bay to navigable water on Takoun Lake or Windy Arm,
which is part of the Upper Yukon River, the distance by land is only, it
is said, about 47 miles, 17 miles of which are in Alaska and the remainder
(30 miles) in British Columbia.
Arrived at Takoun Lake or Windy Arm the vast Yukon River is
.navigable (with the  exception  of White Horse Canyon) to its mouth,
in Behring Sea, for River Steamers of large tonnage. 56
The land Route referred to crosses a range of mountains through a
pass, the altitude of which is 2400 feet above the level of the sea, or
1200 feet less than that of Chilcoot Pass, which is the only other known
practicable Pass.
It thus appears that only a distance of 47 miles has to be traversed
by land to reach the navigable waters of the Upper Yukon River, and
when this route has been opened it will be possible to reach those regions
in about 6 days from Victoria ; 4 days being occupied by Steamer to
Skagna Bay and 2 days in land travel, and a country of vast possibilities
to the Miner and Trader will then be within easy reach.
It is stated that the Government of the United States will, at an
early date, construct a trail through the portion of the Route in their
Territory—that is, from Skagna Bay to the Summit of White Pass—a
distance of about 17 miles.
The remainder of the Route, 30 miles, as before mentioned, traverses
British Columbia, and the Committee therefore recommend that the
Local Government should be urged to consider the matter herein submitted, and to adopt means for continuing the trail from the point of
terirination in Alaska, to Takoun River or Windy Arm, thus securing a
trail over the entire distance of 47 miles.
Inasmuch as such a trail would also open a way into the North West
Territory (also a rich mining Region) the Local Government would no
doubt obtain the co-operation of the Dominion Government in a work
which would be beneficial to both Governments.
Another matter also deserving consideration is that at present Canadian goods destined for the Upper Yukon in British Columbia and North .
West Territory, pass through United States territory, and are in consequence subject to the duties of that country, the effect of which is that
that Region is entirely supplied with goods from United States, and
practically the country as a source of Revenue, or as an outlet for
Canadian trade, is valueless to the Dominion.
The Dominion Government should therefore endeavor to arrange
with the Government of the United States a scheme by which goods purchased in Canada could be passed through Alaskan Territory, in Bond,
and probably the system which was adopted and is now in force in relation
to the Stickeen River and Cassiar might be applied at Skagna Bay.
A memorandum of distances from Juneau City to various points on
the Yukon River is appended.
MATTHEW T. JOHNSTON,-v
R. P. RITHET, J-Comniittee.
THOMAS EARLE, J
HS DISTANCES FROM JUNEAU CITY TO VARIOUS POINTS IN THE YUKON  REGION.
From Juneau City to the Mission  951 Miles.
'"'    Mission to Head of Salt Water  25 "
"            "         Boundary  35i "
Head of Lake Linderman 44 "
Head of Lake Bennett 49 "
Foot of Lake Bennett  751 "
"           "         Takish House  99J "
"           "         Head of Marsh Lake 100 "
1           "        Foot of Marsh Lake 116J "'
|           "        Head of Miles Canyon 145£ "
"         Head of. Lake Labarge 176 "
"           |        Foot of Lake Labarge 208 I
"           "         Hoodelnika River 240 "
"        Big Salmon River 274 "
"         Little Salmon River 311 "
"           "        Rink Rapids 371 "
" "        Chilcat House 411
"           "        Pelly River 437 "
"    Pelly River to Stuart River (R. F.)... . .120 "
''    Stuart River to Forty Mile Creek 120 "
Victoria, B. C, February 9th, 1888.
APPENDIX No. 11.
Address to the Late Hon. Thos. White, Minister of the Interior.
To the Honorable Thomas White, Minister of the Interior, d-c, dec.:
Sir :—We, the President and Members of the British Columbia
Board of Trade desire to extend to you a hearty welcome on this your
second visit to the Pacific province, and would avail ourselves of the
opportunity afforded by your presence, as a member of the. Cabinet, to
lay before you various public matters demanding, in our opinion, the
attention of the Dominion Government.
MAIL AND TELEGRAPH COMMUNICATION.
The'trausfer by the Government of the Telegraph lines within the
Province to the Canadian Pacific Railway Company has proved a source
of considerable inconvenience to the community generally, and we would
respectfully urge that the recommendations made to the Dominion Government by this Board, to grant the necessary permission to a private. 5&
Company to maintain and operate a line of telegraph at and from the
City of Victoria to connect with the Puget Sound Company's line, be I
carried out.
STEAM COMMUNICATION BETWEEN BRITISH COLUMBIA AND CHINA AND JAPAN.
The inauguration of this service, and the results which might fairly
be expected to follow, are hailed with much satisfaction by this Board.
We regret, however, that the Canadian Pacific Railway Company
has not thought fit to arrange for the steamers in question to call at this
place,  to land mails, freight or passengers for Victoria or Esquimalt, J
(Her Majesty's Naval  Station adjacent), thereby creating a delay of
■ fully 24 hours.
The Board, in view of the many claims which this port, as the chief
business centre and capital of the Province, possesses, would strongly
represent their feeling herein, and to point out to the Dominion Government that in their opinion no subsidy towards the said steamship line
should be granted by the Imperial or Dominion Governments, unless
upon the condition that the said steamers shall be directed to call at
Victoria inwards and outwards for the purposes named,
VICTORIA HARBOR IMPROVEMENTS.
This matter has been fully represented to the Government both by
this Board and by the members for Victoria City, but we regret that no
appropriation for the purpose has been made by Parliament. We would
again press upon the Government the growing necessity, so long existing,
for improving Victoria Harbor, and would respectfully ask that the work
be taken in hand without further delay.
BONILLA POINT SIGNAL STATION AND TELEGRAPH LINE.
This Board cannot too strongly urge upon the Federal Government
the importance and necessity of a station at this point, and it seems ^
hardly credible that the Dominion of Canada should possess no signal
and telegraph station on its Pacific Seaboard. Numerous shipping
casualties and loss of life might have been averted had such an establishment existed, and the great value of a signal station in this locality
cannot be over estimated. The Board trusts that the Government will
take into its consideration the recommendations already made with a
view to their speedy accomplishment.
PILOTAGE.
The system at present in force involves considerable vexation and
unnecessarily heavy expenditure on shipping, by reason of the existence
of a separate pilotage authority for each port in the Province, and we
are of opinion that the remedy for the evils complained of is the abolition
MHBPWiifr 59
of separate Boards, and the establishment of a central authority under
the Dominion Government, and this the Board urgently recommends.
TOWAGE.
Is a matter involving a long standing grievance by reason of the
undue facilities (which are not reciprocated) afforded by our shipping
laws to foreign tow boats. Legislation by the Dominion Government is
respectfully asked in order that our own ship owners may not continue
to be hampered in the prosecution of an industry which can hardly thrive
' nnder the existing law.
It would also be a direct benefit to British Columbia shipping
interests were the law prohibiting foreign vessels from engaging in
coasting trade in Canadian waters strictly enforced. American steamers
running between ports in Oregon and Washington Territory and Alaska
now call en route at two or more ports in British Columbia, which is
clearly a violation of the law and which if prevented might tend to
develop local enterprise in that direction.
INSOLVENCY LAW.
This Province in common with the rest of the Dominion continues
to feel the want of necessary legislation on this point, the absence of
which surrounds all business operations with a degree of uncertainty not
by any means conducive to the development of our resources or the expansion of our trade. The Board would respectfully direct your special
attention to this much felt want.
FISHERIES. /
One of our leading industries, viz., Salmon canning, would, in the
opinion of this Board, be greatly benefited where the Dominion Government to provide by legislation for the restriction of such establishments
to a number proportionate to the fishing capacity of the various rivers,
as the granting of licenses indiscriminately must result in the rapid
deterioration and ultimate exhaustion of these valuable fisheries.
The present system of licensing, viz., by imposing a tax on each
boat, in lieu of on each cannery, is also a matter of general complaint.
The Board has at the present time a special committee engaged in .examining into and reporting upon these and other points bearing upon the
subject of our Fisheries. We need hardly bespeak your good offices in
connection with a matter of such importance to this Province. .
behring's sea seizures.
The recurrence of the disagreeable events which last season threatened to cause serious international difficulties, point* to the necessity for
the speedy adjustment of the question at issue; and, inasmuch as the 60
interests of this Province are deeply involved, we sincerely trust that a
new treaty with the United States containing favorable fishery provisions
may shortly be negotiated. In addition to this there was the cost of
outfit. With respect to the seizures lately made in Behring's Sea, the
Board would respectfully ask that prompt steps be taken for the legal
representation of the Dominion Government at the approaching trial of
the imprisoned crews. It would be greatly to the advantage of this
Province were such provisions to include free interchange of all the
products of fisheries including fish oil.
It may here incidentally be remarked that the wages alone of the
men employed last season on board our own Sealing fleet amounted to
upwards of $75,000.
customs' tariff.
The recent heavy and sudden increase in rates of duty on many
articles of import, especially on such as cannot be cheaply manufactured
within the Dominion, and which are used in the construction of Public
works, has tended to adversely affect the trade interests of this Province,
and in view of the frequent and unexpected changes to which the
Dominion Customs Tariff appears ever liable, engendering as it does a
feeling of uncertainty, and consequent lack of enterprise, it is to be
hoped that the Government may, in response to the many representations-
that have been made to them on the subject, see fit to devise some
remedy for this oft recurring trouble. This Province, in view of its
isolated position, feels more than others the evil effects of these sudden
changes.
In conclusion we would say that recognizing in you one who has
always manifested a genuine interest in the welfare and progress of this
Province, we submit for your kindly consideration the various points
touched upon in this address, in the full assurance that your best efforts
will be directed in furtherance of our views.
Tendering you our best thanks for your courtesy in attending this
meeting,
We are,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
For the members of the B. C. Board of Trade,
f ROBT. WARD, Preident.
signed, ^ w   M0NTEITH) Secretary-
'Victoria, 10th August, 1887. 61
APPENDIX No. 12.
Resolution Passed by Council of British Columbia Board of Trade
re Navigation of Fraser River, 14th March, 1888 :
1. Whereas, the navigation of the Fraser River has hitherto been
impeded by the constant displacement of the channel in the vicinity of
the Sand Heads and the continual shifting of the buoys marking said
channel;
2. And Whereas, in consequence of the imperfect navigation
referred to herein and no authoritative Charts of said River being in
existence, it has not been found practicable to procure vessels to enter
said river for the purpose of carrying the products of the Lumber Mills
established at New Westminster and other points on said river ;
- 3. And Whereas, the Dominion Government has already taken
preliminary steps to establish a permanent channel sufficient to admit
vessels of reas6nable tonnage ; and the thorough completion cf this work
will, it is believed, fully supply a long felt want and enable manufacturers
to find an outlet for their products on an extensive scale in foreign
markets.
Resolved, that this Board represent to the Dominion Government
the urgent necessity of completing said work at the earliest possible
moment and that an appropriation be made by the Government for
that purpose.
The Board would also recommend that upon completion of the work •
now in progress, the Dominion Government authorize and carry out a
survey and prepare a Chart of said River in order that the publication of
the same in the proper quarter may enable Ship owners and Underwriters
to ascertain all requisite information to be obtained thereby.
Victoria, B. C, 14th March, 1888.
^>^»V
;v»i -T";w<tMH'V
SHIPPING
APPENDIX No. 13.
Port of Victoria, B. C.—Statement exhibiting the
number of vessels, with their tonnage and crews, which arrived
at and departed from this Port (Seaward) during the Fiscal
year ending 30th of June, 1888, distinguishing the countries
to which they belong, not including vessels trading between
Ports within the Dominion :
ARRIVED.
Under what Flag.                                       Number.            Tons. Crew.
British     55             26,302 909
United States  503           479,470 24,521
German       1                     50 14
Norwegian and Swedish       2               2,092 37
Bolivian       4              3,407 57
Chilian       2               1,542 26
Total   567           512,863 25,564
DEPARTED.
Under what Flag.                                       Number.             Tons. Crew.
British     47             25,632 906
United States  503           471,120 24,388
Norwegian and Swedish       1                     50 14
Bolivian       1                   762 14
Chilian       1                   616 12
Total  553          498,180 25,334
RECAPITULATION.
ARRIVED.
Under what Flag.                                       Number.            Tons. Crow.
British Steamers     20           10,249 426
mm 03
Under what Flag.                                     Number. Tons. Crew.
British Sailing Vessels     35 16,053 483
Total British     55 26,302 909
Foreign Steamers  484 467,293       ■     24,301 •
Foreign Sailing Vessels     28 19,268 354
Total Foreign  512 486,561 24,655
Total British and Foreign   567 512,863 25,564
DEPARTED.
Under what Flag.                                        Number.            Tons. Crew.
-British Steamers     29 17,043 645
British Sailing Vessels     18              8,589 261
Total British     47 25,632 906
Foreign Steamers   491 469,145 24,291
Foreign Sailing Vessels     15 3,403 137
Total Foreign  506 472,548 24,428
Total British and Foreign      553 498,180 25,334
 0	
Port of Victoria, B. C.;—Annual return, showing the
description, number and tonnage of vessels built and registered ; also the number, tonnage and value of vessels sold to
other countries at this Port, during the Fiscal year ending
30th June, 1888:
STEAMERS.
Built. Registered.
Class of Vessel. No.       Tonnage. No.    Tonnage.
Steamers'(Screw)  5 92.21 3       345.56
Total Steamers  5 92.21 3       345.56
SAILING vessels.
Sailing Vessels  1 41.25 j> 450.82
Total Sailing Vessels   1 41.25 5 450.82
•Grand Total  6 133.46 8 796.38 64
Port of . Victoria, B. C.—Statement of Vessels, British,
Foreign and Canadian, entered inward (from sea), at this Port
during the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1888 :
BRITISH  WITH  CARGOES.
No. of Tons Tons
From—                                                   Vessels.  Registered. Freight. CrewiJ
United Kingdom  10         8,020       11,812 170
United States     4         1,616            351 71
China     1             -729          1,000 20
Siam     1            709         1,080 16
Sindwich Islands     1             799               30 25
Japan     1          1,241               30 69
Total 18       13,114       14,303 371
FOREIGN WITH  CARGOE.
No. of Tons Tons
From—                                               Vessels.  Registered.   Freight. CrewJJ
United States ■ 390     354,366       18,755 18,735
Sandwich Islands     1     -      593              28 14
From Sea Fisl ones     3             186               15 35
Chili     1         1,046              75 16
Total 395     356,191       18,873 18,800
CANADIAN WITH  CARGOES.
No. of Tons Tons
From—                                                  Vessels.  Registered.   Freight. Crew.
United States     3            251            327 20
From Sea Fisheries   11             795               55 13Q
Total   14         1,046            382 150
BRUTISH  IN  BALLAST.
No. of Tons
From—                                                       Vessels.       Registered. Crew.'
United States     3               3,480 55
Japan     3               6,209 196
Total     6              9,689 251
FOREIGN IN BALLAST.
No. of Tons
From—                                                       Vessels.       Registered. Crew.
United States HI           125,154 5 763 65
No. of
Vessels.
Peru     1
Mexico  2
Sandwich Islands  1
Chili  1
United States of Columbia  1
Total 117
CANADIAN IN BALLAST.
No. of
From— Vessels.
United States  15
Chiua     2
Tons
Registered
742
2,306
842
76
1,250
Crew.
12
36
15
7
22
130,370
5,855
Tons
Registered.
Crew.
1,161
112
1,292
'   25
Total.
Vt
2,453
137
RECAPITULATION.
WITH CARGO.
No. Of
Under what Flag. Vessels.
British..  18
Foreign 395
Canadian   14
Total 427
Tons Freight
Tons Weight
Registered, and Measure.
13,114 14,303
356,191   18,873
1,046     382
370,351
33,558
Crew.
371
18,800
150
19,321
No. of
Under what Flag. Vessels.
British     6
Foreign 117
Canadian   17
IN  BALLAST.
Tons
Registered.
9,689
130,370
Total 140
Grand Total 567
2,453
142,512
512,863
 0	
Port of Victoria, B. C.—Statement of vessels, British,
Canadian and Foreign, entered outwards for sea, at this Port
during the fiscal vear ending 30th June, 1888: , 66
BRITISH  WITH  CARGOES.
No. of Tons
Destination— Vessels. Registered.
United Kingdom     4 2,887
United States     4 2,280
Total     8 5,167
FOREIGN  WITH  CARGOES.
United States 209 206,759
Chili     1 616
Total 210 207,375
BRITISH IN  BALLAST.
No. of
Destination— Vessels.
United States     1
Australia     2
Japan     7
Total jj   10
CANADIAN IN  BALLAST.
United States  20
Mexico  1
China  1
To Sea Fisheries  7
Total  29
FOREIGN  IN BALLAST.
United States ' 291
To Sea Fisheries     5
Total 296
RECAPITULATION.
WITH  CARGO.
No. of Tons
Under what Flag. Vessels.      Registered.
British     8 5,167
Foreign 210     •   207,375
Total 218 212,542
Tons Cargo
Weight and
Measurement.
4,340
1,383
Tons
Freight.
5,723
4,203
9,926
Crew,
67
68
5,723
135
4,195
10,815'
8
12
4,203
10,827
Tons
Registered.
Crew.
700
13
2,814
37
14,108
472
17,622
522
1,809
124
142
17
396
10
496
98
2,843
249
264,897
13,541
276
60
265,173
13,601
Crew-
135
10,827
10,962 67
Tons
s.      Registered.
17,622
2,843
265,173
Tons
Freight.
Crew.
522
249
13,601
'     285,638
9,926
14,372
498,180
25,334
\
IN BALLAST
No. of
Under what Flag. Vessels.
British   10
Canadian   29
Foreign 296
Total 335
Grand Total 553
 0
Port of Victoria, B. C.—Statement of vessels, British
and Foreign, employed in the Coasting Trade of the Dominion
of Canada, which arrived at or departed from this Port during
the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1888 :
VESSELS  ARRIVED.
Numher.
Steamers—Screw 245
Paddle 359
Sternwheel  54r
Total Steamers 658
Sailing Vessels—Schooners  82
Sloops  19
Barges, &c     1
Total Sailing Vessels 102
Grand Total .' -760
VESSELS  DEPARTED.
' Steamers—Screw 240
Paddle 366
Sternwheel  52
Total Steamers.
.658
Sailing Vessels—Schooners  84
Sloops  15
Total Sailing Vessels  99
Grand Total 757
Tonnage.
•29,654
273,037
34,992
337,683
Crew.
1.713
7,402
1,026
10,141
3,104
45
835
398
20
10
3,984
428
341,667
10,569
27,540
278,105
33,696
1,680
7,481
988
339,341
10,149
3,192
35
401
16
3,227
417
342,568
10,566
I— Arrived—British.
68
RECAPITULATION.
Number.
    760
Total  760
Peparted—British  757
757
Tonnage.
341,667
341,667
342,568
342,568
684,235
CrewM
10,569
10,569
10,566.'
10,566^
21,135
Grand Total Arrived and Departed 1,517
 0—
Statement showing the number, class and tonnage of
vessels built and registered; and also the number, class, tonnage and value of vessels sold to other countries during the1-;
fiscal year ending 30th June, 1888 :
Built.
Class of Vessel.
Steamers—Screw.
Ships, new or old,-
Registered.   sold to other
No.
5
Tonnage.      No.    Tonnage. Countries.!.-
Total Steamers  5
Sailing Vessels—Schooners .. 1
Total Sailing Vessels.. 1
Grand Total  6
92.21
92.21
41.25
41.25
133.46
345.56
345.56
450.82
450.82
796.38
mi CUSTOMS STATISTICS.
APPENDIX No. 14.
EXPORTS.
Exports from the Port of Victoria, B. C, from 1st July,
1887, to 30th June, 1888 :—
Produce of the Mines—Gold in dust and bars    $560,756 00
" " Coal  2,866 00
" " Granite  95 00
Total of the Mines      563,717 00
Produce of the Fisheries  1,159,504 00
Forest  5,197 00
Animals and their Produce      296,297 00
Manufactures        31,956 00
Miscellaneous  658 00
Total -. $2,057,329 00
Goods not the produce of British Columbia        65,610 00
Total Exports $2,122,939 00
Exports from the Port of New Westminster, B. C, for
the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1888:—
Produce of the Forest $88,981 00
Mines (Platinum)     2,609 00
Fisheries     3,762 00
-Sundries        898 00
Total Exports $96,250 00
Exports from the Port of Nanaimo, B. C, for the fiscal
year ending 30th June, 1888 :—
Produce of the Mines (coal) $1,168,399 00
Produce of the Forest        71,994 00
Total Exports $1,240,393 00 70
Memo, of Coal shipments from Nanaimo for the fiscal
year ending. 30th June, 1888:—
Country where sent.                                                    Tons. Value.
United States 324,869 $1,137,040 00
Sandwich Islands     2,240 7,839 00
Mexico     3,020 10,570 00
China     3,700 12,950 00
Total 333,829 $1,168,399 00
Exports from the Port of Vancouver, B. C, for the fiscal
year ending 30th June, 1888 :—
Produce of the Mines $154,996 00
Fisheries  39100
Forest  361,199 00
Animals and their Produce     18,492 00
Agricultural Products       1,110 00
Manufactures     17,351 00
Total $553,539 00
Exports, the produce of Canada, from the Province o
British Columbia, for 16 years, ending 30th June, 1887:—
Animalsand Agricl   Manu-
Fisheries.   Forest, their Produce Produce factures
$ 37,706 $214,377 $214,700 $ 142 $1,540 $1,
Year.        Mines.
1872 $1,389,585
1873 1,224,362
1,351,145
1,929,294
2,032,139
1,708,848
1,759,171
1,530,812
1,664,626
1,317,079
1,437,072
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
43,361 211,026
114,118 260,116
133,986 292,468
71.338 273,430
105,603 287,042
423,840
633,493
317,410
400,984
976,903
6Zt
1,309,646 1,332,385
1,441,052 899,371
1,759,512 727,672
1,720,335 643,052
1,832,827 910,559
,360
273,366
258,804
172,747
362,875
407,624
458,365
262,071
194,488
235,913
259,292
320,625
411,810
329,027
240,893
257,314
268,671
339,218
350,474
300,429
287,394
271,796
414,364
329,248
380,126
2,885
5,296
9,727
3,080
3,083
462
2,505
3,843
248
946
6,791
1,745
2,324
1.917
10,265
1,197
443
1,
68
,500
100
22
2,616
443
1,413
5,948
2,811
1,911
3,
Total.
858,050
742,123
051,743
777,285
709,082
346,969 -
768,147
708,848,
584,001
231,55-*'
080,841
345,263 j
100,404
,172,39Xj
,891,811
,371,601- 71
Exports from British Columbia during the fiscal year
ending 30th June, 1888:—
Countries Exported To. Value. Articles Exported.
Great Britain $   812,677 Salmon, Lumber, Furs, &c.
United States  2,328,764 Gold Dust, Coal, Fish, Hides, &c.
Germany	
China	
Chili	
Peru	
Mexico	
Sandwioh Islands	
1,000 Curios.
jji^j 38,879 Lumber and Coal.
33,828 Lumber.
!$&■■ 38,078 Lumber.
875 Coal.
33,113 Salmon, Planks and Boards.
Australia      160,676 Salmon, Lumber, &c.
Japan        28,078 Lumber, Coal, &e.
Total value $3,475,968
IMPORTS.
Imports into the Port of Victoria, B. C, for the fiscal
year ending 30th June, 1888:—
Dutiable Goods—
Value of Total Imports $2,340,780 00
Entered for Consumption $2,233,376 00
Duty paid thereon $748,613 98
Free Goods—
Value of Goods entered for Consumption     523,543 00
"       Leaf Tobacco subject to Excise	
"       Leaf Tobacco entered for Consumption         14,470 00
Coin and Bullion      145,439 00
"       Other Imports	
12,725 00
145,439 00
423,451 00
Total Value of Imports $2,922,395 00
Total Value of Goods entered for Consumption. $2,916,828 00
Imports into the Port of New Westminster, B. C, for
the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1888:—
Dutiable Goods, value $ 79,165 00
Fiee Goods, value \ 29.320 00
Total Imports $108,485 00
Duties collected  $20,747 .00 72
Imports into the Port of Nanaimo, B. C, for the fiscal
year ending 30th June, 1888 :—
Value of Dutiable Goods Imported $172,394 00
"       Free " "            16,284 00
Total Imports $188,678 00
Duties collected  $41,584 03
Imports into the Port of Vancouver, B. C, for the fiscal
year ending 30th June, 1888 :—
Total Duties collected on Goods Imported $50,508 33
1     Chinamen   11,038 50
Minor Revenues     1,459 62
« Total Duties collected $63,006 45
■i 73
Imports into the Province of British Columbia for 16
years ending 30th June, 1887 :—
Value of
Total
Imports.
Goods Entered for Home Consumption.
Dutiable
Goods.
Free
Goods.
T t , Duty
total.       collected.
To 30th June, 1872 $1,790,352 00 $ 1,600,361 00J
From Canada        22,215 00 1
To 30th June, 1873  2,191,011 00  1,569,112 00|
From Canada        75,604 00	
|S> 30th June, 1871  2,085,560 00 1,676,792 00
I  From Canada         66,104 00 ,
To 30th June, 1875  2,543,552 00  1,924,482 00
From Canada      il7,654 00 !
To 30th June, 1876  2,997,597 00 2,237,072 00
From Canada      129,735 00	
To 30th June, 1877  2,220,968 00  1,820,391 00|
FromCanada      163,142 00	
To 30th June, 1878  2,244,503 OOl 1,905,201 00
From Canada     144,754 00	
To 30th June, 1879 l.\ 2,440,781 00 1,997,125 00
FromCanada      184,95100	
To 30th June, 1880  1,689,394 00  1,614,165' 00
FromCanada      208,072 00	
To 30th June, 1881  2,489,643 00 2",214,153 00
FromCanada      387,11100    1
To 30th June, 1882  2,899,223 00 2,472,174 00|
From Canada      449,768 00	
To 30th June, 1883  3,937,536 00 3,331,023 00
FromCanada      624,207 00	
To 30th Jime, 1884.-  4,142,286 00  3,337,642 00:
From Canada      789,287 00	
To 30th, June, 1885  4,089,492 00 3,458,529 00
FromtCanada      927,054 00   	
To 30th June 188&  3,953,299 00  2,951,379 00
To 30th June, 1887.  3,547,852 00 3,065,791 00
$166,707
22,215
507,364
75,604
371,544
66,104
566,111
117,054
707,906
129,735
346,318
163,142
367,926
144,754
320,326
184,951
122,451
208,072
242,963
387,111
404,287
449,768
550,833
624,207
702,693
789,287
'564,923
927,054
1,060,347
560,348
00 f 1,761
001 22
2,076,
2,048!
66.
2,490.
117.
2,944,
129!
2,166,
163.
2,273
144.
2,317.
208!
2,457:
184
1,736.
387!
2,875.
449:
3,866
624
4,040
789
4,023
927
4,011.
3,626
,068 00
,215 00
.47<5 00
604 00
336 00
104 00
,593 00
054 00
,978 00
735 00
,709 00
142 00
,127 00
,754 00
454 00
,072 00
,116 00
,951 00
,616 00
,111 00
,461 00
,768 00
856 00
207 00
335 00
287 00
,452 00
,054 00
726-OH
139 00|
$342,400 18
302,147 65
336,494 47
413,921 50
488,384 52
403,520 21
426,125 14
484,704 04
450,175 43
589,423 62
678,104 53
907,765 54
884,076 21
966,143 64
880,226 65
883,421 53
Duties paid by the Province of British Columbia during
17 vears, ending- 30th June, 1888:—
Duties collected for year" ending 30th June, 1872 $
SDuties colleoted for year ending 30th June, 1873	
vButLes collected for year ending 30th June, 1874 	
^Duties collected for year ending 30th June, 1875 	
•^Duties collected for year ending 30th June, 1876	
Duties collected for year ending 30th June, 1877	
Duties collected for year ending 30th June, 1878	
\Dutdes collected for year ending 30th June, 1879	
jDutaes collected for year ending 30th June, 1880	
Duties collected for year ending 30th June, 1881	
Duties collected for year ending'30th June, 1882	
Duties collected for year ending 30th June, 1883	
Duties collected for year ending 30th June, 1884	
Duties collected for year ending 30th June, 1885	
Duties collected for year ending 30th June, 1886	
Duties collected for year ending 30th June, 1887'	
Duties collected for year ending 30th June, 1888	
342,400 84
301,147 65
336,494 37
413,991 50
488,383 52
403,920 21
426,125 14
484,704 04
450,175 43
589,423 62
678,104 53
907,765 54
884,076 21
996,119 36
880,393 36
877,188 78
873,952 26
§10,305,367 26 «M BY-LAWS
—of the;—
British Columbia Board of Trade,
AS AMENDED TO 30th JUNE, 1888.
APPENDIX No. 15.
MEETINGS.
I. The Annual General Meeting of Membeis of the "B. C. Board
of Trade " shall be held on the 1st Friday in July at 3 p. m. The regular
Quarterly Meetings of the Board shall be held at the same hour on the
1st Friday of months of January, "April, July and October each year,
and at the time prescribed for the Annual General Meeting. Should the
day of Meeting, either Annual or Quarterly, fall on a legal holiday, the
Meeting shall be held the following day. >
QUORUM.
II. At any General Meeting seven members present in person shall
constitute a quorum for the transaction of business. At Council Meetings five shall form a quorum (including the President, Vice-President
or Member elected to act as Chairman). Should a quorum not be formed
by 3.30 on any occasion the Meeting shall stand adjourned for one week.
PLACE  OF MEETING.
III. The place of meeting shall be arranged from time to time by
the Council, and mentioned in the Notices calling each Meeting until
such time as a regular place of Meeting shall have been determined by
the Council.
ORDER OF  BUSINESS.
IV.'   Reading Minutes of last Meeting.
Reports and Communications.
Elections to fill Vacancies.
Nomination and Election of new Members.
Unfinished business.
Miscellaneous business, 76
AUDIT.
V. At the regular Quarterly Meeting held in April of each year the
President shall appoint a Committee of three to audit the books and;
accounts of the Secretary-Treasurer for presentation at  the   Annual^
General Meeting.
MOTIONS.
VI. All motions, except those for previous questions, postponement or adjournment, shall be made in writing ; and no debate shall be
permitted, except on a motion regularly moved and seconded ; every
motion made in writing shall be read by the proposer in his place previous to offering it to the President. K*?ll
(a.) No Member shall speak twice on the same subject except by
permission or by way of explanation.
(b-.) A Member may call for the division on any motion, should any
doubt exist as to the ruling of the President.
ALTERATION OF BY-LAWS.
VII. Notice to amend any By-Laws or to introduce a new one shall
be made in writina; at the regular Quarterly Meeting next previous to ;
the one at which it is intended to be considered.    Any such notice as
aforesaid must contain in full " the wording of the proposed amendment
or addition."
SUBSCRIPTIONS.
VIII. (a.) The annual subscription of Members shall be twelve
dollars, payable by quarterly installments of $3.00 in advance, to the
Secretary at the office of the Council of the Board of Trade.
(b.) Members in arrears for three months shall be deemed delinquent aud their names shall be posted up in the office of the "Board of
Trade " for one month, and the Secretary shall'notify them to that effect.
After thirty days from the date of such notice and posting their names
shall be liable to be remoyed from the "List of Members."
(c.) A list of delinquent Members (if any) shall be read at each
Quarterly Meeting, and their names duly entered on the minutes of said
Meeting.
ARBITRATIONS.
IX. (1.) Before any arbitration can be entered upon the parties
shall execute a bond of submission as provided by Statute hereinbefore
expressed.
| (2.)   In case of arbitration the Arbitrators shall be selected from the
" Board of Arbitration " as follows :    Each party shall choose one arbitrator and the third arbitrator shall be drawn by lot, from the remainder -
of said Board, by the Secretary of the Board, in the presence of the 77
parties, unless a third shall have been agreed upon or chosen by the
arbitrators within three days after the submission of the parties.
(3.) The three Arbitrators shall sit together unless the parties shall
consent to the matter being heard by one or two Arbitrators alone.
(4.) The decision of the majority of the Arbitrators, when more
than two sit, shall be final, and binding on both parties.
(5.)   The fees for arbitration shall be as follows :
(a.) For every meeting where the cause is proceeded with, but an
enlargement or postponement is made at the request of either party,
not less than $ 5.00
Nor more than  10.00
(b.) For every day's sitting, to consist of no less than five hours 10.00
(c.) For every sitting not extending to five hours (fractional parts
of hours being excluded) where the arbitration is actually proceeded
with,—for each hour occupied in such proceedings, at the rate of. .$ 2.0*0
(d.) Preparing forms of Submission Bond and forms of oath (to
litigants not being Members of the Board $5.00 per set, said fee to be
applied to the funds of the Board.
(6.) If any Arbitrator who has been duly selected (in manner aforesaid) to act, refuses or neglects to attend such arbitration, he shall be
liable to pay to the Secretary of said Board a fine of $5.00 for each and
every day on which he neglects to attend such arbitration unless relieved
by the Council. All fines inflicted as aforesaid to form part of the
revenue of the Board of Trade.
PROXIES.
X. (1.) At all meetings of the Board no Member shall be entitled
to vote who has not paid all dues belonging to him.
(2.) Members in good standing shall be entitled to hold two proxies,
and no more, for the purpose of voting at any meeting.
(3.) All proxies must be in writing and shall be deposited with the
Secretary on or before the day of the meeting, and may be either Special
or General.
EXPULSION  OF MEMBERS.
•XL (1.) Any member who is declared an insolvent shall thereby
be considered as retiring from the Board but shall be entitled to be
nominated for re-election at any time.
(2.) Any member can be expelled by the vote of three-fourths of
the members present at any meeting specially called for the purpose, at
which not less than one-half (£) of the whole number of members are
present either in person or represented by their proxies, 78
ENTRANCE  FEE.
XII. On and after the first day of January,  1886, any person
desirous of joining the Board of Trade shall pay an  entrance fee df-J
twenty dollars ($20.00) in addition to his annual subscription.
XIII. Officers, Council and Arbitration Board shall be elected by
ballot.
APPENDIX No. 16.
CUSTOMS   OF   THE   PORT.
RATES  OF  COMMISSION.
Whenever no special   agreement   exists,   the  following
collectable:
1. On purchase of stocks, bonds, and all kinds of securities,
including the drawing of bills for payment of the same. 2$
2. On sale of stocks, bonds, and all kinds of securities, in
cluding remittances in bills and guarantee 2^
3. On purchase and sale of specie, gold dust and bullion.. .  1
4. On sale of bills of exchange, with endorsement 3^
5. On sale of bills of exchange, without endorsement  1
6. For endorsing bills of exchange, when desired 2J
7. On sale of produce, &c, from California, Oregon, Wash
ington Territory, Sandwich Island ports and other
Pacific Coast ports, with guarantee 7£
8. On sale of merchandise from other ports, with guarantee. 10
9. On goods   received on   consignment   and   afterwards
withdrawn 3i
10. On purchase and shipment of merchandise, with funds
on hand, on cost and charges  5
11. On purchase,  and shipments  of merchandise without
funds, and cost and charges 7i
12. For collecting and remitting delayed or litigated accounts. 10
13. For collecting freight by vessels from foreign ports, on '
amount collected  5
14. For collecting general claims   5
15. For collecting general average,—on the first $20,000 or
any smaller amount  5
16. For collecting general average,—on any. excess  over
$20,000 2£
17. On purchase or sale of vessels  2
shall   be
per cent.
per cent.
per cent.
per cent.
per cent.
per cent.
per cent,
per cent.
per cent.
per cent.
per cent,
per cent.
per cent.
per cent.
per cent.
per cent,
per cent, 79
18. For " Port Agency " to vessels with cargo or passengers from foreign
ports, as under :
On vessels under 200 tons register $ 50.00
On vessels of 200 to 300 tons register   100.00
On vessels of 300 to 500 tons register   150.00
On vessels over 500 tons  200.00
19. For disbursements of vessels by consignees with funds
on hand 2i per cent.
20. For disbursements  of vessels  by  consignees  without
I funds on hand   5 per cent.
21. For procuring freight or passengers   5 per cent.
22. For chartering vessels, on amount of freight, actual or
estimated, to be considered as due when the "Charter
Parties" or memorandum of their conditions, &c.,
are signed  5 per eent.
23. ' On giving Bonds ^or vessels under attachment in litigated
cases, on amount of\the liability 2^ per cent.
24. For landing and reshipping goods from vessels in dis
tress, on invoice value, or in its absence, on market
value   5 per cent.
25. For receiving and forwarding goods,—on invoice amount.2^ per cent.
26. For advancing on freight to be earned  5 per cent.
27. For effecting marine insurance,—on the amount insured ^ per cent.
28. The foregoing Commissions to be exclusive of Brokerage, and every
charge actually incurred.
29. Vessels to pay clerk hire and the labor on the wharf, sorting and
delivering cargo.
30. The receipt of Bills of Lading to be considered equivalent to receipt
of the goods.
xrv
RATES OF STORAGE ON MERCHANDISE.
STORAGE PER MONTH. V
On measurement goods 50 cents per ton of forty cubic feet
(40 c. ft.) On heavy goods 50 cents per ton of 2240 lbs. Or in either
case the amount actually paid if more. The consignee to have the option
of charging by measurement or weight.
Any fraction of a mouth to be charged as a month.
REGULATIONS.
XV. (a.) Concerning the delivery of merchandise, payment of
freight, &c. : When no express stipulation exists per bill of lading,
goods are to be considered as deliverable on shore.
<— 80
(b.) Freight on all goods to be paid, or secured to the satisfaction
of the captain or consignee of the vessel prior to the delivery of the goods, I
(c.)   After delivery to the purchaser of goods sold no claims for
damage, deficiency, or other cause, shall be admissable after goods sold ■
and delivered have once left the City.
(d.)   When foreign bills of lading expressly stipulate that the freight
shall be paid in a specific coin, then the same must be  procured if^
required,  or its equivalent given,—the rate to be determined by the!
current value at the time at the Banks.
XVIII. WHARVES.
I. The proprietor or occupants of any wharf shall be entitled to thes,
inside berth up to the line of his or their property.
II. The proprietor or occupant of the adjoining property may
"overlap " by using the outer berth, or may use the inner berth if not
required.
III. Not more than two vessels shall be allowed to lie abreast of
any wharf at the same time unless they can do so without occupying H
greater depth (or space) ^han 60 feet from the water front.
The foregoing By-Laws, Rules and Regulations were submitted to
and approved by the members present at the Quarterly General Meeting
of the British Columbia Board of Trade held on the 2nd of October, and .
finally adopted at an adjourned General Meeting on the 8th of October,
A. D. 1879.
APPENDIX No. 17.
Ports of Victoria and Esquimalt, British Columbia.
PORT CHARGES.
Vessels bound to other Ports, coming to an anchor in Royal Roads,
Pilotage  free, except services of Pilot are  employed, when  Pilotage
according to the following graduated scale shall be payable : —
Inside or North of Race Rocks to Royal Bay $0 75 per foot.
Beachy Head to Royal Bay  1 50       "
Pillar Point to Royal Bay   3 00       1
Cape Flattery to Royal Bay   6 00       "
Vessels entering into or clearing from undermentioned Ports :—
Esquimalt Harbor (under sail) $4 00 per foot.
do. (under steam or in tow) i  3 00      "
Victoria Harbor (under sail)  4 00      "
do. (under steam or in tow)  3 00      "
HBP^w 81
Vessels proceeding from Victoria to Esquimalt, and vice versa, and
having discharged or received a portion of their cargo in either Harbor,
and having paid full Pilotage into either Harbor, if proceeding with the
assistance of steam, shall pay $1.50 per foot.
Towage from Royal Roads or Esquimalt to Victoria Harbor, from
$50XX) to $75.00.
Towage from Victoria, Esquimalt Harbor, or Royal Roads, to Sea,
outside Cape Flattery, from $100.00 to $150.00.
Towage from Victoria and Esquimalt Harbor, or Royal Roads, to
Burrard Inlet or Nanaimo and back;—
For vessels 400 tons and up to 500 tons $350 00
"         500 " 600 "     400 00
600 " 700 "     425 00
700 " 800 "     450 00
800 " 900 "     475 00
"         900 " 1000 "     525 00
"        1000 " 1100 I     550 00
"        1100 " 1200 I     575 00 -
Over 1200 "                               600 00
SIGNALS.
One Whfetle, Trim Yards.
Two      "       Set Fore and Aft Sails.
Three   "       Square Sails.
Four     "       Let go Hawser.
Ships to supply their own Hawser.
Ballast (Shingle)—From $1.00 to $1.25 per ton.
Fresh Water (at Esquimalt)—$1.00 per 1,000 gallons.
Victoria.
Wharfage—Free.
Hospital Dues—2 cents per ton register.    Sick Mariners are provided
with  Medical Attendance and Board, Free of Charge, at the
Government Marine Hospital, Victoria.
Stevedore Charges—For Stowing Salmon, 50 cents per ton weight of
2,240 lbs.
For Stowing Lumber, from $1.25 to $1.50 per mille feet.
For Discharging General Cargo, 50 cents per ton of 2,240 lbs.
Ballast to be discharged in not less than 20 fathoms of water.    This
applies also to the Harbors of Nanaimo and Burrard Inlet, B. C.

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