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British Columbia, &c. Return to an address of the Honourable the House of Commons, dated 1 June 1869;-for,… Great Britain. Colonial Office 1869

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Array     BRITISH   COLUMBIA,   &c.
§^m^ %.     Mtt
RETURN to an Address of the Honourable The House of Commons,
dated 1 June 1869;—-for,
PAPERS
ON THE
UNION   OF   BRITISH    COLUMBIA
WITH  THE
DOMINION   OF   CANADA.
Colonial Office,    "I
2 August 1869.)
W.  MOKSELL.
(Sir Harry Verney.)
Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed,
3 August 1869.
39°- 430
[  *  ]
SCHEDULE.
No. in
Series.
1.
DESPATCH FROM THE GOVERNOR OF CANADA.
Number and
Date.
7 March 1868
(No. 35).
Subject.
(Viscount Monck):
Transmits approved Minute of the Privy Council of Cnnada
on the subject of certain Resolutions adopted at a public meeting of the inhabitants of Victoria, British Columbia, with
reference to the desire of that Colony to be incorporated with
the Canada Union       --------
Page.
DESPATCHES FROM THE SECRETARY OF STATE.
1.
F
3.
4.
13 April 1868
(No. 69).
(Duke of Buckingham and Chandos):
Acknowledges Despatch, No. 36, enclosing Minute of Privy
Council relating to the incorporation of British Columbia with
the Canadian Union. States that whatever may be the advantages to be expected from the union of British Columbia
with the Dominion of Canada, the practical consideration of
the question must await tbe time when the intervening territory, now under the control of the Hudson's Bay Company,
shall have been incorporated with the Confederation
13 July    1868
(No. 135).
21 Sept.   1868
(No. 198).
1 Feb.     1869
(No. 22).
May     1869
(No. 84).
16 Aug. 1869
(No. 165).
Transmits, with reference to previous correspondence, for the
information of his Responsible Advisers, a Despatch from the
Governor of British Columbia, forwarding a Resolution passed
by the Legislative Council of that Colony relative to the incorporation of British Columbia with the Canadian Union -
Encloses Despatch from the Governor of British Columbia,
forwarding a motion which was made in the Legislative Council
of that Colony in favour of an Address to Her Majesty on the
subject of confederation. Observes, however, that the motion
was lost     ----------
(The Earl Granville):
Transmits Despatch from Governor Seymour, enclosing a
letter addressed to him by delegates from a convention held at
Yale on the subject of the Confederation       -
Forwards a Despatch from the Governor of British Columbia,
enclosing a Resolution of the Legislative Council of that
Colony adverse to the immediate union -
Transmits copy of Despatch addressed to the Governor of
British Columbia, making known to him the views of Her
Majesty's Government relative to the incorporation of that
Colony with the Dominion of Canada -
10
10
10 [    3    ]
ft Q1
Schedule—continued.
DESPATCHES FROM THE GOVERNOR OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
No. in
Series.
Number and
Date.
Subject.
II March 1867
(Telegram).
24 Sept.  1867
(No. 126).
24 Sept.  186?
(Separate) ■
14 May  1868
(No. 45).
28 July   1868
(No. 74.)
30 Nov. 1868
(No. 125).
4 March 1869
(No. 26).
(Governor Seymour) :
Enquiries whether provision can be made in the Bill now
before the Imperial Parliament, for admission of British
Columbia into Canadian Confederacy   -
With reference to telegram, encloses a Resolution passed by
the Legislative Council in favour of negotiations being entered
into for the union of British Columbia with the Eastern Provinces of North America     -------
States Iris views regarding tbe feeling entertained in the
Colony on the subject of the proposed union with the
Dominion ----------
Forwards Resolution passed by the Legislative Council on
the subject of the union. Although desirous to seethe projeet
carried out, is aware of the difficulties which obstruct its progress. Encloses paragraphs of his speech on the subject in
opening and closing the Legislative Council -        -        -        -
Encloses a motion made in the Legislative Council by Mr.
De Cosmos in favour of an Address to Her Majesty on the
subject of Confederation, which motion, however, was lost.
States that there is a feeling with many persons that the hopes
of the Colony's progress are to be found in a union with
Canada ; but that the difficulties appear to him almost insuperable, and the advantages remote   ------
Forwards letter from the principal leaders of a public meeting held at Yale. The questions being: (l). Union with the
Dominion; (2.) Representative Institutions and Responsible
Government; (3.) Retrenchment in the Public Expenditure;
and (4.) A reciprocal Commercial Treaty with the United
States. The Governor expresses his opinion on these questions, and encloses'his reply to that letter     -        -        -        -
Forwards a Resolution of the Legislative Council, urging
Her Majesty's Government not to take any decisive steps
towards the immediate consummation of a union with the
Dominion of Canada  --------
Page.
11
11
12
13
14
16
28
39°-
A -1 Ft Q ^
[    4    ]
Schedule—continued.
<■
DESPATCHES FROM THE SECRETARY OF STATE.
No. in
Series.
i\
Number and
Date.
19 Not.   1867
(No. 87).
11 July  1868
(No. 47).
19 Sept. 1868
(No. 75).
4 Feb.      1869
(No. 10).
6 May     1869
(No. 30).
14 Aug.  1869
(No. 84).
Subject.
(Duke of Buckingham and Chandos):
Acknowledges Despatches, No. 126, and | Separate," of the
24th September. States that whatever might be the advantage
from the union, that the consideration of that question must
await the time when the intervening territory, now under the
control of the Hudson's Bay Company, shall have been incorporated with the Confederation    ------
Informs the Governor that his Despatch, No. 45, of the 14th
May, enclosing a Resolution of the Legislative Council, on
the subject of union, had been forwarded to the Governor of
Canada for his information -------
States that his Despatch, No. 74, of 28th July, enclosing a
motion in the Legislative Council by Mr. De Cosmos, on the
subject of Confederation, had been forwarded to Lord Monck -
(The Earl Granville):
Acknowledges Despatch, No. 125, or 30th November, enclosing letter from delegates of a Convention held at Yale,
containing a Resolution and Address on the subject of the admission of British Columbia into the Dominion of Canada,
the desirableness of establishing Representative Institutions,with
Responsible Government, and the necessity for Retrenchment
in the Public Expenditure   -------
Acknowledges Despatch, No. 26, of the 4th March, enclosing a Resolution of the Legislative Council adverse to the
immediate union, and informs the Government that a copy of
it had been forwarded to Sir John Youngf -
States the views of Her Majesty's Government regarding
the Incorporation of British Columbia with the Dominion of
Canada      ----------
Page.
28
29
29
29
29
30 [    5    ]
PAPERS
ON  THE
UNION      OF     BRITISH      COLUMBIA
WITH THB
DOMINION      OP      CANADA.
98
DOMINION OF CANADA.
Despatch from the Governor of Canada.
Dominion of
Canada.
No. 1 —
(No. 35-)
Copy of a DESPATCH from Governor General Viscount Monck to his Grace
the Duke of Buckingham and Chandos.
Government House, Ottawa, Canada,
7 March 1868.'
■  (Received, 23 March 1868.)
My Lord Duke/ (Answered, No. 69, 13 April 1868, page 9.)
I have the honour to transmit for your Grace's information and favourable
consideration an approved Minute of the Privy Council of Canada on the subject
of certain resolutions adopted at a public meeting of the inhabitants of Victoria,
British Columbia, with reference to the desire of that Colony to be incorporated
with the Canadian Union.
I have &c.
(signed)       Monck.
No. |
Governor General
Viscount Monck
to his Grace the
Duke of
Buckingham and
Chandos.
7 March 1868.
Enclosure in No. 1.
Copy of a Report of a Committee of the Honourable the Privy Council, approved by Ins    Enclosure in No. 1
Excellency the Governor General on the 6th day of Maich 1868.
The Committee have had under consideration a memorandum, dated 5th March 1868,from
the Honourable the Minister of Public Works, stating that certain resolutions on the subject
of union with Canada, adopted at a public meeting of the inhabitants of Victoria, British
Columbia, on the 29th of January last, transmitted through the Hon. S. L. Tilley to
the Secretary of State for Canada, were, on the the third instant, referred to a Committee
of the Hon. the Privy Council, and by the Council referred to him, the Minister of Public
Wprks, for immediate Report.
That he has read and duly considered the purport of these resolutions, the circumstances
under which they were passed, and the action which ought to be taken by the Government
of Canada thereupon.
That it appears from these resolutions and the memorial of the Committee appointed at
the public meeting, which accompanies them, that the Legislative Council of British
Columbia on the 18th of March 1867, unanimously adopted a resolution requesting his
Excellency Governor Seymour "to take measures without delay to secure the admission of
British Columbia into the Canadian Confederacy on fair and equitable terms."
That it appears further that neither the people of British Columbia, nor the Government
of Canada have been apprised of any measures that may have been taken by the Government of British Columbia, in pursuance of the resolution of the Legislative Council.
390. A 3 That K *> Ft
PAPERS ON THE UNION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Dominion op
Canada.
That the resolutions adopted at the public meeting of the 29th January which was called
and presided over by the Mayor of Victoria, the chief city of the Colony, and the
statements of the memorial signed by the Mayor and by members of the Legislature and
others, leave little room to doubt that the people of that Colony are willing and anxious
that it should be admitted into union with Canada if the terms of admission can  be agreed
upon. i
The Minister of Public Works calls attention to the 146th section of "The British
Noith America Act" which applies to the case of British Columbia in express terms.
That it will be seen the resolution of the Legislative Council was passed before the British
North America Act came i .to force, and that it did not specify the terms of admission which
the Council asked the Government to secure. That if. is evident, therefore, that further
action is necessary by the Legislature of British Columbia before admission can take place
under the provisions of the Imperial Act.
That it is suggested in ihe memorial of the Mayor and other citizens of Victoria that
the Legislature of the Colony, being largely composed of officials, is not m zealous for
Confederation as the people whose opinions and wishes it ought to represent.
The Minister submits that, considering the peculiar constitution of ihe Legislature and
Government of British Columbia, and that notwithstanding the resolution of the Legislative
Council in March of last year, and the resolutions of public meetings and the expression of
opinion through the press of the Colony, both before and since the Act of Confederation, in
favor of union with Canada, no official communiction on the subject from British Columbia
has reached this Government, he would recommend that your Excellency communicate to
his Grace the Duke of Buckingham a copy of the memorial and resolutions referred to,
and request his Grace to instruct Governor Seymour to take such steps as may be deemed
proper to move the Legislative Council of British Columbia to further action in terms of
the imperial Act. He further recommends that his Grace be informed that the Goven-
ment of Canada will be prepared to submit to Parliament a proposal for the admission of
British Columbia into the union in the expectation that the Imperial Government will lose
no time in transferring the intervening North Western Territory to the jurisdiction of tbe
Canadian Government.
(Certified)
Wm. H. Lee, Clerk, P. C.
To His Excellency the Governor General and the Honourable the Queen's Privy Council of
Canada.
The Memorial of the undersigned, a Committee appointed at a Public Meeting
of the Citizens of Victoria, B.C., held on 29th January 1868,
Respectfully sheweth,
1. That on the 18th of March last, a resolution was unanimously passed by the Legislative Council of this Colony, asking his Excellency, Governor Seymour, to take measures
without delay, to secure the admission of British Columbia into the Canadian Confederacy
on fair and equitable terms.
2. That a public meeting was held at the same time in Victoria, expressing concurrence
with the action of the Legislative Council.
3. Thai the people of Cariboo, the next most populous and influential portion of the
Colony, held in December a highly enthusiastic meeting, and unanimously passed resolutions
in favour of immediately joining the Dominion of Canada.
4. That the "Daily British Colonist," the leading newspaper of the Colony, has, and
does, strenuously support confederation. The " Cariboo Sentinel," a paper of local
influence, pursues a similar course. The " British Columbian," a semi-weekly, published
at New Westminster, regarded as somewhat subject to Government influence, has expressed
itself in favour of confederation, but not very earnestly. The " Columbian" has only a
local influence. The " Examiner," a semi-weekly, published also at New Westminster,
advocates confederation. The " Morning News," a weekly, published in Victoria, the only
other paper in the Colony, is in favour of annexation to the United States, failing that,
supports confederation. The only paper that circulates through the whole Colony is the
" Colonist," and represents the general feeling of the country on confederation.
5. That public opinion throughout the Colony, so far as we can learn, is overwhelmingly
in favour of confederation.
6. 1 hat there is a small party in favour of annexation to the United States, and if it were
practicable or possible, their number would be largely increased.
7. i here is a small party, other than annexationists, who are opposed to confederation.
8. Nearly all the office holders in the Colony are allied to the latter party.
9. The WITH THE DOMINION OF CANADA. 7
9. The total number of those opposed to confederation on fair and equitable terms, is
numerically small, but supported by the office holders, they may exert a good deal of
resistance to the popular will.
10. That from information in a telegram from Ottawa, dated 22nd January 1868, we i
learn, that Governor Seymour has not made any propositions to the Dominion Government /
respecting our admission as was expected.
11. That the Legislative Council, the only Legislative body in the Colony, is made up
of a majority consisting of heads of departments, gold commissioners, magistrates, and
others, subject to Government influence, and cannot be relied upoh to urge on confederation
as it ought to be at the present juncture.
12. That the only popular institutions in the Colony are the city councils of Victoria and
New Westminster.
13. That, therefore, the people of this Colony are really without the means of expressing
and carrying out their wishes through the Legislature.
14. We, therefore, representing as we do the views of the people of this the most
populous and influential section of the Colony, and acting in unison with the general and
expressed wishes of the people throughout the Colony, would respectfully ask the Government of the Dominion to take immediate steps to bring this Colony into the Dominion, by
telegraphing or communicating with Her Majesty's Government, to issue instructions, with
as little delay as possible, to Governor Seymour, or otherwise to conclude negotiations as to
the terms of our admission.
15. We feel that, without the help and support of the Government of the Dominion, the
time will be remote when this Colony will be admitted into the Dominion, but with the aid
which we solicit, we believe that there is no obstacle to prevent our admission bv 'he 1st
of July next.
16. We would further represent for the information of the Government of the Dominion,
that the terms of admission which would be acceptable to the people of this Colony would
be :—
1. Canada to become liable for the entire public debt of this Colony, estimated
at #1,500,000.
2. Canada to provide for federal officers and services.
3. To grant a sufficient fixed subsidy, and per capita subsidy, to insure the support
<.f the local Government, in addition to the powers of taxation reserved to Provincial
Governments in " British North America Act."
4. Representation in the Senate and Commons of Canada.
5. The construction of a trans-con Linental waggon-road, from Lake Superior to the
head of navigation on the Lower Fraser, within two years after the time of admission.
This is regarded as an essential condition.
6. Popular representative institutions, insuring responsible control over the Government.
17. Hereafter we hope to communicate further information.    In the meantime we confidently trust the Government of the Dominion v. ill cheerfully aid the people of this Colony '
in furthering their wishes for immediate admission into the confederation.
18. Enclosed we send you a copy of requisition to the Mayor to call a public meeting,
and also resolutions passed at said meeting, held on the 29th January 1868.
We have, &c.
(signed)        James Trimble, Mayor of the City of Victoria,
and Chaiiman of Committee.
A. De Cosmos, Member of Legislative Council.
J. H. Powell, m.d., Member for the  City of
Victoria,    of    the     late     Legislative
Assembly of Vancouver Island.
R. Wallace, Merchant.
H. E.   Seelye, one   of the   Editors   of   the
" British   Colonist," and Secretary to
the Committee.
Victoria, B. C, 1 February 1868.
4oO
Dominion of
Canada.
Requisition.
To his Worship the Mayor of Victoria,
We, the undersigned citizens of Victoria, would respectfully request your worship to call
a public meeting in the theatre, on an early day, for the purpose of inquiring of his Excellency the Governor what   progress has  been  made  in   the negotiations respecting  the
390. A 4 admiss.on R O i
4
Dominion of
Canada.
PAPERS ON THE UNION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
8
admission of this Colony into the Dominion of Canada, and to consider the advisability of
takino- further steps to accomplish that object.
J.W.Powell.
Robert Wallace.
J. R. Stewart.
George J. Findlay.
Lowe Bros.
Lumley Franklin.
J. Id. Turner Sf Co.
And 55 others.
Reply.
Gentlemen,
In reply to your numerously signed requisition asking me ft call a public mee
inSe named therein I have great pleasure in acceding to your request, am
i^o n  WedneS e'vening nixt, atLlf-past seven o'clock, for said meeting.
the       ,
fore, appoint Wednesday evenin
Victoria, 27 Jan. 1868.
e to call a public meeting for
d, there-
To Messrs. Geo. J. Findlay.
J. W. Powell.
Lowe Bros.
Robert Wallace.
Lumley Franklin.
J. R Stewart.'
J. H. Turner & Co., and others.
I have, &c.
(signed)        James Trimble,
Mayor of Victoria.
Mr. Be Cosmos then offered the following Preamble and Resolution :—
Whereas we recognise in the successful consolidation of Canada, New Brunswick, and
Nova Scotia, into one great Government, constituting a new Nationality the hand ot
destiny pointing unerringly to the speedy consolidation of all Br.tish North America.: And
whereas the recent action of the Canadian Parliament in asking the Imperial Government
to transfer the North-West territory to the Dominion, making British Columbia its western
boundary, removes all obstacles of a territorial character to our admission into the Con-
fiEQGrflCV *
And whereas the Legislative Council at its last session unanimously passed an address to
the Governor, asking him to apply to the Government of Canada to admit this Colony into
the Dominion; and whereas information respecting such admission has not, as yet, been
communicated to the public through the Legislative Councillors as was expected : .
Resolved, That we deem it expedient that steps should be taken to conclude negotiations
with the Government of Canada for the immediate admission of this Colony into the
Dominion, on fair and equitable terms; and that an essential condition to such admission
should be the construction by the Dominional Government, within two years, of a transcontinental waggon-road, connecting Lake Superior and the head of navigation on the
Lower Fraser.
"When put to vote, the resolution in favour of confederation, with the Overland waggon-
road as an essential condition, was successful amid the wildest enthusiasm. Only about
20 hands were raised in opposition. A resolution, appointing a committee to wait upon the
Governor to ascertain what progress had been made in the matter, and to take steps to
further negotiations for the union of this Colony with the Dominion, was unanimously
adopted, and the meeting broke up with three cheers for the Mayor."—Colonist.
Mr. Seelye offered the following Resolution, which was seconded and carried unanimously:—
Resolved, That a committee of six, including the Mayor, be appointed by the chair, to
wait on his Excellency the Governor, and urge the adoption and carrying out of the views
of this meeting, and that such committee be authorised to transact any other business that
they may deem expedient to further the cause of confederation.
The Mayor appointed Messrs. Lumley Franklin, A. De Cosmos, Dr. Powell, H. E.
Seelye, Robert Wallace, and G. J. Findlay, who, with his Worship added, completes the
number called for in the resolutions.
Three cheers were given for the Mayor, and three for confederation, after which the vast
assemblage separated, and thus ended the most enthusiastic meeting in favour of confederation ever held here. WITH THE DOMINION OF CANADA.
437
Despatches from the Secretary  of State.
Dominion of
Canada.
No.
-No. 1.—
(No. 69.)
Copy of a DESPATCH from his Grace the Duke of Buckingham and Chandos His Grace theDuke
to Governor General Viscount Monck. of Buckingham and
Chandos to
My Lord, Downing-street, 13 April 1868.      vS^^S?
I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Despatch, No. 35,* of 13 April 1868. '
the 7th March, enclosing for my favourable consideration an approved Minute *Page 5.
of the Privy Council relating to the incorporation of British Columbia with the
Canadian Union. I have given to that Minute that attention which its subject
deserves, but I am of opinion that whatever may be the advantages to be
expected hereafter from the union of the Colony of British Columbia with the
Dominion of Canada, and however willing Her Majesty's Government may be to
promote that union, the practical consideration of the question must at all
events await the time when the intervening territory now under the control of
the Hudson's Bay Company shall have been incorporated with the confederation.
I have, &c.
(signed)        Buckingham and Chandos.
(No. 135.)
— No. 2. —
Copy of a DESPATCH from his Grace the Duke of Buckingham and Chandos
to Governor General Viscount Monck.
My Lord, Downing-street, 13 July 1868.
With reference to your Despatch, No. 35,f of the 7th of March, and to my
reply, No. 69,$ of the 13th of April, relating to the incorporation of British
Columbia with the Canadian Union, I have the honour to transmit to you, for
your information and for that of your Responsible Advisers, a copy of a Despatch
which I have received from the Governor of British Columbia, forwarding a
copy of a resolution passed by the Legislative Council of the Colony, in its
recent session, on the same subject.
I have, &c.
(signed)        Buckingham and Chandos.
No. 2.
His Grace the Duke
of Buckingham
and Chandos to
Governor General
Viscount Monck.
13 July 1868.
t Page 5.
J Above, p. 9.
mm
ar
— No. 3.—
(No. 198.)
Copy of a DESPATCH from his Grace the Duke of Buckingham and Chandos
to Governor-General Viscount Monck.
My Lord, Downing-street, 21 September 1868.
I have the honour to transmit to you for your information, and for that of
your Responsible Advisers, with reference to my Despatch, No. 135,§ of the 13th
July, a copy of a Despatch from the Governor of British Columbia, enclosing-
copy of a motion which was made in the Legislative Council of that Colony in
favour of an Address to Her Majesty on the subject of confederation with the
Dominion of Canada.
You will observe that the motion was lost.
I have, &c.
(signed)        Buckingham and Chandos.
No. 3.
His Grace the
Duke of Buckingham and Chandog
to Governor General Viscount Lord
Monck.
21 Sept. 1868.
Above, page 9.
Nr
"0.74
28 Jn
%J4;°^
390.
B y.
OQ
10
PAPERS ON THE UNION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
i
Dominion of
Canada.
No. 4.
Earl Granville,
k.g., to Governor
General the Right
Hon. Sir J. Young,
Bart.
1 Feb. 1869.
* Page 9.
t Page g.
»
3fi
$<*■
No. 4. —
(No. 22).
Copy of a DESPATCH from the Earl Granville, k.g., to Governor General
the Right Honourable Sir J. Young, Bart.
Sir Downing-street, I February 1869.
I have the honour to  transmit to you for your consideration,  and with
reference to my predecessor's Despatches to Lord Monck, of the 13th July* and
21st Septemberf last, a copy of a Despatch from Governor Seymour, enclosing
a letter addressed to him by delegates from a convention held at Yale, on the
subject of the union or confederation of British Columbia with the Dominion
of Canada.
I have, &c.
(signed)        Granville.
No. 5.
Earl Granville,
k.g., to Governor
General the Right
Hon, Sir J. Young,
Barf.
8 May 1869.
X Page 9.
— No. 5. —
(No. 84.)
Copy of a DESPATCH from the Earl Granville, k.g., to Governor General
the Right Honourable Sir J. Young, Bart.
Sir, Downing-street, 8 May 1869.
I have the honour to transmit to you for your information, and with reference
to my predecessor's Despatch to Lord Monck, No. 135,$ of the 13th July, a
copy of a Despatch from the Governor of British Columbia, enclosing a copy of
a resolution by the Legislative Council of that Colony adverse to the immediate
union of British Columbia with the Dominion of Canada.
I have, &c.
(signed)        Granville.
i
No. 6.
Earl Granville,
k.g., to Governor
General the Right
Hon. Sir J. Young",
BO'
art.
16 August 1869.
(No. 165).
No. 6. —
Copy of a DESPATCH from the Earl Granville, k. g., to Governor General
the Right Honourable Sir John Young, Bart.
\\
Sir, Downing-street, 16 August 1869.
I transmit to you herewith a copy of a Despatch I have addressed to the
Governor of British Columbia, making known to him the views of Her Majesty's
-$o.^'.pT-iea.at   Government—the important question of  the incorporation of that Colony
-^69- i       jj>>* with the Dominion of Canada.
I have so fully explained myself in that Despatch, that it is not necessary
that I should do more than instruct you at once to lay a copy of it before
your Advisers.
I have, &c.
(signed)        Granville,
sag* WITH THE'DOMINION OF CANADA.
11
439
BRITISH    COLUMBIA.
Despatches from the  Governor of British Columbia.
British
Columbia.
— No. 1. —
Copy of Telegram from Governor Seymour to Lord Carnarvon,
11 March 1867.
Can provision be made in Bill now before Parliament for ultimate admission
of British Columhia into Canadian Confederacy ?
No. j.
Governor Seymour
to Lord Carnarvon.
11 March 1867.
(No. 126.)
No. 2. —
Copy of a DESPATCH from Governor Seymour to his Grace the Duke of
Buckingham and Chandos.
No. 2.
Governor Seymour
to his Grace the
Duke of Buckingham and ChaDdos.
24 Sept. 1867.
Victoria, 24 September 1867.
(Received, 4 November 1867.)
My Lord Duke, (Answered, No. 87, 19 November 1867, page 28.)
I telegraphed to your Grace's predecessor, on the 11th of March—
i Can provision be made in the Bill before Parliament for the ultimate admission of British Columbia to Canadian confederation?"
2. I have the honour to enclose copy of a resolution passed by the  Legis- Enclosure
lative Council in favour of negotiations being entered into for the union of this
Colony with the Eastern Provinces of North America.
3. I have made some remarks on this subject in a separate Despatch of even
date.
I have, &c.
(signed)        Frederick Seymour.
Enclosure in No. 2.
Monday, the 18th day of March 1867.
Pursuant to the order of the day, the Council went into committee of the whole to consider the Hon. Mr. De Cosmos' motion in respect to taking steps to include British Columbia
in the British North American Confederation.
The presiding member left the chair.
The Hon. Mr. Brew in the chair of the committee.
The presiding member resumed the chair.
The committee rose, and the chairman handed in the following resolution, which, having
been put to the Council, was carried unanimously, and it was—
Resolved, That this Council is of opinion that at this juncture of affairs in British North
America, east of the Rocky Mountains, it is very desirable that his Excellency be respectfully requested to take such steps, without delay, as may be deemed by him best adapted
to insure the admission of British Columbia into the Confederation on fair and equitable
terms, this Council being confident that in advising this step they are expressing the views
of the colonists generally.
Enclosure in No. 2.
390. 440
British
Columbia.
12
PAPERS ON THE UNION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
No. 3. —
No. 3.
Governor Seymour
to his Grace the
Page 11.
f
If
111
(Separate.)
Copy of a DESPATCH from Governor Seymour to his Grace the Duke of
Buckingham and Chandos.
Victoria, 24 September 1867-
(Received, 6 November 1867.)
My Lord Duke, (Answered No. 87, 19 November 1867, page 28.)
With reference to my Despatch, No. 126,* of this date, I have the honour to
Duke of* Bucking- place in a separate despatch, with less reserve, a few remarks on the desire of
ham and Chandos. tne pe0ple of this Colony to join the Eastern Confederation.
2. A resolution was passed by the Legislative Council in favour of negotiations being entered into with a view to a union of all the British possessions in
North America.
3. Though the motion passed through the Council without opposition, there
was but little warmth felt in its favour. The question is obviously at present
one of great difficulty. It is hard to know what benefits the Colony or the
Eastern Confederacy would derive from a closer connection while the lands intervening between Canada and our frontier belong to a private company. The
resolution was the expression of a despondent community longing for change.
It was felt that no harm could be done by making public the desire for amalgamation with English communities so much nearer the mother country, and that
possibly some assistance might be given either by England or Canada towards
the making of a road across the continent.
4. When gold was discovered in British Columbia, and glowing accounts of
the wealth of the country filled columns of the leading London journals, a considerable number of immigrants arrived from home, with expectations which
even the vast national resources of the Colony could not satisfy. Most of those
who sought their fortunes here were men unable to make their way in Europe,
1 unequal to the labour which gold mining entails, without the business habits
requisite for the trader or the capital necessary to the farmer. Many of them
failed, and have thrown the blame of the failure upon other shoulders than their
own. No immigrants from England now resort to this Colony. The only Englishmen who find their way hither filter to us through California, and, as adventurous
Americans still visit us, the population is now becoming alien to a large extent.
5. It is thought by many of those who have made this their home that
the only chance of its being prosperous while a dependency of a very distant
country, which helps more by advice than by the substantial aid which a young
and struggling community requires, is a union with the more developed and
apparently more prosperous colonies on the Atlantic. My own impression is
that the main chance of keeping British Columbia English in sentiment is to
furnish from home some pecuniary aid, some military assistance, or help its
communications with the Dominion of Canada. Even independent of the great
distance from the mother country, natural features seem to indicate its connection with the eastern lands. The Cascade Mountains on the western side of our
principal gold mines and finest agricultural districts are more rugged than the
Rocky Mountains; and Dr. Rae, the celebrated explorer, informed me that there
were greater difficulties already surmounted on the line of road between Yale
and Lytton in this Colony than were to be found between Lytton and the
Red River settlements. The extraordinary natural difficulty of the access from
the Pacific to our best gold mines and agricultural districts seem to point to
an eastern connection.
6.
I;
I feel that I must necessarily write very vaguely on this subject. It is for
me merely to state the wish of the people of this Colony and my own for a
fusion or an intimate connection with the Eastern Confederation. It rests with
your Grace to see if that wish can be carried out. Merely to join the Confederation on the condition of sending delegates to Ottawa, and receiving a Governor
from the Canadian Ministry, would not satisfy the popular desire.
I have, &c.
(signed)        Frederick Seymour. WITH THE DOMINION OF CANADA
'3
441
— No. 4. —
(No. 45.)
Copy of a DESPATCH from Governor Seymour to his Grace the Duke of
Buckingham and Chandos.
New Westminster, 14 May 1868.
T\/r    t -, t» i (Received 1 Julv 1868.)
My Lord Duke, ; (Answered, No. 47, 11 July 1868, page 29.)
With relereiice to previous correspondence, I have the honour to forward
copy of a resolution passed by the Legislative Council on the subject of
union with the Dominion of Canada. Desiring, on the whole, to see the project carried out, I cannot be blind to the great difficulties which obstruct its
progress.
I enclose copy of the paragraphs on the subject which appeared in the
speech, with which I opened the Legislative Council, and in that with which
I closed it.
I have, &c.
(signed)        Frederick Seymour.
British
Columbia.
No. 4.
Governor Seymour
to his Grace the
Duke of Buckingham and Chandos.
14 May 1868.
Enclosure 1, in No. 4.
(No. 35.)
Resolution of the Legislative Council of 30 April 1868.
Ri
ir,
Encl. 1, in No. 4.
Council Chamber, 30 April 1868.
I have the honour to submit the annexed resolution of the Legislative Council of the
24th instant.
Resolved, That this Council, while confirming the vote of last Session in favour of the
general principles of the desirability of the union of this Colony with the Dominion of
Canada to accomplish the consolidation of British interests and institutions in North
America, are still without sufficient information and experience of the practical working of
confederation in the North American Provinces to admit of their defining the terms on
which such an union would be advantageous to the local interests of British Columbia.
His Excellency the Governor.
I have, &c.
(signed) William A. G. Young,
Presiding Member.
Enclosure 2, in No. 4.
Extract from Governor's Speech at Opening of Legislative Council.
During the last Session, your Honourable Council unanimously passed a resolution in
favour of negotiations being entered into for the union of this Colony with the confederation
which has been formed among the Eastern British Provinces on this continent.    Although
1 could not be blind to difficulties which made me consider the resolution principally as the 1
expression of a disheartened community, longing for change of any kind, yet the possibility I
alone uf something arising out of it to promote an overland communication with Canada,/
was enough to induce me to support your resolution.   I learn, in reply to my communications
on the subject, that the consideration of it must, at all events, await the time when the intervening territory now under the control of the Hudson's Bay Company shall have been
incorporated with the confederation."
Encl. 2, in No. 4.
Extract from Governor's Speech at the Closing of the Legislative Council.
I I notice that, while adhering to your vote of last year, in favour of confederation with
Canada, you are of opinion that it is not necessary to take any further steps in the matter
at present. I think your resolution a wise one. The question is by no means slumbering;
but the difficulties of the project are seen clearer by those who have a wider range of ■'
vision than we can possess, and without whose material assistance our efforts would be but
vain."
390-
c 2 44fc]
Q
British
Columbia.
No. 5.
Governor Seymour
to his Grace the
Duke of Buckingham and Chandos.
28 July 1868.
* Page 13.
14 PAPERS ON THE UNION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
— No. 5. —
(No. 74.)
Copy of a DESPATCH from Governor Seymour to his Grace the Duke of
Buckingham and Chandos.
Victoria, 28 July 1868.
(Received 9 September 1868.)
My Lord Duke, (Answered, No. 75, 19 September 1868, page 29.)
Referring to my Despatch, No. 45,* of the 14th May, I have the honour to
forward to your Grace copy of a motion which was made in the Legislative
Council by Mr. De Cosmos in favour of an Address to Her Majesty, on the
subject of confederation with the Dominion of Canada. This motion, your Grace
will see, was lost..
2. There is, however, a feeling with many persons in this Colony, that the
best hopes of its progress are to be found in an intimate union with Canada.
The difficulties, however, appear to me to be, in the present state of things,
almost insuperable, and the advantages remote.
Confederation would, however, probably attract greater attention to this
Colony than it now receives in England.
I have, &c.
(signed)        Frederick Seymour.
Enclosure in No. 5.
Enclosure in No. 5. Pursuant to a deferred Order of the day, the Honourable Mr. De Cosmos moved, the
Honourable Mr. Stamp seconding, the following Address to Her Majesty, on the subject
of Confederation with the Dominion of Canada :—
Li
To the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty.
Most Gracious Sovereign,
We, Your Majesty's dutiful and loyal subjects, the Members of the Legislative Council
of British Columbia, in Session convened, would most respectfully represent,—
I. That in an Act passed in the thirtieth year of Your Majesty's reign, entitled " The
British North America Act, 1867," provision is made for the admission of British Columbia
into the Dominion of Canada.
II. That the 146th section of the said Act declares that British Columbia may be admitted into the Dominion of Canada, provided that addresses to Your Majesty, containing
the terms and conditions of such admission, shall be passed by the Houses of Parliament of
Canada and the Legislature of British Columbia.
III. That Your Majesty's dutiful and loyal subjects the inhabitants of British Columbia
most earnestly desire that such admission may take place without delay, on the terms and
conditions hereinafter enumerated.
IV. That being fully convinced that such admission would, in a marked degree, strengthen
British power and influence, and establish more firmly British institutions in your Majesty's
possessions in North-west America; and generally throughout all British North America;
and faithfully representing, as we do, the general and expressed wishes of the inhabitants
of this Colony, we earnestly desire that such admission may take place without delay, on
the terms and conditions hereinafter enumerated. I
_ V. Therefore we, Your Majesty's dutiful and loyal subjects, the Members of the Legislative Council of British Columbia, humbly pray that Your Majesty may be graciously pleased
to admit without delay the Colony of British Columbia into the Dominion of Canada, in
accordance with the provisions of | The British North America Act, 1867," and on the
terms and conditions following1:
1. The limits of British Columbia, on and after admission, to be the same as at
present.
2. The Dominion of Canada to become liable for the public debt of British Columbia,
and make the same a charge on the Consolidated Revenue Fund, the said debt not to
exceed one million five hundred thousand dollars ($ 1,500,000).
3. British Columbia to be liable for such portion of her funded and floating debts as may
exceed the said 1,500,000 dollars.
4. The WITH THE DOMINION OF CANADA.
15
4. The Dominion of Canada to pay annually out of her Consolidated Revenue Fund, in
semi-annual advances, to British Columbia for the support of her local Government and
Legislature, the sum of 110,000 dollars, and also an annual grant in aid of the local Government of British Columbia, equal to 80 cents per head of the population of British
Columbia, the minimum number of said population, including Indians, not to be estimated at less than 40,000 at aay time, and the increase of population after admission to be
the increase of population other than Indians, and the said increase of population to be determined by census or otherwise, as may from time to time be expedient.
I 5. All Crown lands, mines, minerals, and royalties situate in British Columbia at the
time of admission, and all sums of money then due or payable, or that may afterwards
accrue for such Crown lands, mines, minerals, and royalties, to belong to British Columbia,
and be under the exclusive control of its Government and Legislature.
6. All stocks, cash, bankers' balances, and securities for money belonging to British Columbia at the time of admission to be the property of British Columbia.
7. All public works and property of British Columbia at the time of admission to belono-
to the Colony of British Columbia.
8. The Dominion of Canada to construct, within three years after admission of British
Columbia, a good overland waggon road extending from Lake Superior, Ontario, to the
head of navigation on Lower Fraser River, British Columbia, and to commence the construction of the same through the Rocky Mountains within one year after admission.
9. The Imperial Government to guarantee a loan to construct the said overland road, if
deemed expedient.
10. British Columbia to be represented in the Senate by not less than two Members, and
in the Commons by not less than three Members, at any time.
11. At the first election of representatives to the Commons, and until otherwise provided by the Parliament of Canada, the Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia to
proclaim what shall be the qualifications and disqualifications of representatives and electors,
the boundaries of electoral districts, and the laws governing such elections.
12. At the time of admission, the revenue laws of the Dominion of Canada to extend
and apply to British Columbia, and thereupon the revenue laws of British Columbia
thereby affected to be null and void, and all duties and revenues derived in and from
British Columbia under the revenue laws of the Dominion of Canada to belong to
Canada. •
13. The exclusive powers of provincial legislatures enumerated in the 92nd section
of " The British North America Act, 1867," and all other provisions of the said Act
that extend and apply generally 10 the provinces of the Dominion of Canada and that
may be applicable to British Columbia, except as otherwise in this address provided, to extend and apply to British Columbia, at and from the time of admission.
14. Except as otherwise provided, all laws in force in British Columbia, at the time of
admission, and all courts of civil and criminal jurisdiction, and all legal commissions, powers,
and authorities, and all officers, judicial, administrative, and ministerial existing therein at
the time of admission to continue in British Columbia as if such admission had not taken
place ; subject nevertheless to be repealed, abolished, or altered by the Parliament of Canada,
or by the Legislature of British Columbia, according to the authority of the said Parliament or of the said Legislature, under "The British North America Act, 1867."
15. Until the Parliament of Canada provides otherwise, all officers of British Columbia,
at and from the time of admission, having duties to discharge in relation to matters other
than those coming within the classes of subjects assigned by " The British North America
Act, 1867," to the provinces, to be officers of Canada.
16. And generally all such unenumerated provisions, acts, and things as may be necessary to the due and proper execution of the terms and conditions hereinbefore enumerated,
and to the granting of the prayer of this address.
17. And as in duty bound we will ever pray.
The Hon. Mr. Wood moved, in amendment, the Hon. Mr. Ball seconding:
That this Council, while confirming the vote of last Session in favour of the general
principle of the desirability of the union of this Colony wiih the Dominion of Canada, to
accomplish the consolidation of British interests and institutions in North America, are
still without sufficient information and experience of the practical working of confederation
in the North American Provinces, to admit of their defining the terms on which such an
union would be advantageous to the local interests of British Columbia.
Whereupon a debate arose, which having terminated,—
The Hon. Mr. De Cosmos moved that the Standing Orders be suspended, in order to
enable him to withdraw his motion.
Ft / o
44 6
British
Columbia.
39°-
The 444
44:
• 6
PAPERS ON THE UNION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
British
Columbia.
The question of suspending the Standing Orders having been put and  lost, the amendment was put.
The Council divided.
Ayes, 12. Noes, 4.
Messrs. Trutch, Messrs. Stamp,
O'Reilly, De Cosmos,
Cox Robson,
Wood, Walkem.
Pemberton,
Helmcken,
Smith,
Elwyn,
Ker,
Ball,
Spalding,
Crease,
The names having been taken down by the clerk, pursuant to request.
So the amendment was carried, and it was resolved accordingly.
it
No. 6.
Governor Seymour
to his Grace the
Duke of Buckingham and Chandos.
30 Nov. 1868.
— No  6. —
(No. 125.)      '
Copy of a DESPATCH from Governor Seymour to his Grace the Duke of
Buckingham and Chandos.
Victoria, 30 November 1868.
(Received 16 January 1869.)
My Lord Duke, (Answered (No. 10) 4 February 1869, page 29.)
I have the honour to lay before your Grace a letter addressed to me by the
principal leaders of a large and respectable public meeting, or, as these gentlemen
prefer to style it, a Convention held at Yale.    I add a copy of my reply.
2. The principal questions upon which the convention agreed appears to have
been,—      .
1. Union or confederation with the Dominion of Canada.
2. Representative Institutions and Responsible Government in the Colony.
3. Retrenchment in the public expenditure, principally in the way of
dismissing certain public officers, and reducing the salaries of others.
4. A reciprocal commercial treaty with the United States, whereby the
raw productions of the Colony might be introduced into the neighbouring
republic, duty free.
3. As regards the first point, I do not suppose that there is an Englishman who
would not desire to see one unbroken Dominion under his flag extending from
the Atlantic to the Pacific. For all present facilities of intercourse we are as
near to Japan as to Ottawa. But the matter does not rest with the so-called
Convention at Yale, but has already occupied your Grace's attention, and that of
/the Government of Canada. I must say that this Colony appears to possess so
j little interest for the people of England, that perhaps any change which would
{ call attention to its really wonderful resources would do good.
4. The second resolution is in favour of Representative Institutions and Responsible Government in the Colony. The Legislative constitution of the Colony is
a subject which has occupied my attention much of late ; but I have not been
able to see a clear path before me. Local politics have their head-quarters in
Victoria. If one ascends the Fraser but a few miles one finds less excitement
and better tempers at New Westminster, and so it goes on in proceeding up
country till, at Clinton, the whole thing is ignored. The miners of Cariboo and
Kootenay are in the most profound state of indifference as regards what is passing
at head-quarters. I should be glad if we had some mode of allowing the people
of Victoria, through their representatives, to relieve themselves of their burden
of complaints, and by simply stating what the "miserable misgovernment"
(with which cry the streets echo) consists of, enable a respectful explanation to
be furnished. I shall anxiously consider this subject, and it is not unlikely that
it will be brought up at the next Session of the Legislature.
5. The WITH THE DOMINION OF CANADA. 1?
5. The Convention then urges retrenchment. We have an enormous amount
to pay foi interest on loans, nearly a third of our revenue. Were we free from
debt*, our finances would be in a most flourishing condition. I am not answerable for the debt. It was not incurred by me, yet it devolves upon me to pay,
and I believe that the doing so is the principal cause of the outcry of "miserable
misgovernment." Reductions in salaries, to the extent of upwards of 80,000
dollars, have been made during my tenure of office. I have never appointed
anyone higher than a constable, and have no hope of doing so during my incumbency of office. I think my own salary a little high for the Colony to pay, but
certainly not so for the bolder of the very important and expensive position I
fill to receive. Sir James Douglas, in October 1858 (when the revenue had not
amounted to 22,900 /.) reported to the Secretary of State that he could not live
under 5,000 I. a year.
6. As regards a treaty of commercial reciprocity, I agree entirely with the
Convention. Our nearest markets for lumber now are Australia and France;
and at this moment when San Francisco has been half ruined by an earthquake,
and it is proposed to rebuild the shaken houses of timber instead of stone, the
citizens will have to depend upon the mills of Washington territory for their
supplies, instead of being able to make use of the magnificent timber of Burraw
Inlet, a few miles from the boundary, but unfortunately for the mill-owners
on English soil.
7. It is but right that I should state that the proceedings of the Yale meeting
did not meet with universal approval. I enclose two notices, very respectably
signed, protesting against the whole affair.
8. I may add that the more prominent advocates for confederation were
defeated at the last elections in Victoria for Members to serve in the Legislative
Council.
I have, &c.
sgned)        Frederick Seymour.
445
British
Columbia.
Enclosure 1, in No. 6.
Memorial from Messrs. R. Wallace k De Cosmos and others to Governor Seymour.       Encl. I, in No. &.
May it please your Excellency :
The Memorial of the undersigned respectfully showeth,—
That a Convention, consisting of 26 delegates from different sections of the Colony,
was held at Yale, B. C., on 14th September 1868, g for the purpose of accelerating the
admission of this Colony into the Dominion of Canada upon equitable and beneficial terms,
and also to devise means to secure Representative Institutions with Responsible Government
for this Colony, and to take such other steps as the Convention might deem proper to
obtain redress of the numerous grievances under which the country now suffers."
That the said Convention was convened after due and ample public notice.
That the session of the said Convention occupied three days.
That the resolutions hereto annexed were passed at the said Convention.
That the undersigned were appointed by the said Convention to prepare and transmit to
your Excellency an address in accordance with, and accompanied by, the said resolutions.
That therefore the undersigned, in the name and behalf of the said Convention^ respectfully pray that your Excellency may be pleased to take into your favourable consideration
the resolutions hereto annexed, and especially that your Excellency be pleased to take,—
1. Such measures as may determine, at the earliest possible period, whether this Colony
can be admitted on such terms; and that if it cannot be admitted on such terms, to make
public the reasons why such terms cannot be obtained, in order to quiet the public mind
on the subject.
2. Such measures as may immediately establish Representative Institutions and Responsible Government in the Colony.
3. Such measures as may effect the most thorough retrenchment in the public service
compatible with due and proper securities for the preservation of life and property.
4. Such measures as may. induce Her Majesty's Government to open negotiations to
obtain from the United States of America the privilege of allowing the raw productions of
this Colony to be entered free of duty in the ports of the United States under the operation
of a reciprocal commercial treaty.
39°-
c 4
5. Such 44(5
r*
It
18
PAPERS ON THE UNION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
British 5. Such means as may initiate and perfect the other reforms enumerated in the resolu-
Columbia.        tions of the Convention, hereto annexed.
  (signed)        R. Wallace, Chairman.
A. De Cosmos.
John T. Robson.
Hugh Nelson.
Victoria, British Columbia, P G. M'Millan
9 October 1868. J' G. Norris.
1
J
!l
•li
1
j
'V
Governor Seymour to Messrs. Wallace, De Cosmos, and others.
Gentlemen, Victoria, 14 November 1868.
I have had the honour to receive your letter, forwarding certain resolutions passed at a
public meeting held at Yale. It will now be so soon that I shall have to communicate
with the Legislative Council on all, or nearly all, the topics adverted to in the resolutions
passed, that you will forgive me for not doing more at present than stai ing that I shall forv\ ard
the resolutious enclosed to the Secretary of State, with perfectly respectful comments. .
The Local Government is by no means indifferent to the very important and difficult
subjects to which the Yale resolutions refer.
I have, &c.
(signed)        Frederick Seymour.
Minutes of a Preliminary Meeting of the Delegates, elected by the various Districts of
British Columbia, convened at Yale, pursuant to the following call:
"Yale Convention.
"The Confederation League propose holding at Yale, on Monday, 14th September 1868,
a Convention of Delegates, for ihe purpose of accelerating the admission of this Colony into
the Dominion of Canada, upon equitable and beneficial terms ; and also to devise means
to secure Representative Institutions with Responsible Government for this Colony ; and to
take such other steps as the Convention may deem proper to obtain redress for the numerous
grievances under which this country now suffers.
" The inhabiiants of the respective districts of the Colony are invited to elect delegates
without delay to represent their views in tbe above Convention.
" By order of the Executive Committee,
" Robert Beaven,
" Secre:ary."
The following gentlemen were present:
Messrs. Wallace, Robson, De Cosmos, Fisher, Barnard, Black, Evans, Norris, M'Millan,
Thompson, Featherstone, Gibbs, Babbitt, Withrow, Armstrong, Miller, Smith, Holbrook,
Rose, Nelson, Havelock, Fulton, M'Lardy, Brouse, King.
Moved by Mr. Barnard, seconded by Mr. Robson : That Mr. Wallace take the chair pro
tern.—Carried.
Moved by Mr. Barnard, seconded by Mr. Nelson : That Mr. Charles Evans be secretary
pro tern.—Carried.
Moved by Mr. De Cosmos : That a committee on credentials, consisting of three, be
appointed; which committee shall suggest what offices are necessary for: the purposes of the
Convention.—Seconded by Mr. M'Millan, and carried.
The chairman appointed as Committee on Credentials, Messrs. Barnard, Thompson, and
Babbitt.
Moved  by Mr. De Cosmos, seconded by Dr. Black :  That an intermission till the
call   of  the   chairman   be   allowed   for   the   Committee  on   Credentials   to
Carried.
leport.—
On the chairman resuming his seat, the Committee on Credentials presented the following
report, and asked leave to sit again :
The Committee appointed to examine credentials report the following gentlemen
qualified to sit in this Convention :
Messrs. R.Wallace; Amor De Cosmos (Victoria); Brouse (Lake La Hache); Henry
Holbrook; John Robson; A. W. S. Black; David Withrow (New Westminster City)-
Alex. Rose (Yale District); D. W. Miller (New Westminster District); R. Smith (Lytton
District); Charles Evans ; Adam M< Lardy ; Henry Havelock (Yale); Jas. E. M'Millan •
J. G. Norris (Vjctoria); M. W. Gibbs (Salt Spring Island); E. H. Babbitt; W. C. Kin<*
(Cariboo); J. C. Armstrong (Quesnel Mouth); F. J. Barnard (Williams Lake) ; Thomas
Fulton WITH THE DOMINION OF CANADA.
19
Fulton (Metchosin); H. Featherstone (Lillooet); J. B.Thompson; W. Fisher (Esquimau.);
Hugh Nelson (Burrard Inlet); James Donnelley (Harrison River).
The committee recommended the election of the following officers for this Convention,
viz.:
A Chairman, a Vice-Chairman, two Secretaries, a Sergeaiit-at-arms, a Standing  Committee on Business, to consist of five members.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
(signed)        F. J. Barnard, Chairman.
Moved by Mr. Robson, seconded by Mr. De Cosmos ; That report of Committee on
Credentials be received.—Carried.
Moved by Mr. De Cosmos : That the Committee on Business be seven instead of five.	
Carried.
Moved by Mr. Robson: That so much of the report as related to a vice-chairman be
rej ected.—Carried.
The report of the Committee on Business was then adopted as amended.
Moved by Mr. Barnard, seconded by Mr. Norris: That Mr. Wallace be chairman of the
Convention.—Carried.
Moved by Mr. Robson, seconded by Mr. Thompson : That Messrs. Havelock and Evans
act as secretaries.—Carried.
Moved by Mr. Barnard, seconded by M'Lardy: That Mr. Barlow be engaged to act as
sergeant-at-arms.—Carried.
The chairman then declared the Convention open for the transaction of business.
The chairman appointed Messrs.  Havelock, Babbitt, De Cosmos,  Robson, Thompson,
M'Millan, and the chairman, as Committee on Business.
Moved by Mr. Norris, seconded   by M. Barnard: That the Convention adjourn till
one p.m.
Adjourned Meeting.
Convention met at one p.m.
Mr. Wallace in the chair.
Present : Messrs. Robson, De Cosmos, Fisher, Black, Evans, Norris, M'Millan, Thompson, Barnard, Featherstone, Gibbs, Babbitt, Withrow, Armstrong, Miller, Smith, Holbrook,
Rose, Nelson, Havelock, Fulton, M'Lardy, King, Brouse.
The Committee on Business presented their report and asked leave to sit again.
Moved by Mr. Barnard, seconded by Mr. Norris : That the report of the Committee on
Business be received.
Moved by Mr. Thompson, seconded by Mr. De Cosmos, "That this convention resolve
itself into committee of the whole, for consideration of the report of the Committee on
Business."—Carried.
The chairman then appointed Dr. Brouse as chairman of committee, and left the chair.
On the chairman resuming the chair, Dr. Brouse reported the following 15 resolutions:
" Whereas this convention, composed of delegates representing different constituencies,
has, at the general popular desire, and after due and ample public notice, been convened at
Yale, British Columbia, this 14th September 1868, by the call of the Confederate League,
and by the authority of the people of British Columbia in the respective districts declared,
to give a full, unprejudiced, and united expression of their views and feelings respecting the
desirability of the admission of this Colony into the Dominion of Canada, the necessity for
the immediate establishment of Representative Institutions with Responsible Government,
and generally as to the state, wants, and wishes of the country :
" And whereas this convention is duly impressed with the high, responsible, and patriotic
duties that their fellow-countrymen have called on them to discharge, and cherishes the
most ardent and devoted loyalty to Her Most Gracious Majesty the Queen, and attachment
to British institutions: ,,...-•• , ,       -,
"And whereas it is expedient to resolve and declare what, in its opinion, is right and
proper in the premises. This Convention therefore, in virtue of the trust reposed m it, and
with an honest and patriotic desire to promote the public welfare, after due deliberation,
resolves and declares as follows :
" I That all Governments should exist by the free and just consent of the governed, and
that the government that does not exist by the free and just consent of the K?je™"f LS *
despotism. That the Government of British Columbia does not exist by the free and just
consent of the governed, and is, therefore a despotism. That it is ^^^
British subjects°of this Colony. That it deprives the people of their rig 1^ f^™ ^
Government, as no Statute or Order mCounci exists which guarantees^ Je ™»|Jetoe
right to participate in the Government of the Colony; but in the ^^iveMdJgttvtoe
Departments all are nominated, or may be rejected, suspended, or removed by the Governor
r D
39°-
British
Columbia. 4-,
8
British
Columbia.
I
»
20
PAPERS ON THE UNION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
of this Colony. That the ordinary consequences of such a form of government are manifest
in this Colony in the disregard of public opinion, in the neglect of public interests, in the
high taxation, in the annual deficits, in the annually-increased public debt, in expending
large sums of public money in paying salaries disproportionate to the services rendered, and
in maintaining an unnecessarily large number of officials, and in the tendency which the continuance ol such political evils have to weaken the attachment of the people to the Crown
and British connection. That to such an extent have the evils of misgovernment multiplied
that profound, widespread, universal discontent prevails, and is expressed at the form of
o-overnment, and at the manner in which the affairs of the Colony have been and are mismanaged ; and that the people of British Columbia loudly demand a remedy.
" II. That the proper remedy for the present political condition of the Colony, and the one
that commends itself as preferable to all others, being in harmony with Imperial policy and
the legitimate aspirations and desires of the people of this Colony, is the immediate admission of Briti-h Columbia into the Dominion of Canada, on terms equitable, expedient, and
beneficial, simultaneously with the establishment of Representative institutions and Responsible Government; and that, whether admission into the Dominion of Canada shall occur
or not, Representative Institutions and Responsible Government should be inaugurated forthwith in British Columbia.
"III. That the terms of admission into the Dominion of Canada that would be equitable,
expedient, and beneficial to the Colony, in the opinion of this Convention, are chiefly
expressed in the following 15 sections :
" 1. The limits of British Columbia, on and after admission, to be the same as at present.
" 2. The Dominion of Canada to become liable for the public debt of British Columbia, at
the time of admission.
" 3. The Dominion of Canada to pay annually out of her Consolidated Revenue FuncL, in
semi-annual advances to British Columbia, for the support of her local Government and
Legislature, the sum of 110,000 dollars, and also an annual grant in aid of the local Government of British Columbia, equal to 80 cents per head of the population of British Columbia,
the minimum number of said population, including Indians, not to be estimated at less than
40,000 at any time, and the increase of population after admission, to be the increase of
population other than Indians, and the said increase of population to be determined by
census or otherwise, as may from time to time be expedient.
" 4. All Crown lands, mines, minerals, and royalties situate in British Columbia at the
lime of admission, and all sums of money then due or payable, or that may afterwards
accrue, for such Crown lands, mines, minerals, and royalties to belong to British Columbia,
and to be under the exclusive control of its Government and Legislature.
" 5. All stocks, cash, bankers' balances, and securities for money belonging to British
Columbia, at the time of admission, to be the property of British Columbia.
" 6. All public works and property of British Columbia, at the time of admission, to belong
to British Columbia, with the exception of such portions of the Grand Trunk road through
British Columbia, or other roads then constructed, as may be used as a portion of the
trans-continental road, which shall become the property of the Federal Government.
" 7. The Dominion of Canada to construct, within three years after the admission of
British Columbia, a good overland waggon road, extending from Lake Superior, Ontario, to
the head of navigation on the lower Fraser river, British Columbia, and to commence the
construction of the same through the Rocky Mountains, within one year after admission.
" 8. The Imperial Government to guarantee a loan to construct the said overland road if
deemed expedient.
" 9. If, at any time after admission, the Legislature of British Columbia shall pass an
address to the Governor General of Canada, declaring that it is expedient to establish a
a free port on the Pacific, in order to advance the interests of British commerce in the
North Pacific, the Parliament of the Dominion to make provision for the establishment of
the same.
" 10. British Columbia to be represented in the Senate by not less than two Members
and in the Commons by not less than three Members at any time.
"11. At the first election of representatives to the Commons and until otherwise provided by the Parliament of Canada, the Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia to proclaim what shall be the qualifications and disqualifications of representatives and electors
the boundaries of electoral districts and the laws governing such elections.
" 12. At the time of admission the revenue laws of the Dominion of Canada to extend and
apply to British Columbia, and thereupon the revenue laws of British Columbia thereby
affected to be null and void, and all duties and revenues derived in and from British
Columbia under the revenue laws of the Dominion of Canada to belong to Canada.
" 13. The exclusive powers of provincial legislatures enumerated in the 92nd sectioi
of The British North America Act, 1867/ and all other provisions of the said Act tha
extend and apply generally to the provinces of the Dominion of Canada, and thai
applicable to British Columbia, except as otherwise in these terras provided, to ex
apply to British Columbia, at and from the time of admission.
" 14. Except as otherwise provided, all laws in force to British Coumbia at
on
t
it may be
tend and
the time of
admission, WITH THE DOMINION OF CANADA.
21
449
admission, and all courts of civil a.nd criminal jurisdiction, and all legal commissions,
powers and authorities, and all officers, judicial, administrative, and ministerial, existing
therein at the time of admission, to continue in British Columbia as if such admission had
notteken place; subject, nevertheless, to be repealed, abolished, or altered by the Parliament
of Canada or by the Legislature of British Columbia, according to the authority of the
said Parliament or of the said Legislature, under ' The British North America Act, 1867 '
and any subsequent Imperial Act.
'15. Until the Parliament of Canada provides otherwise, all officers of British Columbia,
at and from the time of admission, having duties to discharge in relation to matters other
than those coming within the classes of subjects assigned by ' The North America Act,
1867,' to the provinces, to be officers of Canada."
British
Columbia.
Che convention adjourned till 10 a.m., 15th September,
^ursuant to adjournment, the Convention met at 10 a.m. on
Tl
I
the 15th.
Moved  by Mr.  Babbitt, seconded by Mr. Smith: That the reading  of the  minutes of
yesterday be deferred.—Carried.
The secretary presented the Report of the Committee on Business, and asked leave to sit
again.
Moved by Mr. De Cosmos and seconded by Mr. Robson: That report of Committee be
received.—carried.
Moved by Mr. Barnard and seconded by Mr. Nelson: That the Convention go into
committee of the whole to consider report of Business Committee.—Carried.
The chairman then appointed Dr. Brouse as chairman of the committee, and left the
chair.
On the chairman resuming, Dr. Brouse reported the following resolutions:
"That this Convention further resolves and declares,—
"IV. That the people of British Columbia desire Representative Institutions with Responsible Government, and have the capacity to work those institutions successfully in the
interest of the Colony; and that any representations that have been or that may be made to
the contrary in England or elsewhere, would neither be in accordance with facts nor the
views of the people of this Colony, the people being the best judges of their own affairs.
" V. That the establishment of Representative Institutions, without the simultaneous
inauguration of Responsible Government, would be only a partial and very imperfect remedy
for the evils produced by the present form of government; and that unless the Governor
were required to govern in accordance with the advice and consent of an executive council
holding seats in the Legislature, and commanding the confidence and support of a majority
of the representatives of the people, there would never be that degree of harmony between
the Executive and the representatives of the people that is essential to the successful working
of the Government, and the rational contentment of the country.
" VI. That, whether admitted into the Dominion or not, the Legislature should consist of
a Governor and one Chamber, called the Legislative Assembly: that the Members of the
Assembly should be elected for a period of not more than four years : that the Sessions
should be held annually : that members be paid their reasonable expenses for a period not
exceeding 40 days in each Session. That the qualification for Members be as follows:
Being a male British subject of full age, and possessing real or personal property, or both,
of the value of 500 dollars. That the qualification of electors be as follows: 1. A male
British subject or alien who has taken the oath of allegiance. 2. Residence in the Colony
one year, and in the district in which the vote is cast, three months. 3. Possessed of
real or personal property, or both, at the time of registration, to the value of 100 dollars.
4. Registered on the electoral roll of the district. That any male alien, who can read and
write or speak the English language, and who has been five years in the Colony, and is
possessed of real estate to thevalue of 100 dollars, and appears on the electoral roll, shall
be entitled to vote.
" VII. That the Executive Council, as at present constituted, does not command public
confidence nor represent the country in the Government, is irresponsible, or not accountable
to the people for the administration of its respective departments, and under the present
constitution of the Colony is but an echo of the Governor, and generally antagonistic to the
well-being of the Colony, and that the substitution therefore of an executive council which
holds office only while it commands the confidence and support of a majority of a representative legislature, would be hailed with delight by the country.
"VIII. That the nominative character and official elements of the Legislative Council
render it unsuited to a Colony of free British subjects. That the Council may be composed of 23 members, or merely a quorum, as the Governor may decree. That the people
have no right guaranteed to them by Statute or Order in Council by which they may send
representatives to participate in the deliberations of the Council as they would have, were
the Council a representative assemblv, in the British sense of the term "representative,
inasmuch as the election of a Member by the people does not insure him a seat in the
Council. That the people have no constitutional power to pass good measures, nor to stop
the passage of bad measures through the Council. That the Legislative Council violates a
fundamental principle of the British constitution by imposing taxes on the people without
"       l D 2 representation. 45
22
PAPERS OIN THE UNION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
British
Columbia.
representation. That it disregards public opinion, and neglects public interests. That it
consents to the maintenance in office of more officials than the country can afford, or the
public service requires. That it concurs with the Executive in an extravagant civil list,
adding annually to the public debt. That the non-representative character of the Council,
the non-existence of a representative assembly, combined with mal-administration, have
(by the discontent produced), a tendency to alienate the affections of the people from the
Crown, That the officials, the paid servants of the public, rule the people with irresponsible authority, and that it is their interest to resist reform to retain office. That the
officials, who'form a majority of the Council, vote as the Executive intimates ^whenever-
required, and that, consequently, the majority of the Council has no real independence, is a
sham legislature, the Governor and Executive Council being virtually the Legislature of the
Colony° That the Legislative Council does not represent the people of British Columbia,
and, from its nominative and dependent character, can never gain popular confidence and
support, and will always be productive of popular discontent. That the people have no
confidence in the Council, and will never be satisfied with the constitution of the Legislature
till a representative assembly is established.
" IX. That one of the reasons why union between Vancouver Island and British Columbia was sought was that a supreme court of appeal for the whole Colony could be
economically created. That the Colonies were united two years ago, and yet no appellate
court has been inaugurated. That, as a consequence of the continued separate existence
of the Supreme Courts of Vancouver Island and British Columbia, confidence in those
courts respectively has been materially impaired. That it is the prevailing opinion that
such continued separation of the courts, and non-inauguration of a supreme court of
appeal, has been due to more consideration for the personal interests of the judges than for
the general interests of justice throughout the Colony.
" X. That by appointing stipendiary magistrates and gold commissioners to seats in the
Legislative Council, they are withdrawn from their respective districts for long continuous
periods, leaving such districts without any competent authority to aid in the protection of
life and property, and thereby virtually declaring that such officers are not required.
" XI. That the salary, allowances, and perquisites of the Governor (exceeding the sum
of 20,000 dollars) are unreasonable, and ought to be reduced to a figure proportionate to the
ability of the Colony, and the services rendered. That, in addition to the above salary and
perquisites, there is an annual interest of six per cent, on 45,000 dollars, making the approximate cost of residence in Victoria, 2,700 dollars. That the salary of the Lieutenant
Governor of the Province of Ontario, Canada, with a population of 1,500,000 is only
8,000 dollars per annum; and that there is no good reason why the salary of the Governor
of this Colony should exceed 10,000 dollars per annum, with a residence. That if the
Governor's salary be reduced to that amount, and the allowances, perquisites, and extra
assistance of 500 dollars be abolished, there would be an annual saving in the Governor's
department of about 10,000 dollars.
" XII. That the salary of the Colonial Secretary, 3,880 dollars per year, is too high and
ought to be reduced to a sum not exceeding 3,000 dollars per annum, thereby saving 880
dollars. That one clerk in the Colonial Secretary's department, at a salary of 1,800 dollars, is
sufficient to meet the requirements of the public service. That an assistant printer, at 600
dollars per annum, is unnecessary. That the total saving by these reductions, without
impairing the efficiency of the public service would be 3,540 dollars.
" XIII. That the office of Lands and Works is maintained at a great annual expense,
amounting in 1868, for a Chief Commissioner and three clerks, to 8,490 dollars, and in
former years to a far larger sum. That the greatest ignorance prevails in the department
as to the lands in Vancouver Island and on the mainland, although a land office has been
kept open in the former place 17 years, and in the latter for 10 years. That nothing is done
by the department to assist in the sale and settlement of the public lands, except recording a few pre-emptions in Vancouver Island, and on the mainland the pre-emptions are
recorded by the magistrates. That a few parcels of public lands are leased for the purposes of trade, agriculture, lumbering, and mining, and the rents collected for the same.
That instalments on lands sold or pre-empted are collected. That a few maps are made or
extended occasionally. That the above includes the total services performed by this department pertaining to land, and could all be transacted by one clerk. That the public works
carried on by the department are confined to repairing roads, constructing some small
bridges, cutting out or keeping open a trail, or repairing or enlarging a public building,
and are either performed by contract or by temporary service. That the entire public
works, including map-making, could be well attended to by one competent civil engineer.
That two competent clerks or civil engineers to perform all the above services efficiently
and satisfactorily, could be had for 1,500 dollars each, and thus a saving could be made in
the permanent expenditure of the department, amounting to 5,490 dollars. That by connecting this department with that of the Colonial Secretary, one civil engineer would be
sufficient to transact all the business. That, therefore, for purposes of economy, it is
expedient to abolish the office of Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works, and to reduce
the permanent staff of the department to not more than two civil engineers, under the
supervision of the Colonial Secretary.
XIV. That the duties of the Treasury can be performed, under efficient
checks, by two
clerks:
-■*«$ WITH THE DOMINION OF CANADA.
23
451
clerks; that, therefore, one clerk should be discharged, thereby saving 1,200 dollars per
annum.
" XV. That the auditor's department is too expensively conducted. That two competent clerks can efficiently audit the public accounts, at a salary not exceeding 1,800 dollars
and 1,500 dollars respectively, thereby saving in this department 1,750 dollars.
" XVI. That the office of Registrar. General of Titles, at Victoria, is almost a sinecure.
That the incumbent draws a salary of 2,440 dollars per year for a service that notoriously
does not occupy him more than one hour a day, yet the Government refuses to reduce the
salary; on the contrary, has raised it 485 dollars in 1868, and persists in keeping the office
separate, instead of amalgamating it with some other, and thereby utilising the services of
the incumbent. That reports are industriously published by the Government that the
office is self-paying and ought, therefore, to be continued. Brit that is effected by imposing
a high tariff of charges for registering documents, and thereby the office is made self-paying
at the expense of those who register. That by affixing a salary to this office proportionate
to the labour performed, the tariff of charges for registration could be reduced four-fifths ;
that the labour employed in the service is not worth more than 500 dollars per annum.
That, by an alteration of local Statutes (if necessary at all), so that the office may be amalgamated with that of Registrar of the Supreme Court, Victoria, the whole time of the
incumbent might be employed ; and, at a salary of 1,800 dollars per annum, there would be
saved in this department 700 dollars, and in the Supreme Court 1,500 dollars, making a
total saving of 2,200 dollars per annum. That the office of Registrar of Titles might be
amalgamated with one of two other offices, yet. retain all its efficiency and secure economy
in the expenditure. That the continuance of this officer, at the present salary, is a glaring
public wrong.
" XVII. That the office of stipendiary magistrate for New Westminster should be
abolished, and that the duties should be discharged by the Registrar General of British
Columbia, in addition to the duties of postmaster general.
" XVIII. That the office of harbour master should be amalgamated with that of the
Customs department; that a saving would thereby be effected of 1,800 dollars, without any
public injury.
" XIX. That the salary of the Attorney General should be 1,500 dollars with practice,
and that he be allowed a clerk at 1,000 dollars per year.
" XX. That reform in the office of sheriff is essentially necessary, as it is virtually a
sinecure, without proper securities being filed by the sheriff, in case of errors or losses in
civil suits. That a division of the shrievalty into two or more shrievalties, the incumbents
giving bonds in a suitable amount for the faithful performance of their duty, is required
both for efficiency and security of the public. That the paying out of public moneys as a
bonus to the sheriff, under present circumstances, is a wasteful and wanton expenditure.
" XXI. That the office of chief inspector of police is not required, and therefore ought
to be abolished."
Moved by Mr. De Cosmos, and seconded by Mr. M'Millan: That the Report be received.
—Carried.
Moved by Mr. De Cosmos, and seconded by Mr. M'Millan: That the Report be adopted.
—Carried.
[Adjourned till 11 a.m., 16th September 1868.
British
Columbta.
Pursuant to adjournment, Convention met at 11 a.m., on the IGth September.
The Secretary then read the minutes of 14th inst.
Moved by Mr. De Cosmos, and seconded by Mr. Barnard : That the minutes of 14th
inst, as read be adopted."—Carried.
The Secretary then read the minutes of the 15th inst.
Moved  by   Mr. Thompson, an
d seco
nded by   Mr. McMillan:   That the minutes  of
15th inst, as read, be adopted.—Carried.
The Secretary then presented Report of Committee on Business, and asked leave to sit
again.
Moved by Mr. De Cosmos, and seconded by Mr. Norris: That Report of Business
Committee be received.—Carried.
The Convention then adjourned till two p.m.
Pursuant to adjourment, Convention met at two p.m.
Moved by Mr. Barnard, and seconded by Mr. Rose: That the Convention go into
Committee of ti.e whole, to consider the Report of the Committee on Business.
The Chairman then nominated Dr. Brouse as Chairman of Committee, and left the
chair. m - §
39°-
D
n
o K 9
24
PAPERS ON THE UNION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
w
'*
British
Columbia.
On the chairman resuming, Dr. Brouse reported the following resolutions-.—
" XXII. That there is no public necessity for keeping five extra constables in Cariboo,,
at an annual expense of 3,500 dollars per year. That in the Lillooet-Clinion district a
stipendiary magistrate is not required, thereby saving 2,400 dollars per annum. That at
Nanaimo, a stipendiary magistrate is not required, and the duty of deputy collector of customs there, with that of postmaster could be performed satisfactorily for 1,000 dollars, saving
therebv 1,000 dollars. That in Lillooet Clinton, and Nanaimo, honorary magistrates can
discharge the duties of justice of the peace. That the retrenchment that might be made by
the Executive under these heads is equal to 10,300 dollars per year.
" XXIII. That the Supreme Court judges should discharge the duties of county court
judges, holding court periodically in the different districts of the Colony.
"XXIV. That the vote of 3 000 dollars in the Estimates for expenses of j udge and
registrar on circuit, on the mainland of the Colony, is exorbitant, and calls for revision.
I XXV. That, including the reductions suggested, and others which might advantageously be adopted, a saving of about 60,000 dollars in the annual expenditure for civil
establishments may be made, without impairing in the least degree the public service, or
endangering in the least the securities for the preservation of life and property, or the maintenance of order throughout the Colony.
" XXVI. That the people of British Colombia are willing to bear patiently the heavy
financial burden imposed upon the country for the construction of public works, amounting
to nearly 150,000 dollars annually; but they denounce the extravagant expenditure by which
a deficit was created in 1866, amounting to about 170,000 dollars; and, in 1867, 130,000
dollars. That these deficits were effected in violation of the rule laid down by the Secretary
of State for the Colonies, in a Despatch dated 30th April 1866, viz.: that the expenditure
of the year must be reduced to such an amount as may be covered by ihe actual average
receipts of the past two years; that the Estimates of 1868 violate this rule,
" XXVII. That the system of dividing and sub-dividing the public service into departments, and placing such duties respectively in the hands of a single person, may be the
proper mode to transact public business in a rich and populous country; but to a Colony
such as British Columbia, where the population is very small, the financial resources proportionately limited, and the business to be transacted under each head but trifling, such a
system is wholly unsuited, entailing too high an expenditure without increasing efficiency.
That it is mainly by attempting to carry out this system, and by keeping too large a staff of
officials at salaries disproportionate to the circumstances of the Colony, that the public
expenditure is annually unnecessarily increased. That it is therefore to amalgamation of
offices, reduction of the civil list, and lowering of salaries, that the people look for a reduction in the current expenditure for the support of establishment-;.
" XXVIII. That the total population of British Columbia, exclusive of Indians, does not
exceed 10,000; and that the number of Indians does not exceed 30,000. That the Indians,,
living; chiefly by hunting and fishing, are not individually on the average large consumers
of dutiable or taxable commodities. That the highest estimate that could be placed on the
Indians as eonsumers is, that three Indians consume as much as one white or civilised person, and that, consequently, the total Indian population is only equal to 10,000 white consumers. That a more correct estimate would in all probability be that five Indians are
equal to one white person, thereby making the total Indian inhabitants, as consumers, equal
to 6,000 whites. That (taking the highest estimate of the Indians as consumers) the total
number of consumers of dutiable and taxable commodities is 20,000. That in 1867, the
revenue, without loans, was 475,250 dollars, and the average tax per head of the consumers
23 dollars 75 cents. That the expenditure, as reported to the Council as less than the
actual expenditure was, in 1867, 560,159 dollars, or 28 dollars to each consumer. That out
of the expenditure of 560,159 dollars in 1867, only 52,000 dollars were expended in public
works. That the estimated revenue of 1868 is 576,000 dollars, or nearly 29 dollars to each
consumer. That the estimated expenditure of 1868 is 572,553 dollars, or 28 dollars 60 cents
to each consumer. That the total amount appropriated for public works out of the
572,553 dollars is 55,300 dollars. That out of the latter sum there has been about
12,000 dollars expended in unnecessary additions to the Governor's residence and the Land
Office, whilst necessary improvements to roads and bridges, to advance the interests of
farmers and settlement generally, are deferred. That the "return made to the Legislative
Council in 1868, by his Excellency the Governor, comparing the customs' tariffs of England,
United States, Canada, and other colonies and countries is fallacious, if intended to show
that British Colombia is not taxed higher than other countries. That the fallacy is apparent
when it is observed that the average annual tax per head in Canada is only 3 dollars 50 cents,
whilst the average tax to each consumer in British Columbia, in 1867, was 23 dollars
75 cents, and that proposed in 1868, is 29 dollars to each consumer. That home productions, other than gold, in this Colony are not so advanced as in the countries enumerated
in the return, and that, consequently, there is a larger average consumption here of dutiable
commodities, and a correspondingly higher tax paid by each consumer. That, with tariff,
internal revenue dues, road tolls, &c, taxation is [%ia and oppressive. That, after payin'
the interest and sinking fund on the public debt, nearly all the revenue is consumed non--
productively. That retrenchment is therefore demanded by the united voice of the people
of British Columbia. *
"XXIX. That
■PVNM
s WITH THE DOMINION OF CANADA.
25
' XXIX. That it is the duty of the Executive to institute the most thorough retrenchment in the expenditure, and cause to be amended and repealed all statutes or ordinance8
that interfere with economy in the public, service.
" XXX. That miners and capitalists during the last 10 years have been subject to the
greatest inconvenience and delays in securing copper and silver bearing quartz veins, under
such a tenure and with such facilities as would offer reasonable security for the investment
of capital; that the non-existence of a general law on the subject, and the obstacles interposed by the Government, have tended to prevent the investment of capital in the country,
and retarded the development of its mineral resources. That the enactment of a law under
which a limited extent of any copper or silver-bearing quartz veins, free from royalties,
onerous laws, and taxations, may be taken up and held by any one or more persons, under
reasonable conditions of working, is absolutely essential to the investment of caoital in such
enterprises.
" XXXI. That religion, humanity, and public opinion demand that due and proper consideration be paid to the Indian population, with a view to their preservation, and the
improvement of their moral, intellectual, and material condition. That beyond making-
reservations of land, Government has done nothing for them. That in many instances the
Indian reserves are large and valuable tracts of agricultural land. That such lands, though
situated in districts where they would be cultivated by settlers, remain unimproved by the
Indians, except the occasional cultivation of a small patch. That settlers are prohibited
occupying them. That such reserves are consequently neither properly utilised by the
Indians nor by settlers. That it is incumbent, therefore, on the Government to establish
such regulations as would utilise the Indian reserves, and appropriate the proceeds to the
benefit of the Indians.
" XXXII. That the people of Btitish Columbia, recognising the principle that it is the
imperative duty of the State to provide for education, earnestly desire the immediate establishment of a national system of popular education, based upon broad non-sectarian principles, and that the non-existence of any recognised system of education applicable to the
whole Colony, is discreditable to the Government.
" XXXIII. That while it is apparent to any disinterested person that retrenchment in
the public service could be made by which about 60,000 dollars of the annual expenditure
could be saved without impairing the efficiency of the public service, yet the Government
persists in imposing road tolls on merchandise passing between Yale and Cariboo that
amount to 60,000 dollars per annum. That the continuance of the road tolls, and the
resistance offered to retrenchment by the Executive, are grave acts of misgovernment.
" XXXIV. That a reciprocal commercial treaty between the United States and England,
by which the lumber, coal, fish, and other raw productions of British Columbia and the
United States may be entered duty free for home consumption in the ports of the last-
named countries respectively, would be a powerful stimulant to industry in this Colony.
That it is, therefore, expedient to urge upon the attention of the local and Imperial Governments the desirability of taking immediate steps to secure such a commercial privilege,
whilst the Rec iprocity Treaty between Canada and the United States is under consideration.
" XXXV. That though there has always been a large staff of officials connected with
the office of Lands and Works, and notwithstanding there are vast areas of good unoccupied
agricultural and grazing lands in the Colony, the country but sparsely populated, the imports
of agricultural produce and stock large, and the prices of agricultural productions highly
remunerative, yet the Executive has never made any systematic and continuous effort to
invite immigration, or induce people to engage in agriculture. That the apathy and indolence of the Government respecting the settlement of the public lands is therefore totally
indefensible.
" XXXVI. That free grants of at least 320 acres of land ought to be offered to actual
settlers upon the public lands, and that the Executive should spare no effort in inviting
immigration and facilitating the settlement of the country.
" XXXVII. That the vote of the Legislative Council, refusing to pass an address to
Her Majesty the Queen respecting the Confederation of this Colony with Canada, is not
indorsed by the country; but is opposed to the well-understood wishes of the people ot
British Columbia.
" The Convention further resolved :
" 1. That an address be prepared and sent to Her Majesty the Queen, praying for the
reforms enumerated in these resolutions.
" 2. That an address to the Governor General of Canada be prepared and transmitted,
urging confederation on the terms proposed.
" 3. That an address be transmitted to his Excellency the Governor, accompanied by-a
copy of these resolutions, praying that the reforms therein contained may be initiated and
perfected.
" 4. That a petition to the Imperial Parliament be prepared and circulated fogato
390. D 4
British
Columbia. 404
i
f
British
Columbia.
26
PAPERS ON THE UNION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
throughout the Colony, and transmitted to some prominent Member of Parliament for
presentation, accompanied by the resolutions of this Convention.
" 5. That an Executive Committee be appointed, with full authority to call conventions*
communicate with the Imperial, Canadian, and local Governments, to prepare and transmit
the addresses and petitions above alluded to, and to take any measures theymay deem
expedient to secure the reforms enumerated in the resolutions of the Convention."
The following Committee was appointed to carry out'the objects of the Convention:—
Messrs. De Cosmos, McMillan, Wallace, and Norris, of Victoria; Havelock, of Yale;
John Robson, of New Westminster; and F. J. Barnard.
Moved by Mr. Norris, and seconded by Mr. Robson: That the Report be received.
—Carried.
Moved by Mr. Norris, and seconded by Mr. Robson: That the Report of Business
Committee be adopted.—Carried.
Moved by Mr. Barnard, and seconded by Mr. Smith : That the following gentlemen be
an Executive Committee in accordance with the 5th Resolution: Messrs. A. De Cosmos,
R. Wallace, J. E. McMillan, J.G. Norris, John Robson, H. Havelock, and F. J. Barnard.
Moved by Mr. Norris, and seconded by Mr. Armstrong : That the thanks of the Contention be tendered to the steamboat owners and stage proprietor, and that the secretary
be instructed to communicate the same.—Carried.
Three cheers were then proposed and given for the Queen.
Three cheers were then proposed and given for the Dominion.
Moved by Mr. Robson, and seconded by Mr. Barnard : That this Convention adjourn.—
Carried.
(signed)        Robert Wallace, Chairman.
Charles Evans   "1  o .
u        rjjii Secretaries.
Henry Havelock)
Extract from the " Daily British Colonist" of the 22nd of September 1868.
A Card.
it:
Whereas certain persons, styling themsel
is termed a Convention, to be held at Yale,
the citizens of Victoria: We, whose names
have not in any way received any authority
Sam O. Beeman.
D. Work.
Donald Moutray.
Wm. Leigh.
W. H. Franklyn.
A. J. McDonnell.
John O'Dwyer.
James Isbister.
Geo. Hardisty.
W. R. Cuthbert.
"Wm. Spring.
John McTeigh.
N. C. Bailey.
W. H. Newton.
F. Widdowson.
Wm, Spencer.
R. B. Powell.
C. Hounslow.
John Spencer.
Thos. A. Williamson.
A. Peele.
H. Gaston.
Chas.    agden.
Thomas Hunter.
Patk. McFarlane.
A. Gilmore.
John G. Taylor.
W. G. Bowman.
Matthew Reynolds.
P. Everett.
Theodore Davie.
Thos. Hodgers.
Wm. Wilson.
John Stannard.
ves delegates, from Victoria, have gone to what
B. C, purporting to represent the opinions of
are hereunder signed, declare that such persons
to represent our opinions or desires:
J. S. Helmcken.
David Leneveu.
James Steel.
Stuart & Co.
Thos. Lett Stahlschmidt.
J. Robertson Stewart.
James Burns.
Henry Rhodes.
Godfrey Brown.
A. R. Green.
Matthew T. Johnston.
Geo. Leggatt.
J. C. Nicholson.
Dickson, Campbell &
Co., per J. C. Nicholson.
Rodk. Finlayson.
C. W. R. Thomson.
James Lowe.
J. P. Davies.
Chas. A. Baron.
Jessie Cowper.
George Walker.
Robt. L. Todd.
Joseph Spratt.
Charles S. Nicol.
J. Lloyd Fisher.
John Russell.
H, Forman.
Thos. Flewin.
John Spence.
Rout Harvey.
J. D. Robinson.
W. T. Livock.
A. Couves.
Forest J. Alexander.
E. A. Whittenham.
Charles James Prevost.
William Denny.
William I. McDougal.
James Lannan.
Jno. J. Austin.
Joseph Graham.
William Newbury.
Henry Soar.
Samuel Partridge.
W. G. Lawson.
Wm. Geo. Jamieson.
Wm. Rippon.
Joseph Dwyer.
Charles Meloy.
Hugh Kennedy.
H. 0. Tiedmann.
George Elvin.
George Balls.
Leonard Stealy.
Henry Short.
Geo. Janues.
D. Dale.
Geo. Edwards.
Chas. P. Pratt.
William Farron.
James Liddle.
William Thomson.
H. Richardson.
H. Luman.
Peter Walsh.
J. A. Phillips.
Eli Harrison.
Barthw. Doolinar.
o
A. W. Patterson,
Thos. Storey.
Ninian Murray.
L. T. Hallett.
F. Dultetride.
G. Beckingham.
Joseph Wilson.
Henry C. Courtney.
Geo. Hemingway.
A. W. Piper.
Rob. E. Jackson.
T. H. Tye.
H. F. Heisterman.
L. Davies.
W. H. McNeill. •
Henry Nathan, jun.
Thomas Chadwick.
Ld. Lowenburg.
E.Read.
R. H. Adams.
J. W. Waitt.
Chas. L. Jones.
A. Bunster.
John T. Howard.
Graham Hankin.
Claverie Deans.
F. Reynolds.
Fellows, Roscoe & Co.
W. C. Robinson.
Robert Bishop.
John C. Davie, m.r.c.s.
Thos. Wilson. WITH THE DOMINION OF CANADA.
27
Wm. Geo. Cox.
D. Babington Ring.
Samuel Harris.
C. A. Bayley.
Richd. H. Alexander.
H. Mansel.
A. McLean.
John Stevens.
Charles L. Leggett.
Ed. Dickinsoj.
G. Norris.
Wm. Harrison.
Chas. F. Barnard, m.
C. Moss.
Wm. Wilson, Fort-st.
John Vaughan.
James Wilcox.
C. W. North.
n.
William Owens.
J. Heywood.
Barend Rob.
J. Kriemler.
P. Swigert.
Walter Sims.
R. P. Whear.
Stanhope Farwell.
H. B. Guerra.
B, P. Griffin.
Edward Mallandaine.
C. Richardson.
H. E. Levey.
J. Newbery.
John Gilmore.
Wm. Whidbom.
Jas. Bower.
E. F. Billington.
Thomas Carter.
Robert Burnaby.
E. Pimbury.
H. L. Jones.
Edward Watson.
L. Kamey.
A, J. Langley.
John Moore.
Lewis Lewis.
John Gilmore.
T. J. Burnes.
John Wagner.
Owen Melloy.
W. T. Armstrong.
G. O. Graith.
Chas. H. Tretmot.
Chas. Bribon.
G. Baker.
Cornelius O'Neil.
James Andrews.
Cornelius Daly.
M. W. T. Drake.
Tho. S. Allatt.
Alfred Fellows.
E. H. Jackson.
James Fell.
Chas. E. Redfern.
Alex. E. B. Davie.
N. I. Neustadt.
Jno. C. Davie, jr. M.n.
John Swanson.
Thomas Pamphlet.
John Crowther.
E. C. Holden..
George Robinson.
Arch. Turner.
455
British
Columbia.
Whereas certain persons, styling themselves delegates from Victoria, have gone to what
is termed a Convention, held at Yale, B. C, purporting to represent the opinions of the
citizens of Vctoria: We, whose names are here undersigned, being Foreign residents in
the city of Victoria, do declare that such persons have not in any way received any
authority to represent our opinions or desires:
W. T. Welcker.
Jules David.
Emil Sutro.
L. Wolff.
Thomas Wright.
S. L. Kelly.
John Bissell.
Chas. Allman.
D. Kaufman.
Joseph Zay.
Joseph Loewen.
Wm. Lohse.
A. W. Lundbom.
Louis Vigelius.
G. Promis.
S. Anthony.
J. Grunbaum Bros.
J. Crossen.
Pierre Tissett.
J. P. Fitere.
F. Corbiniere.
F. Letlouis.
T. Mitchell.
Robert Lowenberg.
Joseph Lovett.
Thos. Geiger.
John Becker.
A. de Neuf.
C. Lombard.
H. Harris.
John Weiler.
David Shade.
A. Rickman.
A. F. Keyser.
Henry Rudolph.
Anten Vigelius.
F. Sehl.
A. Frank el.
Peter McQuade.
J. A. McCrea.
J. Morris.
L. Blum.
Louis Steimler.
M. H. Ahlenfeld.
J. D. Johnson.
J. Harnishfeger.
Julius Seitz.
Wm. Kohl.
S^A. Spencer.
Gio Batta Garibaldi.
J. E. Meyer.
J. Stevens.
O. Parsons.
John Vogel.
George Pappenberger.
John Wagner.
Giacomo Bossi.
Joe Pitrade.
Aron Oldenburg.
W. J. Doane.
M. Fronum.
H. W. Alexander.
Frank Sylvester.
H. M. Cohen.
T. W. Fowlis.
T. Eckstein.
D. Evans.
L. & J. Boscowitz.
J. Rueff.
Wm. P. Sawyard.
James Burns.
Morris E. Dobrun, and
others.
Extract from the " Daily Colonist" of the 23rd of September 1868.
A Card.
Whereas certain persons, styling themselves delegates from Victoria, have gone to what
is termed a Convention, to be held at Yale, B. C, purporting to represent the opinions of
the citizens of Victoria : We, whose names are hereunder signed, declare that such persons
have not in any way received any authority to represent our opinions or desires:
Supplemental.
W. K. Bull.
Alex. Young.
J. R. Robertson.
Wm. B. Townsend.
Doughty.
Thomas Gorrie.
William Harrison.
George Winter.
William Seally.
George Harrison.
John Ash, m.d.
Dr. Turner.
R. Andrews.
W. H. Huxtable.
Robt. Plummer, junr.
G. Williams.
Arthur F. Ludlow.
John Bovd.
A. Richard.
Alex. Hay.
39^-
A. W. Barnett.
P. McTiernan.
Henry Glide.
Richard Roberts.
Richard Pritchard.
John A. Billing.
Benj. S. Marshall.
John Winger.
Chas. Pardee.
Solomon Bros.
T. H. King.
James S. Smith.
Thos. Ball.
A. M. Huntley.
Thomas Cavin.
Sam. Bridgman.
Saml. E. King.
Wm. Emery.
Thos. W. Eastman.
Thos. Conlan.
Philip Melmer.
Donald McKenson.
William Reed.
Robt. Foster.
George Richardson.
J. S. Drummond.
W. Marsh.
Joseph Hilliard.
John Mathison.
R. T. Lawrence.
Wm. P. Douglass.
R. S. Byrn.
William Ettershank.
George Lomas.
Peter J. Leech.
A. W. Davey.
B. Sloman.
David Stephen.
John Bagnall.
Jas. Johnston.
John Goodacre.
Geo. Stevens.
John T. McQuorrie.
John Gestineau, ce.
Jos. Yorke.
T. R. Mitchell.
Jos. W. Carey.
Thos. J. Smith.
E. Wilson.
J. Doughty.
R, Caselton.
Tom Lamont.
Thos. Theobald.
S. M. Hughes.
Thos. Wm. Mills.
Jno. Speld.
Stephen Whitley.
George Thompson.
John Sandsom.
W. A. Franklin.
E 76
4ob
British
Columbia.
No. 7.
Governor Seymour
to the Right Hon.
the Earl Granville,
K.G.
4 March 1869.
No. 45, of 14 May
1868, page 13.
No. 74, of 28 July
1868, page 14.
No. 125, of 30 Nov.
1868, page 16.
ue60\^0ti;. <$&
28
PAPERS ON THE UNION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
E. C. White.
Philip Smith.
W. W. Houseman.
G. Barrett.
B. W. Savage.
J. Ramsay.
John Davis.
Robt. Jenkinson.
Thos. Sellers.
Richard Roberts.
Chas. Kent.
Richard Lewis.
I Harry Butt.
1 JohnAnderson.
A. Yeosten.
T. Wallace.
Wm. Bick.
McFenirty.
Charles McClure.
William Peacock.
H. E. Newton.
— No. 7. —
(No. 26.)
Copy of a DESPATCH from Governor Seymour to the Right Honourable
the Earl Granville, k.g.
Victoria, 4 March 1869.
(Received 24 April 1869.}
My Lord, I (Answered, No. 30, 6 May 1869, page 29.) ^
With reference to my Despatches noted in the margin respecting the possibility
x the union of this Colony with the Dominion of Canada, I have now the honour
to forward copy of a Resolution passed by the Legislative Council on 17th
February antagonistic to the immediate consummation of such a measure.
J O
I have,   &c.
(signed)        Frederick Seymour.
of
Enclosure in No. 7*
Enclosure in No. 7.
Resolution of Legislative Council, of 17 February 18G9.
Resolved, "That this Council impressed .vith the conviction that, under existing circumstances, the confederation of this Colony with the Dominion of Canada would be undesirable,
even if practicable, urges Her Majesty's Government not to take any decisive steps towards
the present consummation of such union."
(signed)        William A, G. Young,
Presiding Member.
Despatches from the Secretary of State.
No. 1.
His Grace the
Duke of Buckingham and Chandos
to Governor
Seymour.
19 Nov. 1867
♦Page u.
+ Pase 12.
— No. 1. —
(No: 87.)
Copy of a DESPATCH from his Grace the Duke of Buckingham and Chandos
to Governor Seymour.
Sir, . Downing-street, 19 November 1867.
I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your two  Despatches, No.
12i
d Separate, t of the 24th September, the first inclosing copy of a resolution
"nto
parsed by the Legislative Council in favour of negotiations being entonec
0
f North America;
for the union of British Columbia with the Eastern ProviDcei
tbe second containing your remarks upon the subject.
Whatever might be the advantages which in course of time might result from
the union of British North America under one government, it appears tome that
the consideration of that question must at all events await the time when the
intervening territory now under the control of the Hudson Bay Company shall
have been incorporated with the Confederation.
1 have, &c.
(signed)        Buckingham and Chando*. WITH THE DOMINION OF CANADA.
29
— No. 2. —
(No. 47.)
Copy of a DESPATCH from his Grace the Duke of Buckingham and Chandos
to Governor Seymour.
T  Sir'   J/M _        111 Downing-street, 11 July 1868.
1 have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Despatch, No 45 * of
the 14th of May, forwarding a copy of a resolution passed by the Legislative
Council of British Columbia during its recent session, on the subiect of union
with the Dominion of Canada.
Copies of your Despatch and of its enclosures have been forwarded for the
information of the Governor of Canada.
I have, &c.
(signed)        Buckingham and Chandos.
457
British
Columbia.
No. 2.
His Grace the
Duke of Buckingham and Chandos
to Governor
Seymour.
11 July 1868.
* Page 13.
(No. 75-)
— No. 3. —
Copy of a DESPATCH from his Grace the Duke of Buckingham and
Chandos to Governor Seymour.
Sir, Downing-street, 19 September 1868.
I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Despatch, No. 74,f of
the 28th July, enclosing copy of a motion made in the Legislative Council of
British Columbia by Mr. De Cosmos, in favour of an Address to Her Majesty on
the subject of confederation with the Dominion of Canada.
A copy of your Despatch and of its enclosure has been forwarded to Lord Monck.
I have, &c.
(signed)        Buckingham and Chandos.
No. 3.
His Grace the
Duke of Buckingham and Chandos
to Governor
Seymour.
19 Sept. 1868.
t Page 14.
— No. 4. ■—
(No. 10.)
Copy of a DESPATCH from the Earl Granville, k.g., to Governor Seymour.
Sir, Downing-street, 4 February 1869.
I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Despatch, No. 125,% of
the 30th November, enclosing a letter addressed to you by certain delegates from
a convention held at Yale, inclosing copies of Resolution and an Address on the
subject of the admission of British Columbia into the Dominion of Canada, the
desirability of immediately establishing Representative Institutions, with Responsible  Government, in the Colony,  and the necessity for retrenchment in the
puhlic expenditure. .
Your Despatch also incloses what appear to be certain advertisements signed
by persons in Victoria, who declare that those delegates have not in any way
received authority to represent their opinions or desires.
I am, &c.
(signed)        Granville.
No. 4.
Earl Granville,
k.g., to Governor
Seymour.
4 Feb. 1869.
Page 16.
No.
5. —
(No. 30.)
Copy of a DESPATCH from the Earl Granville, k.g., to Governor Seymour.
Downing-street, 6 May 1869.
I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Despatch (No. 26) § o
^^^mt «Py «f absolution passed by the Legislative Council
39°-
No. 5.
Earl Granville,
K.G., to Governor
Seymour.
6 May 1869.
$ Page 28. y.
40 o
British
Columbia
30
PAPERS ON THE UNION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
of British Columbia adverse to the immediate union of the Colony with the
Dominion of Canada.
A copy of that Resolution has been forwarded to Sir John Young.
I have, &c.
(signed)        Granville,
M
No. 6.
Earl Granville,
k.g., to Governor
Musgrave.
14 August 1869,
— No. 6. —
(No. 84.)
Copy of a DESPATCH from the Earl Granville, k.g., to Governor Musgrave.
Sir, Downing-street, 14 August 1869.
In my Despatch of the 17th June, in which I communicated to you your
appointment to the government of British Columbia. I informed^ you that I
should probably have occasion to address you on the question, then in agitation,
of the incorporation of that Colony with the Dominion of Canada.
You are aware that Her Majesty's Government have hitherto declined to
entertain this question, mainly because it could not arise practically till the
I territory of the Hudson's Bay Company was annexed to the Dominion, but also,
perhaps, in the expectation that the public opinion of British Columbia might
have opportunity to form and declare itself.
. I have now to inform you that the terms on which Rupert's Land and the
Nortli West Territory are to be united to Canada, have been agreed to by the
parties concerned, and that the Queen will probably be advised before long to
issue an Order in Council which will incorporate, in the Dominion of Canada,
the whole of the British Possessions on the North American Continent, except
the then content inous Colony of British Columbia.
The question, therefore, presents itself whether this single Colony should be
excluded from the great body politic which is thus forming itself. On this question the Colony itself does not appear to be unanimous. But as far as I can
judge from the Despatches which have reached me, I should conjecture that the
prevailing opinion was in favour of union. I have no hesitation in stating that
such is also the opinion of Her Majesty's Government.
They believe that a Legislature selected from an extended area, and representing a diversity of interests, is likely to deal more comprehensively with large
questions, more impartially with small questions, and more conclusively with
both, than is possible when controversies are carried on and decided upon in the
comparatively narrow circle in which they arise—questions of purely local interest
will be more carefully and dispassionately considered when disengaged from
the larger politics of the country, and at the same time will be more sagaciously
considered by persons who have bad this larger political education. Finally, they
anticipate that the interest of every Province of British North America will be
more advanced by enabling the wealth, credit, and intelligence of the whole to
be brought to bear on every part, than by encouraging each in the contracted
policy of taking care of itself, possibly at the expense of its neighbour. Most
especially is this true in the case of internal transit. It is evident that the
establishment of a British line of communication between the Atlantic and
Pacific Oceans is far more feasible by the operations of a single Government
responsible for the progress of both shores of the Continent, than by a bargain
negotiated between separate—perhaps in some respects rival—Governments and
Legislatures. The San Francisco of British North America would, under these
circumstances, hold a greater commercial and political position than would be
attainable by the capital of the isolated Colony of British Columbia. Her
Majesty's Government are aware that the distance between Ottawa and Victoria
presents a real difficulty in the way of immediate union. But that very difficulty will not be without its advantage if it renders easy communication indispensable, and forces onwards the operations which are to complete it. In any
case it is an understood inconvenience, and a diminishing one, and it appears far
better to accept it as a temporary drawback on the advantages of union, than to
wait for those obstacles, often more intractable, which are sure to spring up after
a neglected opportunity.
The constitutional connexion of Her Majesty's Government with the Colony
of British Columbia is, as yet, closer than with any other part of North America;
and
«,. WITH THE DOMINION OF CANADA. Si
and they are bound, on an occasion like the present, to give, for the consideration
of the community and the guidance of Her Majesty's servants, a more unreserved
expression of their wishes and judgment than might be elsewhere fitting.
You will, therefore, give publicity to this Despatch, a copy of which I have
communicated to the Governor General of Canada ; and you will hold yourself
authorised, either in communication with Sir John Young, or otherwise, to take
such steps as you properly and constitutionally can for promoting the favourable
consideration of this question.
It will not escape you, that in acquainting you with the general views of the
Government, I have avoided all matters of detail, on which the wishes of the
people and the Legislature will of course he declared in due time. I think it
necessary, however, to observe that the constitution of British Columbia will
oblige the Governor to enter personally upon many questions—as the condition
of Indian tribes and the future position of Government servants, with which in
the case of a negotiation between two Responsible Governments, he would not be
bound to concern himself.
I have, &c.
(signed) Granville.
459
British
Columbia.
39°-    This  book  is  for  use  in
Library Building ONLY
and as a
"Reserved"  Loan. 

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