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From the Atlantic to the Pacific. A Journey to Vancouver Island and British Columbia Achintre, A. (Auguste), 1834-1886 1872

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Array   
FROM THE ATLANTIC TO THE PACIFIC. JOURNEY
TO
VANCOUVER ISLAND AND BRITISH COLUMBIA.
PROSPECTUS.
Whether from a want of knowledge of our resources, and of our powers,
of the political necessities of the day as well as of the measures to be taken
in view of the contingencies of the future; whether from an imperfect
knowledge of the advantages of our geographical position, or a doubt of the
greatness of the forces lying dormant in our young Canadian Confederation;
whether, in a word, from prejudices in the minds of some, fear or feebleness
in the breast of others, many eminent men, notwithstanding the often
repeated assurances and promises of our statesmen, had but precarious faith
in the creation and establishment of a great British empire on this continent
The idea of seeing at some future day, the frontiers of Canada stretching from one Ocean to the other, and the .immense tracts of country between
the two seas united, and bound solidly together by the chain of a transcontinental railroad, would appear to such people to be the dazzling Utopian
vision of patriotic hearts rather than the design of statesmen prudently
devised and well matured.
That Canada—like a young giant just emerging from infancy and
essaying to walk alone—having one foot in the Atlantic, should seek at one
step, and this the first one, to stride the Rocky Mountains and place the
other foot in the Pacific—this would seem to such timorous minds impossible
to be realized, in fact, utterly chimerical. Yet the attempt has succeeded:
the dream of the night has become the reality of the morrow ; the vision of
yesterday stands the accomplished achievement of to-day. The old world applauds our success; the Mother Country lends us her
aid; our powerful neighbours treat us as their equals; and our Confederation, grown already great, fortified by trial, and confident of her strength,
advances with no hesitating step. Thus, as an infant, when, after a few
tottering steps, he has reached his object, stands firm and erect upon his feet,
and smiles with a look of happy triumph, our young country, after a successful essay, can look round with elation on the charmed and amazed
spectators of her progress.
The work which we are about to publish under the title of: " From
the Atlantic to the Pacific, a Journey to Vancouver Island and
British Columbia," will comprise, not only an entertaining and elegantly
written narrative of the journey, but also a desinterested view of Canadian
state-policy, as well as an original but faithful review of the advancement of
our country in its agricultural, commercial, industrial, and social aspects. It
will furnish also an instructive itinerary of the route actually taken to reach
our new province ; a route of which Manitoba, and soon no doubt the
Saskatchewan, will form the two principal stations. It is unnecessary to add
tthat he book is especially intended to set forth the varied wealth and inexhaustible resources of British Columbia.
We consider it our especial duty, as well as a recommendation for our
book, to inform the public that through the kindness of a gentleman well
versed in literature, who has, later in life, accepted a position in the Ministry,
-^the Hon. H. L. Langevin, C. B., who has not allowed his present more
exalted career to lead him to forget the earlier pursuits of his youth, nor his
elevated position to make him neglect an opportunity of conferring a favour—
through the kindness of this distinguished statesman the author has been
able, without holding any official position, to accompany the Hon. Minister
of Public Works in his mission to British Columbia; and profiting by this
good fortune to collect from the most authentic sources, notes, information,
and inquiries upon all subjects of importance, with the view of presenting a
series of animated scenes in which the impressions made upon the mind of a
traveller will be found among matters of a more technical character, the whole
furnishing a complete and detailed description of a country hitherto but
little known, abounding in resources, and fully as able to contribute, in the
future, to the prosperity of the Confederation as the territories bordering on
the Pacific to that of the United States.
In order to carry out the plan suggested by the title of the book it has
been thought advisable to divide the work into two parts : the first part
entitled | From the Atlantic to the Pacific," to comprehend the journey
across the American continent; the passage and return from the one Ocean to —- ar: , -  BS
the other, with the numerous incidents occurring during so long a trip : a
description of the plains; the wonderful beauty of the places as yet
unpeopled; some account of the great Pacific Railroad; the stay at Salt-
Lake ; Mormonism; visit to Brigham Young; excursion to the Rocky
Mountains; picturesque scenes of the Sierras; wonders of California, San
Francisco and the Chinese quarter, &c, &c. Moreover, as our new provinces
constitute what may be called the Canadian Far West we have deemed it
fitting, in view of the augmentation and importance of our relations with the
Western States and Territories, to give some items of information concerning
the population, industry, and principal productions of such of them as have
been visited by the author.
The second part of the work, which will be its principal and really
essential portion, will be styled "Journey to Vancouver Island and
British Columbia." It will embrace, along with the history of British
Columbia since its discovery, an account of the different forms of government
which have succeeded each other; its physical geography, its geological
constitution, its climate, cities, ports, mineral productions, those of its forests
and fields, its fisheries, commerce and industrial products. We shall also
notice the manners and customs of the Indians, and offer some observations
upon the advantages which the province holds out to emigrants from
Europe.
The author has personally visited the country from the port of Esqui-
malt in the strait of Fuca to the bay of Burrard-Inlet, in the Sound ; from
the fertile plains of Cowichan and Comox to the wooded plateaux of Cascades
Range ; from Barclay-Sound to Nahaimo ; from the mouth of the Fraser to
the rivers Thompson and Harrison; from Seymour Narrows to the Cariboo
mines, 600 miles in the interior; he has thus been enabled with his own
eyes to observe the most striking points, and to gather the most accurate
information.
A glance at the annexed summary of the contents of the chapters of the
book will at once make clear the plan that has been pursued. To state
figures and statistics divesting them of their dryness; to use official documents without imitating their stiffness; to weave these materials so indispensable to every book of a serious and instructive character in the web of a
style abounding in description and anecdote, so as to offer to the public a
work at once agreable and useful, in which all professions, all ages, shall find
a subject of interest, and relaxation, or even for study; to make known to
Canada and to other countries the sublime scenery, and the as yet unexplored
riches of British Columbia),—this has been our object. On the tide page of the work we have deemed it not amiss to print, as
a very appropriate epigraph, and one hereafter to be often heard, the expression with which Sir G. E. Cartier concluded his speech in the Dominion
Parliament at Ottawa, in favour of the annexation to Canada of this new
province of the Pacific : All aboard for the West ! TO
THE HON. HECTOR LOUIS LANGEVIN, C. B.
MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS, CANADA.
The existence of nations, like the lives of individuals, offers many
extraordinary contrasts and singular coincidences. Who would have ever
imagined that the handful of colonists whom France, in the time of her
monarchical greatness cast upon these shores, and whom the fortune of war
constrained her afterward to abandon, should become, by reason of the virtue
naturally inherent in their race, loyalty the very corner stone of an empire
loyal obedience to Great Britain,  (i)
Must it not appear a most striking coincidence, if we may not say
providential, that, following the line of illustrious men such as Jacques
Cartier, Roberval, Champlain, Maisonneuve, La Salle, Iberville, Lemoyne
de Bienville, Montcalm, Levis, hardy adventurers, founders of cities, valiant
captains, whose names float in our memories like glorious waifs left from the
shipwreck of French colonial power in America, there has been reserved for
one of their descendants, a loyal subject of the power against which they bore
arms, the honour of achieving, in a confidential mission to Columbia, the
completion of a political edifice of which his ancestors had laid the foundations.
Were there no gratitude to impel; history would lay upon me the
obligation of dedicating my work to one so honoured.
Praying the acceptance of this dedication as the expression of profound
personal respect, as well as a tribute of homage due for high public character
and good service to our country, the author signs himself,
A. ACHINTRE.
Montreal, November 1872.
(1) Twice since the cession of this country to England, in 1778 and 1812, French Canadians have fought
for the Mother Country against the United States. Since the establishment of the Confederation of the
British Provinces of North America in 1866 Lower Canada has been the pivot, the political base of the new
order of things.
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O  WMOM TME ATLANTIC TO- THE PACIFIC.
JOURNEY TO VANCOUVER ISLAND
A.3STID
BRITISH COLUMBIA
liTTI^OIDTJCTIOlsr.
CHAPTER I.
Departure.—Farewells.—La Colombiere.—Routes by which to reach British Columbia; the prairies, Isthmus of Panama,
Cape Horn. — A title to discover.—Companions in travel. — Upper Canada.—The visiting deputation: Messrs.
MacKenzie, Stirton, Hon. Mr. Aikins and Somerville, Toronto.—Custom House at Port Huron.—The Grand Trunk o
the United States.—Michigan, its appearance and resources.—Arrival at Chicago.—The city, its business.—Sherman
Hotel.—The Aqueduct.—Lincoln Park.—Negro women and their fans.
CHAPTER  II.
Terminus of Burlington and Quiney railroad.—Insurance agents.—Routes to Omaha.—Transcontinental railroad.—Pacific
Union. — The Central Pacific.—Advantages and results of these roads.—Canadian Pacific railroad. —Sir Hugh
Allan.—The Northern Pacific. —The plains of the West.—The farms. — The passengers. —Railroad accommoda-
tionsfor cooking and washing. — The Pulman Company and its cars.—New mode of travel.
CHAPTER III.
Railway carriage-restaurant.—The-hotel keeper Bedard.—The waiters.—The haughty conduct of the blacks.—The State
of Iowa.—Burlington.—The lumber trade:—The Mississippi.—Omaha.—Council Bluffs.—The Missouri.—Railroad
terminus.—The bridge in course of construction.—Nebraska territory.—The storm.—The baggage.—The elevators.—
Gilmore.—Butterfly.—Elkhorn.—Emigrant settlers.—Fremont.—The river Platte.
CHAPTER IV.
Entrance Tinto the Rooky Mountains. — The Canadian missionary, Mr. Cusson. — Indian missions. — Canadians among
the tribes. — The ohief s poney. — The pipe of peace. — Father de Smet. — Savage Life. — The Metis of Sioux
City. — Courtesy of the American government and of the Company. — The Irish in the army. — Canadian newspapers. — Cheyenne. — Wyoming territory. — Forts Laramie and Kearney. — Denver railway. — The Colorado. —
Mineral resources.
CHAPTER V.
The table lands of the Rooky Mountains. — The highest peak. — Sherman station. — Dinner on the train. — Buffalo
tongue. — Mountain shells. — John, the botanist. — Mr. Langevin's herbal. — The pines. — The brooks. — Fruit
culture. —jCollection of stones. — Temperature. — Sunset. — Bridges and viaducts. — Indian tombs. — Fishing and
bunting*
J, IO
CHAPTER VI.
The red banks. — Laramee Station. — Jury of women. — The depot. — Chinese laborers. —The white frost. — Coal mine.
—The red desert. — The roik table. — The river Verte. — The deserted town. — Hares and foxes. — Passage of
grasshoppers. — Fishing, 6131 feet above the sea. — Reinforcing locomotive. — Brilliancy behind the glaciers- —
American notice. — Fort Bridger. —"Echo-Canyon. — Mormon Fortifications. — Echo village. — Wahsatch mountains-
CHAPTER VII.
Weber ravine, or Weber Canyon. — The thousand mile tree. — The devil's gates. — The devil's slide. — Ogden. —Departure for Salt Lake. — Mormon railroad. — Italian harper. — The travellers. — The journey, the twilight. — The
crops. — Arrival at the city. — Scene in the omnibus. — Mormon hotel. — Salt-Lak6 City.
CHAPTER VIII.
The Mormons. — Origin of the sect, its progress and persecutions endured.
Customs and doctrines of the prophet. — Visit to Brigham Young.
■ Its establishment in Utah Valley. —
CHAPTER IX.
Visit to Mormon tabernacle. — Construction of the temple. — Revolutionary teaching. —Business, industry and agriculture of the territory. — Cooperative societies. — Play at the prophet's theatre. — River Jordan. — Irrigating works
in Utah. — Difficulties of the present visit to Camp Douglas.
CHAPTER X.
Return to Ogden. —Excursion to the gorge and river of Ogden. — Equipment and route. — Trout fishing. — Grizzly bears
— Picnic by the river. — John's cookery. —Manufacture of cloth.— Ox carts. —Mormon colony. — The gold mines.-
The Bohemian Jew,- exchange agent.—The raspberries.—The Swedish emigrant, his saw-mill, and business plans.-
The English book-seller. — Photography on the train. — Chinese autograph. — Bear and eagle for sale.
CHAPTER XL
Departure from Ogden. — Accident. — Red flags. — Stoppage on the road. — Two hours detention.— Corinne. — Stages
of Montana territory. — A tragedy in two, minutes. — The great American desert. — Halleck station. — The
American deserter. — Elks city. — The cavern at Shermantown. — The palissades. — The young girl's grave. — The
pillars of dust. — Humboldt. — The verdure. — Artesian wells. — The white plains. — The mirage.
CHAPTER XII.
Oyster soup, 1,500 feet above the sea. — A train lost in the snow. — The Sierra Nevada, its forest and mines. — The " bits
and reals."—Lakes Tahoe and Donner. — Summit station. — Cisco. — Cape Horn. — Colfax. — Nevada country. —
Junction ]of the Pacific and Oregon and California railways. — Sacramento. — Valley of Vallejo. — Terminus of
Pacific railroad. — Oakland.
CHAPTER XIII.
Arrival at San Francisco. — The city, its appearance. — Temperature.—Inhabitants. — Theatres.—Woodward's gardens,
or the zoological garden. — A walk to Cliff House.— Mass at the Cathedral. — Mission Dolores. — Little nuggets of
gold, or the gambling house. — Messrs. Armstrong and Smyth. — A visit to the Chinese quarter. — The pagoda. —
Fumes of opium. — The jewellers. — The restaurants. — The gambling saloons. — The manners and employments of
the Chinese. — The climate, population, agriculture, industry, mines, and resources of the State of California. —
Courtesy of the English Consul-general, Mr. W. Lane Booker.
CHAPTER   XIV
Departure for Victoria. — Steamer Prince Alfred. — Contract for the Oanndian mail. — Messrs. Rosenfield and Birmingham. — Senator for Oregon, Mr. Williams, member of the commission of the Washington Treaty. — Route by Portland and Olympia. — Departure delayed.— Captain Sholl. — Basket of peaches and case of wine. — Lunch. — The
Golden Gate, the bay of San Franoisoo. —The passengers. —Sea sickness. — The voyage.— The shores of Oregon. —
Columbia River. — Washington territory. — Olympic mountains. — American frigate Saranac. —North East wind. —
Predictions of the Captain. — View of Vancouver Island. —Fuca strait. II
CHAPTER
The pilot. — Lighthouse and port of Esquimau. — Entrance to the port of Victoria. — Anchor'age. — Discovery of British
Columbia, its colonization. — Political changes. — The city of Victoria. — Reception ot Hon. Mr. Langevin. —
Governor's house.
CHAPITRE XVI.
Walk to Esquimalt. — Currents, tides, and harbours on the coast. — Dockyard. — Admiral Farquhart. — Walk around
Victoria. — The gorge. — French Hospital. — Restaurant Driard, or the epic of a cook. — Lunch and ball on board
the Zealous. — Sail to Nanaimo.—Steamer Douglas. — Captain Clarke. — The Archipelago. — The savages. — The
Mount Backer. — Agricultural settlers of Ohimenous, Cowichan, Maple-Bay, Admiral-Island.— County-magistrate
Mr. Spalding. — College chum of Sir G. E. Cartier. —Indian villages. — Uelator and Seychelles tribes.
CHAPTER XVII.
Coal mines of Nanaimo. — Geological description of the island. — Stone-quarry. — The agent, Mr. Dawes. — Election
times. — Postal arrangements. — The American from Sitka. — Shipment of cattle at Maple-Bay. — The,Indians of
the island, their numbers and customs. — Animals of the island. — Vegetables. — Villages. — Miners' hotel.
CHAPTER   XVIII.
Return to Victoria.—Optical phenomenon. —The lighthouse upside down.—Departure for New-Westminster.—Steamer
Enterprise. — Courtesy of the Hudson Bay Company. — Their administration in the island. — The route. — Another
archipelago. —Nanaimo again. — The protestant minister, Mr. Owen and his family. — Mouth of Fraser river:
Quicksands, fogs, source of the river, its course and navigation. — The seals on the buoys. — The rivers, springs and
lakes of British Columbia. — The American geologist, Mr. Lecompte and the correspondent of the Alta California.—
Members of religious orders on board. — Metis women. — Arrival ai New-Westminster.
CHAPTER  XIX.
Colonial Hotel. — The city of New-Westminster. — Its foundation, its progress and its future.—The money. — The
director, Mr. Claudet. — Departure for Tale. — The steamer Victoria. — Indians and their squaws on the banks of
Fraser. — Their condition. — Catholic and protestant missions'. — The late Mgr. Demers, Mgr. D'Harbonney. —
Brother Oblat. — The postmaster. — St. Mary's mission. — Reception of Hon. Mr. Langevin by the Indians. — The
mission of Mr. Duncan, catechist and trader at Metlahkahtla. — The Canadian ex-employees ot the Hudson Bay
Company. — Settlement of a colonist.—The river Harisson. — Visit to a camp of savages. — Fort Hope. — Its mines.
The Indians and the rapid of the river.—Visit of Judge Bushby. — The six Canadian miners.— The rock of the
Two-Sisters. — Devil's gate. — Fanning on the banks of the Fraser.
CHAPTER XX.
Arrival at Yale. — A comical incident. — The rapids. — Captain Smith's project. — Mr. Cruse, puisne judge of the Superior Court.'— Mr. Robertson, mayor of New-Westminster. — Claims on the Fraser. — Indian feast.—Salmon Fishing.
— Our guide, Mr. Barnard, his life, and success. — The team and vehicle. — The route to Cariboo. — Suspension
bridge. — Mr. Trutch, engineer, Lieutenant-Governor. — Indians of the interior.— River Anderson.— Indian
salmon preserves. — Graves of Indian chiefs. — Geological aspect of the country. — Arrival at Boston Bar. — Origin
of the name. — Canadian Hotel. — The mines and the Chinese.
CHAPTER XXL
Departure from Boston Bar.—Jackass mountain. — Grave of an European. — Breakfast at Lytton. — Globe Hotel. — Mr.
and Mrs. Oilier.— The protestant mission. —The ranch of Mr. OlUer. — The mines- —Thompson river. — The
bridge. — The road. — The devil's chair. — Trains of provisions and goods. — Their equipment, march, camping and
provisioning. —Surprise and joy of the Indians. — Meeting with a chief. — Iron horse, the fetish of John. —Fires in
the woods. ~ The Frenchman, Pierre Morin.—Hahsoraft station. — The limit of Mr. Cornwall. — CattUS breeding. —
Regatta on the Thompson river. — The brewer in the hills.
CHAPTER  XXII.
Cascades mountain range. — Olympian mountains. — Hillocks. — Bonaparte valley. —Farms and agrioulture. — Grave
Creek.—Arrival at Clinton.— The city and its neighborhood.— Industry.—Agriculture.— The drama of the
hotel. — Chineso cooks and waiters. — Meeting with Mr. E. fl. Sanders, county judge. — Departure from Clinton. —
'*$ /
12
Green timber. — The Chasm. —Mount Big-Bee. — The ascent. — The view. — The Indian messenger. — Meeting
with the Mail-Coaoh. — The lunar rainbow. — Arrival at Bridges Creek. — The incantations of a doctor. — A night
at the hotel.
CHAPTER XXIII.
Departure for Soda Creek. — Lake la Hache. — The miner traveller. — Forced to wait. — Breakfast at Blue Tent. — The
Gnide Stevens Seynglay. —Burial of anlndian chief. — The farm of Mr. J. T. Barnard.—Mission at lake Williams.
— Mr. John Saul, cattle breeder. — Mode of breeding. — Cereals. — Meeting with the missionary, Mr. Gaudidier.—
Murder of a miner, his grave. — Reception of an Indian doctor. — Narrow Valley, Deep Valley. — The American
farm of Messrs. Calbreath and Hawks, their method of irrigation. — Arrival at Soda Creek.
CHAPTER XXIV
Steamer L'lUoet. — The American, Mr. Gustavus Blinwright. — Fort George. — River Nechago. —Lake Stewart. — River
Tache'. — Lake Tremble. — River Middle. — Lake Tatla. — Ominica. — The Mines on the rivers Germanson and
Peace. — The nuggets. — Quesnel Mouth. — Mr. J. H. Karr, of Ottawa. —The ferry boat. — The coal mine. — Petition to Hon. Mr. Langevin. —Rising of the Fraser river in 12 hours. —Captains Haughton and Vernon.—The valley
of O'Kanagan. — Shipment of a herd of cattle. — Canadian farm of Mr. Brousseau, on the Prairie. — Route to
Cariboo. —Wallace the miner. — The produce of his farm.
CHAPTER XXV.
First cold weather. —Travelling wrappers. — Arrival at Vanwinkle. — Miners' cabins. — The lodging. — South Wales
mine.— Accident on the brink of the precipice. — Judge Ball. — William's Creek. —River and town of Bakerville.
— Messrs. Walkem and Thompson. — Cariboo district. — Gold mines, and their discovery.— Ballerat mine.—Mount
Forest mine. — American Company, Messrs. Kutre and Lane. — Formation of gold. — Processes of extraction. —
The Rocker. — The mine tunnel. —The shafts.—Hydraulic mines. — Quartz mill. — Bed-Rock-Flume Company. —
Lake J ack-Club. — Visit to the essay office. — Melting of the gold.v— Fixing the standard- — Exports. — Amateur
theatricals. — Demonstration in honour of the Hon. Mr. Langevin.
CHAPTER XXVI.
Return to New-Westminster.— Arrival at Yale. — Meeting with a company of Canadian surveyors. —Invitation from the
Mayor and City Council of New-Westminster. — Visit to Burrard Inlet. Messrs. Halbrook, Nelson, Claudet, <fec, &o.
The woodyards. — Steam sawmills. — The slide on fire. — The bay. — The lumber trade. — The forest of British
Columbia.—Messrs. Moodie, Dietz, Nelson and Co. — Hastings Mills Company. — Dance room of the savages. — The
working men, their reading rooms. — The French ship, Theodore-Ducos. Captain Guignon. — Accident to Mr. Brew,
custom house officer. — Government of British Columbia, religion, population, oommeroe, industry, banks, revenues,
expenditure, <fec., &e.
CHAPTER XXVII.
'ublic buildings of New-Westminster. — Departure for Victoria. — Dinner to Hon. Mr. Langevin. — The dining room, the
decorations, the managing stewards (Commissaire-gfnfral), the guests, and speeches. — Visit to the public buildings.
Laying the corner stone of the convent of St. Anne. — Visit to the bishop's palace, to the convent, to the college. —
The Rev. Messrs. Segnars, Manda, Kirly, Brabant and Jonckan. —Excursion to Seymour Narrows. — The passengers. — The fog. — The anohorage.—Trip to Nanaimo.—Comox.—Seymour Narrows. —The tide. — The smuggling
schooner. — Anight in the bay of Manzeies- —Wolves. — Savage animals of the Island- —Hunting party. —A
hunter lost in the woods- — The miners and the Indian oanoe picked up. — A night in Deep Bay. —Whaling brig
Byzantium- — Captain Roys, inventor of the harpoon with the exploding ball- — The fisheries of British Columbia •
CHAPTER XVIII.
Visit to Island of San Joan. — Steamer Sparrow Barak. — The English and American camps. — Origin of the difficulty
about this Island. —Its position and importance.* Visit to Race-Rock light house. — Barclay-Sound. — Allb-erni
canal. — Project for oanal extension as far as Nanaimo —Terminus of Canadian Paeifio Railroad. — Indians of the
west side —A priest become a minister. — Fishing stations. — Immigration into British Columbia. — Departure
from Viotoria. — Cheers for the Hon. Mr. Langevin- — Passage across. — The Canadians of San Francisco. — Rook
Island railroad. — The return.   13
ILLUSTRATIONS TO BE CONTAINED IN THE BOOK-
CHAPTER  I.
Quebec. — Montreal. — Toronto. — Chicago.
CHAPTER II.
Pacific Transcontinental R. R. — Refreshment oar. — Omaha. — Council Bluffs.
CHAPTER III.
The River Platte. —The plains- — The Antelope.
CHAPTER IV.
The Indians. —Soda water fountain. — Cheyenne.
CHAPTER V
The desert, east of Dale Creek. — Prairie dogs- —Bridge of Dale Creek.
CHAPTER VI.
Church Butts. — Little Cotton Wood. — Wasatch mountains-
CHAPTER VII.
Weber Canyon. — The thousand mile tree. — Devil's gates. — Ogden village.
CHAPTER VIII.
Salt-Lake city. — Brigham Young. — The President's house. — The temple.
CHAPTER IX.
The tabernacle. — The theatre. — A street in the city. — Revolutionary sign. — Salt-Lake.
CHAPTER X.
A street in Ogden. —View of the river and Canyon. — Valley of Zion.
CHAPTER XL
The stockades. — Valley of Truckee. — The snow shed. — The great American desert.
CHAPTER XII.
Railway train for Cisco. — Lake Tahoe. - Cisco. - Snow sheds- — City of Sacramento.
CHAPTER XIII.
Railway terminus. - Cape Horn. - Two views of San Francisco.
CHAPTER XIV.
Golden gate. - Bay'.of Drake. 1558. - Bay of San Francisco. - A street of the city. CHAPTER XV.
Town of Victoria. — Governor's official residence. — Portrait of Mr. Truteh- ~ Private residence of Mr. Trutoh.
CHAPTER XVI.
Harbor of Esquimau. ~ View of Nanaimo. ~ Indian villages.
CHAPTER XVII.
Types of Indians. — Indian camp.
Fraser river. — The steamboat Victoria.
CHAPTER XVIII.
CHAPTER XIX.
New-Westminster. -.- Town of Hope. — River Harisson.
CHAPTER XX.
Yale city. — Suspension bridge. — Indian drying rooms-
CHAPTER XXI.
Indian graves. — River Thompson. — Trains of goods and provisions.— Town of Lytton.
CHAPTER XXII.
Town of Clinton. ~ The Chase
Waterfall on the road. — Spencer bridge.
Two views of the Cariboo rot
CHAPTER   XXIII.
CHAPTER XXIV.
CHAPTER XXV.
Vanwinkle. — Mining district. — The rocker. — The tunnel.-- Subterranean galleries. ~ Hydraulic mine. — Quartz mill.
CHAPTER XXVI.
The Douglass pine. — Trees of Burrard Inlet--- Sawmillpnthe Pacific coast.
CHAPTER XXVII.
Salmon fishing. — Whale fishing-
CHAPTER XXVIII
Maps of Vancouver Island and British Columbi TERMS
The book will contain about 400 pages, and will be illustrated with
nearly 100 engravings of the style and size stated in the prospectus.
It will be published in French and English, and will be delivered to
subscribers, either in English or French, bound, on their sending the
subscription price.
In order to cover the cost of the publication of the book, the travelling
penses, numerous illustrations, &c, the double edition, elegant style and
inding, it will be necessary to fix the subscription price at 4 dollars.    The
selling price will be five dollars.
I GEO. E. DESBARATS,
PUBLISHER.
Montreal, November, 1872.
v * -~ »
Please fill up the blanks in the appended form and return to us as soon as
possible.
M. GEO. E. DESBARATS,
Montreal.
Please put my name down for  copies of the work entitled
"./From the Atlantic to the  Pacific," by Mr.  Achintre, and send to
my address.    The terms to be those stated in the Prospectus.
Name	
Address.
Date. 

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