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An output adjusted price index for public school expenditures in British Columbia (1961-1969) Armstrong, Henry Graham 1970

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AN OUTPUT ADJUSTED PRICE INDEX FOR PUBLIC SCHOOL EXPENDITURES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA (1961-1969) by Henry Graham Armstrong B.Ed., University of Alberta, 1968 M.Ed., University of Alberta, 1970 A Dissertation submitted in Partial Fulfilment i; The Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Education in the Center for the Study of Administration in Education Faculty of Education We accept this dissertation as conforming to the required standard THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA August 1970 In present ing th i s thes i s in pa r t i a l f u l f i lment o f the requirements fo r an advanced degree at the Un iver s i t y of B r i t i s h Columbia, I agree that the L ib ra ry sha l l make it f r ee l y ava i l ab le fo r reference and study. I f u r ther agree that permission for extensive copying of th i s thes i s fo r s cho la r l y purposes may be granted by the Head of my Department or by his representat ives . It is understood that copying or pub l i c a t i on of th i s thes i s fo r f i nanc i a l gain sha l l not be allowed without my wr i t ten permiss ion. Department of The Un ivers i ty o f B r i t i s h Columbia Vancouver 8, Canada ABSTRACT The research examined the validity of four commonly held assumptions which appear to be the bases of public school policy i n British Columbia. 1. The rate of increase i n the price of public school education has been greater than price increases i n the economy generally. 2. There has been an increase i n the quantities of goods and services purchased and that these goods and services are not required for the educative process. 3. A reduction i n the flow of funds w i l l curtail the purchases of goods and services not required for the educative process. , 4. The rate of increase i n price can be curtailed by reducing the flow funds to public schools and by restricting the rate of increase i n . teachers' salaries. A price index, using the Paashe method, was f i r s t constructed. Then, using this index operational expenditures for public schools in B.C. between 1961 and 1969 were deflated. Differences i n the costs of elementary, junior secondary, senior secondary, special elementary and occupational students were used to weight student data to determine changes.in the units of output. Unit costs were determined in current and constant dollar terms. Analysis of the data.demonstrated that the rate of increase i n the price of public school education was lower than the rate of increase i n the prices of the products of some other labour intensive industries and the average weekly wage of British Columbians. Further, that the rate - i i -of increase i n the price and the rate of increase i n the quantity Of services purchased were inversely related to the degree to which the services are directly involved i n the educative process. - i i i -TABLE OF CONTENTS Pan*-Abstract . . . . • • >. « • . . . . . . . . . • . . . • . • . • • • • 1 Table of Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . ., . . . i i i Lis t of Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . '. . . . . . . . . Li s t of Appendexes . t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x l L i s t of Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x i i "Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x i i i - CHAPTER ' •. 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 THE MAvIOR ASSUMPTIONS: A STUDY OF THEIR VALIDITY . . . . . . :V Changes in Price. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 The Impact of Policy on Price Changes . .... • . . . . . . 4 Changes in Quantities of Purchases. . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 The Impact of Policy on Quantity Changes. . . . . . . . . . 7 II. METHODOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Selection of Base Year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . 8 Selection of Index Method . . . . . . . .... . . . . . . . 12 Input Weighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H Sub-Indexes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Id Teachers' Salaries Sub-Index. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 III. INDEX CONSTRUCTION—CATEGORY WEIGHTS . . . . . . . . . ..... • 22 Weight Determination. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Provincial Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . 23 Sub-Categories. . . . . . . . . .... . . . . . . .... . . . 24 Input Determination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 - i v -CHAPTER Page IV. INDEX CONSTRUCTION—INPUT PRICE INDEXES . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Salaries of Non-Teaching Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Other Payroll Costs. 51 Trustees Expenses. . . . . . . ... . . . .'.. • •"• • • . . . . 51 B.C.S.T.A. Dues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • • • 52 Insurance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5? Auxiliary Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Power. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • 54 Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Expense Accounts V 54 Teachers' Salaries Price Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 A Teachers' Wage Index 56 A Comparison of Instructional Salary Indexes . . . . . . . 57 Instructional Salary Trends. . . . . . . • • 59 Other Price Indexes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . >• 61 V. PUBLIC SCHOOL PRICE INDEXES . . . . . . . . . . . 89 VI. PUPIL WEIGHTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 METHOD. . . . . . . . . . . * . . . . . . . 97 DIFFERENTIAL DETERMINATION. . . . . . . . 100 Teachers' Salaries .... . . . . . . . . . . 100 Administration, Transportation, and Auxiliary Services . . 102 Clerical Salaries. . 102 Instructional Supplies . ... . . . . . 103 Plant Operation and Maintenance. 104 DIFFERENTIALS APPLIED TO STUDENT DATA . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 SUMMARY AND DISCUSSION OF FINDINGS. . 106 - V -CHAPTER Page VII. UNIT COSTS . . . . . * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i;>s Analyses of Per-Un.it. Costs in Current Doll.us I .'Vv CONSTANT UNIT COSTS 128 School Board Operational Expenditures . . . . 128 Provincial and Municipal Costs. 128 DISCUSSION OF FINDINGS 130 Discussion of Current Dollar Costs. . . . . . . 130 Constant Dollar Costs 131 VIII. SUMMARY AND IMPLICATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 The Three Variables 156 Changes in Price 157 The Impact of Policy on Price Changes 163 Change's in Quantities of Purchases 166 The Impact of Policy on Quantity Changes. . . . . . . . . . -168 Summary . . . . . 169 - v i -List of Tablet Table I Local Tax Revenue as a Per cent of Total Revenue 9 II Teachers Salaries for British Columbia, Index of 10 Change by Category III School Board Operational Expenditures for B.C. 11 1960- 1969 in Thousands of Dollars and Per Cent of Total IV Mean Category Weights i n Sample School Districts 17 Compared to Provincial Weights V Source of Data for Indexes 18 VI Comparison of B.C. Public Schools Annual Reports 25 and Auditors' Annual Reports for Selected School Districts in Selected Years VII Chilliwack School District No. 33. Operational 3? Expenditures and Weighting of Categories, 1961- 1965 (incl.) VIII Chilliwack School District No. 33. Operational 33 Expenditures and Weighting of Categories, 1966-1970 (incl.) IX Burnaby School District No. 41. Operational 34 Expenditures and Weighting of Categories, 1961-1965 (incl.) X Burnaby School District No. 41. Operational 35 Expenditures arid Weighting of Categories, 1966-1970 (incl.) XI Howe Sound School District No. 48. Operational 36 Expenditures and Weighting of Categories, . 1961-1965 (incl.) XII Howe Sound School District No. 48. Operational 37 Expenditures artd Weighting of Categories, 1966-1970 (incl.) XIII Nanaimo School District No. 68. Operational . 38 Expenditures and Weighting of Categories, . 1961-1965 (incl.) XIV Nanaimo School District No. 68. Operational 39 Expenditures and Weighting of Categories, 1966-1970 (incl.) XV Weighting of Categories in Sample School Districts 40 - v i i -Tables XVI Weighting of Classifications Within "Administration" 41 Kxpemse Cateqory XVII Weighting of Classifications Within "Other Instruction" 4? Expense Category XVIII Weighting of Classifications Within "Plant Operation" 43 and Maintenance Category, Part I XIX Weighting of Classifications Within "Plant Operation" 4 4 and Maintenance Category, Part II XX Weighting of Classifications Within "Auxiliary Services" 45 Expense Category XXI Price Relatives of a l l Expense Classifications 46 XXII Relative Weights to be Applied to a l l Input Indexes 47 XXIIIA Relative Input Weights Grouped in Categories 48 XXIIIB Inputs Relative to Respective Categories 49 XXIV Administration Salaries Price Index 62 XXV Clerical Salaries Price Index 63 XXVI Office Supplies Price Index 64 XXVII Trustees Expense Price Index (>!.> XXVIII Non-lYwhiiiq Staff Pension Price Index (>6 XXIX Group Life Insurance Price Index 6/ XXX Workmen's Compensation Price Index 68 XXXI British Columbia School Trustees Association 69 Dues Price Index XXXII Expense Accounts Price Index 70 XXXIII Teachers Salaries Index (Residual Approach) 71 XXXIV Teachers Salaries Index (Paasehe) 72 XXXV Janitors' Salaries Price Index 73 XXXVI Maintenance Supplies Price Index 74 - v i i i -T.ihL> XXXVII ' I 'VwtM Price Index '/'< XXXV 1.1 I Fu.-I l V l r e Index 7 <' XXXIX ; Electrical Fixtures Price Index n XL Insurance Price Index 7 8 XLI Maintenance Salaries Price Index 7^ XLII . Equipment Repair Price Index ^ XLIII Price Index Transportation ^ •XLIV Transportation Price Index 8 2 XLV Auxiliary Services Price Index O J XLVT Teachers' Salaries Laspeyne Formula. 84 Teachers Salaries Projected from 1961 Base on Equal Place on 1962-1971 Salary Grids XLVII Teachers' Salaries Laspeyre Formula 85 Index of Teacher and Principal Salary Categories Xl.VIII Price Relatives of Teachers' Salary Sub-Index 86 Laspeyre Formula XLIX Teachers' Salary Sub-Index Laspeyre Formula 87 L Summary of Input Price Indexes 88 LI Public School Price Index Constructed 91 Weighted Indexes by Category LII Administration Category Price Index 1 : ' LIII G±her Instruction Category Price Index 93 LIV Plant Operation and Maintenance Price Index 94 LV Summary of Category and Total Price Indexes 95 LVT Determination of Weighting for Teachers' Salaries Index Paasche Formula Part I 108 Part II 109 Part III 110 Part IV 111 - ix -Table LV1.I LVIII LIX LX LXI LXII LXIII LXIV LXV LXVI LXV1I LXVIII LXIX LXX LXXI LXXII Construction of Teachers' Salaries Index Paasehe Formula Part I Part I I Part III Calculation of Pupil Weighting. Instructional Salaries by Type of School Calculation of Pupil Weighting Enrolment by Type of School and Program by School Year Calculation of Pupil Weighting. Instructional Salaries Per Pupil and by Type of School and Program Calculation of Pupil Weighting. Teachers Salary Differential and Weighting. Calculation of Pupil Weighting Differentials Weighted by. Expense Category Calculation of Pupil Weighting. Weighted Differential by Type of School and Program Part I Part II British Columbia Public School Enrolments British Columbia Public School Enrolments Adjusted to Fiscal Years Units Derived from Students and Differential Data Unit Cost in Current Dollars with Indexes Part I Administration Unit Cost in Current Dollars with Indexes Part II Teachers Salaries Unit Cost in Current Dollars with Indexes Part III Clerical Unit Cost in Current Dollars with Indexes Part IV Instructional Supplies and Other Instruction Unit Cost in Current Dollars with Indexes Part V Janitors Salaries and Supplies Unit Cost in Current Dollars with Indexes Part VI U t i l i t i e s , Insurance and Other, and Grounds 113 11/I 115 116 117 118 119 IPO IP I 122 123 124 137 138 139 140 141 142 - X Table I .XXI J 1 LXXIV LXXV LXXVI LXXVTI LXXVIII LXXIX . LXXX LXXXI 1,XXXII LXXXII1 LXXXIV Unit Cost: in Qirrent Dollars with Indexes Part. VII Buildings, Equipment and Other Maintenance Unit Cost in Current Dollars with Indexes Part VIII Total Plant Operation and Maintenance, Transportation, and Auxiliary Services Unit Cost in Current Dollars with Indexes Part IX Total School Board Operational Costs and Departmental Expenditures Unit Cost in Current Dollars with Indexes Part X Revenue Support by Level of Government Unit Cost in Current Dollars with Indexes Part XI Summary of Unit Cost Indexes B.C. Public School Board Expenditures Deflated by Category Instructional Salaries - Sub-Categories Deflated with Constant Unit Costs Constant Unit Costs by Category. School Board Expenditures Constant Unit Costs by Category. Provincial Government Department of Education Expenditures Constant Per Unit Public School Board Revenues by Source Summary of Constant Unit Costs Indexes of Change in Real Inputs, Based on Constant Per Unit Costs J43 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 r.3 154 - x i -List of Appendexes Appendex A Questionnaire and Covering Letter. B Verification of Financial Data including Correspondence with British Columbia Department of Education and Statistics Canada. C National Education Price Index and Correspondence with Deflation Section, National income and Expenditure Division, Statistics Canada. D Correspondence with British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority. E Copies of Original Enrolment Returns from British Columbia Department of Education to Statistics Canada for School Years 1960-61 to 1969-70 inclusive. F Correspondence with Workmen's Compensation Board of British Columbia. G British Columbia School Trustees Association Correspondence, Fee Schedules, and Teacher Salary Scales. H British Columbia Department of Education Additional Financial Data. I Preliminary Geographical Distributions of Personal Income and i t s Main Components, Statistics Canada. J Index Numbers of Average Wage Rates Economics and Research Branch, Labour Canada. K Population Data. Statistics Canada. L National and Inter-Provincial Cost Comparissons. - X l l -LIST OF FIGURES Instructional Staff Price Indexes Indexes of Total School Board, Municipal and Provincial Per-Unit Costs Indexes of Constant Total Per-Unit Inputs and Constant Municipal and Provincial Unit Costs Public School and Other Price Indexes - X l l l -ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The writer gratefully recognizes the encouragement, constructive criticism, and other assistance received from many sources throughout the research and the completion of this dissertation. Appreciation i s expressed to Dr. S. Jamieson, Dr. W. Hartrick and Dr. I.E. Housego, members of the supervisory committee. A special word of thanks to Dr. H.A. Wallin, dissertation supervisor, and Dr. R.G. Evans who gave considerable time and effort bringing the university campus to Ottawa to make an immeasurable contribution to the research and this report. The author i s indebted to Dr. G. Neil Perry who acted as external examiner. The author wishes to thank the following persons who assisted i n the identification and interpretation of data by giving freely of their .time and s k i l l . Miss M. Robertson, Librarian, Ottawa. Mr. Y. Fortin, Education Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa. Dr. A. Horvath, Education Division^ Statistics Canada, Ottawa. Mrs. L. Steingarten, Education Division, Statistics Canada. Miss E. Buckley, Deflation Section, Statistics Canada, Ottawa. Mr. R.L. Coddett, Prices Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa. Dr. C.B. Conway, Department of Education, Victoria, B.C. Mr. S.E. Espley, Department of Education, Victoria, B.C. Mr. W. Sawadsky, British Columbia School Trustees Associations Mr. A.C. Durkin, Burnaby School District, Burnaby, B.C. Mr. F.W. Hurford, Burnaby School District, Burnaby, B.C. Mr. H.W. Shannon, Chilliwack School District, Chilliwack, B.C. Mr. F.D. Ross, Howe Sound School District, Howe Sound, B.C. Mr. J.W. McPherrin, Nanaimo School District, Nanaimo, B.C. - xiv -The writer i s indebted to his colleagues Messrs. P. Lampkin and R. Christy of The Economics and Research Branch, Canada Department ol Labour, and Mr. N. Chippendale of The Canada Department of Manpower, and to Mrs. J. Bryant, Algonquin College, Ottawa, for their construct tve criticism and other assistance throughout the study. Appreciation i s expressed to Mrs. D. Sinnett and Mrs. B. Theriault and the members of their staff for their assistance in the typing of this manuscript, and to Messrs. J.M. McGuire and R. Woods for their time and expert advice in the reproduction of the work. Finally, the author wishes to acknowledge the support of his family. A special word of thanks to Garth, Kevin, Kerry and Patrick who gave up the writer's time and sacrificed friendships to move to Ottawa for the internship experience, and to Tiddles whose competence in her own work motivated the i n i t i a t i o n and completion of this work. CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION. Increased costs of public school education, together with the increased competition for resources i n the public sector, have created policy problems in the area of public school support* A variety of methods has been employed by policy makers i n different provinces in an attempt to solve these problems. In British Columbia constraints have been placed on total budgets and on the rate of increase in teachers' salaries. Legislation i n British Columbia requires school boards to obtain the approval of their electorates when the amount of the budget is above the ceiling established by the provincial government. Provincial legislators have further attempted to constrain costs by placing a ceiling on the rate of increase i n teachers' salaries and by requiring electoral approval for salary increases above the limits specified. These policy actions of the British Columbia legislature would appear to be based on at least two of four assumptions. The f i r s t i s that the rate of increase i n the price of public school education has been greater than price increases i n the economy generally. The second assumes that the rate of increase i n the price of public school education can be curtailed by reducing the flow of funds to public schools and by restricting the rate of increase i n teachers' salaries. This latter assumption appears to be implicit i n policy actions and i s commonly expressed i n terms of "holding the line". A third assumption i s that there has been an increase i n the quantities of goods and services purchased and - 2 -that these additional goods and services are not required for the educative process. The fourth assumption, which relates to the third, is that a reduction in the flow of funds w i l l curtail the purchases of these unnecessary goods and services. This assumption i s commonly expressed in terms of "cutting the f r i l l s " . These assumptions may be examined by attempting to discover the extent to which they describe the real world and the possible effectiveness of the policies which appear to be based on them. Until now, a lack of appropriate data has made i t impossible to examine the assumptions by providing answers to the related questions. Provincial and school board decision-makers have been handicapped as a result. Provincial Departments of Education and Statistics Canada record public school financial data in terms of total costs within specific expenditure classifications; but no price index has been constructed for public school goods and services that would provide a vehicle for the identification of price and quantity changes in British Columbia. Moreover, total cost data do not identify the effects of changes in the number of pupils in the public school system, and student cost data are seldom adjusted to f i s c a l years or weighted to reflect the level at which the students are enrolled. In addition, capital cost data are included in total cost data on the basis of total depreciation of the capital over - 3 -the period of debt retirement.^ Present data cannot be used to examine adequately the validity of the assumptions identified above. THE MAJOR ASSUMPTIONS; A STUDY OF THEIR VALIDITY This study was designed to examine three of the assumptions which appear to be implicit i n the policy actions of the provincial legislators i n British Columbia, and to provide a basis for the examination of the fourth. Changes i n Price. Have the prices of public school goods and services increased at a higher or lower rate than the prices of similar goods and services i n the economy generally? This question was researched through the construction of a price index for public school operational goods and services for the period 1961 to 1969. The method by which this price index was determined i s discussed i n the following chapter and the various components of the price index are reported i n Chapters III through V. In the concluding chapter the price index for public school operational goods and services i s compared to other price indexes. 1 In public school accounts, capital costs are reported as the sum of debt repayment and interest on the diminishing balance. This method does not take into account the l i f e of the acquired assets, i n accord with accepted accounting practice or economic principles. A lack of accurate capital cost data necessitated the exclusion of a l l such data from the study. It may be noted, however, that capital costs represent a small portion of total public school costs. - 4 -The Impact of Policy on Price Changes. Will the constraint of public school budgets and control over the rate of increase i n teachers' salaries reduce the rate of increase i n the price of public school education? While this reseach was not designed to examine that question i t could serve as a basis for future research of the problem. There can be l i t t l e doubt that spending decisions at the provincial level w i l l have some impact on prices. Public school goods and services are purchased in different kinds of markets which may be broadly categorized as non-education and education-specific. The purchases of public schools represent a small portion of non-education markets and are, therefore, unlikely to have any effect on prices. In education-specific markets, on the other hand, the public school system possesses monopsonistic buying power and prices would be affected by public school decisions. It would seem logical to assume, therefore, that the provincial policy actions outlined above would reduce the rate of increase i n prices i n education-specific markets such as teachers' salaries. These provincial policy actions could, however, serve to accelerate rather than retard the rate of increase i n the average price of teaching services. A provincial policy decision to reduce public school spending would reduce the demand for teachers by forcing decision-makers at the local level to increase the pupil-teacher ratio. This would produce a lower average price under most market conditions but teacher tenure provisions could - 5 -produce a reverse effect in the market for teacher services. In the-first instance the teachers l e f t unemployed, by the provincial policy to reduce costs, would most likely be younger teachers without tenure, with a minimum of experience, and at the lower end of the salary scale. Secondly, the teaching force comprises a large number of teachers, particularly female, who leave the profession periodically for one or more years. A reduction in demand may mean that such teachers would not leave i f the prospects for re-entry did not look promising. The reduced mobility of teachers and the reduced opportunity for younger, less expensive teachers to enter the profession might produce an increase in the average price of teaching services. Appreciation of this concept requires a conceptual differentiation between price behaviour in the market for teaching services and the classical theory of wage determination. A major difference between the classical wage theory and a price theory of teaching services is the supply dimension. The classical wage theory assumes that units of labour are homogeneous in terms of cost and productivity. While this study assumes that no additional services are derived from additional teacher qualifications and experience, these variables do produce differential costs. The supply of teachers is not, therefore, a single homogeneous supply curve, but a number of supply curves. In terms of qualifications alone there are six supply 1 curves. 1 Teachers' salary schedules are constructed on the basis of qualifications and experience. There are six categories of qualifications according to years of university education. - 6 -Teachers i n the lower categories have less of an investment i n the profession, have fewer qualifications, earn lower salaries, and may have more options available i n other labour markets. Moreover, teachers i n the lower categories have the alternative and the incentive to move to the higher categories by improving their qualifications. The supply of teachers i n the lower categories would, therefore, be more elastic than the supply of teachers i n the higher categories, and a restriction i n the rate of increase i n teachers' salaries could serve to reduce the number of lower priced teachers to a greater degree than of the higher priced teachers, resulting i n a higher average price for teaching services. The effect of government wage controls on the average price of teaching services i s dependent, therefore, on the elas t i c i t y of the supply curves of teachers i n the different price categories. The foregoing discussion w i l l serve to demonstrate the need for further examination of this assumption which appears to be implicit i n provincial policy action. Changes i n Quantities of Purchases. Has there been an increase i n the quantities of goods and services purchased for public school education and are these additional goods and services necessary for the educative process? - 7 -Examination of this question required the determination of deflated costs per unit of output. Results of the research designed to identify changes i n the units of output are reported i n Chapter VI. Unit costs are reported i n current and constant dollar terms i n Chapter VII, and the question i s examined i n the f i n a l chapter. The Impact of Policy on Quantity Changes. Will the constraint of public school budgets curtail the purchases of goods and services not contributing directly to the educative process? Data produced by the research permitted some examination of this question, an aspect of which is also discussed i n the f i n a l chapter. - 8 -CHAPTER II METHODOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS The f i r s t methodological considerations were the selection of a base year and an index method. Problems were encountered in the area of input weighting, as a result of the paucity of required data for British Columbia, the province selected for study. These problems were overcome, at least partially, through the use of a sample made up of four school d i s t r i c t s . Selection of Base Year. The selection of 1961 as a base year for examination was prompted by the fact that a majority of price indexes i n current use by Statistics Canada used 1961 as the base year. Thus a common base year would not only f a c i l i t a t e the ready use of Statistics Canada data i n the study and the use of such data to update the study at a future date, but would also enable easy comparison of the educational price indexes produced by the study with the price indexes for other commodities. It was recognized, however, that while 1961 was an acceptable base year for purposes of Statistics Canada i t may not have been an acceptable year for the purpose of this study i f the public school system was subject to cycles which did not coincide with the business cycle i n the private sector. Preliminary research for the study sought, therefore, to discover the existence of a cycle i n the public school system. - 9 -Price cycles i n the public school system could be determined by provincial grants paid to school boards. Prior to 1968 provincial grants were based largely on the qualifications and experience of the teaching staff. This grant formula encouraged the hiring of highly qualified teachers. Every four or five years the amounts of the grants were revised, thus creating a four to five year cycle. Since the introduction of the present School Finance Formula i n 1968 the incentive to hire highly rated teachers i n order to claim larger grants no longer exists. One such revision of provincial regulations before the new formula occured i n January, 1961, when budgets were established and teachers' salary contracts settled. Table I appears to indicate that 1961 was the beginning of a cycle. TABLE I LOCAL TAX REVENUE AS A PERCENT OF TOTAL REVENUE One Urban Provincial System. Aggregate. 1958 52.75% 1959 55.36% 1960 55.05% 1961 51.86% 51.03% 1962 52.55% 51.43% 1963 53.09% 52.10% It may be argued that the increased flow of funds from provincial sources in 1961 could have produced inflationary effects i n 1962 which were not present i n 1961, making 1961 unacceptable as a base year. Reference to Table II tends to indicate that such was not the case with "Teachers' Salaries", which represented the major input. The rate of increase i n the indexes of change i n salaries was TABLE II TEACHERS' SALARIES FOR BRITISH COLUMBIA Index of Change by Category 1961=100 1 Year 2 Year . 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year Min. Max. Min. Max. Min. Max. Min. Max. Min. Max. Min. Max. 1961 $3,000 $3,630 $3,500 $5,400 $3,850 $5,950 $4,300 $6,600 $4,800 $7,400 $5,200 $8,000 1961. 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1962 100 99.86 100 100.92 100 100.42 100 101.51 100 102.02 100 101.25 1963 101.00 101.92 102.00 103.70 103.89 102.85 102.55 104.54 102.29 106.75 103.26 106.25 1964 103.33 103.03 105.71 106.48 107.79 106.21 106.97 108.48 105.68 111.28 106.05 111.25 1965 110.00 106.96 111.42 111.11 112.46 111.76 111.62 115.15 110.93 117.64 111.53 118.75 1966 116.66 111.57 117.14 117.59 . 119.48 118.48 118.60 123.03 117.70 125.06 118.26 126.37 1967 129.33 117.13 128.57 125.92 129.87 127.73 128.90 131.96 129.16 135.13 128.84 135.65 1968 136.66 122.17 137.14 133.33 138.31 135.12 136.69 140.75 137.50 144.10 136.53 144.87 1969 .148.16 134.84 145.71 141.20 146.75 143.51 145.65 149.30 145.83 152.97 144.86 153.50 1970 166.66 151.51 157.14 151.85 158.57 153.94' 157.20 160.15 157.29 163.51 156.44 164.06 Rank 1 12 8 11 5 10 7 4 6 3 9 2 Source: Derived from Provincial Averages Supplied by B.C.T.F. TABLE III School Board Operational Expenditures for B.C. 1960-1969 In Thousands of Dollars and Percent of Total 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Teachers' Salaries $ 67,901 72,505 77, 536 85,572 94,257 105,759 121,100 141,482 162,973 187,087 Percent of Total 66.22 66. 32 66.66 67.06 67.25(H) 66.91 66.03(L) 66.29 66.42 66.60 Instructional Supplies $ 4,436 4,850 5,568 6,318 7,206 8, 533 10,469 13, 310 16,954 18,751 Percent of Total 4.33(L) 4.44 4.79 4.95 5.14 5.40 5.71 6.24 6.91(H) 6.67 Administration $ 4,803 5, 348 5,296 5,664 6,280 6,938 9,477 10,891 12,769 13,945 Percent of Total 4.68 4.89 4.55 4.44 4.48 4.39(L) 5.17 5.10 5.20(H) 4.96 ' Maintenance $ 19,833 20,829 21,872 2 3,419 25,147 27,374 30,856 36,357 41,275 44,771 M Percent of Total 19.34(H) 19.05 18.80 18. 35 17.94 17. 32 16.83 17.03 16.82 15.93(L) 1 Transportation $ 2,477 2,611 2,722 2,887 3,126 3,476 4,009 4,610 5, 355 5,892 Percent of Total 2.42(H) 2. 39 2.34 2.26 2.23 2.20 2.19 2.16 2.18 2.10(L) Other $ 3,089 3,184 3, 329 3,754 4,152 5,980 7,455 6,795 6,066 10,518 Percent of Total 3.01 2.91 2.86 2.94 2.96 3.78 4.07(H) 3.18 2.47(L) 3.74 Total Operational Exp 102,539 109,327 116, 323 .127,614 140,168 158,060 183, 366 213,445 245,392 280,964 (H)= 10-Year High Per Cent in that Category (L)= 10-Year Low Per Cent in that Category. Source: Derived from unpublished data supplied by The Educational Division of Statistics Canada. (Appendix B) - 12 -lowest i n the years 1962, 1963 and 1964. Table III shows that there were no abnormal tendencies i n the relative share of other inputs between 1961 and 1963. There were trends for some categories to reduce and others to increase, but this continued throughout the period of the study. The value of having a base year that would be common to other price index series, and the failure of the preliminary research to identify data which would indicate a possible distortion of the price index, led to the selection of the base year of 1961. Selection of Index Method. In the preliminary stages of study both the Laspeyre and Paasche methods of price index construction were considered. The Laspeyre method takes a "basket" of goods i n the base year, and prices the same basket of goods i n the base and each succeeding year. Since the basket of goods remains constant, each item i n the basket i s given the same relative weight i n each year of price index construction. A basic difference i n the Paasche method i s that the basket of goods i s changing. The Paasche method looks at the basket i n each year of the study and prices each basket for the year i n which i t exists and for the base year. The quantity of goods i n each year would be different and the relative weights assigned to each type of good would be li k e l y to change. - 13 -The base year index is established at 100 i n both methods. In the Laspeyre method the index for year one i s calculated by dividing the cost of the base year basket i n year one, by the cost of the base year basket i n the base year, and multiplying by 100. The Paasche method involves dividing the price of year one's basket i n year one, by the price of year one's basket i n the base year, and multiplying by 100. The two methods may be expressed as follows; Laspeyre Paasche Application of the Paasche and Laspeyre methods to a constant basket of goods would produce the same price indexes. Selection of index methods, therefore, becomes a question of the extent to which the composition of the basket i s changing over time, and the degree of correlation between component price movements and changes i n the composition of the basket. Component price movements had not been determined at this stage of the research. Changes i n the composition of the basket were known, however, and the extent of these changes was significant. Reference to Table III w i l l indicate trends i n the value share of some components. The value share of the "Instructional Supplies" category was at a low of 4.33 percent i n the f i r s t year and grew steadily to a high of 6.91 percent i n 1968. Maintenance costs were at x 100 o p l Q l p o Q i 100 - 14 -a relative high of 19.34 percent i n 1960 and declined to a low of 15.93 percent i n 1969. It was not possible, at this stage of the research, to determine the extent to which these changes i n the composition of the basket would distort the price index. Since component price movements were not known, i t was not possible to determine the correlation between component price movements and the known changes i n the composition of the basket. It follows, therefore, that the selection of the Laspeyre method would have limited the study, i n that the degree to which the price index had been distorted by changes i n the composition of the basket was not known. Because the Paasche method overcame this limitation i t was, therefore, selected for use i n the study. 1 Input Weighting. The high level of aggregation of provincial and national data created a problem i n the determination of input weights. School d i s t r i c t operational expenditures are recorded i n six broad categories at the provincial and national levels of accounting. It i s impossible to determine a more precise measure of the composition of the basket on the basis of these data. In the "Administration" category, for example, there i s no indication of the portions spent on the sub-categories: "Administration Salaries", "Office Expense", "Trustee Expense", or "Other Administration". "*"* Previous studies of this kind used the Laspeyre formula, perhaps because there may have been a greater degree of sta b i l i t y i n the composition of the basket i n earlier years. Reference: Atherton, P.J. The Impact of Rising Price Levels on Expenditures  for School Operation i n Alberta, 1957-1965. Unpublished Dissertation, University of Alberta, 1968. - 15 -Solution to this problem indicated the use of a sample of school d i s t r i c t s . The sample was used only to discover the weight of sub-categories within the six categories contained in provincial and national data. Provincial category weights, and not the category weights of the sample, were used in index construction. That is to say, the weight of a category as determined at the provincial level was not changed in the process of calculating the weighting of sub-categories within that category. Sub-category weights, determined by the sample, were calculated as a percentage of the category. I n i t i a l steps toward the solution of the sub-category weight problem involved analysing data from a representative sample of school d i s t r i c t s . Two l i s t s of school districts were used in the selection of the sample. The f i r s t l i s t , which was furnished by officers of the Department of Education, included eight of the largest school districts in the province. It was considered to be representative on the basis that these school dis t r i c t s were responsible for the majority of students in the province. Officers of the British Columbia School Trustees Association supplied a second l i s t containing eleven additional school d i s t r i c t s . The addition of the second l i s t contributed in making the sample more representative by including some smaller school districts as well as some experiencing rapid rates of growth. The nineteen school districts appearing on the l i s t s were contacted and requested to participate in the study. Some of the dist r i c t s indicated that they did not have the resources to participate, others stated that they did not have the required information, but four agreed to supply complete information on their revenue and expenditure for the period covered by the study. - 16 -Determination of the representativeness of the sample involved an analysis of the Auditors' Reports for each school d i s t r i c t in the sample. Category weights for each d i s t r i c t were determined in the same manner as those for the province presented in Table 1.11. Reference to Table IV w i l l serve to indicate that the unweighted mean of the sample was representative of the province. For the purposes of this study, i t was assumed that i f the unweighted mean of categories in the sample was representative of the province, the unweighted mean of sub-categories would also be representative. The representative nature of the sample is discussed further in Chapter III. Sub-Indexes Table V indicates the variety of sources used in the construction of price indexes for sub-categories. Five main sources were used in the determination of price indexes for the goods and services that comprise the inputs of the public school system in British Columbia. In the case of inputs purchased on the national market, or where changes in the national market were like l y to be the same as changes on the local provincial market, national price indexes were used. An example of the latter would be the price index for "Transportation" published by the Prices Division of Statistics Canada. The second source of price indexes was the Deflation Section of the National Income and Expenditure Division of Statistics Canada. This source was used for inputs which contained a mix of goods, such as the "Office Supplies" index. TABLE IV Mean Category Weights in Sample School Districts Compared to Provincial Weights 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 Administration Mean Average of Sample 4.36 4.23 4.21 4.28 4.39 4.86 5.33 5.24 5.04 4.83 Provincial Average 4.89 4.55 4.44 4.48 4.39 5.17 5.10 5.20 4.96 Teachers' Salaries Mean Average of Sample 67.15 66.79 67.50 67.31 67.86 67.21 67.14 67.84 68.91 69.87 Provincial Average 66.32 66.66 67.06 67.25 66.91 66.03 66.29 66.42 66.60 Other Instruction Mean Average of Sample 4.78 5.04 4.99 5.53 5.65 5.86 6.51 6.73 6.74 6.79 Provincial Average 4.44 4.79 4.95 5.14 5.40 5.71 6.24 6.91 6.67 Plant & Maintenance Mean Average of Sample 18.86 19.15 18.51 18.06 17.58 17.91 17.06 16.69 16.26 15.50 Provincial Average 19.05 18.80 18.35 17.94 17.32 16.83 17.03 16.82 15.93 Transportation Mean Average of Sample 2.79 2.48 2.39 2.48 2.42 2.24 2.38 2.16 2.11 2.13 Provincial Average 2.39 2.34 2.26 2.23 2.20 2.19 2.16 2.18 2.10 Auxiliary Services"*" Provincial Average 2.91 2.86 2.94 2.96 3.78 4.07 3.18 2.47 3.74 1 I n the analysis of the sample this category was found to contain the purchase of capital items and the purchase of items which has not been offset with corresponding receipts. The special treatment of this category i s outlined in Chapter III. Source: Table XV "Weighting of Categories in Sample School D i s t r i c t s " and Statistics Canada data Appendix B. - 18 -TABLE V SOURCE OF DATA FOR INDEXES Input Administration Salaries Office Expense Trustees Expense Other Administration Non-teaching staff pensions 57% Group Life (20.3%) Workmen's Compensation (8.1%) B.C.S.T.A. Dues (2.9%) Superintendents1 Admin. (3.5%) Expense Accounts (8.2%) Total-Other 100% Teachers' Salaries Clerical Salaries Teaching Supplies Other Instruction Plant Operation Janitors' Salaries Janitors' Supplies U t i l i t i e s Power (62.8%) Fuel (33.0%) Fixtures (4.2%) Maintenance Men's Salaries Grounds Maintenance Men's Salaries Other Plant and Grounds Mainte Equipment Maintenance Transportation Auxiliary Services Source Questionnaire Statistics Canada Index Appendix C Questionnaire Mean of non-teaching staff salary indexes Mean of staff salary indexes Appendix "F" Appendix "G" Administration Salary Index Composite Index Statistics Canada As weighted above Index constructed on basis of B.C. data Questionnaire Office Expense Index Appendix "C" Office Expense Index Appendix "C" Questionnaire Building Maintenance Index, Statiscs Canada, Appendix "C" B.C. Hydro Index Appendix "D" Statistics Canada Index for Heating Fuel Statistics Canada Index for u t i l i t i e s Questionnaire Questionnaire Building Maintenance Index, Statistics Canada, Appendix "C" Equipment Maintenance Index, Statistics Canada, Appendix "C" Index constructed from data in Appendix "B", Statement C Index constructed on basis of per pupil cost - 19 -A third source of price indexes was utilized for inputs purchased in the British Columbia market and for which the British Columbia market price was likely to be different from the national market price. In such cases data were derived from the British Columbia Department of Education and the Annual Reports of that Department. For some inputs purchased in the British Columbia market data were not available, and a fourth source had to be used. These data were obtained through a questionnaire (Appendix A) which was sent to a l l of the eighty school dis t r i c t s in the province. Of the twenty-five questionnaires returned, fourteen had sufficient data to be included in the analysis, a rate of just over seventeen percent. They were from large and small rural, and large and small urban d i s t r i c t s . The f i f t h source of data was individual suppliers of services in British Columbia. Examples of the latter are the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority and The Workmen's Compensation Board of British Columbia. Teachers' Salaries Sub-Index. Several approaches to teachers' salaries price index construction were investigated in the study. In an i n i t i a l approach teachers' salaries as reported in the British Columbia Provincial Department of Education Annual Reports, for elementary, junior secondary and senior secondary, were averaged and placed on an index. This approach was subsequently rejected by virtue of the fact that the salaries reported were for June 30. It was f i r s t thought that these data could be transposed into f i s c a l years but further study indicated that this would be impossible. The following example wi l l give some indication of the problem. - 20 -A teacher reports his present annual salary on June 30 and leaves for the summer recess. On his return in September he is entitled to one salary increment in addition to payment for additional qualifications he may have obtained during the summer. On the following January 1, he may receive an increase in salary as a result of collective bargaining. These unknown variables make the transposition of school year salary data into f i s c a l year terms extremely d i f f i c u l t , i f not impossible. While the above approach was rejected as a means of price index construction, the data were subsequently used for differential determination in Chapter VT. Justification for the use of the data in this context i s discussed in Chapter VI. The method selected for index construction calculated the total salary cost by f i s c a l year for the three groups for which detailed data were available, namely, d i s t r i c t supervisors, supervising principals, and special staff. Total salaries for these groups were deducted from the total instructional salary cost. The residual was then divided by the number of teachers to determine their average annual salary. In this study this method has been termed the "Residual Approach". Price indexes were constructed for the four groups: d i s t r i c t supervisors, supervising principals, special staff, and residual. Value shares were determined for each group and a teachers' salaries price index was constructed on the basis of these data. The construction of a teachers' salaries price index on the basis of average salaries assumes that no additional services are derived from additional qualification and experience. This assumption was accepted for the purpose of this study. - 21 -A third approach to teachers' salaries price index construction was developed for purposes of comparison. This approach, which has been termed the "Laspeyre Approach", held qualifications and experience constant. The teaching force i n the base year was priced for each year, at a high level of aggregation, on the basis of provincial average salaries, and an index constructed. Since the Laspeyre wage type index was based on constant qualifications and experience, a comparison between i t and the "Residual" index w i l l permit an examination of the extent to which rising prices were caused by changes i n the qualification and experience level of the teaching force. This comparison i s made i n Chapter IV. - 22 -CHAPTER III INDEX CONSTRUCTION—CATEGORY WEIGHTS The f i r s t step i n index construction i s the determination of the goods and services purchased by the consumer. Each category of purchase has to be calculated as a portion of the total purchases, i n order to determine the value share to be assigned to each expenditure, or input. Use of the Paasche method, selected i n this study, involves the determination of the value share of each input i n each year of index construction. An obvious problem created by this method i s that each value share, i n years subsequent to the base year, i s affected by changes i n the price of the respective input. This error i s corrected i n the following chapter by dividing the value share by the relevant price index to produce what has been termed a "reciprocal". Reciprocals are summed and divided into 100 to produce the price index for public school goods and services i n Chapter V. Weight Determination. Determination of the types of goods and services that represent the economic inputs into the British Columbia Public School System, and the value share to be assigned to those inputs, involved a process of breakdown from the provincial to the school d i s t r i c t level. This breakdown was conducted i n three distinct stages. - 23 -The f i r s t stage i n the determination of value shares involved calculations at the provincial level of aggregation. Further refinement of the value shares was accomplished at the school d i s t r i c t level, where sub-categories were weighted relative to the provincial category weights. In the third stage the value shares of expenditures within certain sub-categories were determined through an examination of expense ledgers within the sample. Provincial Categories. At the national and provincial levels of accounting, school board operational expenditures are recorded within six categories: "Administration", "Teachers' Salaries", "Instructional Supplies", "Maintenance", "Transportation", and "Other". The value share of each category has been determined and presented i n Table III, i n the preceding chapter. Data contained i n Table III were supplied by the Education Division of Statistics Canada. These diff e r somewhat from data contained in the Annual Reports of the British Columbia Department of Education. It was decided to use Statistics Canada data because some important corrections have been made by the Education Division. Correspondence with officers of the British Columbia Department of Education (Appendix B) indicated that they agreed with the changes made by Statistics Canada. Their correspondence also indicated a limitation i n the data for British Columbia. - 24 -In the years 1961 to 1968 the expenditure data reported by the British Columbia Department of Education and recorded by Statistics Canada were not a record of actual expenditure but a record of final budget estimates. In view of this limitation i t was decided to check the r e l i a b i l i t y of these data. Accordingly, data from the Auditors' Reports for the four sample school districts and the Annual Reports of the Department of Education were compared. This comparison for four selected years is presented in Table VI. While the difference between the final budget estimate and the actual expenditure in some budget categories was as high as 42 percent, the total estimate and the total expenditure did not vary by more than one percent. It i s assumed that the discrepancies in the data outlined above, cancel each other at the provincial level of aggregation. That is to say, i t i s assumed that a transfer from one budget category to another in one school d i s t r i c t is negated by a similar transfer in the other direction in another school d i s t r i c t . Sub-Categories. Having determined the weighting of the six categories at the provincial level of aggregate expenditures. The next step was the determination of the weight of sub-categories of expenditures within each of the six categories. Data from four sample school districts, were used for the analysis. TABLE VI Comparison of B.C. Public Schools Annual Reports and Auditors Annual Reports for Selected School Districts in Selected Years Adminis-tration Teachers Salaries Other Instruc-tion Plant Operation & Maintenance Conveyance of Pupils Other Auxiliary Services Total Including Capital 61/62 Annual Report of Dept. (Z27) 60,925 1 ,225,559 70,520 304,546 64,056 46,616 1 ,984,276 61 Financial Statement of SD 33 61,907 1 ,265,379 74,202 297,929 62,522 39,767 1 ,981,412 Per Cent of Error +1.61 +3.24 +5.22 -2.17 -2.40 -14.69 -.14 63/64 Annual Report of Dept. (N30) 220,455 5 ,500,297 367,857 1,314,516 14,568 261,081 9 ,013,898 63 Financial Statement of SD 41 220,437 5 ,507,330 375,458 1,295,293 11,789 258,577 Per Cent of Error -.01 +.13 +2.07 -1.46 -19.07 -.96 r i 65/66 Annual Report of Dept. (F30) 50,380 481,325 50,605 177,338 27,050 21,395 982,864 65 Financial Statement of SD 48 57,516 ' 482,543 53,482 182,680 30,989 12,333 990,918 Per Cent of Error +14.16 + .25 + 5.68 +3.01 +14.56 -42.35 + .81 67/68 Annual Report of Dept. (G32) 254,100 2 ,924,000 346,750 733,107 147,865 61,400 5 ,343,698 67 Financial Statement of SD 68 267,561 2 ,938,406 343,257 701,287 144,657 62,966 5 ,351,818 Per Cent of Error + 5.30 + .49 -1.01 -4.34 -2.17 + 2.55 + .15 Source: Annual reports of the B.C. Department of Education to Lieutenant Governor and audited financial reports of corresponding school districts in respective years. Note: In the 1961/62 annual report expenditure for the f i s c a l year 1961 i s reported. The 1961/62 report i s dated January 1963. See appendix for correspondence with B.C. Department of Education. - 26 -School District No. 33 (Chilliwack), located on the lower mainland of British Columbia, is a relatively large rural d i s t r i c t with expenditures in excess of five million dollars in 1970. School District No. 41 (Burnaby) is an urban system forming part of the Greater Vancouver Metropolitan area. Operational expenditures i n Burnaby i n 1970 were i n excess of seventeen million. School District No. 48 (Howe Sound), one of the smaller rural d i s t r i c t s , had expenditures i n 1970 of less than two million dollars. School District No. 68 (Nanaimo) including both urban and rural schools i s one of the larger di s t r i c t s located on Vancouver Island, with expenditures i n 1970 i n excess of six million dollars. The Annual Auditors' Reports covering the years 1961 to 1970 inclusive were examined for each school d i s t r i c t i n the sample. Data identified by this research are contained in Tables VII through XIV, located at the end of this chapter. There are seven categories i n the Auditors' Reports for school d i s t r i c t s . It w i l l be recalled that there are only six categories at the national level of public school accounting. The difference i s caused by the combination of school d i s t r i c t "Plant Operation" and "Repairs and Maintenance" categories, into one single "Maintenance" category at the national level. Two separate weights have been calculated i n the analysis of the sample school d i s t r i c t s . In the f i r s t set of calculations each category was calculated as a percent of total operational expenditures, i n the same manner as those data for the province which were outlined - 27 -i n the preceding chapter, Table III. The second set of calculations was designed to determine the weight of each sub-category as a percent of the respective category. An unweighted mean of the category weights for the four sample school dis t r i c t s indicated that the sample was representative of the province. These means were compared to the provincial category weights i n the preceding chapter, Table IV. The representativeness of the sample, when calculated on the basis of an unweighted mean, may be somewhat of a st a t i s t i c a l accident. Notwithstanding considerable variation of weights within the sample, the unweighted means of the sample closely resemble the provincial weights, and the trends are similar. In the largest single category, "Teachers' Salaries", weights within the sample vary up to fourteen percent. The unweighted mean of value shares i n the sample varies between .06 and 2.31 from.the provincial category weights. It w i l l be recalled that one of the reasons given i n Chapter II for the selection of the Paasche formula was the presence of trends i n some value shares to increase and others to decrease. The sample showed the same trends with the value share of "Other Instruction" increasing and the value shares of "Maintenance" and "Transportation" decreasing. - 28 -The value share ..of categories in the sample has been discussed here to indicate the representative nature of the sample. Data from the sample d i s t r i c t s were used only to weight sub-categories relative to their respective categories. The value share of categories at the provincial and national levels of aggregation were used in index construction. With one exception, the data presented in Tables VII through XIV reflect the exact amounts recorded in the Auditors' Reports for the respective school jurisdictions. The exception refers to the sub-category marked "Other" under "Auxiliary Services". Certain expenditures in this sub-category do not properly belong in the data for this study. These include non-operational expenditures, such as the purchase of "Band Instruments", and payments which were not expenditures such as cafeteria payments which had not been adjusted for cafeteria receipts. Two trends were noted in the "Auxiliary Services" category. With the exception of Burnaby the total amount spent on health services decreases over time, notwithstanding enrolment growth in a l l four systems, while the sub-category "Other", when such items as band instruments and cafeteria were included, tends to rise. The above findings led to the decision to treat the "Auxiliary Services" category in a different manner. This method and the reasons for i t may best be explained at this point. - 29 -A major purpose of an educational price index is to analyse the operational expenditures that comprise the inputs to the public school system. Acquisition of capital items, such as band instruments, are not-operational expenditures. Health and cafeteria services are not educational inputs. It i s recognized that good food and good health may be pre-requisites of good education, but i n terms of public accounting on the latter the costs of health care and food should be kept quite distinct from the costs of education. Since the focus of this study was on the latter, i t was decided to delete the sub-categories, to weight the "Auxiliary Services" category according to provincial weights, and to construct a price index for the category based on the per-pupil-cost of "Auxiliary Services". This approach had the effect of holding this input level in constant terms and minimizing the effect of the input on subsequent analyses. The next step i n the determination of weighting involved taking the mean weights of sub-categories within the sample and calculating these weights as a portion of each respective provincial category weight. Within the "Administration" category, for example, there are four sub-categories: "Administration Salaries", "Office Expense", "Trustees'Expense", and "Other Administration". Each of these sub-categories was calculated as a percentage of total administration cost i n the analyses of the sample. The unweighted mean of each sub-category within the sample was applied as a percentage of the provincial category weight to determine the weight of the sub-category. A calculation for one sub-category w i l l serve to il l u s t r a t e the method used. The unweighted - 30 -mean of "Administration Salaries" within the sample was 36.48 percent of total administration costs. At the provincial level of aggregation administration costs i n 1961 were 4.89 percent of total operating expenditures. The sub-category weight of "Administration Salaries" in 1961 was, therefore, 36.48 percent of 4.89, yielding 1.78 percent as the "Value Share" of "Administration Salaries". The same kind of calculation was used for each sub-category and for each year covered by the study. Sub-categories within the "Other Instruction" and "Plant Operation" categories were also calculated by using the unweighted means of the sample to determine the portion of the provincial category weight. The "Transportation" category does not contain sub-categories. The sub-categories of "Teachers' Salaries" were determined i n the construction of the "Teachers1 Salaries" price index, reported i n the following chapter. The calculation of sub-categories as a proportion of categories i s reported i n Tables XVI through XX inclusive, located at the end of this chapter. Input Determination. The value share of specific inputs within sub-categories was determined through an examination of expense ledgers of the sample d i s t r i c t s . Sub-categories were broken into input classifications that were most likely to be affected by different price changes. The "Administration Salaries" sub-category was found to comprise "Clerical Salaries", as distinct from salaries of administrative personnel, whose salaries were more likely to follow the "Administrative - 31 -Salary Index". On a cost basis the approximate ratio between the two was one to one, or a f i f t y percent weight to each input classification as a percentage of the sub-category. There were five major input classifications i n the "Other Administra-t i o n " sub-category. These classifications were also weighted relative to the sub-category, and the resulting percentages used to determine the value share of each input. .Calculations of inputs are reported i n Tables XXII through XXIIIB at the end of t h i s chapter. In summary, the research reported i n this chapter conducted i n three stages determined the nature and value shares of the expenditures that comprise the operational inputs of public schools. The six categories of expenditure, recorded at the provincial level of aggregation, were calculated as a percentage of total operational expenditures in each year covered by the study. Auditors' Reports for four school dis t r i c t s were used to determine the relative weight of sub-categories of expenditures within the respective major categories. School d i s t r i c t ledgers were the basis for a more refined identification of expenditures within sub-categories. In the following chapter the value shares of these expenditures, or inputs, are divided by the relevant price indexes to produce the reciprocals which form the basis of index construction i n Chapter V. TAH£ VH Chilllvacx School District No. 33 Operational Expenditures and Weighting of Categories, 1961-1965 (Incl.) 1961 S 1 %2 1962 t 1 %2 1963 X 1 %2 1964 X1 %2 1965 X1 X2 Administration S S S S S Salaries Office Expense Trustees Expense Other Total Administration 19,993 4,905 3,679 33,329 61,906 3.44 32.30 7.92 5. 94 53.84 100.00 20,360 4,916 4,216 31,864 61,358 3.09 33.19 8.01 6.87 51.93 100.00 20,985 5,794 4,554 34,208 65,541 2.95 32.02 8.84 6.95 52.19 100.00 24,723 6,199 4,861 40,612 76,395 3.13 32.37 8.11 6.36 53.16 100.00 26,921 6,459 5,479 45,678 84,537 3.11 31.85 7.64 6.48 54.03 100.00 Instruction Teachers' Salaries 1,265,379 70.22 1,400,475 70.50 1,593,998 71.69 1,752,427 71.74 1,963,851 72.33 Other Instruction School Clerical Salaries Teaching Supplies Other Total Other Instruction 16,242 47,571 10,389 74,202 4.12 21.89 64.11 14.00 100.00 • 17,403 49,747 14,849 81,999 4.13 21.22 60.67 18.11 100.00 17,541 56,926 16,303 90,770 4.08 19.32 62.71 17.97 100.00 20,837 75,077 20,659 116,573 4.77 17,87 64.40 17.73 100.00 2e,952 76,777 21,184 126,913 4.67 22.81 60.50 16.69 100.00 Plant Operation Janitors Salaries Janitors Supplies Light, Power, Water, Fuel Insurance & Other Total Plant Operation 111,725 10,831 60,750 20,035 203,341 11.29 37.51 3.64 20.39 6.72 118,332 12,937 66,000 21,891 219,160 11.03 34.35 3.76 19.16 6.36 135,492 13,489 77,884 18,436 245,301 11.03 36.11 3. 59 20.75 4.91 152,206 12,105 74,731 22,432 261,474 10.70 38.20 3.04 18.76 5.63 159,796 13,956 78,161 24,645 276,558 10.19 37.06 3.24 18.12 5.71 Repairs & Maintenance Wages & Supplies Grounds Buildings Equipment Other Total Repairs & Maintenance 18,543 41,307 30,002 4,736 94,588 5.25 6.22 13.86 10.07 1.59 20,439 65,188 30,988 8,690 125,305 6.31 5.93 18.92 9.00 2.52 24,374 62,919 33,321 9,340 129,954 5.84 6.50 16.77 8.88 2.49 29,100 62,710 35,721 9,383 136,914 5,61 7.30 15.74 8*97 2.36 32,632 76,779 34, 303 10,432 154,696 5.70 7.58 17.80 8.07 2.42 Total Plant & Maintenance (297,929) 100.00 (344,465) 100.00 (375,255) 100.00 (398,388) 100.00 (431,254) 100.00 Transportation 62,522 3.47 54,615 2.75 55,609 2.50 58,074 2.36 6 3, 06£ 2.32 Auxiliary Services Health Services Other Total Auxiliary Services 25,111 14,657 39,768 2.21 63.14 36.86 100.00 25,719 17,868 43,587 2.19 59.01 40.99 100.00 23,850 18,631 42,481 1.91 56.14 43.86 100.00 21,378 19,305 40,683 1.67 52.55 47.45 100.00 24,242 21,427 45,663 1.66 53.08 46.92 100.00 Total Operational Expense 1,801,706 100.00 1,986,499 100.00 2,223,654 100.00 2,442, 540 100.00 2,715,210 100.00 Category as a percent of total expenditure. Each sub-category as a percent of respective category. Source: Data derived from annual auditor's report for the district. TABLE Vm Chilliwack School District So. 33 Operational Expenditures and Weighting of Categories, 1966-1970 (Incl.) 1966 S 1 *2 1967 *2 1963 1969 *2 1970 Administration i S t i i Salaries 31,588 25.55 38,192 24.88 46,157 26.79 53,724 26.77 68,572 Office Expense 6,995 5.66 8,987 5.85 9,388 5.45 19,049 9.49 19,591 trustees Expense 6,961 5.63 11,456 7.46 14,030 8.14 18,614 9.27 19,633 Other 78,093 63.16 94,896 61.81 102,713 59.62 109,316 54.47 118,294 Total Administration 123,637 4.01 100.00 153,531 4.32 100.00 172,288 4.31 100.00 200,703 4.42 100.00 226.090 Instruction Teachers' Salaries 2,209,493 71.60 2,516,859 70.82 2,829,445 70.83 3,213,237 70.75 3,767,379 Other Instruction School Clerical Salaries 45,860 30.15 55,311 26.88 68,212 30.44 82,319 28,89 112,175 Teaching Supplies 80,171 52.72 112,761 54.81 126,198 56.31 182,534 64.06 220,295 Other 26,046 17.13 37,669 18.31 29,698 13.25 20,098 7.05 25,874 Total Other Instruction 152,077 4.93 100.00 205,741 5.79 100.00 224,108 5.61 100.00 284,951 6.27 100.00 358,344 Plant Operation Janitors Salaries 207,529 42.37 232,614 40.71 272,240 42.17 316,472 42.62 390,997 Janitors Supplies 14,991 3.06 16,438 2.88 16,590 2.57 25,960 3.50 24,175 Light, Power, Water, Fuel 76,780 15.67 86,337 15.11 106,637 16.51 103,727 13.97 112,431 Insurance & Other 30,041 6.13 38,734 6.78 33,118 5.13 44,411 5.98 42,806 Total Plant Operation 329,341 10.67 374,123 10.53 428,585 10.73 490, 570 10.80 570,409 Repairs & Maintenance Wages & Supplies Grounds 34,212 6.98 36,142 6.32 42,630 6.60 58,490 7.88 58,617 Buildings 73,697 15.04 103,112 18.04 93,394 14.46 103,982 14.00 141,810 Equipment 41,349 8.44 43,172 7.55 65,177 10.09 73,484 9.90 92,502 Other 11,313 2.31 14,890 2.61 15,945 2.47 15,994 2.15 17,479 Total Repairs & Maintenance 160,571 5.20 197,316 5.55 217,146 5.44 251,950 5.55 310,408 Total Plant & Maintenance (489,912) 100.00 (571,439) 100.00 (645,731) 100.00 (742,520) 100.00 (880,817: Transportation 66,925 2.17 75,697 2.13 91,707 2.30 90,288 1.99 116,942 Auxiliary Services Health Services 22,818 52.22 19,216 63.14 10,178 32.71 9,773 100.00 10,000 Other 20,879 47.78 11,217 36.86 20,942 67.29 Total Auxiliary Services 43,697 1.42 100.00 30,433 .86 100.00 31,120 .78 100.00 9,773 .22 100.00 10,000 Total Operational Expense 3,085,741 100.00 3,553,700 100.00 3,994,399 100.00 4,541,472 100.00 5,359,572 4.22 70.29 10.64 5.79 .13 100.00 30.33 8.67 8.68 52.32 100.00 31.30 61.48 7.22 6.69 100.00 44.40 2.75 12.76 4.S6 6.65 16.10 10.50 1.98 1C0.CO 100.00 .19 100.00 Category as a percent of total expenditure. Each sub-category as a percent of respective category. Source: Data derived from annual auditor's report for the district. TABLE IX Burnaby School District No. 41 Operational Expenditures and Weighting of Categories 1961-1965 (Incl.) 1961 1962 1963 1964 -91,561 5,034 5,418 128,277 1965 Administration Salaries Office Expense Trustees Expense Other Total Administration Instruction Teachers' Salaries 87,246 4,321 3,814 119,363 214,749 3.28 40.63 2.01 1.78 55.58 100.00 90,177 4,015 6,003 110,230 210.425 42.86 1.91 2.85 52. 3e .97 100.00 4,655,768 71.21 5,049,306 71.18 89,790 3,971 6,062 120,614 220,437 5,507,330 2.87 71.82 40.73 1.80 2.75 54.72 100.00 2 30^290 2. 76 39.76 2.19 2.35 55.70 100.00 6,045,953 72.49 98,644 3,330 6,679 140,679 249,332 6,716,251 2.70 72.33 39.56 1.34 2.68 56.42 100.00 Other Instruction School Clerical Salaries Teaching Supplies Other Total Other Instruction Plant Operation Janitors Salaries Janitors Supplies Light, Power, Water, Fuel Insurance & Other Total Plant Operation Repairs & Maintenance Wages & Supplies Grounds Buildings Equipment Other Total Repairs & Maintenance Total Plant & Maintenance Transportation Auxiliary Services Health Services Other Total Auxiliary Services Total Operational Expense 91,808 167,114 57,791 316,713 475,497 35,634 226,415 35,314 772,860 32 , 726 265,088 42,767 18,747 359,328 (1,132,188) 22,619 186,596 9,217 195,813 6,537,850 28.99 52.76 18.25 4.84 100.00 42.00 3.15 20.00 3.12 11.82 5.50 .35 2.89 23.40 3.78 1.66 100.00 95.29 . 4.71 3.00 100.00 102,670 169,278 37,170 3S9.118 521,371 41,104 244,291 37,019 843,785 35,452 281,395 63,933 11,785 392,565 (1,236,350) 12,068 204,456 22,274 226,730 28.59 47.14 24.27 5.06 100.00 42.18 3.32 19.76 2.99 11.89 5.53 .17 2.87 22.76 5.17 .95 100.00 90.18 9.82 3.20 100.00 104, 320 181,494 89,644 375,458 547,835 40,816 238,214 38,960 865,325 46,274 307,479 59,033 16,682 429,468 (1,295,293) 11,789 224,119 34,458 258,577 27.78 48.34 23.88 4.90 100.00 42.29 3.15 18.39 3.01 11.29 5.60 .15 3.57 2 3.74 4,56 1.29 100.00 . 86.67 13.33 3.37 100.00 116,426 204,721 93,084 414,231 S72.882 45,175 247,505 52,463 918,025 48,086 317,432 73,219 15,316 454,053 (1,372,073) 12,138 233,956 . 30,047 264,003 28.11 49.42 22.47 4.97 100.00 41.75 3.29 18.04 3.32 11.01 5.45 .15 3. 50 2 3.14 5.34 1.12 100.00 88.62 11.38 3.17 100.00 136,225 232,477 97,378 466,680 641,140 44,350 249,747 73,177 1,008,414 41,343 343,519 73,485 20,291 483,738 (1,492,152) 13,506 247,348 34,345 232,693 5.06 10.94 5.25 .15 29.19 49.82 20.99 100.00 42.98 2.97 16.74 4.90 2.77 23.36 4.92 1.36 100.00 87.67 12.33 3.07 100.00 7,093,397 100.00 7,668,884 100.00 8,338,693 100.00 9,220,614 100.00 Category as a percent of total expenditure. Each sub-category as a percent of respective category. Source: Data derived from annual auditor's report for the district. TABLE X Burnaby School District Mo. 41 Operational Expenditures and Weighting of Categories 1966-1970 (Incl.) 1966 X1 X2 1967 X1 X2 1968 X1 X2 1969 xl X2 1970 X1 X2 Administration t $ S S s Salaries Office Expense Trustees Expense Other Total Administration 116,646 3,830 6,114 167,875 294,465 2.84 39.61 1.30 2.08 57.01 100.00 125,710 4,908 15,622 302,015 448,2S5 3.78 28.04 1.09 3.49 67.38 100.00 133,148 4,094 15,706 316,182 469,130 3.48 28.38 .87 3.35 67.40 100.00 130.869 16,356 24,856 313,534 485,615 3.16 26.95 3.37 5.12 64.56 100.00 151.429 17,577 23.122 369.141 561,269 3.19 26*98 3.13 4.12 65.77 100.00 Teachers* Salaries 7,589.433 73.07 8,605,251 72.51 9,770,588 72.47 11,128.975 72.51 12,796.686 72.72 Other Instruction School Clerical Salaries Teaching Supplies Other Total Other Instruction 155,709 265,112 115,015 535,836 5.16 29.06 49.48 21.46 100.00 173,735 344,554 141,359 659,648 S.56 26.34 52.23 21.43 100.00 210,223 378,712 a7,274 906,209 5.98 26.08 46.97 26.95 100.00 277,421 567,541 160,633 1,005.595 6.55 27.59 56.44 15.97 100.00 340,378 682.083 187.268 1,209,729 6.87 28.14 56.38 15.48 100.00 Janitors Salaries Janitors Supplies Light, Power, Water, Fuel Insurance a Other Total Plant Operation 731,942 45,748 264,562 54,954 1,097,206 10.96 45.15 2.82 16.32 3.39 813,011 55.054 282,764 68.224 1,219,053 10.27 45.99 3.11 16.00 3.86 911,871 62,020 294,032 74,479 1.342,402 9.95 45.37 3.09 14.63 3.71 993,466 73.475 320,350 101,808 1,489,099 9.70 44.26 3.27 14.28 4.54 1,127.665 70,801 342.891 108,035 1,649.392 9.37 45.49 2.86 13.83 4.36 Reoalrs & Maintenance Wages & Supplies Grounds Buildings Equipment Other Total Repairs & Maintenance 40,858 372,252 76,526 34,314 523,950 5.05 2.52 22.96 4.72 2.12 46,076 389,820 84,665 27,998 548,559 4.62 2.61 22.06 4.79 1.58 70,702 462,215 97,385 36,754 667,056 4.95 3.52 23.00 4.85 1.83 71,090 525,908 106,136 51,829 754,963 4.92 3.17 23.44 4.73 2.31 52,678 S94.572 128.185 54,400 829.335 4.72 2.12 23.98 5.17 2.19 Total Plant & Maintenance 11,621,156) 100.00 (1,767,612) 100.00 (2,009,458) 100.00 (2,244,062) 100.00 (2,479,227) 10C.00 Transportation 16,220 .16 17,915 .15 18,535 .14 21,420 .14 30,551 .17 Auxiliary Services Health Services Other Total Auxiliary Services 288,407 39,673 328,080 3.16 87.91 12.09 100.00 320,312 49,015 369,327 3.11 86.73 13.27 100.00 350,841 57,747 408,588 3.03 85.87 14.13 100.00 389,624 73,254 462,878 3.02 84.17 15.83 100.00 431.973 98,950 520,328 2.96 82.92 17.08 100.00 Total Operational Expense 10,385,190 100.00 11,868,008 100.00 13,482,508 100.00 15,348,545 100.00 17,598,392 100.00 Category as a percent of total expenditure. 2Each sub-category as a percent of respective category. Source: Data derived from annual auditor's report for the district. TABLE XI Howe Sound School District Ho. 48 Operational Expenditures and Weighting of Categories, 1961-1965 (Incl.) 1961 X 2 1962 *X x2 1963 X2 1964 X 1 %2 1965 X 1 %2 Administration S S S t S Salaries Office Expense Trustees Expense Other Total Administration 13,220 2,085 2,440 12,877 30,622 5.77 43.17 6.81 7.97 42.05 100.00 14,658 2,542 3,142 11,673 32,015 5.81 45.79 7.94 9.81 36.46 100.00 15,577 3,180 4,024 13,106 35,887 5.96 43.41 8.86 11.21 36.52 100.00 20,301. 3,609 4,507 15,705 44,122 6.41 46.02 8.18 10.21 35.59 100.00 24,137 S.026 5,439 22,913 57,515 7.02 41.96 8.74 9.46 39.84 100.00 Instruction Teachers' Salaries 323,527 60.95 325,598 59.13 358,006 59.44 399,695 58.20 482,542 58.88 Other Instruction School Clerical Salaries Teaching Supplies Other Total Other Instruction 5,280 18,958 3,185 27,423 5.16 19.25 69.14 11.61 100.00 5,945 20,244 6,409 32,598 5.92 18.24 62.10 19.66 100.00 7,385 21,642 6,478 35,505 5.90 20.80 60.95 18.25 100.00 8,616 25,120 8,960 42,696 6.22 20.18 58.83 20.99 100.00 11,978 31,034 10,468 53,480 6.53 22.40 58.03 19.57 100.00 Plant Operation Janitors Salaries Janitors Supplies Light, Power, Water a Fuel Insurance and Other Total Plant Operation 33,406 2,854 28,932 8,301 73,493 13.85 27.58 2.36 23.90 6.86 33,492 2,555 29,354 8,467 73,868 13.41 25.43 1.94 22.29 6.43 35,892 2,907 27,420 9,745 75,964 12.61 25.84 2.09 19.74 7.02 39,260 4,216 32,331 10,944 86,751 12.63 24.42 2.62 20.11 6.81 45,123 5,266 37,384 15,623 103,896 12.68 24.70 2.88 20.74 8.55 Repairs & Maintenance Wages 4 Supplies Grounds Buildings Equipment Other Total Repairs & Maintenance 11,759 24,126 10,407 1,279 47,571 8.96 9.71 19.93 8.60 1.06 13,687 33,087 8,930 2,138 57,842 10.50 10.39 25.12 6.78 1.62 16,523 28,422 14,354 3,651 62,950 10.45 11.89 20.46 10.33 2.63 19,251 33,287 17,080 4,398 74,016 10.78 11.97 20.71 10.62 2.74 19,894 36,756 17,129 5,001 78,780 9.61 io.e9 20.12 9.38 2.74 Total Plant & Maintenance (121,064) 100.00 (131,710) 100.00 (138,914) 100.00 (160,767) 100.00 (182,676) 100.00 Transportation 22,230 4.19 20,843 3.78 22,319 3.71 27,095 3.95 30,989 3.78 Auxiliary Services Health Services Other Total Auxiliary Services 4,464 1,469 . 5,933 1.12 75.24 24.76 100.00 6,064 1,940 8,004 1.45 75.76 24.24 100.00 8,648 2,994 11,642 1.93 74.28 25.72 100.00 8,901 3,509 12,410 1.81 71.72 28.28 100.00 9,150 3,182 12,332 1.50 74.20 25.80 100.00 Total Operational Expense 530,799 100.00 550,768 100.00 602,273 100.00 686,785 100.00 819,534 100.00 'Category as a percent of total expenditure. Each sub-category as a percent of respective category. Source: Data derived from annual auditor's report for the district. TABLE XII Howe Sound School District No- 48 Operational Expenditures and Weighting of Categories, 1966-1970 (Incl.) 1966 S 1 %2 1967 X 1 %2 1968 %2 1969 X1 %2 1970 s1 I2-Administration J S i % S Salaries Office Expense Trustees Expense Other Total Administration 29,038 7,109 5,178 29,319 70,644 6.76 41.10 10.07 7.34 41.49 100.00 35,999 8,246 6,370 42,020 92,635 7.23 38.36 8.90 6.88 45.36 100.00 40,876 8,674 7,650 48,479 105,679 7.12 38.68 8.21 7.24 45.87 100.00 36,504 10,138 14,206 48,298 109,146 6.67 33.44 9.29 13.02 44.25 100.00 39,805 14,367 12,381 49,555 116,103 6.33 34.28 12.37 1C.66 42.69 * "y cc Instruction Teachers' Salaries 609,414 58.32 750,771 59.33 913,612 61.56 1,047,066 64.02 1,163,364 64. CO Other Instruction School Clerical Salaries Teaching Supplies Other Total Other Instruction 17,155 38,196 11.8S2 67,203 6.43 25.52 56.84 17.64 100.00 24,329 48,629 16,704 89,662 6.99 27.13 54.24 18.63 100.00 34,078 63,260 15,413 112,751 7.60 30.22 56.11 13.67 100.00 37,352 72,855 9,444 119,651 7.32 31.22 60.89 7.39 100.00 43,0C8 35,024 14,057 142,089 7.31 30.27 59. S4 9.89 IOC.00 Plant Operation Janitors Salaries Janitors Supplies Light, Power, Water & Fuel Insurance & Other Total Plant Operation 60,974 7,138 46,500 16,101 130,713 12.51 24.50 2.87 18.69 6.47 79,084 7,608 48,049 5,099 139,840 10.91 28.62 2.75 17.38 1.84 85,089 8,797 51,654 17,690 163,230 11.00 28.50 2.95 17.30 5.93 101,819 8,223 53,672 19,965 183,679 11.23 33.94 2.74 17.89 6.65 119,118 7.435 52,674 21,198 200,425 11.03 36.96 2.31 16.35 5.5a Repairs & Maintenance Wages & Supplies Grounds Buildings Equipment Other Total Repairs & Maintenance 31,880 55,429 23,056 7,772 118,137 11.30 12.81 22.27 9.27 3.12 33,054 62,521 32,922 8,053 136,550 10.65 11.96 22.63 11.91 2.91 36,439 66,590 26,788 5,496 135,313 9.12 12. 21 22.30 8.97 1.84 36,320 52,452 19,378 8,224 116,374 7.12 12.10 17.48 6.46 2.74 26,925 66.502 20,705 7,682 121,814 6.70 3.36 2C.63 6.43 2.38 Total Plant 4 Maintenance (248,850) 100.00 (276,390) 100.00 (298,543) 100.00 (300,053) 100.00 (322,239) '• Z0 CO Transportation 35,514 3.40 51,479 4.02 48,410 3.26 54,089 3.31 69,375 3.32 Auxiliary Services Health Services Other Total Auxiliary Services 7,589 5,789 13,378 1.28 56.73 43.27 100.00 4,144 7,048 11,192 .87 37.03 62.97 100.00 2,288 2,719 5,007 .34 45.70 54.30 100.00 5,315 51 5,366 .33 99.C5 .95 100.00 4,574 4,574 .25 100.00 100. CO Total Operational Expense 1,045,023 100.00 1,282,129 100.00 1,484,002 100.00 1,635,371 100.00 1,317,749 Category as a percent of total expenditure. ^Each sub-category as a percent of respective category. Source: Data derived from annual auditor's report for the district. TABLE Xm Nanaimo School District No. 68 Operational Expenditures and Weighting of Categories, 1961-1965 (Incl.) 1961 % i %2 1962 *1 %2 1963 X 1 X 2 1964 *1 X 2 1965 X 1 X 2 Administration S i % S S Salaries Office Expense Trustees Expense Other Total Administration 30,609 6,075 4,286 61,740 102,710 4.95 29.80 5.91 4.17 60.12 100.00 32,285 6,480 4,447 69,491 112,703 5.05 28.65 5.75 3.95 61.65 100.00 35,648 8,746 7,881 70,655 122,930 5.08 29.00 7.11 6.41 57.48 100.00 39,651 10,469 11,022 67,897 129,039 4.83 30.73 8.11 8.S4 52.62 100.00 43,380 10,744 17,081 71,448 142,653 4.74 30.41 7.53 11.97 50.09 100.00 Instruction Teachers' Salaries 1,372,719 66.22 1,481,991 66. 37 1,622,424 67.05 1,784,155 66.82 2,029,765 67.42 Other Instruction School Clerical Salaries Teaching Supplies Other Total Other Instruction 34,491 52,246 16,884 103,621 5.00 33.29 50.42 16.29 100.00 35,173 58,379 19,350 112,902 5.06 31.15 51.71 17.14 100.00 39,422 67,761 15,825 123,008 5.08 32.05 55.09 12.86 100.00 46,267 94,363 24,290 164,920 6.18 28.05 57.22 14.73 100.00 58,301 100,688 31,322 190,811 6.34 30.55 52.77 16.63 100.00 Plant Operation Janitors Salaries Janitors Supplies Light, Power, Water, Fuel Insurance and Other Total Plant Operation 153,220 11,007 69,196 19,101 252,524 12.18 39.36 2.83 17.77 4.91 154,621 12,074 78,333 17,192 262,220 11.74 38.59 3.01 19.55 4.29 155,498 11,650 76,205 18,185 261,538 10.81 37.33 2.80 18.30 4. 37 161,616 11,530 82,173 21,273 276,592 10. 35 36.69 2.62 18.64 4.83 170,793 13,783 36,033 21,816 292,475 9.71 35.59 2.87 17.93 4.54 Repairs & Maintenance Wages & Supplies Grounds 19,096 4.91 22,098 5.51 21,551 5.17 26,811 6.09 34,366 7.16 Buildings 72,996 18.75 98,724 24.64 91,857 22.05 93,101 21.14 102,111 21.27 Equipment 28,607 7.35 17,663 4.41 41,578 9.98 43,997 9.99 51,078 10.64 Other 16,052 4.12 Total Repairs & Maintenance 136,751 6.60 138,485 6.20 154,986 6.41 163,909 6.14 187,555 6.23 Total Plant & Maintenance (389,275) 100.00 (400,705) 100.00 (416,524) 100.00 (440,501) 100.00 (480,030) 100.00 Transportation 65,004 3.14 71,801 3.22 77,805 3.22 91,476 3.43. 102,965 3.42 Auxiliary Services Health Services 6,027 15.20 11,536 21.93 13,161 23.19 13,711 22.86 15,701 24.36 Other 33,624 84.80 41,076 78.07 43,603 76.81 46,278 77.14 48,741 75.64 Total Auxiliary Services 39,651 1.91 100.00 52,612 2.36 100.00 56,764 2.35 100.00 59,989 2.25 100.00 64,442 2.14 100.00 Total Operational Expense 2,072,980 100.00 2,232,714 100.00 2,419,455 100.00 2,669,880 100.00 3,010,666 100.00 ^Category as a percent of total expenditure. 2 Each sub-category as a percent of respective category. Source: Data derived from annual auditor's report for the district. TABLE XIV Nanaimo School District Ho. 68 Operational Expenditures and Weighting of Categories, 1966-1970 (Incl.) 1966 X 1 X 2 1967 X 1 X 2 1968 X 1 X 2 1969 X 1 X 2 1970 X 1 X 2 Administration S S S S i Salaries Office Expense Trustees Expense Other Total Administration 59,687 13,523 15,753 123,128 212,091 5.82 28.14 6.38 7.43 58.05 100.00 78,752 16,897 22,225 149,685 267,559 6.00 29.43 6.32 8. 31 55.94 100.00 98,610 18,978 24,256 176,343 318,187 6.07 31.00 5.96 7.62 55.42 100.00 111,481 23,774 26,004 192,284 353,543 5.91 31.53 6.72 7.36 54.39 100.00 115,014 20,005 25,533 185,040 345,592 5. 52 33.28 5.79 7.39 53.54 100.00 Instruction Teachers' Salaries 2,399,985 65.85 2,938,405 65.92 3,488,240 66.50 4,091,162 68.36 4,534,348 72.48 Other Instruction School Clerical Salaries Teaching Supplies Other Total Other Instruction 66,433 110,712 75,560 252,705 6.93 26.29 43.81 29.90 100.00 86,654 151,847 104,754 343,255 7.70 25.24 44.24 30.52 100.00 99,416 175,471 131,353 406,240 7.75 24.48 43.19 32.33 100.00 122,192 221,934 65,769 409,895 6.35 29.81 54.14 16.05 100.00 132 , 375 180,325 50,350 363,050 5.80 36.46 49.67 13.87 100.00 Plant Operation Janitors Salaries Janitors Supplies Light, Power, Water, Fuel Insurance and Other Total Plant Operation 201,455 15,783 100,029 39,915 357,182 9.80 33.76 2.65 16.77 6.69 247,109 15,882 118,994 41,908 423,893 9.51 35.24 2.26 16.97 5.98 294,171 16,667 129,041 51,919 491,798 9.38 36.05 2.04 15.81 6.36 341,039 26,839 152,573 51,393 571,844 9.56 36.20 2.85 16.19 5.45 271,775 24,671 135,307 53,136 534,889 8. 55 3i.63 2.87 21.56 6.13 Repairs & Maintenance Wages & Supplies Grounds Buildings Equipment Other Total Repairs & Maintenance 46,525 133,497 24,608 34,829 239,459 . 6.57 7.80 22.37 4.12 5.84 48,472 168,386 37,465 23,066 277,389 6.22 6.91 24.01 5.34 3.29 64,817 187,806 39,708 32,012 324,343 6.18 7.94 23.01 4.87 3.92 76,101 197,938 52,690 43,656 370,385 6.19 8.08 21.01 5.59 4.63 43, 372 201,868 45,313 33,906 324,459 5.19 5.05 23.49 5.27 3.95 Total Plant & Maintenance (596,641) 100.00 (701,282) 100.00 (816,141) 100.00 (942,229) 100.00 (859 , 348) 100.00 Transportation 118,376 3.25 144,657 3.24 154,801 2.95 180,834 3.02 147,066 2.35 Auxiliary Services Health Services Other Total Auxiliary Services 13,704 51,294 64,998 1.78 21.08 78.92 100.00 9,372 53,593 62,695 1.41 14.88 85.12 100.00 6,458 54,883 61,341 1.17 10.53 89.47 100.00 6,345 6,345 .11 100.00 100.00 6,580 6,580 .11 100.00 100.00 Total Operational Expense 3,644,796 100.00 4,458,123 100.00 5,244,950 100.00 5,984,008 100.00 6,255,984 100.00 Category as a percent of total expenditure, ^ach sub-category as a percent of respective category. Source: Data derived from annual auditor's report for the district. TA3LE XV Weighting of Categories in Sample School Districts 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 <z Administration S.D. Ho. 33 3.44 3.05 2. .95 3.13 3.11 4. .01 4.32 4.31 4. 42 22 41 3.2B 2.97 2. .37 2.76 2.70 2. ,34 3.78 3.48 3. 15 3. 15 48 5.77 5.31 5. ,96 6.41 7.02 6. ,76 7.23 7.12 a , 67 6. 39 68 4.95 5.05 C •J % .08 4.33 .4.74 5. ,82 6.00 6.07 c _ 91 c 52 Mean Average 4.36 4.23 • 4. .21 4.23 4.39 4. ,36 5.33 5.24 5. 4. 33 Teachers' Salaries S.D. No. 33 70.22 70.50 71. .69 71.74 72.33 71. .60 70.82 70.83 70. 75 70. 25 41 71.21 71.18 71. ,32 72.49 72.83 73. .07 72.51 72.47 72. = T_ 72. 72 43 60.95 59.13 59. ,44 53.20 58.88 58. 32 59.33 61.56 64. 02 64. OC 68 66.22 66.37 67. ,05 66.82 67.42 65. .85 65.92 66.50 es. 36 72. 4= Mean Average 67.15 66.79 67. ,50 67.31 67.86 67. 21 67.14 67.84 63. 91 69. 37 Other Instruction S.D. No. 33 4.12 4.13 4. . 08 4.77 4.67 4. 93 5.79 5.61 6. 27 6. 69 41 4.84 5.06 4. 90 4.97 5.06 5. 16 5.56 5.98 6. 55 6. 37 48 5.16 S.92 5. 90 6.22 6.53 6. 43 6.99 7.60 7. 32 7. SI 68 5.00 5.05 5. .OS 6.18 6.34 6. 93 7.70 7.75 6. 35 c # 30 Mean Average 4.78 5.04 4. 99 5.53 5.65 5. 86 6.51 6.73 6. 74 6. 79 Plant & Maintenance S.D. No. 33 16.54 17.34 16. 87 16.31 15.89 15. 87 16.08 16.17 16. 35 16. 43 41 17.32 17.42 16. 39 16.06 16.19 15. 61 14.89 14.90 14. 52 14. 05 48 22.81 23.91 23. 06 23.41 22.29 23. 31 21.56 20.12 13. 35 17. 68 18.78 17.94 17. 22 16.49 15.94 . 16. 37 ' 15.73 15.56 15. 75 13. Mean Average 18.86 19.15 18. 51 13.06 17.53 17. 91 17.06 16.69 16. 26 15. --Transportation S.D. No. 33 3.47 2.75 2. 50 2.33 2.32 2. 17 2.13 2.30 1. 99 2. l i 41 .35 .17 • IS .15 .15 - . 16 .15 .14 . 14 • 17 48 4.19 3.73 3. 71 3.95 3.78 3. 40 4.02 3.26 3. 31 3. 32 68 3.14 3.22 3. 22 3.43 3.42 3. 25 3.24 2.95 3. 02 2. 35 Mean Average 2.79 2.48 2. 39 2.48 2.42 2. 24 2.38 2.16 2. 2. - rt Auxiliary Services S.D. No. 33 2.21 2.19 1. 91 1.67 1.68 1. 42 .36 .78 22 . 15 41 3.00. 3.20 3. 37 3.17 3.07 3. 16 3.11 3.03 3. 02 2. 96 48 1.12 1.45 . 1. 93 1.81 1.50 1. 23 .87 .34 • 33 25 68 1.91 2.36 2. 35 2.2-5 2.14 73 1.41 1.17 • 11 11 Mean Average 2.06 2.30 2. 39 2.22 2.10 1. 91 1.56 1.33 • 92 • 88 Source: Tables VII-XIV. TA3LE XVI Weighting of Classifications Withir. "Administration" Expense Category 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1953 1969 197j Administration Salaries S.D. No. 33 32.30 33.19 32.02 32.37 31.85 25.55 24.88 26.79 25.77 31.. 33 41. 40.63 42.36 40.73 39.76 39.56 39.61 23.04 23.38 26.95 26. 35 48 43.17 45.79 43.41 46.02 41.96 41.10 38.36 33.63 33.44 34.2= 68 29.80 28.65 29.00 30.73 30.41 28.14 29.43 31.00 31.53 23.25 Mean Average 36.48 37.62 36.29 37.22 35.94 33.60 30.30 31.21. 29.57 21.22 Office Expense S.D. No. 33 7.92 3.01 . 8.84 8.11 7.64 . 5.56 5.35 5.45 9.49 5.57 41 2.01 1.91 1.80 2.19 1.34 1.30 1.09 .37 3.37 3.12 48 6.81 7.94 3.36 8.18 8.74 10.07 3.90 3.21 3.29 12.37 68 5.91 5.75 7.11 8.11 7.53 6.38 6.32 5.96 6. 72 • 5.^ 9 Mean Average 5.66 5.90 6.65 6.65 6.31 5.35 5.34 5.12 7.22 7.43 Trustees Expense S.D. No. 33 5.94 6.87 6.95 6.36 6.48 5.63 7.46 3.14 9.27 5.58 41 1.78 2.85 2.75 2.35 2.68 2.08 3.49 3.35 5.12 4.12 48 7.97 9.31 11.21 10.21 9.46 7.34 6.33 7.24 13.02 10. 55 63 4.17 3.95 6.41 8.54 11.97 7.43 3.31 7.62 7.36 7.39 Mean Average 4.96 5.37 6.83 6.86 7.65 5.52 6.54 5.59 3.69 ~. Other Administration S.D. No. 33 53.84 51.93 52.19 53.16 54.03 53.16 61.31 59.62 54.47 52.32 41 55.58 52.33 54.72 55.70 56.42 57.01 67.3B .57.40 54.55 65.7"' 48 42.05 36.46 35.52 35.59 39.84 41.49 45.36 45.37 44.25 42.55 68 60.12 61.65 57.43 52.62 50.09 53.05 55.94 55.42 54.39 53. 54 Mean Average 52.90 50.61 50.23 49.27 50.10 54.93 . 57.62 57.03 54.42 Provincial Administration Category Weight 4.89 4.55 4.44 4.43 4.39 5.17 5.10 5.20 4.95 Price Relative Administration Salaries 1.78 1.71 1.61 1.67 1.58 1.74 i.55 1.62 1.47 Office Expense .28 .27 .30 .30 .28 .30 .23 .27 .36 Trustees Expense .24 .27 .30 .31 .34 .29 .34 .43' Other Administration 2.59 2.30 2.23 2.20 2.19 2.84 2.54 2.97 2.70 Total 4.89 4.55 4.44 4.48 4.39 5.17 5.10 5.20 4.96 Source: School District data from tables "Operational Expenditures and Weighting of Categories" (Tables VTI-XIV). Provincial data.derived from Statistics Canada worksheets, Appendix "B" and Table III. TABLE XVII Weighting of Classifications Within "Other Instruction" Expense Category 1961 1962 1953 1964 1955 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 School Clerical Salaries S.D. Mo. 33 41 43 63 Mean Average 21.69 23.99 19.25 33.29 25.35 21.22 23.59 13.24 31.15 24.30 19.32 27.78 20.30 32.05 24.99 17.87 23.11 20.16 23.05 23.55 22.81. 29.19 22.40 30.55 26.24 30.15 29.06 25.52 26.29 27.75 26.88 26.34 27.13 25.24 26; 40 30.44 26.08 30.22 24.48 27.30 23. 27.59 31.22 29.31 29.33 31.30 23.14 30.27 36.46 31.54 Teaching Supplies S.D. No. 33 41 48 53 Mean .Average 54.11 52.76 59.14 50.42 59.11 60.67 47.14 62.10 51.71 55.40 52.71 43.34 60.55 55.05 56.77 64.40 49.42 53.83 57.22 57.47 60.50 49.32 58.03 52.77 55.28 52.72 49.48 56.34 43.31 50.71 54.31 52.23 54.24 44.24 51.33 56.31 46.97 56.11 43.19 50.65 54.06 55.44 60.35 54.14 53.33 51.43 56.33 59.34 49.67 56.84 Other Instruction S.D. No. 33 41 48 68 Mean Average 14.00 18.25 11.61 16.29 15.04 18.11 24.27 19.66 17.14 19.80 17.97 23.33 13.25 12.36 18.24 17.73 22.47 20.99 14.73 13.98 16.69 20.99 19.57 16.68 18.48 17.13 21.46 17.64 29.90 21.54 18.31 21.43 18.63 30.52 22.22 13.25 26.95 13.67 32.33 21.55 7.05 15.97 7.39 16 .05 11.74 7.22 15.43 9.89 13.67 11.62 Provincial "Other Instruction" Category Weight 4.44 4.79 4.95 5.14 5.40 5.71 6.24 5.91 Other Instruction School Clerical Salaries Teaching Supplies Other Instruction Total 1.15 2.62 .67 4.44 1.19 2.55 .95 4.79 1.24 2.31 .90 4.95 1.21 2.95 .93 5.14 1.41 2.99 1.00 5.40 1.58 2.90 1.23 5.71 1.65 3.20 1.39 6.24 1.92 3.50 1.49 6.91 Source: School Distr i c t data from tables "Operational Expenditures and Weighting of Categories" (Tables VII-XTV). Provincial data derived from Statistics Canada worksheets, Appendix "3" and Table III. TABLE XVIII Weighting of Classifications Within "Plant Operation and Maintenance" Category, Part 1 1961 1962 1963 1964 196S 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 Janitors Salaries S.D. No. 33 37.51 34. 35 36.11 38.20 37.06 42.37 40.71 42.17 42.62 44.40 41 42.00 42.18 42.29 41.75 42.98 45.15 45.99 45.37 44.26 45.49 48 27.58 25.43 25.84 24.42 24.70 24.50 28.62 28.50 33.94 36.96 68 39.36 38.59 37. 33 36.69 35.59 33.76 35.24 36.05 36.20 31.63 Mean Average 36.61 35.13 35.39 35.26 35.08 36.45 37.63 38.02 39.25 39.61 Janitors Supplies S.D. No. 33 3.64 3.76 3.59 3.04 3.24 3.06 2.88 2.57 3.50 2.75 41 3.15 3.32 3.15 3.29 2.97 2.82 3.11 3.09 3.27 2.86 48 2.36 1.94 2.09 2.62 2.88 2.87 2.75 2.95 2.74 2.31 68 2.83 3.01 2.80 2.62 2.87 2.65 2.26 2.04 2.85 2.87 Mean Average 3.00 3.01 2.91 2.89 2.99 2.85 2.75 2.66 3.09 2.70 Light. Water. Power t Fuel S.D. NO. 33 20.39 19.16 20.75 41 20.00 19.76 18.39 48 23.90 22.29 19.74 66 17.77 19.55 18.30 Mean Average 20.51 20.19 19.30 Insurance and other S.D. No. 33 6.72 6.36 4.91 41 3.12 2.99 3.01 48 6.86 6.43 7.02 68 4.91 4.29 4. 37 Mean Average 5.40 5.02 4.83 Grounds S.D. No. 33 6.22 5.93 6.50 41 2.89 2.87 3.57 48 9.71 10.39 11.69 68 4.91 5.51 5.1-7 Mean Average 5.93 6.IS 6. "8 18.76 18.12 15.67 15.11 16.51 13.97 12.76 18.04 16.74 16.32 16.00 14.63 14.28 13.83 20.11 20.74 18.69 17.38 17.30 17.89 16.35 18.64 17.93 16.77 16.97 15.81 16.19 21.56 18.89 18.39 16.85 16. 37 16.06 15.58 16.13 5.63 5.71 6.13 6.78 5.13 5.98 4.86 3.82 4.90 3.39 3.86 3.71 4. 54 4.36 6.81 8.55 6.47 1.84 5.93 6.65 6.58 4.83 4.54 6.69 5.98 6.36 5.45 6.18 5.27 5.90 5.67 4.62 5.28 5.66 5.50 7.30 7.58 6.98 6.32 6.6C 7. S3 €.65 3. 50 2.77 2.52 2.51 3.52 3.17 2.12 11.9" 10.89 12.81 11.96 12.21 12.1C 3.36 6.C9 7.16 7.80 €.51 7. 94 8.03 5.C5 7.22 7.10 7.53 €.95 5"1 7.31 5.55 Source: See Tables VII-XIV. TABLE XIX Weighting of Classifications Within "Plant Operation and Maintenance" Category, Part 2 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 Buildinqs S.D. No. 33 13.86 18.92 16.77 15.74 17.80 15.04 18.04 14.46 14.00 16.10 41 23.40 22.76 23.74 23.14 23.36 22.96 22.06 23.00 23.44 23.98 48 19.93 25.12 20.46 20.71 20.12 22.27 22.63 22.30 17.48 20.63 68 18.75 24.64 22.05 21.14 21.27 22.37 24.01 23.01 21.01 23.49 Mean Average 18.99 22.86 20.75 20.18 20.65 20.66 21.68 20.69 18.98 21.04 Equipment S.D. No. 33 10.07 9.00 8.88 8.97 8.07 8.44 7.55 10.09 9.90 10.50 41 3.78 5.17 4.56 5.34 4.92 4. 72 4.79 4.85 4.73 5.17 48 8.60 6.78 10.33 10.62 9.38 9.27 11.91 8.97 6.46 6.43 68 7.35 4.41 9.98 9.99 10.64 4.12 5.34 4.87 5.59 5.27 Mean Average 7.45 6.34 8.44 8.73 8.26 6.64 7.40 7.20 6.67 6.84 Other Maintenance S.D. No. 33 1.59 2.52 2.49 2.36 2.42 2.31 2.61 2.47 2.15 1.98 41 1.66 .95 1.29 1.12 1.36 2.12 1.58 1.83 2.31 2.19 48 1.06 1.62 2.63 2.74 2.74 3.12 2.91 1.84 2.74 2.38 68 4.12 5.84 3.29 3.92 4.63 3.95 Mean Average 2.11 1.27 1.60 1.56 1.63 3.35 2.60 2.52 2.96 2.63 Provincial "Plant & Maintenance It Category Weight 19.05 18.80 18.35 17.94 17.32 16.83 17.03 16.82 15.93 Plant Operation & Maintenance Janitors Salaries 6.97 6.60 6.50 6.32 6.07 6.13 6.41 6.40 6.26 Janitors Supplies .57 .57 .53 .52 .52 .48 .47 .45 .49 Light, Water, Power & Fuel 3.91 3.80 3.54 3. 39 3.19 2.84 2.79 2.70 2.48 Insurance & Other 1.03 .94 .89 .95 1.02 .95 .79 .89 .90 Grounds 1.13 1.16 1.24 1.30 1.23 1.27 1.18 1.27 1.24 Buildings 3.62 4. 30 3.81 3.61 3.58 3.48 3.69 3.46 3.03 Equipment 1.42 1.13 1.55 1.57 1.43 1.12 1.26 1.21 1..06 Other Maintenance .40 .24 .29 .28 .28 .56 .44 .42 .47 Total 15.CS 13.80 18.35 17.9.4 17. 32 16.33 17.03 16.82 15.93 Source: School District data, fror. tables "Operational expenditures and Weighting of Categories" (Tables VII-XIV). Provincial data derived from Statistics Canada worksheets, Apper.cix "S" ar.d III. TABLE XX Weighting of Classifications Within "Auxiliary Services" Expense Category 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 157C Health Services S.D. No. 33 41 48 68 Mean Average 63.14 59.01 56.14 52.55 53.08 52.22 63.14 32.71 100.00 '100.00 95.29 90.18 86.67 88.62 87.67 87.91 86.73 85.87 84.17 32.92 75.24 75.76 74.28 71.72 74.20 56.73 37.03 45.70 99.05 100.00 15.20 21.93 23.19 22.86 24.36 21.08 14.88 10.53 100.00 100.00 62.22 61.72 60.07 58.94 59.83 54.48 50.45 43.70 95.80 95.73 Other Services S.D. No. 33 41 48 68 Mean Average 36.86 4.71 24.76 84.80 37.78 40.99 9.82 24.24 78.07 38.28 43.86 13.33 25.72 76.81 39.93 47.45 11.38 28.28 77.14 41.06 46.92 12.33 25.80 75.64 40.17 47.78 12.09 43.27 78.92 45.52 36.86 13.27 62.97 85.12 49.55 67.29 14.13 54.30 89.47 56.30 15.83 .95 4.20 17.08 4.27 Provincial "Auxiliary Services" Category Weight 2.91 2.86 2.94 2.96 3.78 4.07 3.18 2.47 3.74 Auxiliary Services Health Services Other Services 1.81 1.10 1.77 1.09 1.77 1.17 1.74 1.22 2.26 1.52 2.22 1.85 1.60 1.58 1.08 1. 39 3.58 .16 Total 2.91 2.86 2.94 2.96 3.78 4.07 3.18 2.47 3.74 Source: School District data from tables "Operational Expenditures and Weighting Categories". (Tables VTI-XIV) Provincial data derived from Statistics Canada worksheets, Appendix "B" and Table III. TABLE XXI Value Shares of a l l Expense Classifications 1361 1362 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1963 1969 Administration Salaries Office Expense Trustees Expense Other Total Administration! Instruction Teachers' Salariesl Other Instruction School Clerical Salaries Teaching Supplies Other Total Other Instruction 1 Plant Operation & Maintenance Janitors Salaries Janitors Supplies Light, Power, Water, Fuel Insurance & Other Wages & Supplies Grounds Buildings Equipment Other Total Plant & Maintenance1  Transportation 1 Auxiliary Services Health Services Other Total Auxiliary Services 1 Total 1.73 .23 .24 2.59 4.89 66.32 1.15 2.62 .67 4.44 6.97 .37 3.91 1.03 1.13 3.52 1.42 .40 19.05 2.39 1.81 1.10 2.91 100.00 1.71 .27 ..27 2.30 4.55 56.66 1.19 2.55 .95 4.79 5.50 3.30 .34 4.3C 1.19 .24 13.30 2.34 1.77 1.09 2.36 100.CO 1.61 .30 .30 2.23 4.44 67.06 1.24 2.81 .90 4.95 6.50 .53 3.54 .39 1.24 3.31 1.55 .29 18.35 2.26 1.77 1.17 2.94 100.00 1.67 .30 .31 2.20 4.43 67.25 1.21 2.95 .98 5.14 6.32 . .52 3.39 .95 1.30 3.61 1.57 .23 17.94 2.23 1.74 1.22 2.96 100.00 1.53 .28 .34 2.19 4.39 66.91 1.41 2.99 1.00 5.40 6.07 • 52 3.19 1.02 1.23 3.58 1.43 .28 17.32 2.20 2.26 1.52 3.78 100.00 1.74 .30 .29 2.84 5.17 66.03 1.58 2.90 1.23 5.71 6.13 .48 2.84 .95 1.27 3.48 1.12 .56 16.83 2.19 2.22 1.85 4.07 100.00 1.55 .28 .33 2.94 5.10 66.29 1.65 3.20 1.39 5.24 6.41 .47 2.79 .79 1.18 3.69 1.26 .44 17.03 2.16 1.60 1.58 3.18 100.00 1.62 .27 .34 2.97 5.20 66.42 1.92 3.50 1.49 6.91 6.40 .45 2.70 .89 1.27 3.43 1.21 .42 1.5.82 2.18 1.03 1.39 2.47 100.00 1.47 .36 .43 2.70. 4.96 66.50 1.96 3.93 .73 6.57 6.25 .49 2.43 .90 1.24 3 • 03 1.06 .47 15.33 2.10 3.53 .16 3.74 •"•These weights determined at provincial level A l l other weights determined by sample as pe: of aggregation from Statistics Canada worksheets. Appendix "B" and Table III. tables "Weighting of Classifications within Categories" (Tables XVI-XX). TABLE XXII Value Shares to be Applied to a l l Input Index Input No. 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1 Salaries Admin. (50%) .89 .85 .81 .83 .79 .87 .78 .81 .73 2 Clerical (50%) .89 .86 .80 .84 .79 .87 .77 .81 .74 3 Office Expense .28 .27 .30 .30 .28 .30 .28 .27 .36 4 Trustees Expense .24 .27 .30 .31 .34 .29 .33 .34 .43 Other Administration 5 Non-Teaching Staff Pensions (57%) 1.47 1.30 1.28 1.25 1.25 1.62 1.67 1.69 1.54 6 Group Li f e (20.3%) .53 .47 .45 .45 .44 .58 .60 .61 .55 7 Workmen's Compensation (8.1%) .21 .19 .18 .18 .18 .23 .24 .24 .22 8 B.C.S.T.A. Dues (2.9%) .08 .07 .06 .06 .06 .08 .09 .09 .08 1 Admin. Salaries (3.5%) .09 .08 .08 .08 .08 .10 .10 .10 .09 9 Expense Accounts (8.2%) .21 .19 ,18 .18 .18 .23 .24 .24 .22 10 Teachers Salaries 66.32 66.66 67.06 67.25 66.91 66.03 66.29 66.42 66.60 11 Clerical Salaries 1.15 1.19 1.24 1.21 1.41 1.58 1.65 1.92 1.96 12 Teaching Supplies & Other 3.29 3.60 3.71 3.93 3.99 4.13 4.59 4.99 4.71 13 Janitors Salaries 6.97 6.60 6.50 6.32 6.07 6.13 6.41 6.40 6.26 14 Janitors Supplies .57 .57 .53 .52 .52 .48 .47 .45 .49 U t i l i t i e s 15 Power (62.8%) 2.46 2.39 2.22 2.13 2.01 1.78 1.75 1.70 1.56 16 Fuel (33.0%) 1.29 1.25 1.17 1.12 1.05 .94 .92 .89 .82 17 Fixtures (4.2%) .16 .16 .15 .14 .13 .12 .12 .11 .10 18 Insurance 1.03 .94 .69 .95 1.02 .95 .79 .89 .90 Wages & Supplies (Grounds) 19 Maintenance Salaries (45%) .51 .52 .56 .59 .55 .57 .53 .57 .56 14 Building Maintenance (55%) .62 .64 .68 .71 .68 .70 .65 .70 .68 Wages & Supplies (Buildings) 19 Maintenance Salaries (65%) 2.35 2.79 2.48 2.35 2.33 2.26 2.40 2.26 1.97 14 Building Maintenance (35%) 1.27 1.51 1.33 1.26 1.25 1.22 1.29 1.22 1.06 20 Equipment Repair 1.42 1.19 1.55 1.57 1.43 1.12 1.26 1.21 1.06 21 Expense Accounts Cars Etc. .40 .24 .29 .28 .28 .56 .44 .42 .47 22 Transportation 2.39 2.34 2.26 2.23 2.20 2.19 2.16 2.18 2.10 23 Auxiliary Services 2.91 2.86 2.94 2.96 3.78 4.07 3.18 2.47 3.74 1. Source: Data from Table XXI with sub-categories broken into inputs according to School District Expense Ledgers. 2. The percent figures in brackets represents the input as a percer.- of respective sub-categcry. 3.. Input number refers to reclassification of these data in Table XXIII. TABLE XXT.IIA Value Shares Grouped in Categories Incut Mo. 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1569 Administration 1 Administration Salaries .98 .93 .39 .91 .87 .97 .83 .91 .32 2 Clerical Salaries .39 .36 .80 .84 .79 .37 .77 .81 .74 3 Office Expense .23 .27 . 30 .30 .28 . 20 .23 .27 . 36 4 Trustees Expense .24 .27 . 30 .31 . 34 .29 . 33 . 34 .43 5 Non-Teaching Staff Pensions 1.47 1.30 1.28 1.25 1.25 1.62 1.67 1.69 1.54 5 Group Life Insurance .53 .47 .45 .45 .44 .58 .60 .61 .55 7 Workmen's Compensation . .21 .19 .13 .18 .18 .23 .24 .24 .22 S 3.C.S.T.A. Dues .08 .07 .06. .06 .06 .08 .09 .09 .08 9 Expense Accounts .21 .19 .18 .18 .18 .23 .24 .24 .22 Total Administration 4.89 4.55 4.44 4. 48 4. 39 5.17 5.10 5.20 4.96 Instruction 10 Salaries (Total) 66.32 66.66 67.06 67.25 66.91 66.03 66.29 65.42 66.60 Other Instruction Clerical Salaries 1.15 1.19 1.24 1.21 1.41 1.58 1.55 1.92 1.36 12 Teaching Supplies and Other 3.29 3.60 3.71 3.93 3.99 4.13 4.59 4.99 4.71 Total Other Instruction 4.44 4.79 4.95 5.14 5.40 5.71 6.24 6.91 6.67 Plant Operation & Maintenance 12 Janitors' Salaries 6.97 6.60 5.50 6. 32 6.07 6.13 6.41 6.40 6.26 14 Maintenance Supplies 2.46 2.72 2.54 2.49 2.45 2.40 2.41 2. 37 2.2 3 15 Power 2.46 2.29 2.22 2.13 2.01 1.78 1.75 :..70 I. 56 ic P-el 1.29 1.25 1.17 .1.12 1.05 .94 .92 .39 . 52 17 Fixtures .16 .16 • 15 .14 .13 .12 .12 .11 .10 IS Insurance 1.03 .94 .39 .95 1.02 .95 .79 .39 . 30 19 Maintenance Salaries 2.86 3. 31 3.04 2.94 ' 2.88 2.33 2.93 2.33 2.52 20 Equipment Repair 1.42 1.19 1.55 1.57 1.43 1.12 1.26 1.21 1.06 21 Expense Accounts (Cars, Etc.) .40 .24 .29 .28 .28 .56 .44 .42 .47 Total Plant and Maintenance 19.05 13.30 13. 35 17.94 17. 32 16.83 17.03 16.32 15.33 TransDortation 22 Total 2.39 2.34 2.26 2.23 2.20 2.19 2.16 2.18 2.10 Auxiliary Services 23 Total 2.91 2.36 2.94 2.96 3.78 4.07 3.18 2.47 :. / 4 Total Operational Expense 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 I 2 C . 0 C Source: Table XXII. TABLE XXIIIB Inputs Relative to Respective Categories 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1963 1969 Administration Administration Salaries 20.04 20.44 20.04 20. 31 19.82 18.76 17.25 17.50 16.53 Clerical Salaries 18.20 18.90 18.02 18.75 18.00 16.83 15.10 15.58 14.92 Office Expense 5.73 5.93 6.76 6.70 6.38 5.80 5.49 5.19 7.26 Trustees Expense 4.91 5.93 6.76 6.92 7.74 5.61 6.47 6.54 8.67 Non Teaching Staff Pensions 30.06 28.57 28.83 27.90 28.47 31.33 32.75 32.49 .. 31.04 Group Life Insurance 10.84 10. 33 10.14 10.04 10.02 11.22 11.76 11.73 11.09 Workmen's Compensation 4.29 4.18 4.05 4.02 4.10 4.45 4.71 4.62 4.44 B.C.S.T.A. Dues 1.64 1.54 1.35 1.34 1.37 1.55 1.76 1.73 1.61 Expense Accounts 4.29 4.18 4.05 4.02 4.10 4.45 4. 71 4.62 4.44 Total 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 Other Instruction Clerical Salaries 25.90 28.84 25.05 23.54 26.11 27.67 26.44 27.79 29.39 Teaching Supplies & Other 74.10 75.16 74.95 76.46 73.89 72.33 73.56 72.21 70.61 Total 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 Plant Operation & Maintenance Janitors* Salaries 36.60 35.10 35.41 35.23 35.04 36.42 37.65 38.05 39.30 Maintenance Supplies 12.91 14.47 13.84 13.88 14.15 14.26 14.15 14.09 14.00 Power 12.91 12.71 12.10 11.87 11.61 10.58 10.28 10.11 9.79 Fuel 6.77 6.65 6.38 6.24 6.06 5.59 5.40 5.29 5.15 Fixtures .84 .85 .82 .78 .75 .71 .70 .65 .63 Insurance 5.41 5.00 4.85 5.30 5.89 5.64 4.64 5.29 5.65 Maintenance Salaries 15.01 17.61 16.57 16. 39 16.62 16.82 17.20 16.83 15.88 Equipment Repair 7.45 6.33 8.45 8.75 8.26 6.65 7.40 7.19 6.65 Expense Accounts 2.10 1.28 1.58 1.56 1.62 3.33 2.58 2.50 2.95 Total 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 - 50 -CHAPTER IV INDEX CONSTRUCTION—INPUT PRICE INDEXES Having determined the value shares of the goods and services that comprise the inputs of the public school system, the next step in the research was to determine the changes in the price of those goods and services, and to construct price indexes on the basis of those changes. Value shares determined in the preceding chapter were divided by the relevant price indexes to produce reciprocals. These reciprocals form the basis of construction of category and total price indexes in the succeeding chapter. Here the discussion of the various inputs i s designed to show the source of the data and the method by which the price indexes for the respective inputs were determined. Salaries of Non-Teaching Staff. A questionnaire was sent to a l l school dis t r i c t s in the province. Included in the questions were those which sought details of the salaries of a l l non-teaching staff for the years 1961 to 1971, inclusive. Mean salaries were calculated for each category of non-teaching personnel on the basis of data obtained from the questionnaire returns. Price indexes were calculated on the basis of these means for: Administration Salaries (Table XXIV), Clerical Salaries (Table XXV), Janitors Salaries (Table XXXV) and Maintenance Salaries (Table XLI). - 51 -Other Payroll Costs. The price index for non-teaching staff pensions (Table XXVIII) was based on a composite of the weighted salary indexes for a l l non-teaching staff. The direct relationship between pension costs and salary levels was the major reason for this approach. The non-teaching staff pension index formed a basis for the construction of an index for Workmen's Compensation (Table XXX). The Workmen's Compensation Board of British Columbia charges a premium on the basis of payroll. This rate was multiplied by the weighted salary index for non-teaching staff to produce a price index for Workmen's Compensation. The strange behaviour of the price index i s due to the application of a fluctuating rate to an increasing salary index. A weighted index for a l l personnel, including teachers, formed the basis of the Group Life Insurance, price index (Table XXIX). Many of the group l i f e plans in effect in school dis t r i c t s in British Columbia relate benefits to income level in direct ratio. • Major price changes would, therefore, result from changes in the face value. Trustees' Expenses. Questionnaire responses were again the basis of the price index for Trustees* Expenses (Table XXVII). Payments made to trustees in each year were averaged and the index constructed on the basis of the mean. - 52 -After 1966 trustees in a growing number of school d i s t r i c t s voted themselves a salary for the f i r s t time. Consequently, post-1966 data reflect this addition to the out-of-pocket expenses which were recorded in pre-1966 expenditures. The rationale underlying the method used in constructing this index i s similar to that used in constructing other indexes. Since i t cannot be assumed, with any degree of confidence, that the payment of salaries to trustees w i l l produce u t i l i t y to the system or in any way improve the performance of the school system, a l l such increases in cost have been considered increases in price. B.C.S.T.A. Dues. Increases in dues charged by the British Columbia School Trustees Association may have been the result of increases in the amounts and types of services made available to member boards. Again, since there i s no way to argue logically that the payment of fees to a provincial association w i l l produce u t i l i t y to the system, a l l such increases in cost have been treated as increases in price. Insurance. Fire insurance premiums are determined by two factors, the amount of insurance and the rate. Rising replacement values of buildings create a need for upward revision in the amount of insurance coverage. - 53 -Changes in the amount of coverage were determined using as a basis a school that had not had any additions or alterations through-out the period of study. The replacement value was multiplied by the insurance rate applicable to that school. The price index in Table XL was calculated on the basis of the premiums that resulted from those calculations. The relatively high insurance index of 343.3 resulted from the increased cost of building replacement being multiplied by an insurance rate which was increasing at a more rapid rate. On the 1961 base,' the 1969 index for building replacement was 155, compared to an index of 220 for the insurance rate. Investigation into the rate of increase in the insurance rate revealed a number of contributing factors. British Columbia, as a lumber province, builds a large number of frame type school buildings. This factor, combined with an increased incidence of arson and fires resulting from other causes, has produced a high claim loss experience for the insuring companies. School board officers reported some di f f i c u l t y finding insurance companies to underwrite the risks. Notwithstanding the higher premiums, f i r e insurance companies appear to be competing to keep school f i r e insurance risks off their books. Auxiliary Services. The special treatment of this category has been discussed in Chapter III. The price index in Table XLV i s based on the per-pupil cost of these services. - 54 -Power. The price index supplied by the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority (Table XXXVII and Appendix D) was used to determine changes in the price of e l e c t r i c i t y . Transportation. The per-pupil cost of transportation was determined by dividing the number of students transported, adjusted to f i s c a l years, into the total cost of transportation. The price index in Table XLIII was based on the cost per-pupil transported. Expense Accounts. Research of school d i s t r i c t expense ledgers revealed two types of expense accounts, one in the "Administration" category, and one in the "Plant Operation and Maintenance" category. The latter was found to relate to maintenance personnel travelling between schools within a school jurisdiction, while the former was found to relate to travel in a broader sense and included meals. The expense price index for administration personnel in Table XXXII i s based on a composite of the "Transportation" and "Restaurant Meals" indexes supplied by the Prices Division, Statistics Canada. The expense price index for maintenance personnel was based on the single "Transportation" index. - 55 -Teacher's Salaries Price Index. Several approaches to price index construction were considered in the development of the "Teachers' Salaries" price index in Table XXXIII. The "Residual Approach" was the method selected for use in this study. The f i r s t step in the "Residual Approach" involved the calculation and conversion of school year data to fis c a l year data. These data included the number of teachers, special staff, supervising principals, and d i s t r i c t supervisors on staff June 30, in addition to the total salaries paid to special staff and supervising principals. Conversion of these data to f i s c a l year data was performed by adding .6 of the data reported June 30, 1961, to .4 of the data reported June 30, 1962, to arrive at the f i s c a l year data for 1961. The numbers of personnel in special staff and supervising principalship positions were deducted from the number of total instructional staff, to yield the number of teachers. The total instructional salary cost for each year, as supplied by the Education Division, Statistics Canada, was used as the starting point. From this total figure, the total salaries of special staff and supervising principals (adjusted to f i s c a l years), and the total salaries of d i s t r i c t supervisors, were deducted. The residual represented the total salary b i l l for teaching staff. Adjusted f i s c a l year data on the number of teachers were divided into the respective - 56 -residual and an average salary produced. Average salaries were calcu-lated for special staff, supervising principals, and d i s t r i c t super-visors. Indexes were produced for each group, including teachers, based on the respective average salaries. Total salaries paid to each group were weighted as a portion of the total instructional salary expenditure, and these weights were applied to the respective indexes to produce an instructional salary price index. Two observations on the residual method should be noted. Fir s t , the method takes into account changes within a portion of the basket of inputs. It is in this way that the residual method retains some consistency within the Paasche conceptual framework. Secondly, the residual approach considers a l l cost increases to be increases in price. This is in keeping with the rationale used in discussing "Trustees' Expenses" and "B.C.S.T.A. Dues". A Teachers' Wage Index. The "Residual" price index for teachers' salaries considered a l l changes in cost to be changes in price. It should be noted that on the basis of this index i t i s not possible to t e l l the extent to which changes in price were the result of changes in salary level, or changes in the qualification and experience level of the teaching force. A comparison between the "Residual" price index and a wage index would, however, permit a measurement of the extent to which - 57 -changes in price were caused by changes in salaries. Tables XLVI through XLIX present the construction of a teachers' salary wage index based on the Laspeyre concept. The 1961 teaching force was priced according to different levels of qualifications, at a high level of aggregation, on the provincial average salary grids for the years 1961 to 1970. An index was constructed on the basis of changing salaries, holding the 1961 level of experience and education constant. A comparison of the "Residual" and "Laspeyre" indexes w i l l give an indication of changes in the qualification and experience level of the teaching force. A Comparison of Instructional Salary Indexes. Instructional staff price indexes have been compared to the national general wage index and the Laspeyre type teachers' wage index, and are presented in graph form in Figure I. Comparison of the Laspeyre and Paasche indexes in the above figure, indicates some changes in the qualification and experience level of the teaching force. It w i l l be recalled that the Laspeyre index was constructed by pricing the 1961 teaching force on the annual provincial average salary grids. The Paasche index, or "Residual Approach", was constructed on the basis of average salaries. In 1962 the Laspeyre index lay above the Paasche. In 1963 they changed positions while in 1964 and 1965 the Laspeyre line was again above the Paasche. Positions changed again in 1966 and the FIGURE I INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF PRICE INDEXES 170 -160 -150 -140 - i 130 - J 120 -J 170 160 •150 00 -140 , -130 120 - 59 -Paasche line lay above the Laspeyre for the balance of the period. These data would indicate that the qualification and experience level of the teaching force declined in 1962 below the 1961 level, rose in 1963, declined again in 1964 and 1965, and increased for the balance of the period. The differences in teachers' salary indexes, draws attention to the conceptual difference between a price index and a wage index. In Figure I the "Teachers' Laspeyre" and "Canada General" wage indexes have been superimposed on the price indexes for teachers (Paasche), special staff, supervising principals, and d i s t r i c t supervisors. Any comparison of these data should take into account the basic difference between wage and price indexes. Wage indexes are based on grids, or rates of wages paid to the individual. Price indexes, on the other hand, are based on the cost to the employer. The instructional and administrative price indexes in this study were based on the latter. When an employee receives an experience increment, or moves to a new position on the salary grid by virtue of improved qualifica-tions, this does not represent a change in the level of wages paid to this group of personnel. It does, however, represent a change in the price of the service to the employer. Instructional Salary Trends. The data identified by instructional salary price index research revealed a number of trends. Price indexes for senior - 60 -positions, such as d i s t r i c t supervisors and supervising principals, indicated a greater increase in price levels than those for subordinate positions. An increasing portion of the total instructional salary cost was spent on the senior categories. Reference to Table XXXIII w i l l indicate that the portion of instructional salaries expended on teachers diminished throughout the period. In 1961 teachers' salaries accounted for 75.9 percent of the total instructional salary cost, compared to 72.07 percent in 1969. The portion spent on d i s t r i c t supervisors increased from 1.92 percent in 1961, to 2.60 percent in 1969. Similarly, the portion expended on supervising principals increased from 4.91 percent to 5.63 percent, and the special staff portion from 17.27 percent to 19.70 percent. These trends w i l l receive further consideration in the following chapters. Other Price Indexes. Price indexes for other inputs were obtained from Statistics Canada. The "Office and Teaching Supplies" price indexes in Table XXVI are based on the composite index for "Office Supplies'". "Maintenance" and "Janitors' Supplies" price indexes are based on the "Maintenance" price index. The composite "Equipment Repair" index was used to determine price changes in this input (Table XLII), and the composite " U t i l i t i e s " index was used to determine the price index for "Electrical Fixtures" in Table XXXIX. A l l of the foregoing indexes were supplied by the Deflation Section of Statistics Canada. The price index for fuel in Table XXXVIII was supplied by the Prices Section. - 61 r Summary. Table L contains a summary of the input price indexes developed as a result of the procedures discussed in this chapter. It i s to be noted that some of the price indexes in this summary are presented for purposes of comparison and w i l l not be used in the construction of the price indexes related to public school education which are reported in the following chapter. TABLE XXIV Administration Salaries Price Index (Input No. 1 Weighted Index) 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 Administration Salaries Low 6,000 6,000 6, 300 7,200 7,950 8,750 9,410 10,998 11,910 12,960 13,900 High 10,020 10,844 11,103 11,521 12,123 14,162 15,992 17,637 20,665 22,824 24,371 Mean 7,846 8,186 8,576 9,245 9,810 11,000 12,336 13,734 15,260 16,574 18,320 Index 1961 = 100 100 104. 3 109. 3 117.8 125.0 140.2 157.2 175.0 194.5 211.2 233.5 Input No. 1 Value Share .98 .93 .89 . .91 .87 .97 .88 .91 .82 Index Reciprocal .98 .89 .81 .77 .70 .69 .56 .52 .42 Category Value Share 20.04 20.44 20.04 20.31 19.82 18.76 17.25 17.50 16.53 Category Reciprocal 20.04 19.60 18.33 17.24 15.86 13.38 10.97 10.00 . 8.50 Source: Data compiled from Questionnaire responses. For weight determination see Tables XXIIIA and XXIIIB. TABLE XXV Clerical Salaries Price Index (Inputs No. 2 & 11 Weighted Indexes) 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 Clerical Salaries Low 2,460 2,460 2,640 2,878 2,971 3,228 3,540 3,931 4,296 4,416 4,830 High 4,500 4,500 4,620 4,740 5,040 5,280 5,880 6,216 6,576 6,936 7,296 Mean 3,088 3,200 3,440 3,634 3,849 4,055 4,478 4,800 5,156 5,584 6,078 Index 1961=100 100.0 103.6 111.4 117.7 124.6 131.3 145.0 155.4 167.0 180.8 196.3 Input No. 2 Value Share .89 .86 .80 .84 .79 .87 .77 .81 .74 Index Reciprocal .89 .83 .72 .71 .63 .66 .53 .52 .44 Input No. 11 Value Share 1.15 1.19 1.24 1.21 1.41 1.58 1.65 1.92 1.96 Index Reciprocal 1.15 1.15 1.11 1.03 1.13 1.20 1.14 1.24 1.17 Category Value Share 18.20 18.90 18.02 18.75 18.00 16.83 15.10 15.58 14.92 Category Reciprocal 18.20 18.24 16.18 15.93 14.45 12.82. 10.41 10.03 8.93 Category Value Share 25.90 24.84 25.05 23.54 26.11 27.67 26.44 27.79 29.39 Category Reciprocal 25.90 23.98 22.49 20.00 20.96 21.07 18.23 17.88 17.60 Source: Data compiled from questionnaire responses. For weight determination, See Tables XXIIIA and XXIIIB. TABLE XXVI Office Supplies Price Index (Inputs No. 2 arid 12 Weighted Indexes) 1961 1962 1962 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 Office Supplies Index 100.0 99.7 101.8 102.0 104.3 107.0 109.0 110.1 111 .4 115.5 Input No. 3 Value Share .28 .27 .30 .30 .28 .30 .28 .27 • 36 Index Reciprocal .28 .27 .29 .29 .27 .28 .26 •25 * 32 Input No. 12 Value Share 3.29 3.60 3.71 3.93 3.99 4.13 4.59 4.99 4. 71 Index Reciprocal 3.29 3.61 3.64 3.85 3.83 3.86 4.21 4.53 4. 23 Admin. Category Value Share 5.73 5.93 6.76 6.70 6.38 5.80 5.49 5.19 7. 26 Category Reciprocal 5.73 5.95 6.64 6.57 6.12 5.42 5.04 4.71 6. 52 Inst. Category Value Share 7.4.10 75.16 74.95 76.46 73.89 72.33 73.56 72.21 70. 61 Category Reciprocal 74.10 75.39 73.62 74.96 70.84 67.60 67.49 65.59 63. 38 Source: Index supplied by Statistics Canada. For weight determination, see Tables XXIIIA and XXIIIB. TABLE XXVII Trustees Expense Price Index (Input No. 4 Weighted Index! 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 Trustees Expenses Low 102 189 214 286 217 237 293 380 466 504 871 High 734 716 1,083 1,225 1,898 1,750 2,784 3,173 4,000 4,200. 4,000 Mean 410 477 614 652 776 771 1,549 1,778 2,035 2,029 2,215 Index 1961=100 100.0 116.3 149.8 159.0 189.3 188.0 377.8 433.7 496.3 494.9 540.2 Input No. 4 Weight .24 .27 . -30 .31 .34 .29 . .33 .34 .43 - . -Weighted Index Input 4 .24 .23 .20 .19 .18 .09 .08 .09 - -Category Weighting 4.91 5.93 6.76 6.92 7.74 5.61 6.47 6.54 8.67 - -Category Index 4.91 5.10 4.51 4.35 4.09 2.96 •1.71 1.51 1.75 - -Source: Data compiled from questionnaire response. For weight determination see Tables XXIIIA & XXIIIB. TABLE XXVIII Non-Teaching Staff Pension Price Index (Input No. 5 Weighted Index) 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Weighted Indexes Admin. Salaries Input 1 .98 .97 .97 1.07 1.09 1.36 1.38 1.59 1.59 Clerical Salaries Input 2 .89 .89 .89 .99 .98 1.14 1.12 1.26 1.24 Clerical Salaries Input 11 1.15 1.23 1.38 1.42 1.76 2.07 2.39 2.98 3.27 Janitors Salaries Input 13 6.97 6.77 6.86 6.95 6.97 7.58 8.70 9.30 9.85 Maintenance Salaries Input 19 2.86 3.39 3.22 3.23 3.34 3.53 4.00 4.21 4.07 Total 12.85 13.25 13.32 13.66 14.14 15.68 17.59 19.34 20.02 Index 1961=100 100.0 103.1 103.7 106.3 110.0 122.0 136.9 150.5 155.8 Input No. 5 Value Share 1.47 1.30 1.28 1.25 1.25 1.62 1.67 1.69 1.54 Index Reciprocal 1.47 1.26 1.23 1.18 1.14 1.33 1.22 1.12 .99 Category Value Share 30.06 28.57 23.83 27.90 28.47 31.33 32.75 32.49 31.04 Category Reciprocal 30.06 27.71 27.80 26.25 25.88 25.68 23.92 21.59 19.92 Source: Tables XXIV, XXV, XXXV, and XLI. For Weight Determination see Tables XXIIIA & XXIIIB. TABLE XXIX Group Life Insurance Price Index (Input No. 6 Weighted Index) Weighted Indexes 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Non-Teaching Staff (1) 12.85 13.25 13.32 13.66 14.14 15. 68 17.59 19.34 20.02 Teaching Staff (2) 66.32 67.33 70.35 72.97 76.61 81. 22 88.36 94.58 101.83 Total 79.17 80.58 83.67 86.63 90.75 96. 90 105.95 113.92 121.85 Index 1961=100 100.0 101.8 105.7 109.4 114.6 122.4 133.8 143.9 153.9 Input No. 6 Value Share .53 .47 .45 .45 .44 • 58 .60 .61 .55 Index Reciprocal .53 .46 .43 .41 .38 • 47 .45 .42 . 36 Category Value Share 10.84 10.33 10.14 10.04 10.02 11. 22 11.76 11.73 11.09 Category Reciprocal 10.84 10.15 9.59 9.18 8.74 9. 17 8.79 8.15 7.21 (1) Source - Table XXVIII (2) Source - Table XXXIV For weight determination see Tables XXIIIA and XXIIIB. TABLE XXX Workmens Compensation Price Index (Input I'.o. 7 'Weighted Index) 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Salary Index Non-Teaching(1) 100.0 103.1 103.7 106.3 110.0 122.0 136.9 ]_b -' • —' 155.8 Rate (2) 15 10 10 10 ' 10 15 15 12 Rate x Salary 150.00 103.10 103.70 106.30 110.00 183.00 205.35 225. 75 186.96 Index 1961=100 100.00 68.7 69.1 70.9 73.3 122.0 136.9 15C i.5 124.6 Input No. 7 Value Share .21 .19 .18 .18 .18 .23 .24 * 24 .22 Index Reciprocal .21 .28 .26 .25 .25 .19 .18 * 16 .18 Category Value Share 4.29 4.18 4.05 4.02 4.10 4.45 4.71 4. 62 4.44 Category Reciprocal 4.29 6.08 5.86 5.67 5.59 3.65 3.44 3. 07 3.56 (1) Source - Table XXVIII (2) Source - Workmen's Compensation Board of British Columbia For weight determination, see Tables XXIIIA and XXIIIB. TABLE XXXI .British Columbia School Trustees Association Dues Price index .(Input No. 8 Weighted Index -1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 B.C.S.T.A. Total Dues 75,349 92,980 107,575 144,465 161,385 178,180 327,010 340,634 416,842 Index 1961=100 100.0 123.4 142.8 191.7 214.2 236.5 434.0 452.1 553.2 Input No. 8 Value Share .08 .07 .06 .06 .06 .08 .09 .09 .08 Index Reciprocal .08 .06 .04 .03 .03 .03 .02 .02 .01 Category Value Share 1.64 1.54 1.35 1.34 1.37 1.55 1.76 1.73 1.61 Category Reciprocal 1.64 1.25 .95 .70 .64 .66 .41 .38 .29 Source: B.C.S.T.A. correspondence. For weight determination see Tables XXIIIA and XXIIIB. TABLE XXXII Expense Accounts Price Index (Input No. 9 & 21 Weighted Indexes) Expense Accounts 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 Transportation (1) 100.0 99.9 99.9 101.0 104.8 107.3 111.8 114.7 120.0 124.8 Restaurant Meals 100.0 101.4 105.2 110.2 113.3 121.6 130.7 136.9 144.9 154.1 Mean Average (2) 100.0 100.7 102.6 105.6 109.1 114.5 121.3 125.8 132.5 139.5 Input No. 9 Value Share .21 .19 .18 .18 .18 .23 .24 .24 .22 Index Reciprocal .21 .19 • .18 .17 .16 .20 .20 .19 .17 Input No. 21 Value Share .40 .24 .29 .28 .28 .56 .44 .42 .47 Index Reciprocal .40 .24 .28 .27 .26 .49 .36 .33 .35 Admin Category Value Share 4.29 4.18 4.05 4.02 4.10 4.45 4.71 4.62 4.44 Admin Category Reciprocal 4.29 4.15 3.95 3.81 3.76 3.89 3.88 3.67 3.35 Plant Category Value Share 2.10 1.28 1.58 1.56 1.62 3.33 2.58 2.50 2.95 Plant Category Reciprocal 2.10 1.27 1.54 1.48 1.48 2.91 2.13 1.99 2.23 (1) Maintenance men's expense accounts used Transportation Index. (2) Administration expense accounts used composite of Transportation and Restaurant Meals. Source: Indexes supplied by Prices Division, Statistics Canada. For weight determination, see Tables XXIIIA and XXIIIB. TABLE XXXIII Teachers Salaries Index (Residual Approach) 1960/61 1961/62 1962/63 1963/64 1964/65 " 1965/66 1966/67 1967/63 1963/69 1969/70 Total School Staff 1 12,137 12,772 13,571 14,415 15,327 16,173 17,457 18,889 20,140 21,481 Special Staff 1 x 1,773 2,153 •2,270 2,450 2,696 2,825 2,661 3,080 3,512 3,874 Supervising Principals 335 363 364 407 441 506 528 579 524 683 District Supervisory! ^ 161 166 175 139 225 260 285 302 341 347 Total Special Staff Salaries 11, 299,329 14, 347,592 15, 104,580 17, 495,450- 20, 139,120 21, 416,325 21, 594,015 28, 597,800 34, 332,480 40, 564,654 Total Supervising Salaries 1 3, 393,247 3, 306,963 3, 331,593 4, 660,595 . 5, 371,801 637,412 7, 403,000 B, 612,500 5, 352,500 11. 556,000 Fiscal Years 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1963 Total School Staff 2 . 12,391 13,091 13,909 14,780 15,665 16,687 18,030 19,389 20,676 -Deduct Special Staff 2 1,925 2,200 2,342 2,548 2,748 2,759 2,829 3,253 3,657 -Deduct Supervising Principals 346 364 331 420 467 515 549 597 647 -Teachers 10,120 10,527 11,136 11,312 12,450 13,413 14,652 15,539 16,372 -District Supervisory Staff ^ 163 170 185 209 239 270 292 317 344 -Total Instructional Salaries 12, 505,000 77, 536,000 35, 572,000 94, 257,000 . 105, 759,000 121, 100,000 141, 482,000 162, 973,000 137, 037,000 -Deduct Special Staff2 12, 513,634 14, 650,337 16, 060,923 13, 552,918 20, 650,002 21, 487,401 24, 395,529 30, 911,672 36, 355,350 Deduct Supervising Principals 3, 553,733 3, 856,317 4, 223,197 4, 945,077 5, 878,046 6, 943,647 7, 886,800 9, 108,500 10, 533,900 -Deduct District Supervisors 395,443 1, 476,620 1. 690,160 1, 996,159 2, 434,932 3, 140,100 3, 655,548 4, 275,696 4, 356,912 -Teachers Salaries 55, 032,190 57, 552,175 53, 597,715 63, 762,846 76, 796,020 89, 528,852 105, 544,123 118, 677,132 134, 830,338 -Average Teacher's Salary 5,438 5,467 5,685 5,821 6,168 6,675 7,203 7,637 8,235 -Index 1961=100 100.0 100.5 104.5 107.0 113.4 122.7 132.5 140.4 151.4 -Average Special Staff 6,503 6,659 6,358 7,231 7,515 7,788 8,623 9,503 10,073 -Index 1961=100 100.0 102.4 105.5 112.0 115.6 119.8 132.6 146.1 155.0 -Average Supervising Principal 10,285 10,596 11,085 11,774 12,587 13,483 14,366 15,257 16,281 -Index 1961=100 100.0 103.0 107.3 114.5 122.4 131.1 139.7 148.3 158.3 -Average District Supervisor 3,561 8,686 9,135 3,551 10,188 11,630 12,519 13,438 14,148 -Index 1961=100 100.0 101.5 106.7 111.6 119.0 135.8 146.2 157.6 165.3 -Percent of Total Teachers 75.90 74.24 74.31 72.95 72.61 73.94 74.61 72.32 72.07 -Special Staff 17.27 18.89 13.77. 19.68 19.53 17.74 17.24 13.97 19.70 -Supervising Principals 4.91 4.97 4.34 5.25 5.56 5.73 5.57 5.59 5.63 -District Supervisors 1.92 1.90 1.98 2.12 2.30 2.59 2.58 2.62 2.60 -Weighted Indexes Teachers 75.90 74.61 77.65 78.06 82.34 90.72 98.86 102.24 109.11 -Special Staff 17.27 19.34 19.30 22.04 22.58 21.25 22.36 27.72 30.54 -Supervising Principals 4.91 5.12 5.33 6.01 6.81 7.51 7.78 3.29 8.91 -District Supervisors 1.92 1.93 2.11 ' 2.37 2.74 3.52 3.77 4.13 4.30 -Total Index 1C0.0 101.0 104.9 ICS.5 114.5 123.0 133.3 142.4 152.9 -'Data based on B.C. Department of Education Annual Reports. 'Derived by adding .6 of current year to .4 of future year. Based on Statistics Canada Data, Appendix "B" p. 2. TABLE XXXIV Teachers' Salaries Index (Paasche) (Input No. 10 Weighted Index) 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1963 1969 Teachers' Salaries Index 1961=100 100.0 101.0 104.9 108.5 114.5 123.0 133.3 142.4 152.9 Input No. 10 Value Share 66.32 66.66 67.06 67.25 66.91 66.03 66.29 66.42 66.60 Index Reciprocal 66.32 66.00 63.93 61.98 58.44 53.68 49.73 46.64 43.56 Source: Index Data from Table XXXIII see Weight Determination see Tables XXIIIA and XXIIIB. TABLE XXXV •Janitors' Salaries Price Index (Input No. 13 Weighted Index) 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 Janitors' Salaries Low 3,396 3,396 3,600 3,720 3,900 4,140 4,740 5,220 5,580 6,000 6,360 High 4,677 4,760 4,956 5,340 5,491 6,048 6,559 6,776 7,360 7,884 8,534 Mean 3,992 4,091 4,213 4,387 4,583 4,937 5,416 5,801 6,281 6,790 7,413 Index 1961=100 100.0 102.5 105.5 109.9 114.8 123.7 135.7 145.3 157.3 170.1 185.7 Input No. 13 Value Share 6.97 6.60 6.50 6.32 6.07 6.13 6.41 6.40 6.26 Index Reciprocal 6.97 6.44 6.16 5.75 5.29 4.96 4.72 4.40 3.98 Category Value Share 36.60 35.10 35.41 35.23 35.04 36.42 37.65 38.05 39.30 Category Reciprocal 36.60 34.24 33.56 32.06 30.52 29.44 27.75 26.19 24.98 Source: Data compiled from questionnaire responses for Weight Determination see Tables XXIIIA and XXIIIB. TABLE XXXVT Maintenance Supplies Price Index (Input No. 14 Weighted Index) 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 Maintenance Supplies Index 1961=100 100.0 100.6 103.0 106.5 112.0 115.2 117.6 120.5 126 .1 129.5 Input No. 14 Value Share 2.46 2.72 2.54 2.49 2.45 2.40 2.41 2.37 2. 23 Index Reciprocal 2.46 2.70 2.47 2.34 2.19 2.08 2.05 1.97 1. 77 Category Value Share 12.91 14.47 13.84 13.88 14.15 14.26 14.15 14.09 14. 00 Category Reciprocal 12.91 14.38 13.44 13.03 12.63 12.38 12.03 11.69 11. 10 Source: Statistics Canada Index for Weight Determination see Tables XXIIIA and XXIIIB. TABLE XXXVII Power Price Index (Input No. 15 Weighted Index) 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 El e c t r i c i t y B.C. Hydro Index 100.0 100.0 85.9 79.0 74.3 72.0 64.6 61.0 61.0 Input No. 15 Value Share 2.46 2.39 2.22 2.13 2.01 1.78 1.75 1.70 1.56 Index Reciprocal 2.46 2.39 2.58 2.70 2.71 2.47 2.71 2.79 2.56 Category Value Share 12.91 12.71 12.10 11.87 11.61 10.58 10.28 10.11 9.79 Category Reciprocal 12.91 12.71 14.09 15.03 15.63 14.69 15.91 16.57 16.05 64.9 Source: B.C. Elec t r i c i t y Index For weight determination see Tables XXIIIA and XXIIIB. TABLE XXXVTII Fuel Price Index (Input No. 16 Weighted Index) 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 Fuel O i l Index 1961 = 100 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 104.5 111.4 111.4 115.9 122.2 Input No. 16 Value Share 1.29 1.25 1.17 1.12 1.05 .94 .92 .89 .82 Index Reciprocal 1.29 1.25 1.17 1.12 1.05 .94 .88 .80 .74 Category Value Share 6.77 6.65 6.38 6.24 6.06 5.59 5.40 5.29 5.15 Category Reciprocal 6.77 6.65 6.38 6.24 6.06 5.59 5.17 4.75 4.62 Source: Retail Prices Division, Statistics Canada. For weight determination see Tables XXIIIA and XXIIIB. TABLE XXXIX Electrical Fixtures Price Index (Input No. 17 Weighted Index) 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 Index 1961 = 100 100.0 99.0 99.2 98.7 97.1 97.2 104.3 109.5 112.3 121.9 Input No. 17 Value Share .16 .16 .15 .14 .13 .12 .12 .11 .10 Index Reciprocal .16 .16 .15 .14 .13 .12 .13 .10 .09 Category Value Share .84 .85 .82 .78 .75 .71 .70 .65 . .63 Category Reciprocal .84 .86 .83 .79 .77 .73 .67 .59 .56 Source: Retail Prices Division and Deflation Section, Statistics Canada. For weight determination see Tables XXIIIA and XXIIIB. TABLE XL Insurance Price Index (Input No. 13 Weighted Index) 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 • 1968 1969 1370 1971 Replacement Value (in 1,0001s) 222 237 252 267 232 297 313 329 345 361 378 Rate 25.8 25.8 25.8 25.3 25.8 25.8 43.0 43.0 57.0 £2.5 66.5 Premiums 57.28 61.15 65*02 68.89 72.76 76.63 134.59 141.47 196.65 225.54 251.37 Index 1961 = 100 100.0 106.8 113.5 120.3 127.0 133.8 235.0 247.0 343.3 332.9 433.8 Input No. 18 Value Share 1.03 .94 .89 .95 1.02 .95 .79 .89 .90 Index Reciprocal 1.03 .88 .78 .79 .80 .71 .34 .36 .26 Category Value Share 5.41 5.00 4.85 5.30 5.89 5.64 4.64 5.29 5.65 Category Reciprocal 5.41 4.68 4.27 4.41 4.64 4.22 1.97 2.1.4 1.65 Source: Insured Replacement value of School and Rate Applicable to Lower Mainland. For Weight Determination see Tables XXIIIA and XXIIIB. TABLE XLI Maintenance Salaries Price Index (Input No. 19 Weighted Index) 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 Low 3,780 3,780 3,900 4,020 4,200 4,452 51,00 5,616 6,000 6,456 6,840 High 5,255 5,283 5,400 5,562 5,943 6,201 6,870 7,483 8,050 8,659 9,626 Mean . 4,619 4,726 4,887 5,080 5,355 5,769 6,305 6,868 7,423 8,028 8,878 Index 1961 = 100 100.0 102.3 105.8 110.0 115.9 124.9 136.5 148.7 160.7 173.8 192.2 Input No. 19 Value Share 2.86 3.31 3.04 2.94 2.88 2.83 2.93 2.83 2.53 Index Reciprocal 2.86 3.24 2.87 2.67 2.48 2.27 2.15 1.90 1.57 Category Value Share 15.01 17.61 16.57 16.39 16.62 16.82 17.20 16.83 15.88 Category Reciprocal 15.01 17.21 15.66 14.90 14.34 13.47 12.60 11.32 9.88 Source: Data Compiled from Questionnaire Responses For Weight Determination see Tables XXIII A & XXIII B TABLE XXII Equipment Repair Price Index (Input No. 20 Weighted Index) 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 Equipment Repair Index 1961 = 100 100.0 102.9 107.9 109.0 112.3 121.2 131.3 149 .2 160.3 176.9 Input No. 20 Value Share 1.42 1.19 1.55 1.57 1.43 1.12 1.26 1. 21 1.06 -Index Reciprocal 1.42 1.16 1.44 1.44 1.27 .92 .96 • 81 .66 Category Value Share 7.45 6.33 8.45 8.75 8.26 6.65 7.40 7. 19 6.65 -Category Reciprocal 7.45 6.15 7.83 8.03 7.36 5.49 5.64 4. 82 4.15 -Source: Statistics Canada Index for Weight Determination see Tables XXIIIA and XXIIIB. TABLE XLIII Price Index Transportation 60/61 61/62 62/63 63/64 64/65 65/66 66/67 67/68 68/69 69/70 Transportation Assistance $ 229,382 272,902 306,346 302,159 350,813 366,144 398,192 400,879 355,382 404,550 Number of Pupils 1,490 1,763 1,998 2,000 2,072 2,009 2,197 2,513 2,222 2.352 Fiscal Year Adjustment Transportation Assistance 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 .6 of Current $ 137,629 163,741 183,808 181,295 210,488 219,686 238,915 240,527 213,229 .4 of Future t 109,161 122,538 120,863 140,325 _-. 146,457 159,277 160,351 142,153 161,824 Total Assistance t 246,790 286,279 304,671 321,620 356,945 378,963 399,266 382,680 375,053 Transportation Assistance Pupils Adjusted 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1963 1959 1970 .6 Current t 894 1,058 1,199 1,200 1,243 1,205 1,318 1,508 1,333 .4 Future t 705 799 800 828 804 879 1,005 888 941 Total i 1,599 1,857 1,999 2,028 2,047 2,084 2,323 2,396 2,274 Cost Per Pupil Assistance Adjustment $ 154.34 154.16 152.41 158.59 174.37 181.84 171.88 159.72 164.93 Assistance Index t 100.00 99.88 98.75 102.75 112.98 117.82 111.36 103.49 106.36 Total Transportation Cost ,611,370 2,721,510 2,886,696 3,125,447 3,475,395 4,009,393 4,610,089 5,355,378 5,891,894 Cost of Transportation Assistance i 246,790 286,279 304,671 321,620 356,945 378,963 399,266 382,680 375,053 Cost of Bus Operations ,364,580 2,435,231 2,582,025 2,803,827 3,118,950 3,630,430 4,210,823 4,972,698 5,516,841 Pupils Transported 60/61 61/62 62/63 63/64 64/65 65/66 66/67 67/68 68/69 59/70 Total Pupils Carried Daily 45,250 46,791 47,032 50,648 57,364 59,266 60,824 65,456 65,985 79,096 Fiscal Year Adjustment 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1570 -6 of Current t 27,150 28,074 28,219 30,389 34,418 35,559 36,494 39,274 39,591 .4 of Future t 18,716 18,313 20,259 22,945 23,706 24,330 26,182 26,394 31,633 Total Pupils Carried Daily 45,866 46,887 48,478 53,334 58,124 59,889 62,676 65,668 71,229 Cost Per Pupil Carried S 51.55 S1.94 53.26 52.27 53.66 60.62 67.18 75.72 77.45 Cost Per Pupil Index $ 100.00 100.76 103.32 101.40 104.09 117.59 130.32 146.89 150.24 Source: Pupil and total cost data derived from correspondence with B.C. Department of Education Appendix "B" as corrected by annual reports of B.C. Department of Educaticr. for years 1960/61 and 1961/62. TABLE XLIV Transportation Price Index (Input No. 22 Weighted Index) 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1963 1969 Index 1961 = 100 100.0 100.8 103.3 101,4 104.1 117.6 130.3 146.9 150.2 Input No. 22 Value Share 2.39 2.34 2.25 2.23 2.20 2.19 2.16 2.18 2.10 Index Reciprocal 2.39 2.32 2.19 2.20 2.11 1.86 1.66 1.48 1.40 Index determined by cost per pupil transported Table XLIII. For Weight Determination see Table XXIII. TABLE XLV Auxiliary Services Price Index (Input No. 23 Weighted Index) 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Cost Per Pupil Index1 100.0 98.8 105.8 111.0 151.5 179.0 154.5 131.3 217.6 Input No. 23 Value Share 2.91 2.86 2.94 2.96 3.78 4.07 3.18 2.47 3.74 Index Reciprocal 2.91 2.89 2.78 2.67 2.50 2.27 2.06 1.88 1.72 'Determined by per pupil costs of Auxiliary Services for Weight Determination see Table XXIII. TABLE XL'/I Teachers' Salaries Laspeyre Formula Teachers' Salaries Projected from 1961 Base on Equal Place on 1962-1971 Salary Grids 1961 1961 1962 1961 Salary Point Salary Point Equivalent 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 : 1970 1971 Teachers Sr. High 6,923 5 max. 7,449 7,553 7,870 3,258 8,717 9,271 9,989 10,630 11.3C5 12,100 13,006 Jr.-Sr. High 6,371 4 max. 6,614 6,692 6,948 7,233 7,635 8,143 8,737 9,272 9,360 10,573 11,374 Jr. High 5,854 3 max. 5,938 5,989 6,126 6,377 6,691 7,095 7,638 8,068 3,563 9,189 9,879 Elementary Sr. High 5,111 2 max. 5,394 5,437 5,517 5", 775 6,018 6.376 6,852 7,242 7,631 3,253 3,882 Elementary Jr. High 4,983 2 max. 5,394 5,437 5,517 5; 775 6,018 6,376 6,852 7,242 7,631 3,255 3,882 Elementary 4,764 2 max. 5,394 5,437 5,517 5,775 6,018 6,376 6,852 7,242 7,631 3.258 3,8e2 Principals 1 Sr. High 11,074 11,412 12,159 12,496 13,564 13,905 15,676 16,750 18,000 19,306 Jr.-Sr. High 10,740 11,099 11,308 12,187 13,169 14,005 14,922 16,388 17,561 13,743 Jr. High 10,610 10,848 10,996 11,372 12,581 13,328 14,819 15,933 17,208 18,253 Elementary Sr. High 8,670 9,607 11,131 11,728 12,418 12,888 14,717 15,625 16,313 18.063 Elementary Jr. High 9,827 10,355 11,260 11,551 11,959 12,707 12,964 13,679 15,197 15,800 Elementary 9,696 9,999 10,232 11,014 11,582 12,232 13,172 14,268 14,951 16,091 Special Instructors Sr. High 6,885 4 max. 6,614 6,692 6,948 7,233 7.63S 8,143 8,737 9,272 9,860 10,578 Jr.-Sr. High 6,576 4 max. 6,614 6,692 6,948 7,233 7,635 8,143 8,737 9,272 9,360 1C.57S Jr. High 5,959 3 max. 5,938 5,989 6,126 6,377 6,691 7,095 7,638 8,068 3,562 5-, 139 Elementary Sr. High 5,266 6 min. 5,191 5,213 S.384 S.S69 5,844 6,189 6,705 7,131 7,532 5,152 Elementary Jr. High 6,173 3 max. 5,938 5,989 6,126 6,377 6,691 7,095 7,638 8,068 3,563 5.139 Elementary 4,906 5 min. 4,770 4,790 4,954 S.134 5,388 5,710 6,190 6,599 7,019 7,563 Unclassified 7,005 S max. 7,449 7,553 7,870 8,258 8,717 9,271 9,989 10,630 11,305 12.100 Principals salaries projected on mean average according to school as published in B.C. annual reports. Source: 1960/61 through 1969/70 annual reports of B.C. Department of Education and average salaries as supplied by B.C.S.T.A. for teachers. TABLE XLVTI Teachers' Salaries Laspeyre Formula Index of Teacher and Principal Salary Categories Based on Table XLVT 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1570 1971 Teachers Sr. High 100.0 101.4 105.7 110.9 117.0 124.5 134.1 142.7 . 151.8 162.4 174.6 Jr.-Sr. High 100.0 101.2 105.0 109.4 115.4 123.1 132.1 140.2 149.1 159.9 172.0 Jr. High 100.0 100.9 103.2 107.4 112.7 119.5 128.6 135.9 144.2 154.7 166.4 Elementary 100.0 100.8 102.3 107.1 111.6 118.2 127.0 134.3 142.4 153.1 164.7 1970 Principals Sample Sr. High 100.0 103.1 109.8 112.8 122.5 125.6 141.6 151.3 162.5 174.3 (173.2) Jr.-Sr. High 100.0 103.3 105.3 113.5 122.6 130.4 138.9 152.6 163.5 174.5 (173.2) Jr. High 100.0 102.2 103.6 107.2 118.6 125.6 139.7 150.2 162.2 172.1 (173.2) Elementary Sr. High 100.0 110.8 128.4 135.3 143.2 148.7 169.7 180.2 188.2 20S. 3 (173.2) Elementary Jr. High 100.0 105.4 114.6 117.5 121.7 . 129.3 131.9 139.2 154.6 160.8 (173.2) Elementary 100.0 103.1 105.5 113.6 119.5 126.2 135.8 147.2 154.2 166.0 (165.4) Special Instructors Sr. High 100.0 101.2 105.0 109.4 115.4 123.1 132.1 140.2 149.1 155.9 172.0 Jr^-Sr. High 100.0 101.2 105.0 109.4 115.4 123.1 132.1 140.2 149.1 153.9 172.0 Jr. High 100.0 100.9 103.2 107.4 112.7 119.5 128.6 135.9 144.2 .54.7 166.4 Elementary Sr. High 100.0 100,4 103.7 107.3 112.6 125.0 129.2 137.4 146.1 157.0 169.2 Elementary Jr. High 100.0 100.9 103.2 107.4 112.7 119.5 128.6 135.9 144.2 155.9 172.0 Elementary 100.0 100.4 103.9 107.6 113.0 119.7 129.8 • 138.3 147.1 158.5 170.8 Unclassified 100.0 101.4 105.7 110.9 117.0 124.5 134.1 142.7 151.8 152.4 174.6 One school d i s t r i c t priced on 1961 and 1970 salary grids and administrative allowances assuming principal at P.A. max with maximum experience in difference school levels produced this index for comparative purposes. TABLE XLVIII Price Relatives of Teachers' Salary Sub-Index Laspeyre Principle 1961 Employment 1961 Average Salary Total Salary % of Total Teachers' Sr. High Jr.-Sr. High Jr. High Elementary Sr. High Elementary Jr. High Elementary Sub-Total Supervising Principals Sr. High Jr.-Sr. High Jr. High Elementary-Sr. High Elementary-Jr. High Elementary Sub-Total Total Special Instructors Sr. High Jr.-Sr. High Jr. High Elementary-Sr. High Elementary-Jr. High Elementary Unclassified Sub-Total Total 1,187 2,162 1,633 472 217 6,079 39 65 55 27 7 142 268 469 319 29 18 132 203 1,438 6,923 6,371 5,854 5,111 4,983 4,764 11,074 10,740 10,610 8,670 9,827 9,696 6,885 6,576 5,959 5,266 6,173 4,906 7,005 8,217,601 13,774,102 9,559,582 2,412,392 1,081,311 28,960,356 431,886 698,100 583,550 234,090 68,789 1,376,832 3,393,247 67,398,591 1,845,180 3,084,144 1,900,921 152,714 111,114 647,592 1,422,015 9,153,630 10.73 17.99 12.49 3.15 1.41 37.82 64,005,344 83.60 .56 .91 .76 .31 .09 1.80 4.43 88.03 71 2.41 4.03 2.48 .20 .14 .85 1.86 11.97 100.00 Source: A l l data derived frorr. 1960-61 annual report of B.C. Dec cf Educaticr.. TABLE XLTJC Teachers' Salary Sub-Index Laspeyre Formula 19611 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 Teachers Sr. High 10.73 10.88 11.34 11.90 12.55 13.36 14.39 15.31 16.29 17.43 13.73 Jr.-Sr. High 17.99 18.21 18.89 19.68 20.76 22.15 23.76 25.22 26.82 28.77 30.94 Jr. High 12.49 12.60 12.89 13.41 14.08 14.93 16.06 16.97 18.01 19.32 20.73 Elementary Sr. High 3.15 3.18 3.22 3.37 3. 52 3.72 4.00 4.23 4.49 4.32 5.19 Elementary Jr. High 1.41 1.42 1.44 1.51 1.57 1.67 1.79 1.89 2.01 2.16 2.32 Elementary 37.82 38.12 38.69 40.51 42.21 44.70 48.03 50.79 53. 86 57.90 62.29 Sub-Total 83.60 84.41 86.47 90.38 94.69 100.53 108.03 114.41 121.48 130.40 I97C2 Supervising Principals Sanple Sr. High .56 .58 .61 .63 .69 .70 .79 .85 .91 .93 { .97! Jr.-Sr. High .91 .94 .96 1.03 1.12 1.19 1.26 1.39 1.49 1.59 (1.58: Jr. High .76 .78 .79 .81 .90 .95 1.06 1.14 1.23 1.31 (1.32: Elementary Sr. High .31 .34 .40 .42 .44. .46 .53 .56 .58 .65 ( .54: Elementary Jr. High .09 .09 .10 .11 .11 .12 .12 .13 .14 .14 ( .16: Elementary 1.80 1.86 1.90 2.04 2.15 2.27 2.44 2.65 2.78 2.99 (2.93: Sub-Total 4.43 4.59 4.76 5.04 5.41 5.69 6.20 6.72 7.13 7.66 (7.55: Special Instructors Sr. High 2.41 2.44 2.53 2.64 2.78 2.97 3.18 3. 38 3.59 3.35 4.15 Jr.-Sr. High 4.03 4.08 4.23 4.41 4.65 4.96 5. 32 5.65 6.01 6.44 5.93 Jr. High 2.48 2.50 2.56 2.66 2.79 2.96 3.19 3.37 3. 58 3.84 4.13 Elementary Sr. High .20 .20 .21 .21 .23 .25 .26 .27 .29 .31 .34 Elementary Jr. High .14 .14 .14 .15 .16 .17 .18 .19 .20 .22 .24 Elementary .85 .85 .88 .91 .96 •1.02 1.10 1.18 1.25 1.35 1.45 Unclassified 1.86 1.89 1.97 2.06 2.13 2.32 2.50 2.65 2.82 3.02 3.25 Sub-Total 11.87 12.10 12.52 13.04 13.75 14.65 15.73 16.69 17.74 19.03 Total 100.00 101.10 103.75 108.46 113.85 120.87 129.96 137.82 146. 35 157.09 Teachers' Salary Sub-Index 100.0 101.1 103.8 108.5 113.9 120.9 130.0 137.8 146.4 157.1 Laspeyre Formula "Weighting as determined by Table XLVTII. > Sample of one school d i s t r i c t priced on salary grids of 1961 and 1970 with administrative allowances at different school levels assuming Principal at Pa- max. TABLE L Summary of Input Price Indexes Index 1961=100 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 Administration Salaries 100.0 104.3 109.3 117.8 125.0 140.2 157.2 175.0 194. 5 211. 2 233. 5 Clerical Salaries 100.0 103.6 111.4 117.7 124.6 131.3 145.0 155.4 167. 0 ISO. 8 196. 8 Janitors' Salaries 100.0 102.5 105.5 109.9 114.8 123.7 135.7 145.3 157. 3 170. 1 185. 7 Maintenance Salaries ^ 100.0 102.3 105.8 110.0 115.9 124.9 136.5 148.7 160. 7 173. 8 192. 2 Teachers' Salaries (Laspeyre) 100.0 101.1 103.8 108.5 113.9 120.9 130.0 137.8 146. 4 157. 1 -Teachers' Salaries (Paasche) 100.0 101.0 104.9 108.5 114.5 123.0 133.3 142.4 152. 9 - -District Supervisors 1 ^ 100.0 101.5 106.7 111.6 119.0 135.8 146.2 157.6 165. 3 - -Supervising Principals 100.0 103.0 107.8 114.5 122.4 131.1 139.7 148.3 158. 3 - -Special Staffs- 100.0 102.4 105.5 112.0 115.6 119.8 132.6 146.1 155. 0 - -Teachers Only 100.0 100.5 104.5 107.0 113.4 122.7 132.5 140.4 151. 4 - -Office Supplies 100.0 99.7 101.8 102.0 104.3 107.0 109.0 110.1 111. 4 115. 5 -Trustees Expenses 100.0 116.3 149.8 159.0 189.3 188.0 377.8 433.7 496. 3 494. 9 540. 2 Non-Teaching Staff Pensions 100.0 103.1 103.7 106.3 110.0 122.0 136.9 150.5 155. 8 - -Group Li f e Insurance 100.0 101.8 105.7 109.4 114.6 122.4 133.8 143.9 153. 9 - -Workmens' Compensation 100.0 68.7 69.1 70.9 73.3 122.0 136.9 150.5 124. 6 - -B.C.S.T.A. Dues 100.0 123.4 142.8 191.7 214.2 236.5 434.0 452.1 553. 2 - -Admin. Expense Accounts 100.0 100.7 102.6 105.6 109.1 114.5 121.3 125.8 132. 5 139. 5 -Car Expenses 100.0 99.9 99.9 101.0 104.8 107.3 111.8 114.7 120. 0 124. 8 -Maintenance Supplies 100.0 100.6 103.0 106.5 112.0 115.2 117.6 120.5 126. 1 129. S -Power 100.0 100.0 85.9 79.0 74.3 72.0 64.6 61.0 61. 0 64. 9 -Fuel 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 104.5 111.4 111. 4 115. 9 122. 2 Fixtures 100.0 99.0 99.2 98.7 97.1 97.2 104.3 109.5 112. 3 121. 9 -Insurance 100.0 106.8 113.5 120.3 127.0 133.8 235.0 247.0 343. 3 393. 9 438. 8 Equipment Repair 100.0 102.9 107.9 109.0 112.3 121.2 131.3 149.2 160. 3 176. 9 -Pupil Transportation 100.0 100.8 103.3 101.4 104.1 • 117.6 130.3 146.9 150. 2 - -Auxiliary Services 100.0 98.8 105.8 111.0 151.5 179.0 154.5 131.3 217. 6 - -These indexes presented here for comparison purposes only. - 89 -CHAPTER V PUBLIC SCHOOL PRICE INDEXES The f i r s t step in the development of price indexes was the determination of the value share of the various inputs of the public school system. The second step, reported in Chapter IV, called for determining the changes in the price of these inputs and using these input price indexes to produce reciprocals which would form the basis of index construction. In this chapter these reciprocals are summed to produce a total price index and price indexes for the different categories of inputs. Table LI summarizes the value share reciprocals contained in the preceding chapter in Tables XXIV through XLV inclusive, and shows the construction details for the overall price index for public school operational expenditures in British Columbia. Separate price indexes have been constructed for the three categories that contain sub-categories, "Administration", "Other Instruction", and "Plant Operation and Maintenance". The construction of these price indexes i s reported in Tables LII through LIV. A synthesis of the above three category price indexes, together with the indexes for the three single input categories, "Teachers' Salaries", "Transportation", and "Auxiliary Services", i s presented in Table LV. - 90 -Price indexes reported in this chapter were developed to serve two purposes. F i r s t , these price indexes can be used to deflate costs to identify the degree to which changes in price and changes in quantities contributed to changes in the cost of public school education. Secondly, a comparison of these price indexes with other relevant price indexes w i l l determine whether the rate of increase in the price of public school education was greater or less than the rates of increase in the prices of other services. Price and quantity changes in education are relative to the number of pupils in the system. Identification of unit costs i s , therefore, a necessary pre-requisite to the identification of price and quantity variables. In the following chapter the number of common units of output i s determined by weighting student data according to differential cost data. Per-unit costs are set forth in the sub-sequent chapter and these costs are deflated using the price indexes developed and reported in this present chapter. In the fin a l chapter the price indexes reported in this chapter w i l l be compared to other indexes to determine whether the rate of increase in the price of public school education in British Columbia was more or less than that of other labour intensive industries. Public School Price Index Cor.siruc'ec Input Table No. 1962 1963 1964 1965 196'.- 1967 1963 1969 Reference Administration 1 Admin. Salaries 2 Clerical Salaries 3 Office Expense 4 Trustees Expense 5 Non-Teaching Staff Pensions 6 Group Li f e Insurance 7 Workmens' Compensation 8 B.C.S.T.A. Dues 9 Expense Accounts Instruction 10 Instructional Salaries Other Instruction 11 C l e r i c a l Salaries 12 Teaching Supplies & Other Plant Operation & Maintenance 13 Janitors' Salaries 14 Maintenance Supplies 15 Power 16 Fuel 17 Fixtures 18 Insurance 19 Maintenance Salaries 20 Equipment Repair 21 Expense Accounts 22 Transportation 23 Auxiliary Services Reciprocal Total Index 1961= 100 .89 .81 .77 .83 .72 .71 .27 .29 .29 .23 .20 .19 1.26 1.23 1.13 .46 .43 .41 .28 .26 .25 .06 .04 .03 .19 .18 .17 66.00 63.93 61.98 1.15 1.11 1.03 3.61 3.64 3.35 6.44 6.16 5.75 2.70 2.47 2.34 2.39 2.58 2.70 1.25 1.17 1.12 .16 .15 .14 .88 .78 .79 3.24 2.87 2.67 1.16 1.44 1.44 .24 .28 .27 2.32 2.19 2.20 2.89 2.78 2.67 98.90 95.71 92.95 101.1 104.5 107.6 . 70 .69 . 56 .62 .66 .53 .27 .2s .26 .18 .15 .09 1.14 1.33 1.22 . 3 e .47 .45 .25 .19 .18 .03 .03 .02 .16 .20 .20 53.44 53.63 49.73 1.13 1.20 1.14 3.63 3.36 4.21 5.29 4.96 4.72 2.19 2.03 2.05 2.71 2.47 2.71 1.05 .94 .88 .13 .12 .13 .30 • .71 .34 2.43 2.27 2.15 1.27 .92 .96 .26 .49 .36 2.11 1.36- J.66 2.50 2.27 2.06 87.93 31.33 76.61 113.3 122.2 130.S .52 .42 XXIV .52 .44 XXV .25 .32 XXVI .08 .09 XXVII 1.12 .99 XXVIII .42 .36 XXIX .16 .18 XXX .02 .01 XXXI .19 .17 XXXII 46.64 43.56 XXXIV 1.24 1.17 XXV 4.53 4.23 XXVI 4.40 3.98 XXXV 1.97 1.77 XXXVI 2.79 2.56 XXXVII .80 .74 XXXVIII .10 .09 ' XXXIX .36 .26 XL 1.90 1.57 XLI .81 .66 XLII .33 .35 XXXII 1.48 1.40 XLIV 1.83 1.72 XLV 72.51 67.04 137.9 149.2 TABLE LII Administration Category Price Index 1962 1963 I'-964 1965 1966 1967 1963 1969 Administration Salaries 19.60 18.33 l l .24 15 .86 13.38 10.97 10 .00 8.50 Clerica l Salaries 18.24 16.18 15 .92 14 .45 12.82 10.41 10 .03 8.93 Office Supplies 5.95 .: 6.64 6 .57 6 .12 5.42 5.04 4 .71 6.52 Trustees Expense 5.10 4.51 4 .35 4. .09 - 2.98 1.71 1 .51 1.75 Non Teaching Staff Pensions 27.71 •- 27.80 26 .25 25 .88 25.68 23.92 21 .59 19.92 Group L i f e Insurance 10.15 9.59 9 .13 8 .74 9.17 8.79 8 .15 7.21 Workmens Compensation 6.08 5.86 5 .67 '5 .59 3.65 3.44 3 .07 3.56 B.C.S.T.A. Dues 1.25 .95 .70 .64 .66 .41 .38 .29 Expense Accounts 4.15 3.95 3 .81 3 .76- 3.89 3.88 3 .67 3.35 Total Reciprocals 98.23 93.81 89 .70 85 .13- 77.65 68.57 63 .11 60.03 Price Index ; 101.8 106.6 111.5 117.5 128.8 145.8 15 3.5 166.6 TABLE L I U Other Instruction 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1953 1969 Clerica l Salaries 23.98 22.49 20.00 20.96 21.07 18.23 17.88 17.60 Teaching Supplies & Other 75.39 73.62 74.96 70.84 67.60 67.49 65.59 63.38 Total Reciprocals 99.37 96.11 94.96 91.80 88.67 85.72 83.47 80.98 Price Index 100.6 104.1 105.3 108.9 112.8 116.7 119.8 123.5 TABLE LIV Plant Operation and Maintenance Category Price Index 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Janitors Salaries 34.24 33.56 32.06 30.52 29.44 27.75 26.19 24.98 Maintenance Supplies 14.38 13.44 13.03 12.63 12.38 12.03 11.69 11.10 Power 12.71 14.09 15.03 15.63 14.69 15.91 16.57 16.05 Fuel 6.65 6.38 6.24 6.06 5.59 5.17 4.75 4.62 Fixtures .86 .83 .79 .77 .73 .67 .59 .56 Insurance 4.68 4.27 4.41 4.64 4.22 1.97 2.14 1.65 Maintenance Salaries 17.21 15.66 14.90 14.34 13.47 12.60 11.32 9.88 Equipment Repair 6.15 7.83 8.03 7.36 5.49 5.64 4.82 4.15 Expense Accounts 1.27 1.54 1.48 1.48 2.91 2.13 1.99 2.23 Total 98.15 97.60 95.97 93.43 88.92 83.97 80.06 75.22 Price Index 101.9 102.5 104.2 107.0 112.5 119.1 124.9 132.9 TABLE LV Summary of Category and Total Price Indexes 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Administration 100.0 101.8 106.6 111.5 117.5 128.8 145.8 158.5 " 166.6 Teachers' Salaries (Paasche) 100.0 101.0 104.9 108.5 114.5 123.0 133.3 142.4 152.9 Other Instruction 100.0 100.6 104.1 105.3 108.9 112.8 116.7 119. S 123.5 Plant Operation & Maintenance 100.0 101.9 102.5 104.2 107.0 112.5 119.1 124.9 132.9 Transportation 100.0 100.8 103.3 101.4 104.1 117.6 130.3 146.9 150.2 Auxiliary Services 100.0 98.8 105.8 111.0 151.5 179.0 154.5 131.3 217.6 Total School Board 100.0 101.1 104.5 107.6 113.8 122.2 130.5 137.9 149.2 Source: Tables XLVIII - LI and XXXIV, XLIV and XLV. - 96 -CHAPTER VI PUPIL WEIGHTING Changes in the cost of public school education are determined by changes in the number of pupils in the system, changes in the quantity of goods and services purchased for their education, and changes in the price of those goods and services. To this point this study has focused on changes in the price of goods and services purchased by the public school system. Changes in the quantities of goods and services purchased w i l l be determined by using these price indexes to deflate costs. Thus the fi n a l stage of this project takes into account the changes in the number of pupils in the system. Existing per-pupil cost data in British Columbia tend to be inaccurate. F i r s t , they are determined by dividing student data, reported by school year, into f i s c a l year cost data. Further, they do not take into account the differences in the costs of students at each of the various grade levels. Differentials have been established in a variety of ways in previous studies 1. In some only the differentials in the average salaries of teachers at the elementary and secondary levels, were considered and most assumed that cost differentials remained constant over time. Data generated by this present study suggest a need for a new approach to the problem. "'"For a discussion and review of other studies see P.J. Atherton, op.  c i t . , pp. 164-166. - 97 -METHOD Many students in B.C. public schools are educated in combined grade schools. In addition to the elementary, junior secondary, and senior secondary schools, there are those schools which combine elementary with a l l secondary, elementary with junior secondary, as well as junior with senior secondary. This study developed differential cost data for each of the three school types, elementary, junior secondary, and senior secondary. It was assumed that the differentials for students in these schools were the same as for those students in combined schools. A f i r s t step in the determination of differential costs involved an examination of the six categories of expenditures to dis-cover the extent to which costs differed according to grade level. After an examination of such services as "Administration", "Transportation", and "Auxiliary Services" i t was concluded that differences in these expenditures according to grade level would be minimal. A changing ratio of high school students, to elementary school students for example, would not likely have any effect upon per-pupil costs of administration salaries, trustees' expenses, or other fixed inputs in the administration category. The transportation price index was based on the cost per-pupil transported and data on elementary and senior secondary students transported were not available. The "Auxiliary Services" price index was based on cost per-pupil. It -98 -would seem that any impact of differentials in this category would be minimal. Cost differentials were determined for the remaining three categories, "Teachers' Salaries", "Clerical and Supplies", and "Plant Operation". The method used in the determination of these differentials i s presented later in this chapter. A second step in differential determination involved the use of the value shares of expenditures developed in Chapter III. Since the objective was to determine the difference in cost between elementary and other pupils, the elementary pupil costs were considered to be weighted in exactly the same proportions as those determined in Chapter III. The value shares of "Administration", "Transportation", and "Auxiliary Services" were assigned equally to pupils at a l l levels. It has been assumed that these categories would be minimally affected by grade level. The value shares of other categories were adjusted for each group according to the differentials determined for the respective groups in each category. In the case of "Clerical Salaries", for example, i t was found that c l e r i c a l staff were assigned to elementary and secondary schools on a relative basis of one to two, talcing pupil enrolment into consideration. The value share of c l e r i c a l salaries was, therefore, weighted double in the determination of the total relative weight of secondary students. - 99 -The weighted value shares for each group of students were summed to determine the cost ratio between elementary and other pupil:-.. Since elementary students were assigned the same relative weights as those determined in Chapter III, the elementary sum for a l l years was one hundred. In 1961 the sum of senior high weighted relative weights was 182.92. The ratio between elementary and senior secondary in that year was, therefore, 1 to 1.83. Determination of cost differentials using the value shares developed through the Paasche formula recognized changes in the differentials over time. - 100 -DIFFERENTIAL DETERMINATION Teachers' Salaries. The "Teachers' Salaries Index" constructed on the basis of June 30 data and discussed in Chapter II provided the i n i t i a l vehicle for the determination of price differentials in this category. This price index i s presented in Tables LVI through LVIII. Per pupil costs were calculated at different school levels and the price index used to deflate the costs prior to the determination of differentials in inputs of teachers for each level of school. Table LVI, in four parts, outlines the determination of the weighting for the indexes calculated for teachers at different school levels. Average salary data were multiplied by the number of teachers at each school level to determine the total teachers' salaries at each respective level. Total salaries paid at each level were then computed as a percent of the total instructional salaries reported. The weights thus derived were subsequently used to weight the respective indexes developed in Table LVII. Table LVII, in three parts, computed an index for teachers in each type of school, using average salary data. Each of the school level indexes were weighted, according to the data derived in Table LVI, and a total index constructed. A second step in the determination of student weighted differentials for teachers involved the calculation of the total - 101 -instructional salaries reported by type of school. These data are reported in Table LVTII. Total instructional salaries for each level of school were then divided by the enrolment in each type of school to determine the cost per pupil for teachers' salaries at each school level. Enrolment data are set forth in Table LIX, and the per-pupil costs in current dollars reported in Table LX. A primary objective in this part of the study was to determine the differentials in resources required by pupils at different levels of instruction. It was necessary, therefore, to deflate the per-pupil-cost data in Table LX. The respective price indexes, reported in Table LVII, were used to deflate the per-pupil-cost at the corresponding levels of instruction. Deflated data are reported in the second section of Table LX, under the sub-heading "Constant Cost Per-Pupil". A l l data reported up to this point in this chapter are as reported for June 30 in each year. Data relating to constant per-pupil-costs are transposed into f i s c a l years in the fin a l section of Table LX. Differential data were subsequently developed from the con-stant per-pupil-costs by f i s c a l year. The differential calculations were of a ratio type, developed on the basis of "Elementary = 100". Data produced by these computations are reported in the f i r s t section of Table LXI. - 102 -While teachers' salaries represent the largest portion of school board expenditures, the extent of that portion remained to be considered in the calculation of differentials. The next step in the research was, therefore, to weight the differentials according to the respective input categories. These data were calculated on the basis of the weights reported in Chapter III. In the case of teachers' salaries, the annual category input weights are repeated, and the resulting weighted differentials recorded in the final section of Table LXI. Administration, Transportation and Auxiliary Services. The bases for the assumption that changing ratios of students at different grade levels would have a minimal impact on expenditures in these categories, were presented in the introduction to this chapter. Determination of the relative weights of classifications of students required, therefore, that the same relative weights for these categories of expenditures be assigned to a l l classifications of students. The respective annual weights of these categories of expenditures, determined in Chapter III, have been repeated and summed in the f i r s t section of Table LXXI. These totals are subsequently applied to a l l student classifications in the determination of student weighted differentials. Clerical Salaries. The next section of Table LXII deals with the weighting of "Clerical Salaries", and the annual weights of the sub-category have - 103 -again been repeated. An analysis of school board policy relating to the assignment of c l e r i c a l assistants to schools revealed that senior secondary schools have an average of twice as many c l e r i c a l assistants as elementary schools, when the size of the respective enrolments is taken into consideration. On the same basis, junior secondary schools have f i f t y percent more c l e r i c a l assistants than elementary schools with similar pupil enrolment. The second section of Table LXII applies these findings to the relative weights for this sub-category. In the case of senior secondary the weights are multiplied by two, and by one point five for junior secondary, to arrive at the data indicated as "Weighted Differentials". Instructional Supplies. Data relating to schools within the sample indicated that the cost of supplies to secondary schools, on a per-pupil basis, was three times that for elementary schools. Supplies to special elementary classes were estimated as being twenty five percent higher than those for regular classes, on a per-pupil basis. These data were used in the calculation of the weighted differentials in the third section of Table LXII. - 104 -Plant Operation and Maintenance. Differentials applied to weights in the "Plant Operation and Maintenance" category were determined by the relative size of plant and the janitorial staff per pupil of enrolment in schools at the three instructional levels. These differentials have been applied, and the resulting weighted differentials outlined, in the fin a l section of Table LXII. - 105 -DIFFERENTIALS APPLIED TO STUDENT DATA Data relating to weighted differentials by input category in Table LXII, together with the weighted differentials in the "Teachers' Salaries" category in Table LXI, have been re-organized in the calcu-lation of pupil weighting in Table LXIII, Parts I and II. Table LXIV summarizes the student enrolment data from the original returns, in the manner in which they were reported, by school year. Table LXV presents the data from Table LXIV, adjusted to fi s c a l years. Fiscal year enrolment data were adjusted to a common unit output base, using the differentials outlined in Table LXIII. Resulting output unit data have been presented in Table LXVI. - 106 -SUMMARY AND DISCUSSION OF FINDINGS This chapter has reported the procedures which were adopted to compensate for the differences in the costs of education for students in different grade categories through the determination of cost dif-ferences and the weighting of student data according to these differences. Weighted student data were necessary to determine the units of output of the public school system. Some of the previous studies of this kind used only the differences in the average salaries of teachers at the elementary and secondary levels in the determination of student weighting data. The determination of differentials in this study included the differentials in deflated per-pupil cost of teachers' salaries, in addition to differentials in other categories of expenditures where significant per-pupil cost differences were found to exist. An assumption, that the differences in per-pupil costs remain constant over time, appears to be implicit in most previous studies. This present study shows that this assumption would have been indefen-sible in the case of British Columbia. Reference to Table LXVI w i l l indicate some of the effects of applying the Paasche formula, an approach which takes into account the changing relative weights of categories of expenditures. - 107 -Elementary population, as a percent of the total, declined between 1961 and 1962. A static differential would have produced a greater increase in the number of units than the increase in students. Reference to the unit and student indexes of change w i l l indicate that such was not the case. The number of students increased by 5.8 percent, while the number of units increased by 4.1 percent. This phenomenon can be explained by the decline in the relative weights of secondary students. Senior secondary declined from 1.83 units of elementary equivalent, to 1.76. Junior secondary declined from 1.66 to 1.57. Further analysis of the data, contained in Table LXVI, indicated other factors affecting the ratio of student-to-unit data. The ratio of students in elementary special and secondary occupational classes declined toward the end of the period. Elementary special students in 1965 represented 2.30 percent of the elementary population. The percentage increased to 2.37 in 1966 and 2.52 in 1967. In 1968 the proportion declined to 2.48. Total enrolment dropped in 1969, and the percentage dropped, to below the 1965 level, to 2.21. The high percentage figure was two years earlier in the case of occupational and special secondary students. In 1965 this group represented 4.06 percent of secondary enrolment, the proportion declined to 3.97 in 1966, 3.86 in 1967, 3.57 in 1968, and to 3.14 percent in 1969. Total enrolments in these classes were dropping in 1968 and 1969, when the secondary enrolments were increasing. TABLE LVT Part I Determination of Weighting for Teachers' Salaries Index Paasche Formula For Years 1961-64 (Incl.) 1962 Employment 1962 Average Salary 1962 Total Salary 1962 % of Total 1963 Employment 1963 Average Salary 1963 Total Salary 1963 % of Total ,1964 Employment 1964 Average Salary 1964 Total Salary 1964 % of Tc Teachers Sr. High 922 7,028 6,479,316 8.74 85 7,620 647,700 .81 109 7,688 837,992 .93 Jr. - Sr. High 1,627 6,523 10,621,056 14.32 1,667 6,748 11,248,916 13.96 2,028 7,064 14,325,792 15.93 Jr. High 1,254 6,081 7,625,574 10.28 482 6,049 2,915,618 3.62 81-7 6,5457 5,275,369 5.86 Elementary - Sr. 434 5,261 2,283,274 3.08 1,393 6,338 3,898,484 11.04 1,214 6,610 3,024,540 3.92 Elementary - J r . 231 5.2S9 1,214,829 1.64 1,310 5,938 7,778,780 9.65 905 6,030 5,457,150 5.07 Elementary 6,078 4,976 30,244,128 40.76 6,364 5,103 32,475,492 40.30 6,895 5,338 36,805,510 40.92 Sub-Totals 58,468,677 78.82 63,964,990 79.38 70,726,353 78.63 Supervising Principals Sr. High 40 11,412 456,480 .62 4 12,159 48,636 .06 5 12,496 62,480 .07 Jr. - Sr. High 63 11,099 754,732 1.02 69 11,308 780,252 .97 85 12,187 1,035,895 1.15 Jr. High 62 10,848 672,576 .91 27 10,996 296,892 .37 42 11,372 477,624 .53 Elementary - Sr. 26 9,607 249,782 .34 58 11,131 645,598 .80 51 11,728 598,128 .67 Elementary - J r . 10 10,355 103,550 .14 51 11,260 574,260 .71 36 11,551 415,836 .46 Elementary - 157 9,999 1,569,843 2.10 155 10,232 1,585,960 1.97 188 11,014 2,070,632 2.30 Sub-Totals 3,806,963 5.13 3,931,598 4.38 4,660,595 5.18 Special Instructors A l l Levels 1,787 6,664 11,908,127 16.05 1,906 6,654 12,682,564 15.74 2,040 7,141 14,567,210 16.19 Totals 74,183,767 100.00 80,579,152 100.00 89,954,158 100.00 Source: Employment and average salary data derived from annual reports of B.C. Department of Education. Note: Employment and average salary data as at June 30. TABLE LVI Part II Determination of Weighting for Teachers' Salaries Index Paasche Formula for Years 1965-1966 (Incl.) 1965 Employment 1965 Average Salary 1965 Total Salary 1965 % of Total 1966 Employment 1966 Average Salary 1966 Total Salary 1966 % of Tots Teachers Sr. High 227 7,909 1,795,343 1.77 268 8,213 2,201,084 1.94 J r . - Sr. High 2,265 7,410 16,783,650 16.51 2,387 7,919 18,902,653 16.68 J r . High 1,002 6,790 6,803,580 6.69 1,187 7,238 8,591,506 7.58 Elementary - Sr. 980 6,958 6,818,840 6.71 774 7,370 5,704,380 5.03 Elementary - J r . 708 6,159 4,360,572 4.29 606 6,420 3,390,520 3.43 Elementary 7,449 5,660 42,161,340 41.47 8,060 6,066 48,891,960 43.15 Sub-Totals 78,723,325 77.44 88,182,103 77.81 Supervising Principals Sr. High 9 13,564 122,076 .12 14 13,905 194,670 .17 J r . - Sr. High 95 13,169 1,251,055 1.23 99 14,005 1,386,495 1.22 J r . High 50 12,581 629,050 .62 .56 13,328 746,368 .66 Elementary - Sr. 41 12,418 509,138 .50 40 12,888 515,520 .46 Elementary - J r . 30 11,959 358,770 .35 29 12,707 368,503 .32 Elementary 216 11,582 2,501,712 2.46 258 12,232 3,155,856 2.79 Sub-Totals 5,371,801 5.28 6,367,412 5.62 Special Instructors A l l Levels 2,255 7,789 17,563,787 17.28 . 2,264 8,295 13,778,857 16.57 Totals 101,658,913 100.00 113,328,372 100.00 Source: Employment and average salary data derived from annual reports of B.C. Department of Education. Note: Employment and average salary data as at June 30. TABLE LVI Part III Determination of Weighting for Teachers' Salaries Index Paasche Formula for Years 1967-63 (Incl.) 1967 ' 1967 1967 1967 1963 1968 1968 1968 Employment Average Salary Total Salary % of Total Employment Average Salary Total Salary % of Total Teachers & Teaching Principals Senior High 594 8,805 5,230,000 4.03 588 9,380 5,515,500 3.63 J r . Sr. High 3,589 8,777 31,501,000 24.28 3,881 9,363 36,336,250 24.23 J r . High 1,911 7,952 15,197,000 11.71 2,297 8,497 19,518,000 13.01 Elera. Sr. 604 3,244 4,979,500 3.84 550 9,001 4,950,500 3.30 Elem. J r . 675 7,165 4,836,500 3.73 534 7,615 4,066,500 2.71 Elem. 9,043 6,654 60,174,500 46.36 9,844 7,131 70,194,000 46.80 Sub-Totals 121,918,500 93.95 140,580,750 93.73 Supervising Principals Sr. High 17 15,471 263,000 .20 16 16,750 268,000 .18 J r . Sr. High 102 15,118 1,542,000 1.19 107 16,388 1,753,500 1.16 J r . High 69 14,819 1,022,500 .79 32 15,933 1,306,500 .87 Elem. Sr. High 23 14,717 338,500 .26 16 15,625 250,000 .17 Elem. J r . High 27 13,444 363,000 .28 28 13,679 383,000 .26 Elem. 290 13,359 3,874,000 2.99 330 14,095 4,651,500 3.10 Sub-Totals 7,403,000 5.71 8,612,500 5.74 Special Instructors A l l Levels 57 7,763 442,500 .34 95 8,332 791,500 .53 Totals 129,764,000 100.00 149,984,750 100.00 Source: Employment data derived from Annual Reports of B.C. Department of Education. Note: In 1967 method of reporting was changed. The above salaries are mean averages calculated from the data provided. The averages in the annual reports for these years were medians and do not correspond to the above averages. A l l employment and average salary data as at June 30. TABLE LVI Part IV Determination of Weighting for Teachers' Salaries Index Paasche Formula for Years 1969-70 (Incl.) 1969 1969 1969 1969 1970 1970 1970 1970 Employment Average Salary Total Salary % of Total Employment Average Salary Total Salary % of Total Teachers & Teaching Principals Senior High 757 10,032 7,594,500 4.44 831 10,746 8,930,000 4.54 J r . Sr. High . 4,000 9,890 39,561,500 23.13 4,189 10,579 44,317,000 22.55 J r . High 2,536 9,062 22,980,000 13.44 2,905 9,707 28,198,500 14.35 Elem. Sr. 514 9,580 4,924,000 2.88 543 10,319 5,603,000 2.85 Elec. J r . 653 8,431 5,505,500 3.22 630 9,015 5,679,500 2.89 Elem. 10,390 7,644 79,425,500 46.45 10,922 8,298 90,630,000 46.12 Sub-Totals 159,991,000 93.56 183,358,000 93.30 Supervising Principals Sr. High 18 18,000 324,000 .19 18 19,306 347,500 .18 J r . Sr. High 106 17,561 1,861,500 1.09 107 18,743 2,005,500 1.02 J r . High 84 16,994 1,427,500 .83 95 18,258 1,734,500 .88 Elem. Sr. High 16 16,313 261,000 .15 16 17,781 284,500 .14 Elem. J r . High 33 14,894 491,500 .29 30 15,800 474,000 .24 Elem. 367 14,951 5,487,000 3.21 417 16,091 6,710,000 3.42 Sub-Totals 9,852,500 5.76 11,556,000 5.88 Special Instructors A l l Levels 136 8,555 1,163,500 .68 167 9,638 1,609,500 .82 Totals 171,007,000 100.00 196,523,500 100.00 Source: Employment data derived from annual reports of B.C. Department of Education. TABLE LVTJ Part I Construction of Teachers' Salaries Index (1962-64 Incl.) Paasche Formula 1961=100 1961 1962 1963 1964 Average Average Sub-Index X of Total Index Average Sub-Index % of Total Index Average Salary Sub-Index % of Total Index Teachers Sr. High 6,923 7,028 101.5 8.74 8.87 7,620 110.1 .81 .89 7,688 111.1 .93 1.03 Jr.-Sr. High 6,371 6,528 102.5 14.32 14.68 6,743 105.9 13.96 14.78 7,064 110.9 15.93 17.67 Jr. High 5,854 6,081 103.9 10.28 10.68 6,049 103.3 3.62 3.74 6,457 110.3 5.86 6.46 Elementary - Sr. 5,111 5,261 102.9 3.08 3.17 6,388 125.0 11.04 13.80 6,610 129.3 3.92 11.53 Elementary - Jr. 4,983 5,259 105.5 1.64 1.73 5,938 119.2 9.65 11.50 6,030 121.0 6.07 7.34 Elementary 4,764 4,976 104.5 40.76 42.59 5,103 107.1 40.30 43.16 5,338 112.0 40.92 45.83 Sub-Totals 78.82 81.72 79.38 87.87 78.63 89.86 Suservisinq Principals Sr. High 11,074 11,412 103.1 .62 .64 12,159 109.8 .06 .07 12,496 112.8 .07 .08 Jr.-Sr. High 10,740 11,099 103.3 1.02 1.05 11,303 105.3 .97 1.02 12,187 113.5 1.15 1.31 Jr. High 10,610 10,848 102.2 .91 .93 10,996 103.6 .37 .38 11,372 107.2 .53 .57 Elementary - Sr. High 8,670 9,607 110.8 .34 .38 11,131 128.4 .80 1.03 11,728 135.3 .67 .91 Elementary - Jr. High 9,827 10,355 105.4 .14- .15 11,260 114.6 .71 .81 11,551 117.5 .46 .54 Elementary 9,696 9,999 103.1 2.10 2.17 10,232 105.5 1.97 2.08 11,014 113.6 2.30 2.61 Sub-Totals 5.13 5.32 4.88 5.39 5.18 6.02 Special Instructors A l l Levels 6,373 6,664 104.6 16.05 16.79 6,654 104.4 15.74 16.43 7,141 112.1 16.19 13.15 Paasche Index 1961-100 103.8 109.7 114.0 Source? Table Hate: A l l source data as at June 30. TABLE LVII Part II Construction of Teachers' Salaries Index (1965-66 Incl.) Paasche Formula 1961=100 1961 1965 1966 Average Average Sub-Index % of Total Index Average Sub-Index % of Total Index Teachers Sr. High 6,923 7,909 114.2 1.77 2.02 8,213 118.6 1.94 2.30 Jr.-Sr. High 6,371 7,410 116.3 16.51 19.20 7,919 124.3 16.68 20.73 Jr. High 5,854 6,790 116.0 6.69 7.76 7,238 123.6 7.58 9.37 Elementary - Sr. 5,111 6,958 136.1 6.71 9.13 7,370 144.2 5.03 7.25 Elementary - J r . 4,983 6,159 123.6 4.29 5.30 6,420 128.8 3.43 4.42 Elementary 4,764 5,660 118.8 41.47 49.27 6,066 127.3 43.15 54.93 Sub-Totals 77.44 92.68 77.81 99.00 Supervising Principals Sr. High 11,074 13,564 122.5 .12 .15 13,905 125.6 .17 .21 Jr.-Sr. High 10,740 13,169 122.6 1.23 1.51 14,005 130.4 1.22 1.59 Jr. High 10,610 12,581 118.6 .62 .73 13,328 125.6 .66 .83 Elementary - Sr. High 8,670 12,418 143.2 .50 .71 12,888 148.7 .46 .68 Elerier.tary - Jr. High 9,827 11,959 121.7 .35 .43 12,707 129.3 .32 .41 Elementary 9,696 11,582 119.5 2.46 2.94 12,232 126.2 2.79 3.52 Sub-Tctais 5.28 6.47 5.62 7.24 Special Instructors A l l Levels 6 , 373 7,789 122.2 17.2e 21.12 8,295 130.2 16.57 21.57 Paasche Index 1961=100 120.3 127.8 .Voce: A l l source data as at June 30. TABLE LVII PART I I I Construction of Teachers' Salaries Index (1967-70 Incl.) Paasche Formula 1961=100 1967 1968 1969 1970 1961 Average Average Sub-Index . % of Total Index Average Sub-Index % of Total Index Average Sub-Index % of Total Index Average Sub-Index % of Total Index Teachers Sr. High 6,923 8,805 127.2 4.03 5.13 9,380 135.5 3.68 4.99 10,032 144.9 4.44 6.43 10,746 155.2 4.54 7.05 Jr.-Sr. High 6,371 8,777 137.8 24.28 33.46 9,363 147.0 24.23 35.62 9,890 155.2 23.13 35.90 10,579 166.0 22.55 37.43 Jr. High 5,854 7,952 135.8 11.71 15.90 8,497 145.1 13.01 18.88 9,062 154.8 13.44 20.81 9,707 165.8 14.35 23.79 Elementary - Sr. High 5,111 8,244 161.3 3.84 6.19 9,001 176.1 3.30 5.81 9,580 187.4 2.88 5.40 10,319 201.9 2.85 5.75 Elementary - Jr. High 4,983 7,165 143.8 3.73 5.36 7,615 152.8 2.71 4.14 8,431 169.2 3.22 5.45 9,015 180.9 2.89 5.23 Elementary 4,764 6,654 139.7 46.36 64.76 7,131 149.7 46.80 70.06 7,644 160.5 46.45 74.55 8,298 174.2 46.12 80.34 Sub-Totals 130.80 139.50 148.54 159.59 Supervistna Principals Sr. High 11,074 15,471 139.7 .20 .28 16,750 151.3 .18 .27 18,000 162.5 .19 .31 19,306 174.3 .18 .31 Jr.-Sr. High 10,740 15,118 140.8 1.19 1.68 16,388 152.6 1.16 1.77 17,561 163.5 1.09 1.78 18,743 174.5 1.02 1.78 Jr. High 10,610 14,819 139.7 .79 1.10 15,933 150.2 .87 1.31 16,994 160.2 .83 1.33 18,258 172.1 .88 1.51 Elementary - Sr. High 8,670 14,717 169.8 .26 .44 15,625 180.2 .17 .31 16,313 188.2 .15 .28 17,781 205.1 .14 .29 Elementary - Jr. High 9,827 13,444 136.8 .28 .38 13,679 139.2 .26 .36 14,894 151.6 .29 .44 15,800 160.8 .24 .39 Elementary 9,696 13,359 137.8 2.29 4.12 14,095 145.4 3.10 4.51 14,951 154.2 3.21 4.95 16,091 166.0 3.42 5.68 Sub-Totals 8.00 8.53 9.09 9.96 Special Instructors A l l Levels 6,373 7,763 121.8 .34 .41 8,332 130.7 .53 .69 8,555 134.2 .68 .91 9,638 151.2 .82 1.24 Paasche Index 1961-100 139.2 148.7 158.5 170.B Note: A l l source data as at June 30. TABLE Linn Calculation of Pupil Weighting Instructional Salaries by Type of School 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 Paid Teachers & Principals Sr. High •Jr.-Sr. High J r . High Eleoer.tary - Sr. High Eieoer-tary - Jr. High Eleoentarv 8,649,487 14,472,202 10,143,132 2,646,482 1,150,100 30,337,188 6,936,296 11,375,788 3,298,150 2,533,056 1.318,379 31,613,971 696,336 12.029,168 3,212,510 9,544,082 8,353,040 34,061.452 900,472 15,361,587 5,752,993 8,622,668 5,872,936 33,876,142 1,917,419 13,034,705 7,432,630 7,327,978 4,719,342 44,663,052 2,395,754 20,239,148 9,337,374 5,219,900 4,259,023 52,047,316 5,493,000 33,043,000 16,219,500 5,318,000 S.199,500 64,048,500 5,783,500 38,089,750 20,324,500 5.200,500 4,449,500 74,345,500 7,918,500 41.423,000 24,407,500 5,135,000 5.997,000 84,912,500 9 ,,277,500 46,322,500 29,933,000 5,387,500 €.153.500 97,340,000 Special Ir-structors Sr. High Jr.-Sr. High J r . High Elenerrtary - Sr. High Elementary - Jr. High Elementary Special Instructors Average Salary Total Salary Special Instructors Sr. High Jr.-Sr. High J r . High Elementary - Sr. High Eleaentary - J r . High Elenentary Total Salary^ Teachers Principals Instructors Sr. High Jr.-Sr. High Jr. High Elenentary - Sr. High Elenentary - J r . High Elenentary 307 534 374 56 25 274 6,372 1,9S6,204 3,402,648 2,383,128 356,832 159,300 1,745,928 10,605,691 17,874,850 12,526,260 3,003,314 1,309,400 32,083,116 366 590 444 76 36 417 6,664 2,439,024 3,931,760 2,958,816 506,464 239,904 2,778,388 9,375,320 15,307,548 11,256,966 3,039,520 1,558,283 34,592,859 23 639 176 426 341 452 6,654 153,042 4,251,906 1,171,104 2,834,604 2,269,014 3,007,608 849,378 16,281,074 4,383,614 12,378,686 10,622,054 37,069,060 39 774 309 361 211 536 7,141 278,499 5,527,134 2,206,569 2,577,901 1,506,751 3,827,576 1,178,971 20,883,821 7,959,562 11,200,569 7,379,737 42.703,718 82 901 379 309 157 591 7,789 638,698 7,017,889 2,952,031 2,406,801 1,222,873 4,603,299 2,556,117 25,052,594 10,384,661 9,734,779 5,942,215 49,266,351 107 1,013 445 264 139 750 8,295 887,565 8,402,835 3,691,275 2,189,330 1,153,005 6,221,250 3,283,319 2e,691,983 13,029,149 8,409,780 5,412,028 58,269,066 5,563,610 33,323,517 16,377,812 5,194,216 5,113,395 66,541,182 5,905,3e0 38,447,097 21,070,522 5,254,556 4,639,785 3,048,640 41,747,870 24,635,282 5,271,340 6,190,856 I 77,444,748 87,732,304 9,352,648 46,371,039 30,214,338 5,980,588 6,369,310 101,108,048 Change ir. calculation 1961-66 due to 1967 change in method of reporting. ^1K7-197G total derived by multiplying total teachers & special instructors by average salary and adding cost of supervising principals as found in tables establishing paasche formula. A l l data as of June 30. Source: Annual Reports of B.C. Department of Education. TABLE LIX Calculation of Pupil Weighting Enrolment by Type of school and Program by School Year 60/61 61/62 62/63 63/64 64/65 65/66 66/67 67/68 68/69 69/70 Total Pupil by School Type Sr. High 29,299 29,315 2,516 Jr.-Sr. High 51,873 50,233 51,766 Jr . High 37,333 39,921 14,658 Elementary - Sr. High 11,926 12,416 42,620 Elementary - J r . High 6,045 7,173 39,561 Elementary 183,092 199,329 207,784 Special X(2.11-1.00) (3,987) (4,936) (4,844) Occupational X(1.3-1.0) (895) Sub-Totals of Enrolment 319,568 338,387 358,905 No. of Special 3,592 4,447 4,364 No. of Occupational 2,984 Totals 323,160 342,834 366,253 Elementary & Special Adjusted 187,079 204,265 212,628 Jr.-Sr. High & Occupational 54,750 Adjusted 3,218 7,158 7,837 12,544 12,407 16,460 17,533 62,634 70,220 73,316 78,014 83,635 85,268 89,033 24,436 30,295 36,390 43,792 51,477 55,383 61,758 36,509 28,827 22,789 12,804 12,024 11,324 11,702 27,026 20,574 17,745 15,916 13,164 15,460 14,950 224,818 242,990 262,713 282,158 294,619 305,701 318,103 (5,427) (6,163) (6,946) (8,605) (9,080) (8,428) (8,090) (1,389) (1,593) (1,643) (1,599) (1,587) (1,467) (1,437) 378,641 400,064 420,790 445,228 467,326 489,596 513,079 4,889 5,552 6,258 7,752 8,180 7,593 7,288 4,629 5,309 5,477 5,331 5,290 4,891 4,791 388,159 410,925 432,525 458,311 480,796 502,080 525,158 230,245 249,153 269,659 290,763 303,699 314,129 326,193 67,263 75,529 78,793 83,345 88,925 90,159 93,824 Source: B.C. Department of Education Annual Reports. TABLE LX Calculation of Pupil Weighting Instructional Salaries per Pupil and by Type of School and Prograr. Cost per Pupil Sr. High Jr.-Sr. High J r . High Elementary - Sr. High Elementary - J r . High Elementary Elementary Special (2.11) Occupational (Jr.-Sr. x 1.3) Constant Cost per Pupll^ Sr. High Jr.-Sr. High J r . High Elementary - Sr. High Elementary - J r . High Elementary Elementary Special Occupational Constant Cost per Pupil 2  Adjusted to Fiscal Years Sr. High Jr.-Sr. High J r . High Elementary - Sr. High Elementary - J r . High Elementary Elementary Special Occupational 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 196S 1969 1970 $ 362 320 338 366 357 419 444 476 489 533 345 305 315 334 357 391 427 460 490 526 336 282 299 326 343 358 374 409 445 489 252 245 290 307 338 369 406 437 465 511 217 217 268 273 289 305 321 352 400 426 175 174 178 190 203 222 236 263 287 318 362 357 368 391 417 456 484 538 590 654 448 397 387 404 431 473 520 562 602 649 362 315 307 329 313 353 349 351 337 343 345 298 297 301 307 315 310 313 316 317 336 271 289 296 296 290 275 28? 287 295 252 238 232 237 248 256 252 248 248 253 217 206 225 226 234 237 223 230 236 235 175 167 166 170 171 174 169 176 179 183 362 342 344 349 351 358 346 359 368 375 448 387 365 364 371 381 377 3e2 388 391 343 312 316 323 329 351 350 345 339 326 298 299 303 310 313 311 314 316 310 278 292 296 294 284 278 284 29C 246 236 234 241 251 254 250 249 250 213 214 225 229 2 35 231 226 232 235 172 167 168 170 172 172 172 177 181 354 34? 346 354 2C ~ 351 363 371 • l i t 378 365 367 37; - ' 5 334 3cr >f currer -.t year to .4 of future year. A l l data as at June 30. Adjustment made by adding TABLE LXI Calculation of Pupil Weighting Teachers Salary Differential and Weighting 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Differentials 1 Elementary = 100 Sr. High 199 187 188 190 191 204 203 195 187 Jr . High 180 166 174 174 171 165 162 160 160 Elem. 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 Elem. Special 206 206 206 206 206 205 204 205 205 Occupational 231 217 217 216 218 220 220 217 215 Category Weight 66.32 66.66 67.06 67.25 66.91 66.03 66.29 66.42 66.60 Weighted Differentials Sr. High 131.98 124.65 126.07 127.78 127.80 134.70 134.57 129.52 124.54 Jr . High 119.38 110.66 116.68 117.02 114.42 108.95 107.39 106.27 106.56 Elem. 66.32 66.66 67.06 67.25 66.91 66.03 66.29 66.42 66.60 Elem. Special 136.62 137.32 138.14 138.54 137.83 135.36 135.23 136.16 136.53 Occupational 153.20 144.65 145.52 145.26 145.86 145.27 145.84 144.13 143.19 Calculated on the Basis of Constant Cost Per Pupil. TABLE LXII Calculation of Pupil Weighting Differentials Weighted by Expense Category 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Cateqory Weight Administration 4.89 4.55 4.44 4.48 4.39 5.17 5.10 5.20 4.96 Transportation 2.39 2.34 2.26 2.23 2.20 2.19 2.16 2.18 2.10 Auxiliary Services 2.91 2.86 2.94 2.96 3.78 4.07 3.18 2.47 3.74 Total Applicable A l l Students 10.19 9.75 9.64 9.67 10.37 11.43 10.44 9.85 10.80 Cle r i c a l Salaries Weight 1.15 1.19 1.24 1.21 1.41 1.58 1.65 1.92 1.96 Clerical Salaries Weiqhted Differentials 1 Sr. High = 200 2.30 2.38 2.48 2.42 2.82 3.16 3.30 3.84 3.92 J r . High = 150 1.73 1.79 1.86 1.82 2.12 2.37 2.48 2.88 2.94 1 El en. = 100 1.15 1.19 1.24 1.21 1.41 1.58 1.65 1.92 1.96 Special Elem. = 100 1.15 1.19 1.24 1.21 1.41 1.58 1.65 1.92 1.96 r— 1 M Occupational = 200 2.30 2.38 2.48 2.42 2.82 3.16 3.30 3.84 3.92 VD Instructional Supplies Weight 3.29 3.60 3.71 3.93 3.99 4.13 4.59 4.99 4.71 1 Instructional Supplies Weighted Differentials Sr. High = 300 9.87 10.80 11.13 11.79 11.97 12.39 13.77 14.97 14.13 J r . High = 300 9.87 10.80 11.13 11.79 11.97 12.39 13.77 14.97 14.13 Elem. = 100 3.29 3.60 3.71 3.93 3.99 4.13 4.59 4.99 4.71 Special Elem. = 125 4.11 4.50 4.64 4.91 4.99 5.16 5.74 6.24 5.89 Occupational = 300 9.87 10.80 11.13 11.79 11.97 12.39 13.77 14.97 14.13 Plant Operation & Maintenance Weight 19.05 18.80 18.35 17.94 17.32 16.83 17.03 16.82 15.93 Plant Operation & Maintenance Weighted Differentials- 5 Sr. High = 150 Jr. High = 130 Elem. = 100 Special Elem. = 211 Occupational = 195 28.58 24.77 19.05 40.20 37.15 28.20 24.44 18.30 39.67 36.66 27.53 23.86 18.35 38.72 35.78 26.91 23.32 17.94 37.85 34.98 25.98 22.52 17.32 36.55 33.77 25.25 21.83 15.33 35.51 32.82 25.55 22.14 17.03 35.93 33.21 25.23 21.87 16.82 35.49 32.80 23.90 20.71 15.93 33.61 31.06 Calculated on the Basis of Clerical Salaries Per Pupil. Estimated on the Basis of Examination of District Account. Estimated on the Sasis c f J a n i t o r s S a l a r i e s Per ?-j r i l 3nd Value of Plant and Ecuicr.er.: TABLE LXIII Part I Calculation of Pupil Weighting Weighted Differential by Type of School and Program 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 Senior High A.T.A.l 10.19 9.75 9.64 9.67 10.37 11.43 10.44 Clerical 2.30 2.38 2.48 2.42 2.82 3.16 3.30 Instruction Supplies 9.87 10.80 11.13 11.79 11.97 12.39 13.77 P.O. & M.2 28.58 28.20 27.53 26.91 25.98 25.25 25.55 Teachers' Salaries 131.98 124.65 126.07 127.78 127.80 134.70 134.57 Sr. High Differential 182.92 175.78 176.85 178.57 178.94 186.93 187.63 Jr. High A.T.A. 10.19 9.75 9.64 9.67 10.37 11.43 10.44 Clerical 1.73 1.79 1.86 1.82 2.12 2.37 2.48 Instruction Supplies 9.87 10.80 11.13 11.79 11.97 12.39 13.77 P.O. & M. 24.77 24.44 23.86 23.32 22.52 21.88 22.14 Teachers' Salaries 119.38 110.66 116.68 117.02 114.42 108.95 107.39 Jr. High Differential 165.94 157.44 163.17 163.62 161.40 157.02 156.22 1968 9.85 3.84 14.97 25.23 129.52 183.41 9.85 2.88 14.97 21.87 106.27 155.84 1969 10.80 3.92 14.13 23.90 124.54 177.29 10.80 2.94 14.13 20.71 106.56 155.14 -•-A.T.A. = Administration, Transportation and Auxiliary Services. 2p.O. & M. = Plant Operation and Maintenance. TABLE LXIII Part II Calculation of Pupil Weighting Weighted Differentials by Type of School and Program 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Elementary A.T.A.1 10.19 9.75 9.64 9.67 10.37 11.43 10.44 9.85 10 • 30 Clerical 1.15 1.19 1.24 1.21 1.41 1.58 1.65 1.92 1.96 Instruction Supplies 3.29 3.60 3.71 3.93 3.99 4.13 4.59 4.99 4.71 P.O. & M.2 19.05 18.80 18.35 17.94 17.32 16.83 17.03 16.32 15.93 Teachers Salaries 66.32 66.66 67.06 67.25 66.91 66.03 66.29 56.42 66.60 Elementary Differentials 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 Elementary Special A.T.A. 10.19 9.75 9.64 9.67 10.37 11.43 10.44 9.85 10.30 Clerical 1.15 1.19 1.24 1.21 1.41 1.58 1.65 1.92 1.51 Instruction Supplies 4.11 4.50 4.64 4.91 4.99 5.16 5.74 6.24 5.39 P.O. & M. 40.20 39.67 38.72 37.85 36.55 3S.S1 35.93 35.49 33.61 Teachers Salaries 136.62 137.32 138.14 138.54 137.83 135.36 135.23 136.16 136.53 Elementary Special Differential 192.27 192.43 192.38 192.18 191.15 189.04 188.99 189.65 188.79 Minus^ 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 Net Differential 92.27 92.43 92.38 92.18 91.15 89.04 88.99 39.66 88.79 Occupational A.T.A. 10.19 9.75 9.64 9.67 10.37 11.43 10.44 9.35 10.30 Cle r i c a l 2.30 2.38 2.48 2.42 2.82 3.16 3.30 3.34 3.92 Instruction Supplies 9.87 10.80 11.13 11.79 11.97 12.39 13.77 14.97 14.13 P.O. & M. 37.15 36.66 35.78 34.98 • 33.77 32.82 33.21 32.30 31.06 Teachers Salaries 153.20 144.65 145.52 145.26 145.86 145.27 145.34 144.13 143.19 Occupational Differential 212.71 204.24 204.55 204.12 204.79 205.07 206.56 205.59 203.10 Minus 4 169.78 170.15 170.50 171.58 172.40 173.04 171.45 168.63 Net Differential 34.46 34.40 33.62 33.21 32.67 33.52 34.14 34.47 A.T.A. = Administration, Transportation & Auxiliary Services. ^P.O. & M. = Plant Operation and Maintenance. 3 The enrolment figures include special students in elementary. The deduction of the elementary value i s to prevent duplication in calculation unit data. *The enrolment figures include occupational students in secondary. Secondary values are deducted to prevent duplication in calculations of unit data. TABLE LXIV British Columbia Public School Enrolments 60-•61 61-•62 62-•63 63-64 64-•65 65-•66 66-•67 67-68 68-•69 69-•70 Elementary 217, 812 227, 487 235, 825 244,804 256, 067 272, 049 287, 663 298,909 310, 677 323, 025 Elementary Special 1, 120 1, 424 1, 590 3,139 5, 874 6, 275 •7, 066 7,802 7, 109 6, 785 Total Elementary 216, 932 228, 911 237, 415 247,943 261, 941 278, 324 294, 729 306,711 317, 786 329, 810 Junior Secondary 71, 327 79, 148 83, 634 87,376 84, 300 89, 870 96, 640 103,573 110, 422 116, 244 Senior Secondary 30, 677 32, 621 36, 767 42,673 48, 281 47, 147 48, 583 52,473 57, 218 61, 861 Occupational and Special Sec. 376 539 1, 504 395 5, 422 5, 506 5, 681 5,902 5, 504 5, 235 Total Senior Secondary 31, 053 33, 160 38, 271 43,068 53, 703 52, 653 54, 264 58,375 62, 722 67, 096 Total 321, 312 341, 219 359, 320 378,387 399, 944 420, 847 445, 633 468,659 490, 930 513, 150 Source: Taken directly from copies of returns from the B.C. Department of Education to Statistics Canada. TABLE LXV British Columbia Public School Enrolments Adjusted to Fiscal Years-'-1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Elementary Elementary Spe^~ a" Total Elementary 221,682 1,242 222,924 230,822 1,490 232,312 239,417 2,210 241,627 249,309 4,233 253,542 262,460 6,034 268,494 278,295 6,591 284,886 292,162 7,360 299,522 303,616 7,525 311,141 315,616 6,979 322,595 Junior Secondary 74,455 80,943 85,131 86,146 86,528 92,578 99,413 106,313 112,751 Senior Secondary Occupational and Special Sec. Total Senior Secondary 31,455 441 31,896 34,279 925 35,204 39,129 1,060 40,189 44,916 2,406 47,322 47,827 5,456 53,283 47,721 5,576 53,297 50,139 5,769 55,908 54,371 5,743 60,114 59,075 5,396 64,471 Total 329,275 348,459 366,947 387,010 408,305 430,761 454,843 477,568 499,817 1961 Fiscal year enrolment arrived at by adding .6 of the 1960-61 enrolment and .4 of the 1961-62 enrolment. Source: Original data taken directly from copies of the returns of the B.C. Department of Education to Statistics Canada. TABLE LXVT Units Derived from Students and Differential Data 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Totals Elementary No. of Students X 1.0=Units 221,682 230,822 239,417 249,309 262,460 278,295 292,162 303,616 315,616 2,393,379 Elementary Special No. of Students Differential No. of Units (1,242) 1.92 2,385 (1,490) 1.92 2,861 (2,210) 1.92 4,243 (4,233) 1.92 8,127 (6,034) 1.91 11,525 (6,591) 1.89 12,457 (7,360) 1.39 13,910 (7,525) 1.90 14,297 (6,979) 1.89 13,190 82,996 Junior Secondary No. of Students Differential No. of Units (74,455) 1.66 123,595 (80,943) 1.57 127,080 (85,131) 1.63 138,764 (86,146) 1.64 141,279 (86,528) 1.61 139,310 (92,578) 1.57 145,347 (99,413) 1.56 155,084 (106,313) 1.56 165,848 (112,751) 1.55 174,764 1,311,072 Senior Secondary No. of Students Differential No. of Units (31,455) 1.83 57,563 (34,279) 1.76 60,331 (39,129) 1.77 69,258 (44,916) 1.79 80,400 (47,827) 1.79 85,610 (47,721) 1.87 89,238 (50,139) 1.88 94,261 (54,371) 1.83 99,499 (59,075) 1.77 104,563 740,722 Occupational & Special Secondary No. of Students Differential No. of Units (441) 2.13 939 (925) 2.04 1,887 (1,060) 2.05 2,173 (2,406) 2.04 4,908 (5,456) 2.05 11 r185 (5,576) 2.05 11,431 (5,769) 2.07 11,942 (5,743) 2.06 11,831 (5,396) 2.03 10,954 67,249 Total Units Index of Change 406,164 100 422,981 104.1 453,855 111.7 484,023 119.2 510,090 125.6 536,768 132.2 567,359 139.7 595,091 146.5 619,087 152.4 4,595,413 Total Students Index of-Change (329,275) 100 (348,459) 105.8 (366,947) 111.4 (387,010) 117.5 (408,305) 124.0 (430,761) 130.8 (454,843) 138.1 (477,568) 145.0 (499,817) 151.8 Elementary As a % of Total 67.3 66.2 65.2 64.4 64.3 64.6 64.2 63.6 63.1 Student data taken directly from copies of the returns of the B.C. Department of Education to Statistics Canada. - 125 -CHAPTER VII UNIT COSTS An analysis of the relative impact which three variables have upon the cost of public school education requires the application of the data developed in the preceding four chapters. The effect upon cost of changes in the number of pupils can be determined by reducing total costs to per-unit costs. Changes in the price of the goods and services purchased have already been identified. Assessing the impact which the remaining variable, the quantity of goods and services pur-chased, has upon costs requires deflating the per-unit costs with the price indexes which have been developed. The f i r s t section of this chapter reports changes in the per-unit costs in current dollar terms. Per-unit costs are then reported in constant dollar terms to enable an identification of the changes in the quantities of goods and services purchased by public school boards during the period covered by the research. Analyses of Per-Unit Costs in Current Dollars Table LXVII shows the calculations of expenditures in each sub-category within the "Administration" category. The sub-category weight as a portion of total expenditure was used to calculate the expenditure for the respective sub-categories. The number of students, which in the case of the "Administration" category is also the number of units, was divided into the sub-category cost to ascertain the per-unit - 126 -cost for each sub-category. The per-unit cost data were then placed on an index, with the base year 1961 equalling 100, to show the rol.al.ivp changes in the per-unit costs. A similar method was used to analyse the per-unit cost of teachers' salaries (Table LXVIII). The unit differentials applicable to the "Teachers' Salaries" category have been calculated, and applied to the enrolment data, in the determination of the number of units applicable to the category. Unit costs for other inputs are presented in Tables LXIX through LXXIV. Student data were adjusted to unit data using the weighting applicable to the respective categories. Where student and unit data were different, unit and student costs, together with the respective indexes, were computed. Next, total public school expendi-tures analysed in per-unit and per-student terms are presented with the respective indexes in Table LXXV. The number of units applied to both school board and Department of Education operational costs are based on total unit data as outlined i n Table LXVI. Unit data applied to "Pensions" used differential data applicable to the "Teachers' Salaries" category. Table LXXVI focusses upon changes in the source of "funds. Provincial grants for "Debt Services" were deducted from the total cost of "Debt Services", and the municipal cost of debt servicing was then calculated. A l l debt servicing costs were subsequently removed from the two revenue sources, provincial and municipal, and the per-unit - 127 -cost of operating expense calculated for each level of government. A summary of the current dollar unit-cost indexes i s outl in Table LXXVII. - 128 -CONSTANT UNIT COSTS School Board Operational Expenditures The respective price indexes developed in Chapter V were used to deflate the expenditures in each of the six categories. Total school board expenditures were deflated using the total price index. These data, and the resulting constant dollars in each category and total school board expenditure, are presented in Table LXXVIII. The f i r s t step in the determination of constant per-unit costs involved deflation of the largest category, "Teachers' Salaries". Data outlined in the "Residual Approach", in Table XXXIII, relative to the total salaries of teachers, special staff, supervising principals, and d i s t r i c t supervisors, together with the respective indexes, have been repeated in Table LXXIX. The respective price indexes have been applied, and the constant costs for each category calculated. Instruct-ional unit data, computed in Table LXVIII, were used again in the determination of constant unit costs for each instructional salary category. A similar method was used to calculate constant unit costs for the remaining budget categories which are presented in Table LXXX. Provincial and Municipal Costs Costs to the two levels of government, based on revenue source, were calculated and are reported in Table LXXVI. - 129 -In the calculation of constant costs, the total price index was used to deflate the total revenue derived from the two levels of government for purposes of operational expenditures. Total units of enrolment were divided into the respective deflated cost data in order to produce constant unit costs to the two levels of government. Indexes developed on the basis of constant unit costs, to show the change in constant unit costs to both levels of government are presented in Table LXXXII. - 130 -DISCUSSION OF FINDINGS Discussion of Current Dollar Costs The f i r s t portion of this chapter developed unit cost data on the basis of current dollar spending. Indexes were developed, based on unit costs in current dollars, and are presented in summary form in Table LXXVII. An examination of these data reveals some sharp upward trends in the second half of the period under study. Costs per unit for administration were below the 1961 level in 1962, 1963 and 1964. In 1965 costs rose to 4.6 percent above the 1961 level. A sharp increase took place in 1966 with the index showing 135.5. Continued increases in the next three years brought the index to 171.8 in 1969. The "Teachers' Salaries" cost per unit index showed a moderate increase of approximately three points per year un t i l 1964, seven points in 1965, ten in 1966, and a fourteen to sixteen point increase in each of the remaining three years. The years 1965 and 1966 marked the beginning of sharp increases in a l l other categories. Total school board costs increased two points in each of the f i r s t twc years, three points in 1964, seven in 1965, eleven in 1966, and thirteen to fourteen points per annum for the balance of the period. - 131 -The rate of increase, in current dollar costs per unit of school board operational expenditures, and the rate of change in the per unit cost to the two levels of government, are presented in graph form in Figure II. Sharper increases in the second half of the period, discussed above, may be observed in this figure. Current dollar costs, discussed above and presented in the f i r s t part of this chapter, do not give any indication of the extent to which the changes in cost were the result of changes in price, or changes in the amount of goods and services purchased. These variables were examined in the second part of the chapter by deflating the costs with the price indexes developed in Chapter V. Constant Dollar Costs Public school operational expenditures were deflated by category, and constant unit cost data are presented in Tables LXXVIII through LXXX. A summary of these unit cost data is presented in Table LXXXIII. Indexes based on constant unit costs for each category of spending, in addition to provincial and municipal costs, have been summarized and are presented in Table LXXXIV. These presentations make i t possible to render some answers to questions raised in earlier chapters. Discussion of the price indexes in Chapter V, pointed to the variation of price indexes in instructional salaries. Senior positions - 133 -showed a higher rate of price increase than lower positions. These data further indicated that the proportions of expenditures for d i s t r i c t supervisors, supervising principals, and special staff were increasing throughout the period. In the eight year period covered by the study, the per-unit inputs of d i s t r i c t supervisors, supervising principals and special staff, increased more rapidly than teacher inputs. Per-unit inputs of d i s t r i c t supervisors in 1969 were 40.8 percent above the 1961 level, supervising principals 24.6 percent, and special staff 26.7 percent. Real per-unit inputs of teachers in the same period increased by 8.0 percent. Other trends may be noted in the instructional salary per-unit input index data. In 1963, while the per-unit inputs of teachers, special staff and supervising principals declined below the 1962 level, the per-unit inputs of d i s t r i c t supervisors were increasing. Per-unit inputs of teachers continued to decline below the 1961 level in 1963 and 1964, while per-unit inputs of special staff, supervising principals, and d i s t r i c t supervisors showed relatively large increases. Trends indicated in the above data permit a more descriptive statement with reference to the "Instructional Salaries" category, discussed in Chapter V. Increased relative expenditures for d i s t r i c t supervisors, supervising principals, and special staff, were caused by relatively higher price increases and the purchase of greater quantities of services in these categories. - 134 -Other questions raised earlier in this chapter may also be examined further on the basis of the per-unit input indexes. A comparison of the indexes for unit costs in current dollars, and per-unit input indexes, in Tables LXXVII and LXXXIV, indicates that the largest portion of cost increases was due to increases in price. In 1962 the total school board cost index showed 102.2 with inputs at 101.1. Cost increased in 1963 to 104.5 and inputs declined to 100.0. A further increase in cost occurred in 1964 to 107.6 with inputs remaining constant at 100.0. Sharp increases in costs in 1965 and 1966 to 115.1 and 126.9, compared to relatively moderate increases in inputs to 101.2 and 103.9, respectively. At the end of the period the 1969 costs were 68.6 percent above the 1961 level. The per-unit inputs showed an increase of 13.0 percent in the same period. There were, however, some relatively high increases in per-unit inputs in some categories. These categories included special staff, supervising principals, d i s t r i c t supervisors, school c l e r i c a l , and supplies. Increases in these areas were offset by reductions in per-unit inputs in the administration, plant operation and transportation categories. The total school board unit input index, together with the constant unit input indexes of municipal and provincial governments, are presented in graph form in Figure III. - 136 -Per-unit input indexes, presented in this figure, indicate a substantial change in the source of inputs in the public school system in British Columbia. School board unit inputs increased to 101.1 in 1962. In the same year provincial unit inputs increased to 100.4 and municipal to 101.7. A decline in school board unit inputs to 100.0 in 1963 was accompanied by a sharper decline in provincial inputs to 98.2. School board unit inputs remained constant in 1964 at 100.0 and provincial unit inputs declined sharply to 92.7. In the same year municipal inputs had increased to 107.5. For the balance of the period, provincial unit inputs remained below the 1961 level, with a drop of thirteen percent below the 1961 level in 1967. Municipal unit inputs increased steadily throughout the period, including years in which school board unit inputs declined. In 1969 school board unit inputs were 13.0 percent above the 1961 level, while municipal unit inputs were up by 33.5 percent, and provincial unit inputs were down by 7.5 percent. TABLE LXVTI Unit Cost In Current Dollars with Indexes Part I Administration Number of Students Total Operational Cost (1,000's) Administration Salaries Price Relative Total Expense Cost per Student Index 1961 » 100 Office Expense Price Relative Total Expense Cost per Student Index 1961 - 100 Trustees Expense Price Relative Total Expense Cost per Student Index 1961 « 100 Other Administration Price Relative Total Expense Cost per Student Index 1961 = 100 Total Administration Price Relative Total Expense Cost per Student Index 1951 • 100 1961 329,275 109,327 .0178 1,946,021 5.91 100.0 .0026 306,116 .93 100.0 .0024 262,385 .80 100 .0259 2,831,569 8.60 100.0 .0489 5,348,000 16.24 100.0 1962 348,459 116,323 .0171 1,989,123 5.71 96.6 .0027 314,072 .90 96.8 .0027 314,072 .90 112.5 .0230 2,675,429 7.68 89.3 .0455 5,296,000 15.20 93.6 1963 366,947 127,614 .0151 2,054,585 5.60 94.8 .0030 382,842 1.04 111.8 .0030 382,342 1.04 130.0 .0223 2,845,792 7.76 90.2 .0444 5,664,000 15.44 95.1 1964 387,010 140,168 .0167 2,340,306 6.05 102.4 .0030 420,504 1.09 117.2 .0031 434,521 1.12 140.0 .0220 3,083,696 7.97 92.7 .0448 5,280,000 16.23 99.9 1965 408,30S 158,060 .0158 2,497,348 6.12 103.6 .0028 442,568 1.08 116.1 .0034 537,404 L.32 165.0 .0219 3,461,514 8.48 98.6 .0439 6,938,000 16.99 104.6 1966 430,761 183,366 .0174 3,190,568 7.41 125.4 .0030 550,098 1.28 137.6 .0029 531,761 1.23 153.8 .0284 5,207,594 12.09 140.6 1967 454,843 213,445 .0155 3,308,398 7.27 123.0 .0028 597,646 1.31 140.9 .0033 704,369 1.55 193.8 .0294 6,275,283 13.80 160.5 .0517 9,477,000 22.00 135.5 .0510 10,891,000 24.14 148.6 1963 477,S68 245,392 .0162 3,975,350 3.32 140.8 .0027 662,558 1.39 149.5 .0034 834,333 1.75 213-8 .0297 7,288,142 15.26 177.4 .0520 12,769,000 26.74 164.7 1969 499,817 280,964 .0147 4,130,171 3.26 139.8 .0036 1,011,470 2.02 217.2 .0043 1,208,145 2.42 302.5 I .0270 7,586,028 15.18 176.5 .0496 13,945,000 27.90 171.3 U> - J TABLE LXVTII Unit Cost in Current Dollars with Indexes Part H Teachers Salaries 1—• "Enrolments 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Elementary 221,682 230,822 239,417 249,309 262,460 278,295 292,162 303,616 315,616 Elementary Special 1,242 1,490 2,210 4,233 6,034 6,591 7,360 7,525 6,979 Junior Secondary 74,455 80,943 85,131 86,146 86,528 92,578 99,413 106,313 112,751 Senior Secondary 31,455 34,279 39,129 44,916 47,827 47,721 50,139 54,371 59,075 Occupational & Spec. 441 925 1,060 2,406 5,456 5,576 5,769 5,743 5,396 Weightinq Elementary =1.0 Elementary Special 2.06 2.06 2.06 2.06 2.06 2.05 2.04 2.05 2.05 Junior Secondary 1.80 1.66 1.74 1.74 1.71 1.65 1.62 1.60 1.60 Senior Secondary 1.99 1.87 1.88 1.90 1.91 2.04 2.03 1.95 1.87 Occupational & Spec. 2.31 2.17 2.17 2.16 2.18 2.20 2.20 2.17 2.15 Weighted Units Elementary 221,682 230,822 239,417 249,309 262,460 278,295 292,162 303,616 315,616 Elementary Special 2,559 3,069 4,553 8,720 12,430 13,512 15,014 15,426 14,307 Junior Secondary 134,019 134,365 148,128 149,894 147,963 152,754 161,049 170,101 180,402 Senior Secondary 62,595 64,102 73,563 85,340 91,350 97,351 101,782 106,023 110,470 Occupational & Spec. 1,019 2,007 2,300 5,197 11,894 12,267 12,692 12,462 11,601 Total Units 421,874 434,365 467,961 498,460 526,097 554,179 582,699 607,628 632,396 Total Salaries (l.OOO's) $72,505 77,536 85,572 94,257 105,759 121,100 141,482 162,973 187,087 Cost per Unit $ 171.86 178.50 182.86 189.10 201.03 218.52 242,80 268.21 295.84 Index 1961 = 100 100.0 103.9 106.4 110.0 117.0 127.2 141.3 156.1 172.1 Cost per Student 220.20 222.51 233.20 243.55 259.02 281.13 311.06 341.26 374.31 Index 1961 = 100 100.0 101.0 105.9 110.6 117.6 127." 141.3 155.0 170.0 TABLE LXIX Unit Cost i n Current Dollars with Indexes Part III Clerical 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Clerical Salaries Enrolments Weighted Elementary x 1.00 221,682 230,822 239,417 249,309 262,460 278,295 292,162 303,616 315,616 Elementary Special x 1.00 1,242 1,490 2,210 4,233 6,034 6,591 7,360 7,525 6,979 Junior Secondary x 1.5 111,683 121,414 127,697 129,219 129,792 138,867 149,119 159,470 169,127 Senior Secondary x 2.0 62,910 68,558 78,258 89,832 95,654 95,442 100,278 108,742 118,150 Occupational & Spec x 2.0 882 1,850 2,120 4,812 10,912 11,152 11,538 11,486 10,792 Total Units 398,399 424,194 449,702 477,405 504,852 530,347 560,457 590,839 620,664 Price Relative .0115 .0119 .0124 .0121 .0141 .0158 .0165 .0192 .0196 Total Salaries $1,257,261 1,384,244 1,582,414 1,696,033 2,228,646 2,897,183 3,521,843 4,711,526 5,506,894 Cost per Unit $3.16 3.26 3.52 3.55 4.41 5.46 6.28 7.97 8.87 Index 1961=100 100.0 103.2 111.4 112.3 139.6 172.8 198.7 252.2 280.7 Cost Per Student $3.82 3.97 4.31 4.38 5.46 6.73 7.74 9.87 11.02 Index 1961=100 100.0 103.9 112.8 114.7 142.9 176.2 202.6 258.4 288.5 TABLE LXX Unit Cost in Current Dollars with Indexes Part IV Instructional Supplies and Other Instruction 1961 1962 1953 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Instructional Supplies Enrolments Weiqhted Elementary x 1.00 Elementary Special x 1.25 Junior Secondary x 3.00 Senior Secondary x 3.00 Occupational 5 Special x 3.00 Total Units 221,682 1,553 223,365 94,365 1,323 542,288 230,822 1,863 242,329 102,837 2,775 581,126 239,417 2,763 255,393 117,387 3,180 618,140 249,309 5,291 258,438 134,748 7,218 655,004 262,460 7,543 259,584 143,431 16,363 639,436 278,295 8,239 277,734 143,163 16,728 724,159 . 292,162 9,200 298,239 150,417 17,307 767,325 303,615 9,406 318,939 163,113 17,229 812,303 315,616 3,724 333,253 177,225 15,188 356,006 Price Relative .0329 .0360 .0371 .0393 .0399 .0413 .0459 .0499 .0471 Total Cost 3,596,858 4,187,628 4,734,479 5,508,602 6,306,594 7,573,016 9,797,126 12,245,061 13,233,404 Cost Per Unit Index 1961=100 $6.63 100.0 7.21 108.7 7.66 115.5 8.41 126.8 9.15 138.0 10.46 157.8 12.77 192.6 15.07 227.3 15.46 233.1 Cost Per Student Index 1961=100 $10.92 100.0 12.02 110.1 12.90 113.1 14.23 130.3 15.45 141.5 17.58 161.0 21.54 197.3 25.64 234.8 26.43 242.5 TABLE LXXI Unit Cost i n Current Dollars with Indexes Part V Janitors Salaries and Supplies 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 A l l Plant Operation Enrolments Weighted Elementary x 1.0 Elementary Special x 2.11 Junior Secondary x 1.3 Senior Secondary x 1.5 Occupational & Special x 1.95 Total Units 221,682 2,ea 96,792 47,183 860 369,138 230,822 3,144 105,226 51,419 1,804 392,415 239,417 4,663 110,670 58,694 2,067 415,511 249,309 8,932 111,990 67,374 4,692 442,297 262,460 12,732 112,486 71,741 10,639 470,058 278,295 13,907 120,351 71,582 10,873 495,008 292,162 15,530 129,237 75,209 11,250 523,388 303,616 15,878 138,207 81,557 11,199 550,457 315,616 14,726 146,576 88,613 10,522 576,053 Janitors Salaries Price Relative .0697 .0660 .0650 .0632 .0607 .0613 .0641 .0640 .0626 Total Salaries $7,620,902 7,677,318 8,294,910 8,858,618 9,594,242 11,240,336 13,681,825 15,705,088 17,588,346 Cost Per Unit Index 1961-100 $20.64 100.00 19.56 94.8 19.96 96.7 20.03 97.0 20.41 98.9 22.71 110.0 26.14 126.6 28.53 138.2 30.53 147.9 Cost Per Student Index 1961-100 $23.14 100.0 22.03 95.2 22.61 97.7 22.89 98.9 23.50 101.6 26.10 112.8 30.08 130.0 32.89 142.1 35.19 152.1 Janitors Supplies Price Relative .0057 .0057 .0053 .0052 .0052 .0048 .0047 .0045 .0049 Total Cost $623,164 663,041 676,354 728,874 821,912 880,157 1,003,192 1,104,264 1,376,724 Cost Per Unit Index 1961-100 $1.69 100.0 1.69 100.0 1.63 96.4 1.65 97.6 1.75 103.6 1.78 105.3 1.92 113.6 2.01 118.9 2.39 141.4 Cost Per Student Index 1961-100 $1.89 100.0 1.90 100.5 1.84 97.4 1.88 99.5 2.01 106.3 2.04 107.9 2.21 116.9 2.31 122.2 2.75 145.5 TABLE LXXU Unit Cost in Current Dollars with Indexes Part VI U t i l i t i e s , Insurance and Other, and Grounds 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 196e 1969 U t i l i t i e s Price Relative Total Cost Cost Per Unit Index 1961=100 Cost Per Pupil Index 1961=100 Insurance and Other Price Relative Total Cost Cost Per Unit Index 1961=100 Cost Per Pupil Index 1961=100 Grounds Price Relative Total Cost Cost Per Unit Index 1961=100 Cost Per Pupil Index 1961=100 .0391 $4,274,686 $11.58 100.0 $12.98 100.0 .0103 $1,126,068 $3.05 100.0 $3.42 100.0 .0113 $1,235,395 $3.35 100.0 $3.75 100.0 .0380 4,420,274 11.26 97.2 12.69 97.8 .0094 1,093,436 2.79 91.5 3.14 91.8 .0116 1,349,347 3.44 102.7 3.87 103.2 .0354 4,517,536 10.87 93.9 12.31 94.8 .0089 1,135,765 2.73 89.5 3.10 90.6 .0124 1,582,414 3.81 113.7 4.31 114.9 .0339 4,751,695 10.74 92.7 12.28 94.6 .0095 1,331,596 3.01 98.7 3.44 100.6 .0130 1,822,184 4.12 123.0 4.71 125.6 .0319 5,042,114 10.73 92.7 12.35 95.2 .0102 1,612,212 3.43 112.5 3.95 115.5 .0123 1,944,138 4.14 123.6 4.76 126.9 .0284 5,207,594 10.52 90.8 12.09 93.1 .0095 1,741,977 3.52 115.4 4.04 118.1 .0127 2,328,748 4.70 140.3 ' 5.41 144.3 .0279 5,955,116 11.38 98.3 13.09 100.9 .0079 1,686,216 3.22 105.6 3.71 108.5 .0118 2,518,651 4.81 143.6 5.54 147.7 .0270 6,625,584 12.04 104.0 13.87 106.9 .0089 2,183,989 3.07 130.2 4.57 133.6 .0127 3,116,473 5.66 169.0 6.53 174.1 .0248 6,967,907 12.10 104.5 13.94 107.4 .0090 2,528,676 4.39 143.9 5.06 143.0 .0124 3,433,954 6.05 180.6 6.57 1S5.9 TABLE LXXIII Unit Cost in Current Dollars with Indexes Part VTI Buildings, Equipment and Other Maintenance 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Buildings Price Relative .0362 .0430 .0381 .0361 .0358 .0348 .0369 .0348 .0303 Total Cost $3,957,637 5,001,889. 4,862,093 5,060,065 5,658,548 6, 381,137 7,876,121 8, 539,642 8, 513,209 Cost Per Unit $10.72 12.75 11.70 11.44 12.04 12.89 15.05 15.51 14.78 Index 1961=100 100.0 118.9 109.1 106.7 : 112.3 120.2 140.4 144.7 137.9 Cost Per Pupil 12.02 .14.35 ' 13.25 13.07 13.86 14.81 17.32 17.88 17.03 Index 1961=100 100.0 119.4 110.2 108.7 115.3 123.2 144.1 148.8 141.7 Equipment Price Relative .0142 .0119 .0155 .0157 .0143 .0112 .0126 .0121 .0106 Total Cost $1,552,443 1,384,244 1,978,017 2,200,638 2,260,258 2, 053,699 2,689,407 2, 969,243 2, 978,218 Cost Per Unit $4.21 3.53 4.76 4.98 4.81 4.15 5.14 5.39 5.17 Index 1961=100 100.0 83.8 113.1 118.3 114.3 98.6 122.1 128.0 122.8 Cost Per Pupil $4.71 3.97 5.39 5.69 5.54 4.77 5.91 6.22 5.96 Index 1961=100 100.0 84.3 114.4 120.8 117.6 101.3 125.5 132.1 126.5 Other Maintenance Price Relative .0040 .0024 .0029 .0028 .0028 .0056 .0044 .0042 .0047 Total Cost 437,308 279,175 370,081 392,470 442,568 1, 026,850 939,158 1, 030,646 1, 320,531 Cost Per Unit $1.18 .71 .89 .89 .94 2.07 1.79 1.87 2.29 Index 1961=100 100.0 60.2 75.4 75.4 79.7 175.4 151.7 158.5 194.1 Cost Per Pupil $1.33 .80 1.01 1.01 1.08 2.38 2.06 2.16 2.64 Index 1961=100 100.0 60.2 75.9 75.9 81.2 178.9 154.9 162.4 198.5 TABLE LXXIV Unit Cost in Current Dollars with Indexes Part VTII Total Plant Operation and Maintenance Transportation and Auxiliary Services 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Total Costs (in 1,000's) $20,829 21,872 23,419 25,147 27,374 30,856 36,357 41,275 44,771 Cost Per Unit $56.43 55.74 56.36 56.86 58.24 62.33 69.46 74.98 77.72 Index 1961=100 100.0 98.8 99.9 100.8 103.2 110.5 123.1 132.9 137.7 Cost Per Pupil $63.26 62.77 63.82 64.98 67.04 71.63 79.93 86.43 89.57 Index 1961=100 100.0 99.2 100.9 102.7 106.0 113.2 126.4 136.6 141.6 Transportation Total Costs (in 1,000's) $2,611 2,722 2,887 3,126 3,476 4,009 4,610 5,355 5,892 Cost Per Pupil Transported $51.55 51.94 53.26 52.27 53.66 60.62 67.18 75.72 77.45 Index 1961=100 100.0 100.8 103.3 101.4 104.1 117.6 130.3 146.9 150.2 Cost Per Pupil Enrolled $7.93 7.81 7.87 8.08 8.51 9.31 10.14 11.21 11.79 Index 1961=100 100.0 98.5 99.2 101.9 107.3 117.4 127.9 141.4 148.7 Auxiliary Services Total Costs (in 1,000's) $3,184 3,329 3,754 4,152 5,980 7,455 6,795 6,066 10,518 Cost Per Pupil $9.67 9.55 10.23 10.73 14.65 17.31 14.94 12.70 21.04 Index 1961=100 100.0 98.8 105.8 111.0 151.5 179.0 154.5 131.3 217.6 TABLE LXXV Unit Cost in Current Dollars with Indexes Part DC Total School Board Operational Costs and Departmental Expenditures 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 School Board Costs - • Total (in 1,000's) $109 , 327 116,323 127,614 140,168 158,060 183,366 213,445 245,392 280,964 Cost per Unit Index 1961 =100 $269.17 100.0 275.01 102.2 281.18 104.5 289.59 107.6 309.87 115.1 341.61 126.9 376.21 139.8 412.36 153.2 453.84 168.6 Cost per Student Index 1961 = 100 $332.02 100.0 333.82 100.5 347.77 104.7 362.18 109.1 387.11 116.6 425.68 128.2 469.27 141.3 513.84 154.8 562.13 169.3 Departmental Expenditures Public Schools Departmental Services Total Cost (in 1,000's) $1,773 2,000 2,330 2,443 2,877 5,665 5,771 5,890 6,655 Cost per Unit"'" Index 1961 = 100 $4. 37 100.0 4.73 108.2 5.13 117.4 5.05 115.6 5.64 129.1 10.55 241.4 10.17 232.7 9.90 226.5 10. 75 246.0 Cost per Student Index 1961 = 100 $5.38 100.0 5.74 106.7 6.35 118.0 6.31 117.3 7.05 131.0 13.15 244.4 12.69 235.9 12.33 229.2 13. 31 247.4 Contributions to Pension Plan Total Cost (in 1,000's) $3,493 S,658 3,881 4,111 4,339 4,635 5,021 5,453 6,160 2 Cost per Unxt Index 1961 = 100 8.28 100.0 8.42 101.7 8.29 100.1 8.25 99.6 8.25 99.6 8.36 101.0 8.62 104.1 8.97 108.3 9.74 117.6 Cost per Student Index 1961 = 100 $10.61 100.0 10.50 99.0 10.58 99.7 10.62 100.1 10.63 100.2 10.76 101.4 11.04 104.1 11.42 107.6 12.32 116.1 Units applied on the same Basis as School Board Total. Units applied on the same Basis as Teachers' Salaries. TABLE LXXVT Unit Cost in Current Dollars with Indexes Part X Revenue Support by Level of Government 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 : 1969 Capital Revenue Total Capital Costs Provincial Grants Municipal & Other (in 1,000's) Capital & Operational Revenue Total Municipal Revenue ' Other Revenue ' Sub-Total ' Deduct Municipal & Other Capital 1 Operational Revenue " Provincial Govt. Operating Grants Total (in 1,000's) $17,357 . 7,803 9,554 64,102 2,560 66,662 9,554 57,108 19,107 8,525 10,582 69,092 2,655 71,747 10,582 61,165 22,035 10,052 11,983 77,692 2,720 80,412 11,983 68,429 24,547 10,965 13,582 88,286 3,990 92,276 13,582 78,694 27,274 11,958 15,316 101,807 4,395 106,202 15,316 90,886 30,399 14,049 16,350 116,706 6,030 122,736 33,984 39,714 41,547 """ " ~ ~~ 21,757 16,160 17,824 143,099 7,146 150,245 20,568 19,146 160,221 8, 316 168,537 16,350 17,824 19,146 106,386 132,421 149,391 19,790 180,170 13,063 193,233 19,790 173,443 51,131 54,075 58,646 60,753 65,542 75,592 81,024 96,001 107,521 Grant per Unit Index 1961 = 100 125.89 100.0 127.84 101.5 129.22 102.6 125.52 99.7 128.49 102.1 140.83 111.9 142.81 113.4 161.32 128.1 173.68 138.0 Municipal & Other Operating Revenue Total (in 1,000's) 57,108 61,165 68,429 78,694 90,886 106,386 132,421 149,391 173,443 Revenue per Unit Index 1961 = 100 140.60 144.60 150.77 162.58 178.18 198.20 233.40 251.04 280.16 100.0 102.8 107.2 115.6 126.7 141.0 166.0 178.5 199.3 Source: Statistics Canada data and correspondence with B.C. Department of Education Appendix "B". TABLE LXXVTI Unit Cost i n Current Dollars with Indexes Part XI Summary of Unit Cost Indexes 1961=100 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Administration Admin. Salaries 100.0 9'6.6 94.8 102.4 103.6 125.4 123.0 140. ,8 139.8 Office Expense 100.0 96.8 111.8 117.2 116.1 137.6 140.9 149. ,5 217.2 Trustees 100.0 112.5 130.0 140.0 165.0 153.8 193.8 218. ,8 302.5 Other Admin. 100.0 89.3 90.2 92.7 98.6 140.6 160.5 177. ,4 176.5 Total Admin. 100.0 93.6 95.1 99.9 104.6 135.5 148.6 164. ,7 171.8 Teachers' Salaries 100.0 103.9 106.4 110.0 117.0 127.2 141.3 156. ,1 172.1 Other Instruction Clerical Salaries 100.0 103.2 111.4 112.3 139.6 172.8 198.7 252. ,7 280.7 Supplies and Other 100.0 108.7 115.5 126.8 138.0 157.8 192.6 227. 3 233.1 Plant Operation & Maintenance Janitors Salaries 100.0 94.8 96.7 97.0 98.9 110.0 126.6 138. 2 147.9 Janitors Supplies 100.0 100.0 96.4 97.6 103.6 105.3 113.6 118. 9 141.4 U t i l i t i e s 100.0 97.2 93.9 92.7 92.7 90.8 98.3 104. 0 104.5 Insurance and Other 100.0 91.5 89.5 98.7 112.5 115.4 105.6 130. 2 143.9 Grounds 100.0 102.7 113.7 123.0 123.6 140.3 143.6 169. 0 180.6 Buildings 100.0 118.9 109.1 106.7 112.3 120.2 140.4 144. 7 137.9 Equipment 100.0 83.8 113.1 118.3 114.3 98.6 122.1 128. 0 122.8 Other Maintenance 100.0 60.2 75.4 75.4 79.7 175.4 151.7 158. 5 194.1 Total 100.0 98.8 99.9 100.8 103.2 110.5 123.1 132. 9 137.7 Transportation 100.0 98.5 99.2 101.9 107.3 117.4 127.9 141. 4 148.7 Auxiliary Services 100.0 98.8 105.8 111.0 151.5 179.0 154.5 131. 3 217.6 Total School Board Costs 100.0 102.2 104.5 107.6 115.1 126.9 139.8 153. 2 168.6 Revenue Support Prov. Grants to Boards 100.0 101.5 102.6 99.7 102.1 111.9 113.4 128. 1 138.0 Local Taxes and Other 100.0 102.8 107.2 115.6 126.7 141.0 166.0 178. 5 199.3 Provincial Government Costs Dept. of Education Services 100.0 108.2 117.4 115.6 129.1 241.4 232.7 226. 5 246.0 Contributions to Pension Plan 100.0 101.7 100.1 99.6 99.6 101.0 104.1 108. 3 117.6 TABLE LXXVTII B.C. Public School Board Expenditures Deflated by Category Category 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Administration (Current) 5 ,348,000 5 ,296,000 5 ,664,000 6,280,000 6 ,938,000 9 ,477,000 10 ,891,000 12 ,769,000 13,945,000 Price Index 100.0 101.8 106.6 111.5 117.5 128.8 145.8 153.5 166.6 Administration (Constant) 5. ,348,000 5 ,202,357 5 ,313,320 5,632,287 5 ,904,680 7 ,357,919 7 ,469,821 8. ,056,151 3,370,348 Instructional Salaries (Current) 72 ,505,000 77. ,536,000 85,572,000 94,257,000 105,759,000 121 ,100,000 141,482,000 162,973,000 187,087,000 Price Index 100.0 101.C 104.9 108.5 114.5 123.0 133.3 142.4 152.9 Instructional Salaries (Constant) 72 ,505,000 76, ,768,317 61,574,833 86,872,811 92 , 365,939 98,455,285 106 ,138,035 114 ,447,231 122,359,053 Cle r i c a l Salaries (Current) 1. ,257,261 1, ,384,244 1. ,582,414 1,696,033 2 ,228,646 2 ,897,183 3, ,521,843 4,711,526 5,506,894 Price Index 100.0 103.6 111.4 117.7 124.6 131.3 145.0 155.4 167.0 Cle r i c a l Salaries (Constant) 1, ,257,261 1, ,336,143 1. ,420,479 1,440,980 1 ,788,640 2 ,206,537 2, ,428,857 3. ,031,370 3,297,541 Supplies (Current) 3, ,596,858 4, ,187,628 4. ,734,479 5,508,602 6 ,306,594. 7 ,573,016 9. ,797,126 12. ,245,061 13,233,404 Price Index 100.0 99.7 101.8 102.0 104.3 107.0 109.0 110.1 111.4 Supplies (Constant) 3,596,858 4, ,200,229 4, ,650,765 5,400,590 6, ,046,591 7. ,077,585 8,988,189 11: ,121,763 11,879,178 Total Other (Current) 4, ,850,000 5, ,568,000 6,318,000 7,206,000 8, ,533,000 10, ,469,000 13, ,310,000 16, ,954,000 18,751,000 Price Index 100.0 100.6 104.1 105.3 108.9 112.8 116.7 113.8 123.5 Total Other (Constant) 4, ,850,000 5, 534,791 6, ,069,164 6,843,304 7, ,835,629 9, ,281,028 11, 405,312 14, ,151,913 15,132,395 Plant & Maintenance (Current) 20, ,829,000 21, 872,000 23, ,419,000 25,147,000 27, ,374,000 30, ,856,000 36,357,000 41, ,275,000 44,771,000 Price Index 100.0 101.9 102.5 104.2 107.0 112.5 119.1 124.3 132.9 Plant & Maintenance (Constant) 20, 829,000 21,464,181 22, 847,804 24,133,397 25, 583,177 27,427,555 30, 526,448 33, 046,437 33,637,735 Transportation (Current) 2, ,611,000 2,722,000 2, ,887,000 3,126,000 3, ,476,000 . 4, ,009,000 4, ,610,000 5, ,355,000 5,892,000 Price Index 100.0 100.8 103.3 101.4 104.1 117.6 130.3 146.3 150.2 Transportation (Constant) 2,611,000 2, 700,397 2, ,794,773 3,082,840 3, ,339,097 3, ,409,014 3, ,537,989 3,645,337 3,922,770 Auxiliary (Current) 3, 184,000 3, 329,000 3, ,754,000 4,152,000 5, ,980,000 7, ,455,000 6, 795,000 6, ,066,000 10,518,000 Price Index 100.0 98.8 105.8 111.0 151.5 179.0 154.5 131.3 217.6 Auxiliary (Constant) 3, 184,000 3,369,433 3, 548,204 3,740,541 3, 947,195 4, 164,804 4, 398,058 4,619,954 4,333,640 Total School Board (Current) 109,327,000 116, 323,000 127,614,000 140,168,000 158, 060,000 183, 366,000 213, 445,000 245, ,392,000 230,964,000 Price Index 100.0 101.1 104.5 107.6 113.8 122.2 130.5 137.3 149.2 Total School Board (Constant) 109, 327,000 115, 057,368 122, 118,660 130,267,657 138, 392,794 150, 054,009 163,559,386 177, 949,233 133,313,672 Source: Current expenditures Appendix A. Price indexes Table LII. TABLE LXXIX Instructional Salaries - Sub-Categories Deflated v.ith Constant Unit Costs Instructional Salaries 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1569 Teachers (Current) 55, ,032,190 57,552,176 63 597,715 68,762,646 76,796,020 -9, 528,852 105,544,123 118 ,677,132 134 ,830,828 Price Index 1961=100 10G.0 100. S 104.5 107.0 113.4 122.7 132.5 140.4 151.4 Teachers (Constant) 55, ,032,190 57,265,347 60, 359,057 64,264,342 67,721,25c 72, 955,650 79 ,655,942 84 ,527,872 69 ,056 , 036 Special Staff (Current) 12, ,518,624 14,650,257 16, 060,928 13,552,918 20,650,002 21. 467,401 24,395,529 30 ,911,672 36 Price Index 100.0 102.4 105.5 112.0 115.6 119.8 132.6 146.1 155.0 Special S t a f f (Constant) 12, ,518,634 14,307.019 • 1 223,628 16,565,105 17,862,324 1", 936,061 18 ,397,835 21 ,157,836 21 ,777,645 Supervising P r i n c i p a l s (Current) 3, ,558,733 3,556,817 4, 223,197 4,945,077 5,872,046 6, 943,647 7 ,886,800 9 ,108,500 10 ,533,900 Price Index 100.0 103.0 107.3 114.5 . 122.4 131.1 139.7 148.3 158.3 Supervising Princ i p a l s (Constant) 3, ,558,733 3,744,463 3, 917,622 4,318,845 4,802,225 5, 296,451 5 ,645,526 6, ,141,942 6 ,654,390 D i s t r i c t Supervisors (Current) 1, ,395,443 1,476,620 1, 690,160 1,996,159 2,434,932 1 140,100 3 ,655,548 4 ,275,696 4 ,366,912 Price Index 100.0 101.5 106.7 111.6 119.0 125. e 146.2 157.6 165.3 D i s t r i c t Supervisors (Constant) 1, ,395,443 1,454,793 1, 584,030 1,788,673 2,046,161 :'' 312,297 2 ,500,375 2 ,713,005 2 ,944,290 Instructional Units 421,874 434,365 467,961 498,460 526,097 554,179 582,699 607,628 632,396 Constant Cost Per Unit Teachers Salaries $130.44 131.33 130.04 128.93 126.72 131.66 136.70 139.11 140.82 Special S t a f f 29.67 32.94 32.53 33.23 33.95 32.37 31.57 34.82 37.60 Supervising Princ i p a l s 8.44 S.62 8.37 8.66 9.13 9.56 9.69 10.11 10.52 D i s t r i c t Supervisors 3.31 3.25 3.38 3.59 3.89 4.17 4.29 4.46 4.66 Total 171.86 176.74 174.32 174.41 175.69 177.76 182.25 188.50 193.60 Source: Salary and index data Table XXXIII. Instructional units calculated on the basis of teachers' salaries d i f f e r e n t i a l s Table LXVIII. TABLE LXXX Constant Unit Costs by Category School Board Expenditures 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Administration Constant Cost No. of Units Constant Unit Cost 5,348,000 329,275 16.24 5,202,357 348,459 14.93 5,513,320 366,947 14.48 5,632,287 387,010 14.55 5,904,680 408,305 14.46 7,357,519 430,761 17.08 7,465,821 454,843 16.42 8,056,151 477,568 16.87 8,370,348 499,817 16.75 School C l e r i c a l Constant Cost No. of Units Constant Unit Cost 1,257,261 398,399 3.16 1,336,143 424,194 3.15 1,420,479 449,702 3.16 1,440,980 477,405 3.02 1,788,640 504,852 3.54 2,206,537 530,347 4.16 2,428,857 560,457 4.33 3,031,870 590,839 5.13 3,297,541 620,664 5.31 Supplies Constant Cost No. of Units Constant Unit Cost 3,596,858 542,288 6.63 4,200,229 581,126 7.23 4,650,765 618,140 7.52 5,400,590 655,004 8.25 6,046,591 689,436 8.77 7,077,585 724,159 9.77 8,988,189 767,325 11.71 11,121,763 812,303 13.69 11,879,178 856,006 13.88 Plant & Maintenance Constant Cost No. of Units Constant Unit Cost 20,829,000 369,138 56.43 21,464,181 392,415 54.70 22,847,804 415,511 54.99 24,133,397 442,297 54.56 25,583,177 470,058 54.43 27,427,555 495,008 55.41 30,526,448 523,388 58.32 33,046,437 550,457 60.03 33,687,735 576,053 58.48 Transportation Constant Cost No. of Units Constant Unit Cost 2,611,000 329,275 7.93 2,700,397 348,459 7.75 2,794,773 366,947 7.62 3,032,840 337,010 7.97 3,339,097 408,305 8.18 3,409,014 430,761 7.91 3,537,989 454,843 7.78 3,645,337 477,568 7.63 3,922,770 499,817 7.85 Auxiliary Services Constant Cost No. of Units Constant Unit Cost 3,184,000 329,275 9.67 3,369,433 348,459 9.67 3,543 , 204 366,947 9.67 3.740,541 337,010 9.67 3,947,195 408,305 9.67 4,164,804 430,761 9.67 4,393,058 454,343 9.67 4,619,954 477,568 9.67 4,833,640 499,817 9.67 See respective current dollar tables in this chapter for calculation of unit data. TABLE LXXXI Constant Unit Costs By Category-Provincial Government Department Of Education Expenditures Unit Costs 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Department Services (Current) Total Education Price Index^-Department Services (Constant)^ Teachers' Pension Plan (Current) Teachers' Salaries Price Index Teachers' Pension Plan (Constant) 4.37 4.73 5.13 5.05 5.64 10.55 10.17 9.90 10.75 100.0 101.1 104.5 107.6 113.8 122.2 130.5 137.9 149.2 4.37 4.68 4.91 4.69 4.96 8.63 7.79 7.13 7.21 8.28 8.42 8.29 8.25 8.25 8.36 8.62 8.97 9.74 100.0 101.0 104.9 108.5 114.5 123.0 133.3 142.4 152.9 8.28 8.34 7.90 7.60 7.21 6.80 6.47 6.30 6.37 ^"Estimated data. Source: Current unit cost data Table LXXV. TABLE LXXXII Constant Per Unit Public School Board Revenues by Source 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Current Dollar Revenue Monicipal Operating Revenue Provincial Operating Grants ' Deficit/Surplus Total Expenditure Price Index Constant Dollar Revenue Municipal Provincial Deficit/Surplus Total Expenditure Units of Enrolment Constant Per Unit Data Municipal Provincial Deficit/Surplus Total Constant Per Unit Indexes 1961=100 Municipal Provincial Total 57,108,000 51,131,000 1,088,000 109,327,000 100.0 57,108,000 51,131,000 1,088,000 109,327,000 406,164 140.60 125.89 2.68 269.17 100.0 100.0 100.0 61,165,000 54,075,000 1,083,000 116,323,000 101.1 60,499,505 53,486,646 1,071,216 115,057,368 422,981 143.03 126.45 2.53 272.02 101.7 100.4 101.1 68,429,000 58,646,000 539,000 127,614,000 104.5 65,482,296 56,120,574 515,739 122,118,660 453,855 .144.28 123.65 1.14 269.07 102.6 98.2 100.0 73,694,000 90,886,000 60,753,000 65,542,000 721,000 1,632,000 140,168,000 158,060,000 107.6 113.8 73,135,687 79,864,674 56,461,896 57,594,024 670,074 1,434,094 130,267,657 138,892,794 484,023 151.10 116.65 1.38 269.14 107.5 92.7 100.0 510,090 156.57 112.91 2.81 272.29 111.4 89.7 101.2 106,386,000 75,592,000 1,388,000 183,366,000 122.2 87,058,919 61,859,247 1,135,843 150,054,009 536,768 162.19 115.24 2.12 279.55 115.4 91.5 103.9 132,421,000 81,024,000 213,445,000 130.5 101,472,030 62,087,356 16,559,386 567,359 178.85 109.43 288.28 149,391,000 95,001,000 245,392,000 137.9 108,332,e49 69,616,388 177,949,238 595,091 182.04 116.98 299.03 173,443,000 107,521,000 280,964,000 149.2 116,248,659 72,065,013 188,313,672 619,087 187.77 116.41 304.18 Lh ro 127.2 86.9 107.1 129.5 92.9 111.1 133.5 92.5 113.0 TABLE LXXXLTI Summary of Constant Unit Costs School Board Category 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Admini stration 16.24 14.93 14.48 14.55 14.46 17.08 16. 42 16.87 16.75 Teachers' Salaries 130.44 131.83 130.04 128.93 128.72 131.66 136. 70 139.11 140.82 Special Staff 29.67 32.94 32.53 33.23 33.95 32.37 31. 57 34.82 37.60 Supervising Principals 8.44 8.62 8.37 8.66 9.13 9.56 9. 69 10.11 10.52 Di s t r i c t Supervisors 3.31 3.35 3.38 3.59 3.89 4.17 4. 29 4.46 4.66 Total Instructional Salaries 171.86 176.74 174.32 174.41 175.69 177.76 182. 25 188.50 193.60 School Clerical 3.16 3.15 3.16 3.02 3.54 4.16 4. 33 5.13 5.31 Supplies 6.63 7.23 7.52 8.25 8.77 9.77 11. 71 13.69 13.88 Plant & Maintenance 56.43 54.70 54.99 54.56 54.43 55.41 58. 32 60.03 58.48 Transportation 7.93 7.75 7.62 7.97 8.18 7.91 7. 78 7.63 7.85 Auxiliary Services 9.67 9.67 9.67 9.67 9.67 9.67 9. 67 9.67 9.67 Department of Education Category Department Services^ 4.37 4.68 4.91 4.69 4.96 8.63 7. 79 7.18 7.21 Teachers' Pensions 8.28 8.34 7.90 7.60 7.21 6.80 6. 47 6.30 6.37 Estimate based on Table LXXI. TABLE LXXXIV Indexes of Change in Real Inputs Based on Constant Per unit Costs 1961=100 School Board Category 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Administration 100.0 91.9 89.2 89.6 89.0 105.2 101.1 103.9 103.1 Teachers Salaries 100.0 101.1 99.7 98.8 98.7 100.9 104.8 106.6 108.0 Special Staff 100.0 111.0 109.6. 112.0 114.4 109.1 106.4 117.4 126.7 Supervising Principals 100.0 102.1 99.2 102.6 108.2 113.3 114.8 119.8 124.6 District Supervisors 100.0 101.2 102.1 108.5 117.5 126.0 129.6 134.7 140.8 Total Instructional Salaries 100.0 102.8 101.4 101.5 102.2 103.4 106.0 109.7 112.6 School Cleri c a l 100.0 99.7 100.0 95.6 112.0 131.6 137.0 162.3 168.0 Supplies 100.0 109.0 113.4 124.4 132.3 147.4 176.6 206.5 209.4 Plant & Maintenance 100.0 96.9 97.4 96.7 96.5 98.2 103.3 106.4 103.6 Transportation 100.0 97.7 96.1 100.5 103.2 99.7 98.1 96.2 99.0 Auxiliary Services 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Totals Municipal Tax Share 100.0 101.7 102.6 107.5 111.4 115.4 127.2 129.5 133.5 Provincial Grants to Boards 100.0 100.4 98.2 92.7 89.7 91.5 86.9 92.9 92.5 Total School Board Costs 100.0 101.1 100.0 100.0 101.2 103.9 107.1 111.1 113.0 Provincial Government Dept. of Education Services 1 100.0 107.1 112.4 107.3 113.5 197.5 178.3 164.3 165.0 Teachers Pensions 100.0 100.7 95.4 91.8 87.1 82.1 78.1 76.1 76.9 Estimate based on Table LXXI. - lib5 -CHAPTER VIII SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS The study was designed to examine the validity of some commonly held assumptions which appear to be implicit i n pressures at the provincial level of decision-making to restrain increases i n the cost of public school education. Further, the study sought to lay the foundations for an examination of the assumptions that seem to be implicated i n provincial education finance policy i n British Columbia. The f i r s t commonly held assumption i s that the rate of increase in the price of public school education has been greater than price increases i n the general economy. This assumption is popularly expressed i n the term "holding the line". The second assumption, that there has been an increase i n the quantities of goods and services purchased and that these goods and services are not required for the educative process, calls forth the popular expression of "cutting the f r i l l s " . Provincial policy-makers i n British Columbia appear to have accepted the validity of at least one of the above assumptions and have introduced policies that seek to restrain the rate of increase i n public school budgets and place some control over the rate of increase i n teachers* salaries. These policy actions appear to be based on at least one of two additional assumptions. The f i r s t i s that the rate of increase i n the price of public school education can be curtailed by reducing the flow of funds and by restricting the rate of increase i n teachers' salaries.; secondly, that a reduction i n the flow of funds to public schools w i l l c u r t a i l the purchases of goods and services not required for the educative process. - 156 -Four research questions have been structured to examine the validity of the four assumptions identified above. This chapter presents empirical data which refer to three of these questions and discusses the need for further research on the fourth and other related questions. The following brief overview of the study identifies the relative impact of the three variables which affect total public school costs, and w i l l serve as an introduction to a more detailed examination of the research questions. The Three Variables. In 1969 the total operational costs of public school board operations i n British Columbia were 157 percent above the 1961 level. During the same period per-unit costs increased by 68.6 percent, the price of the goods and services purchased had increased by 49.2 percent, and the quantity of goods and services purchased on a per-unit basis had increased by 13.0 percent. The following summary of the above data shows the changes i n these variables at two year intervals. 1961 1963 1965 1967 1969 Total School Board Costs 100.0 116.7 144.6 195.2 257.0 Per-Unit Costs 100.0 104.5 115.1 139.8 168.6 Price Index 100.0 104.5 113.8 130.5 149.2 Per-Unit Inputs 100.0 100.0 101.2 107.1 113.0 - 157 -It may be concluded, therefore, that the moat important variable in the determination of total public school board costs was the number of pupils i n the systems, and that price increases accounted for the largest portion of the increase i n per-unit costs. The above analysis of costs has served to separate the effects of changes i n price from changes i n the quantities of goods and services purchased by public school boards. Total price changes must be compared to other economic indicators, and quantity changes have to be examined for changes i n the quantities of specific goods and services purchased, i f such data are to provide a vehicle for the examination of the assumptions. Changes i n Price. Have the prices of public school goods and services increased at a higher or lower rate than price increases of similar goods and services i n the general economy? Education i s a labour intensive industry. Similar goods and services would, therefore, be other industries that are highly labour intensive. Research for the study identified price indexes for the following labour intensive services and industries: new homes, dental services, personal services, and equipment repair. These indexes, together with the price index for public school services., have been presented i n graphic form i n Figure IV and are summarized below. FIGURE IV PUBLIC SCHOOL AND OTHER PRICE INDEXES 170 r-170 - 159 -1961 1963 1965 1967 1969 Public School Services 100.0 104.5 113. 8 130.5 149.2 New Homes 100.0 106.0 117. 5 131.6 151.6 Dental Services 100.0 110.0 118. 4 131.6 152.5 Personal Services 100.0 105.1 117. 5 136.7 151.8 Equipment Repair 100.0 107.9 112. 3 131.3 160.3 The question may be examined further by comparing the public school education price index with other economic indicators such as, the average weekly wage of British Columbians, the total Consumer Price Index and the Consumer Price Index for a l l services. It should be noted, however, that the Consumer Price Indexes include products of industries that are capital intensive and that the above comparisons are based on . industries that have a limited a b i l i t y to substitute capital for labour. 1961 1963 1965 1967 1969 Public School 100.0 104.5 113.8 130.5 149.2 Average Weekly Wage (B.C.) 100.0 106.3 118.2 134.4 151.8 Consumer Price Index 100.0 102.9 107.4 115.3 125.5 (All goods and services) Consumer Price Index 100.0 104.1 114.7 127.0 141.8 (All Services) The above data indicate that the rate of increase in the price of public school education in British Columbia between 1961 and 1969, while greater than the increase for consumer expenditures generally and consumer services, was not greater than other labour intensive industries, nor was i t greater than the economic indicator of average weekly wages. These - 160 -data, however, refer to the total price of public school education, and what i s true of the whole i s not necessarily true of the parts. Data identified by the research indicate that the price of some public school services increased at a much more rapid rate than others; thus, i n some cases the rate of increase was greater than the average indicated above. An appreciation of an additional concept is necessary for the discussion and analysis of these findings. The public school educative process i n our society involves the interaction of pupils and teachers i n classrooms. Any service which is directly connected with that process may be called a "direct service", and services which are complementary to, or indirectly connected with the process may be called "indirect". "Direct" services i n the public school educative process would, include the services of a teacher, a plant i n which to conduct the process, and, i n some cases, transportation to bring the students to that plant. Complementary services include those of other instructional staff, and the non-instructional staff. Moving from instructional to non-instructional staff i n order of diminishing direct involvement there are the services of special staff, supervising principals, d i s t r i c t supervisors, school and central office clerks, administrators (business officers i n the central office), and trustees. The following analysis of the findings of the study ranks services according to their degree of direct involvement i n the - 161 -educative process for the purpose of demonstrating some relationships i n price changes. Such ranking should not be interpreted as a ranking of the u t i l i t y value of the service to the system or to the educative process. When the rates of price increase are examined within this conceptual framework, there i s an almost perfect inverse correlation between the rate of price increase and the rank ordering of the service's degree of direct involvement i n the educative process. The following summary presents the indexes for the professional group and proceeds through the non-professional group on the basis of diminishing direct involvement i n the educative process. Indexes Professional Staff. 1961 1963 1965 1967 1969. 1961 1969 Teachers 100.0 104.5 113.4 132.5 151.4 50.34 48.00 Special Staff 100.0 105.5 115.6 132.6 155.0 11.45 13.12 Supervising Principals 100.0 107.8 122.4 139.7 158.3 3.26 3.75 District Supervisors 100.0 106. 7 119.0 146.2 165.3 1.27 1.73 Non-Professional Services Clerical 100.0 111.4 124.6 145.0 167.0 2.04 2.70 Administrators 100.0 109.3 125.0 157.2 194.5 .98 1.59 Trustees 100.0 149.8 189.3 377.8 496.3 .24 .43 Percent of Operational Expenditure The foregoing analysis provides the basis for a more precise response to the question. While the rate of increase i n the total price - 162 -of public school education in British Columbia between 1961 and 1969 was less than the rates of increase in other labour intensive industries and less than the rate of increase i n the average weekly wage, there was a significant difference i n the rate of increase i n the price of some of the services purchased by public schools. There was an almost perfect inverse correlation between the rate of increase i n the price of professional and non-professional services and the degree to which those services were actually involved i n the educative process i n the classroom. Rates of increase in the price of services directly involved i n the educative process were below the rates of increase i n other labour intensive industries and below the rate of increase i n the average weekly wage. The further the service was removed from the actual educative process the greater the tendency for the rate of increase i n the price of that service to be greater than the rates of increase i n other labour intensive industries. These findings have several implications for the examination of the assumption that the rate of increase i n the price of public school' education has been greater than price increases i n the general economy. This assumption i s not capable of support with respect to direct educational services but i s substantiated with respect to some indirect services. The question which now requires consideration i s what has been the effect of government policy. - 163 -The Impact of Policy on Price Changes. Will the, constraint on public school budgets and control over rate of increase i n teachers* salaries reduce the rate of increase i n the price of public school education? The study was not designed to research this question but to provide a basis for future research of the problem. Several observations may be made, however, on the basis of the data identified by the present study. The study found that the price of indirect services increased at a greater rate than the price of direct services, that the price of direct services increased at a lower rate than the price of goods and services i n other labour intensive industries, and that the price of some indirect services increased at a greater rate than the price of the products of other labour intensive industries. A relevant sub-question would be, w i l l the constraint on public school budgets correct this state? Data identified by the study indicate that such a policy may not correct this condition for there was a reduction i n the flow of funds during the f i r s t half of the period covered by the study, but the price of indirect services increased at a greater rate than the price of direct services during this period. However, the data, did show that the prices of both direct and indirect services rose much less rapidly during the early part of the period when total resources were most constrained. It i s d i f f i c u l t to determine whether there i s a causal connection.; - .1.1 w1 -As was shown in Chapter VII, in 196 3 the portion of the deflated per-unit resources made availabe to the public school system by the provincial government declined below the 1961 level and remained below the base year level for the balance of the period covered by the study. In 1963 and 1964 the total deflated unit resources available to school boards were at the 1961 level and only increased to the 1962 level in 1965. The f i r s t half of the period covered by this study was, therefore, a period in which the resources available to public school boards were restricted. Rates of increase in the price of indirect services were i n excess of the rates of increase i n the price of direct services during this same period. There is a need for a study designed to examine the relation-ship between the rate of price increase and the availability of funds which is indicated by the data identified in this study. When there was a restriction in the availability of resources during the f i r s t half of the period analysed the price index for public school education lagged behind the indexes for the products of other labour intensive industries. There was a tendency for the gap between the price indexes to close in the second half of the period when there was an increase i n the available resources. These trends indicate a need for research designed to examine the following questions; 1. Was the relatively low rate of increase i n the price of public school education between 1961 and 1965 caused by the restriction i n the availability of resources during that period? - 165 -2. Was the relatively greater rate of increase in the price of public school education in the second half of the period caused by the relative increase in the resources available to public schools or was i t the result of other economic pressures? Studies designed to examine the relationship between the rate of price increase and the availability of funds may also take inter- and intra-provincial differences into consideration. The research for the present study included an inter-provincial comparison of public school revenue and expenditure. Data identified by this research are contained in Appendix L. These data indicate that the provincial government of British Columbia bore a smaller share of the increase in the cost of public school education between 1961 and 1969, than the government of any other province. The data also indicate, that the rate of increase in the cost of public school education was lower in British Columbia than in any other province. There is an obvious need for research designed to examine the following questions. 1. Was the lower rate of increase in the cost of public school education in British Columbia caused by a lower rate of increase in the price of public school services or by a level of service which was below that in other provinces? - 166 -2. If the lower rate of increase i n cost was caused by a lower rate ol; increase in price, then to what extent did I lie reduced supper I. ol' the provincial government contribute to the lower rate ol price increase? 3. If the lower rate of increase i n cost was caused by a reduced level of service, what services were reduced and was the reduction in service caused by reduced financial support? The following questions are an extension of this question, stated i n more specific terms. a. This study found that the number of students i n special elementary and occupational classes declined. Was this decline due to a reduced need for these services or was i t caused by restricted resources? b. During the period covered by this study several expensive programs such as automotives and food services were introduced. Does the relatively small increase i n real inputs of direct services, discussed i n the following pages, indicate that these programs were introduced at the expense of inputs into other programs? The above questions cannot be answered u n t i l studies similar to the one reported here have been conducted for other provinces. Changes i n Quantities of Purchases. Has there been an increase i n the quantities of goods and services purchased for public school education and are these additional goods and services necessary for the educative process? - 167 -Data presented above indicate that there has been an increase in quantities purchased. Further examination of the question requires an analysis of changes i n the kinds of goods and services purchased. Changes i n the kinds of goods and services purchased over time may also be analysed within the conceptual framework of direct and indirect services. This type of analysis also demonstrates an inverse correlation between the rate of increase i n the quantity of service purchased, and the degree to which the service was directly involved i n the educative process. Trustees are fixed inputs and are not, therefore, subject to quantity fluctuations. While administrators are not fixed inputs the . quantity should not vary to the same extent as the per-unit inputs of • other services. Indexes of per-unit inputs for the remaining services are presented below i n the same order as that contained i n the summary of price changes. Services are again listed on the basis of diminishing direct involvement i n the educative process. 1961 1963 1965 1967 1969 Professional Staff Teachers 100.0 99.7 98.7 104.8 108.0 Special Staff 100.0 109.6 114.4 106.4 126.7 Supervising Principals 100.0 99.2 108.2 114.8 124.6 District Supervisors 100.0 102.1 117.5 129.6 140.8 Non-Professional Cleric a l 100.0 100.0 112.0 137.0 168.0 - 168 -Analysis of the above data indicate that: there has been an itu-rense in the quantities of goods and services purchased, and that the amount of increase in the quantity of service purchased was inversely related to the degree to which the service was directly involved in the educative process. The second part of the question whether these goods and services are necessary for the educative process cannot be answered empirically on the basis of this study. Patterns of change in the quantities of goods and services purchased would suggest: that policymakers at the local school board level may have assumed that an increase in the indirect services of special staff, supervising principals, d i s t r i c t supervisors and c l e r i c a l staff would improve the educational product to a greater degree than an increase in the direct services of classroom teachers. This could well be an invalid assumption and one which should be examined in future research. The examination of the fi n a l question in this study w i l l assume that indirect services are less necessary than direct services for the educative process. The Impact of Policy on Quantity Changes. Will the constraint of public school budgets curtail the purchases of goods and services not required for the educative process? When the resources available to public schools were restricted during the f i r s t half of the period covered by the study, indirect services demonstrated the greatest resistance to reduction. - 169 -The deflated unit input of the provincial government in 1963 was 2 percent below the 1961 level, and the total deflated resources available to public school boards were at the base year level. In that year the quantity of teachers and supervising principals declined slightly, while quantities of special staff and d i s t r i c t supervisors increased by 9.6 and 2.1 percent respectively, and the quantity of c l e r i c a l staff remained at the 1961 level. Deflated unit inputs of the provincial government declined i n 1965 to 10.3 percent below the 1961 level, and the total deflated resources available to school boards were at the 1962 level. The 1965 quantity of teachers was 1.3 percent below the 1961 level, but the quantities of indirect services had increased substantially. Special staff increased by 14.4 percent, supervising principals 8.2 percent, d i s t r i c t supervisors 17.5 percent, and c l e r i c a l staff by 12.0 percent i n the period between 1961 and 1965. This examination of the question indicates that the assumption that a reduction i n the flow of funds w i l l curtail the purchases of goods and services not required for the educative process, cannot be supported. A restriction of resources i n the early part of the period served only to reduce the purchase of direct services. Summary. Provincial government policy actions i n the area of public school finance i n British Columbia appear to be based on at least two of four assumptions. Two of these assumptions appear to assume the existence of certain conditions i n the real world and two assume that these conditions can be corrected by specific policy actions. - 170 -The f i r s t condition assumed to exist is that the rate ol increase in the price of public school education has been greater than price increases i n the general economy. Findings of this study indicated that this assumption can only be supported with respect to some indirect services; that the rate of increase i n the price of public school education and price increases i n direct services were lower than the rates of increase i n the prices of the products of other labour intensive industries and lower than the average weekly wage of British Columbians; that the rates of increase i n the price of some indirect services were higher than the rates of increase i n other labour intensive industries and the average weekly wage of British Columbians; and that the further the service was removed from the educative process the greater the rate of increase i n the price of that service. A second condition which i s assumed to exist i n the real world i s that there has been an increase i n the quantities of goods and services purchased and that these goods and services are not necessary for the educative process. The study found an almost perfect inverse correlation between the rate of increase i n the quantity of service purchased and the degree to which that service was directly involved i n the educative process. Provincial policy actions appear to assume that the rate of increase i n the price of public school education and the purchase of additional quantitites of goods and services can be curtailed by reducing the flow of funds to public schools and by restricting the rate of increase i n teachers' salaries. Cost r e s t r a i n t and c o n t r o l over the r a t e of increase i n teachers' s a l a r i e s c ould, under the c o n d i t i o n s discussed i n Chapter J., a c c e l e r a t e r a t h e r than r e t a r d the r a t e of increase i n the p r i c e of p u b l i c school education. These p o l i c i e s c o uld, however, serve to c u r t a i l the r a t e of increase i n the p r i c e of p u b l i c school education and t h i s remains a question t o be examined i n f u t u r e research. The r e l e v a n t question examined by the present study sought to discover the extent to which p r o v i n c i a l cost r e s t r a i n t s might c o r r e c t the c o n d i t i o n s which were found e x i s t i n g i n the r e a l world. Conscious or unconscious cost r e s t r a i n t s were i n e f f e c t during the f i r s t h a l f of the p e r i o d covered by the study. During t h i s p eriod the p r i c e of s e r v i c e s l e a s t i n v o l v e d i n the educative process were i n c r e a s i n g at a g r e a t e r r a t e than the r a t e of increase i n the p r i c e s of d i r e c t s e r v i c e s and the general economy. Services l e a s t connected with the educative process were purchased i n l a r g e r q u a n t i t i e s during t h i s p eriod of cost r e s t r a i n t . Cost r e s t r a i n t s d i d , however, reduce the q u a n t i t y of p r o f e s s i o n a l personnel d i r e c t l y i n v o l v e d i n the educative process. BIBLIOGRAPHY A. BOOKS Karmel, P. Applied Statistics for Economists. Melbourne: Sir Isaac Pitman and Sons Limited, 1963. Mudgett, Bruce D. Index Numbers. New York: John Wiley and Sons Inc., 1951. B. GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS Statistics Canada. Prices and Price Indexes. Ottawa: Queen's Printers 1961-1970. Government of British Columbia, Department of Education. Annual Report. Victoria: Queens Printers, 1961-1970. C. UNPUBLISHED MATERIALS Atherton, Peter J. "The Impact of Rising Price Levels on Expenditures for School Operation in Alberta, 195 7-1965." Unpublished Ph. D. thesis, The University of Alberta, Edmonton, 1968. APPENDIX A Copy of letter forwarded to Secretary Treasurer of every School Dis t r i c t in British Columbia Questionnaire to a l l School Districts Response to Questionnaire A.3 PART I CONT'D 2. How would you e s t i m a t e the d i f f e r e n t i a l s i n the per p u p i l o p e r a t i n g c o s t o f e d u c a t i o n i n the y e a r 1961? Elementary = 100 S p e c i a l Elem = J n r Secondary = Snr Secondary = :  O c c u p a t i o n a l = 3. Would you e s t i m a t e the d i f f e r e n c e between 1961 and 1970 as s t a t e d above was one t h a t o c c u r e d g r a d u a l l y o v e r time o r d i d i t take p l a c e i n any p a r t i c u l a r y e a r ? ( P l e a s e use r e v e r s e s i d e i f n e c e s s a r y ) PART 11 P l e a s e i n d i c a t e the s a l a r y o f the S e c r e t a r y T r e a s u r e r f o r the f o l l o w i n g y e a r s 1 9 6 1 1966 1 9 6 2 1967 1 9 6 3 _ 1968 1 9 6 4 1969 1 9 6 5 — 1970 1971 2. P l e a s e e n c l o s e s a l a r y s c a l e f o r a l l s e c r e t a r i e s and c l e r i c a l s t a f f f o r the y e a r s 1961 to 1971 i n c l u s i v e . In the event t h a t t h ese are not a v a i l a b l e p l e a s e i n d i c a t e the s a l a r y o f a person i n the same c l e r i c a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n . 2. 1961 1966 (Cont'd) 1962 _ _ _ _ _ 1967 1963 1968 1964 1969 1965 1970 1971 3. P l e a s e e n c l o s e s a l a r y s c a l e s f o r a l l j a n i t o r s f o r the y e a r s 1961 t o 1971 i n c l u s i v e . In the event t h a t t h e se a r e not a v a i l a b l e p l e a s e i n d i c a t e the s a l a r y o f a j a n i t o r i n a g i v e n s c h o o l which remained c o n s t a n t i n s i z e and workload throughout the p e r i o d . 1961 1966 1962 1967 1963 1968 1964 1969 1965 1970 1971 4. P l e a s e e n c l o s e s a l a r y s c a l e s f o r maintenance per s o n n e l f o r the y e a r s 1961 t o 1971 i n c l u s i v e . In the event t h a t these are not a v a i l a b l e p l e a s e i n d i c a t e the s a l a r y o f a member o f t h i s department whose r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s remained c o n s t a n t throughout the p e r i o d . 1961 _ _ _ _ _ 1966 _ _ _ _ _ 1962 1967 _ _ _ _ _ 1963 1968 __ 1964 1969 1965 1970 1971 A 5 5. What were the average payments to t r u s t e e s f o r the f o l l o w i n g y e a r s ? P l e a s e take t o t a l payments i n c l u d i n g expenses and d i v i d e by the number o f t r u s t e e s i n o f f i c e . 1961 _ _ _ _ _ 1966 1962 1967 1 9 6 3 _____ 1 9 6 8  1964 1969 1965 1970 1971 APPENDIX B Letter from author to Superintendent of Financial Services, British Columbia Department of Education dated November 12, 1971. Worksheet based on worksheet data supplied by The Education Division, Statistics Canada, a copy of which formed the enclosure in the above letter. Letter from author to Superintendent of Financial Services, British Columbia Department of Education dated December 31, 1971. Letter from Superintendent of Financial Services dated January 5, 1972. British Columbia inter-departmental memo, Department of Education, from Mr. E.T. Ingram to Mr. I. Valen dated December 8, 1971, enclosed with the above letter dated January 5, 1972. Statement "A" worksheet enclosed with the above letter dated January 5, 1972. Statement "B" worksheet enclosed with the above letter dated January 5, 1972. Statement "C" worksheet enclosed with the above letter dated January 5, 1972. Letter from Superintendent of Financial Services B.C. Department of Education dated January 10, 1972 Letter from Assistant Director, Educational Division Statistics Canada, dated. February 14, 1972. X • .Ui \a 4 <v>: 4 > 1 5K Q s*» *o, <<» \ t>A \ NA V V V tv~% V^o ^ «\ ^ »S> wV^  x5 \ "bo ^» -v. w rv ^ v a V IN JTV. <5v »-» .4-'*v> 0 3 •01 v^xo „ J*" "V. v^ x - o w r ~ -vo \9 _ ^ _ . L 2 ^ ^ Vi i- ^ ^ \ O \S- >v V, \ 4~ Vv, Vrt ^3 VN \3 _vv i5^ _V>_^ *_rr».._o ^ ^ _ N <n \ yv m v » ^ . N \ « ) JN. ._ _. T 0 VN K \ i ) vV *A Q 0^ W V\ Q \^ <. J±_ ^ Vbi _Q ^ Cjv V>v> Q> ^vK «A Vb, 5 ^ ^ ^ fc« X\ Vv <n_^ v>. _"N ">v 0 N ^ W Cj W» \N V» ON v~-j ^ vj» ^- (jv V» «\ v$ -^ ^  V->r» ^3 ^ K *4 <NJ V> Vk o» "?» ^—tr» Q V \ ^ ^ ^ <bft vr» «*> ""^r ^ V j v cr ^ 't«v N \3 id «\ i n\ Q «\ ^ \5 — - t — 3- "1 > 5S_ ^8 V^N N » V>v_ (5 i > ^1 * <5 "5. vK to , j K u 0 t V o *> r J T 0 J ? ? o W 0 t 5 is • j C> • 0~ • -a er 1'V > - r Jit : vi i V - V l - N -"T ^  4 T'O' •-MCI-»-1 i 3! 10! "'I it -f3 -Al - C f Jr.-B.i8 I I o ..<rr 1 t ( - U — l - v - 4 . I -4-.1 T~1 ' +4 _4__p_t i - i -K I..-4-!--t - r:.:iv . 1 - . l - t . - i i 1 i APPENDIX C Letter from author to Miss E. Buckley, Deflation Section, National Income and Expenditure Division, Statistics Canada, confirming "Implicit Price Index" supplied in worksheet form. Letter from Miss Buckley, Statistics Canada, with revisions to "Implicit Price Index" APPENDIX D Letter from author to B.C. Hydro dated November 29, 1971. Letter from B.C. Hydro with price indexes dated December 6, 1971. Rate schedules enclosed with the above letter dated December 6, 1971. D.4 B r i t i s h Columbia Hydro and Power A u t h o r i t y E l e c t r i c T a r i f f T h i r d R e v i s i o n o f Page III-13-1 C a n c e l s Second R e v i s i o n of Page 111-13-1 E f f e c t i v e : FOR A L L A C C O U N T S WITH C Y C L E BILLING PERIOD ENDING SCHEDULES 1249. 1250. 1251 A F T c R _ 5 GENERAL SERVICE - SECONDARY ( A l l Purpose)  A v a i l a b i l i t y ; F o r - a l l p urposes. S u p p l y i s 60 c y c l e s s i n g l e - or t h r e e - p h a s e a t secondary p o t e n t i a l a v a i l a b l e . A p p l i c a b l e i n : Rate Zones IA and IB Rate: .' 1. Schedule 1249 A p p l i e s where a demand meter i s not i n s t a l l e d because t h e A u t h o r i t y e s t i m a t e s t h e customer's demand i s 34 kw or l e s s ; F o r a period' o f two months: F i r s t 200 kwh per p e r i o d a t 4.00<f per kwh Next 1800 kwh per p e r i o d a t 3.00$ per kwh Next 5000 kwh per p e r i o d a t 2.60$ per kwh Next 7000 kwh per p e r i o d a t 2.25$ per kwh A l l a d d i t i o n a l kwh per p e r i o d a t 1.25$ per kwh 2. S c h e d u l e 1250 A p p l i e s where a demand meter i s i n s t a l l e d , and t h e demand i s 34 kw o r l e s s ; F i r s t 100 kwh per month a t 4.00$ per kwh Next 900 kwh per month a t 3-00$ per kwh Next 2500 kwh per month a t 2.60$ per kwh . Next 3500 kwh per month a t 2.25$ per kwh A l l a d d i t i o n a l kwh per month a t 1.25$ per kwh 3. Schedule 1251 A p p l i e s whenever t h e demand as measured or e s t i m a t e d by t h e A u t h o r i t y i s 35 kw or more; F i r s t 50 kwh per kw of demand per month a t 3.00$ per kwh Next 100 kwh per kw of demand per month a t 2.50$ per kwh Next 50 kwh per kw of demand per month a t 2.00$ per kwh A l l a d d i t i o n a l kwh per month a t 1.25$ per kwh D.5 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Electric Tariff F i f t h Revision of Page III-13-2 Cancels Fourth Revision of Page III-13-2 Effective: February 15» 1971 SCHEDULES 12lf9, 1250, 1251 GENERAL SERVICE - SECONDARY ( A l l Purpose) (Cont'd) Minimum Charge; Special Condition: 1 . (a) Schedule 121+9 (b) Schedule 1250 (c) Schedule 1251 minimum charge is Five Dollars ($5.00) for a period of two months. minimum charge is Five Dollars ($5 .00) per month. minimum charge is One Dollar and F i f t y cents ($1 .50) per kw of demand per month. Where the service is Temporary the minimum charge shall be Three Dollars ( $ 3 . 0 0 ) per month per kva of required transformer capacity or such charge as the Authority in i t s discretion may prescribe for the particular service. For drainage pump customers, when a demand meter is installed, an annual rather than a monthly minimum charge w i l l apply. The annual minimum charge i s : $ 6 . 6 0 per hp of the greater of: a) the connected load; and b) k7 hp Where the Authority estimates that the Customer's demand is 35 kw or more a demand meter w i l l normally be installed; prior to the installation of such a meter the Authority may estimate the demand for b i l l i n g purposes and to deter-mine which rate schedule applies. D.6 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Electric Tariff Original Page III-64-3 Effective: F O r A L L A C C O U N T S WITH C Y C L E BILLING PERIOD ENOING SCHEDULES 1 ^ ? , 1582 A F T E R m ^ ^ m GENERAL SERVICE - PRIMARY ( A l l Purpose - pnimp M]Unz demand 100 kw) Avallability: For a l l purposes when a l l e l e c t r i c i t y supplied to the customer i s supplied through one meter. Supply i s 60 cycles, three-phase at the primary potential available. ^ P r i H f _ h 7 i * - l P ! Rate Zone IA Rate: Schedule 1552 1. Primary metered and a l l supply through one meter 2. Schedule 1240 Special Condition applies, and secondary metered through two meters. Demand Charge: $2.60 per kw of b i l l i n g demand per month plus Energy Charge: First 150,000 kvh per month t 0.754 per kwh A l l additional kwh per month C 0.50* per kwh Schedule 1562 - Where i n the opinion of the Authority maximum demand readings cannot be obtained to the Authority's satisfaction by primary metering, and secondary metering i s installed. Add 5% surcharge to above rate. The demand for b i l l i n g purposes shall be the greater of: 1. The maximum demand for the month; and 2. 100 kw Save only that i f a customer i s bi l l e d seasonal minimum charges as provided hereunder, the b i l l i n g demand shall be the measured demand. D.7 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Electric Tariff Original Page III-64-4 Effective: FOR flit /ICCOUtffS WfTH C Y C L E C:LL!.\G p e r i o d e n d i n g -SCHEDULES 1552. 1582 A F T 1- P v " 5 MAY .'i-'O GENERAL SERVICE - PRIMARY (Cont'd) ( A l l Purpose> Mirdmum b i l l i n g demand ICQ kw) Monthly Minimum Charge: 1. The demand charge. 2. Seasonal: If a customer's operations are such that his use of elec t r i c i t y i s , i n each and every year, limited to particular months of the year, the Authority, at i t s discretion, may enter into a contract which provides for higher monthly minimum charges during a nominated operating period and lower monthly minimum charges during the remainder of the year than would otherwise be applicable; provided that: 1. The aggregate of such monthly minimum charges shall be $3,120.00; and 2. The minimum charge in any month shall not be less than $2.60 per kw of measured demand. Special Condition:This condition i s available only to a customer in those pre-(Closed) " mises with respect to which the Authority, prior to 1 April 1969, agreed that service would be provided under this condi-tion, and only with respect to the load which the Authority, prior to 1 April 1969, agreed to provide with service. Where el e c t r i c i t y i s supplied, under Schedule 1240 for air conditioning of, or as a principal space heating fuel for the premises being supplied; AND, IN ADDITION -1. a l l metering i s at the secondary potential on the load side of the customers' transformers, and 2. the customer provides the necessary transformers and a l l associated equipment other than meters, and 3. e l e c t r i c i t y supplied for purposes within Schedule 1240 i s metered through a separate single meter, and sep-arately b i l l e d on that Schedule, then a l l other el e c t r i c i t y supplied at the same premises shall be metered through a separate single meter, and separately b i l l e d on Schedule 1552. D.8 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Electric Ta r i f f Tenth Revision of Page 111-27 Cancels Ninth Revision of Page 111-27 Effective: ^ j S B71 GENERAL SERVICE Space HeatingJ SCHEDULE 12^0 SECONDARY (Water Heating, Availability : Applicable in: Rate: Minimum Charge: Special Definitions: This schedule i s available for water heating or space heating or both in non-residential premises and in a multiple residential building containing more than two single family dwellings provided such dwellings are separately metered, or served on a multiple residential rate. This schedule i s not available for air conditioning unless the building which i s being a i r conditioned i s also heated with e l e c t r i c i t y supplied under this rate schedule; except, that i t i s available to a customer who does not have elec-t r i c space heating with respect to a i r conditioning equip-ment which was served under this rate schedule on 31 March 1971. E l e c t r i c i t y for motors required for the circulation of a i r or water and forming an integral part of the heating, water heating or a i r conditioning systems supplied under this sche-dule may be included on this schedule. A l l e l e c t r i c i t y for the above purposes purchased under this rate schedule i s supplied through one meter. Service i s single-phase or three-phase at the secondary potential available. Rate Zones IA and IB. 1.1$ per kwh. Two dollars and f i f t y cents ($2.50) per month. For the purposes of this schedule only: 1. "Water Heating" shall be restricted to water heating for the following purposes: (a) Heating of water for washing, rinsing, cleaning or culinary uses or livestock watering or in pro-ducing or processing food for people or livestock or fowl; . (b) Saunas and indoor swimming pools; (c) Outdoor swimming pools during the months of April to October inclusive in each year. GENERAL SERVICE - SECONDARY (Water Heating, Space Heating and Air Conditioning) (Cont'd) D.9 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Electric Tariff Second Revision of Page III-27A Cancels Fir s t Revision of Page III-27A Effective: FOR ALL ACCOUNTS WITH CYCLE BILLING PERIOD ENDING A F T E R - 5 MAY 1970 SCHEDULE 1240 Special Definitions: Water heaters served under this schedule shall be of the non-inductive, automatic, storage type. The tank shall be insulated to the Authority's satisfaction. Water Heater installations having a connected load i n excess of 6 kw must be approved by the Authority. Where the Authority, i n i t s discretion, approves the use of such larger units, the size and number of such units shall be as agreed to by the Authority and the Authority may require that heat-ing units or groups of units shall be sequentially operated by thermostats or relays to the satisfaction of the Authority. In any water heater the maximum capacity of a l l heating ele-ments energized at one time shall not exceed 200 watts per Imperial gallon of tank capacity, except with the written permission of the Authority. 2. "Space heating" i s restricted to heating of enclosed premises for the following purposes: (a) To provide habitable normal indoor l i v i n g or working conditions for people or livestock or fowl; (b) To provide proper maintenance of temperature i n ware-houses or storage areas at conditions of temperature and humidity but not refrigeration required for the storage of food or goods and the storage or mainte-nance of equipment. Uses specifically excluded for the purpose of the schedule are the following: (a) Outdoor heating applications; (b) Applications approximating outdoor conditions, e.g. roadways, outdoor stockyards, green houses, windbreaks arid uninsulated structures used essentially only to provide shelter from the weaiher; infrared heating ap-plications such as outdoor rinks, year-round outdoor swimming pools, street canopies, etc. 3- "Air conditioning" i s restricted to the operation of electric apparatus i n a system designed for the refrigerative cooling of a i r for enclosed premises to provide habitable normal l i v i n g or working conditions for people or livestock or fowl. Ventilating fans and blowers are not included within the meaning of the term "air conditioning" for the purposes of this schedule, except where such fans or blowers are an inte-gral part of an electric refrigerative air-conditioning system. D.10 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Gas Tariff Third Revision of Page III-1M E f f t c t x ^ ^ BILLING PERIOD E N D I N G / AFTER JUN - 4 1969 SCHEDULES 2101. 2102. 2207. 2208. 2191. 2294 GENERAL SERVICE Availability: Applicable in: Rate: Minimum Charge: Schedules: For a l l uses Lower Mainland For a period of two months: Firs t 6 therms per period for $2.00 Next 84 therms per period at 15$ per therm Next 110 therms per period at 11$ per therm Next 1800 therms per period at 8i$ per therm Next 18000 therms per period at 7|$ per therm A l l additional therms per period at .65$ per therm For a period of two months: Two Dollars ($2.00) per period. 2101 - Residential use - without space heating 2102 - Residential use - with space heating 2207 - General use - without space heating 2208 - General use - with space heating 2191 - Residential use - L.P. Gas 2294 - General use - L.P. Gas APPENDIX E Copies of original enrolment returns from B.C. Department of Education to Statistics Canada for school years 1960-61 to 1969-70 inclusive. E . l m i ENROLMENT BY SEX, GRADE, (Must agree with B. 5 on reverse side.) Ages at June 30th, 19j£/~ (For School-year 19 J A G E (jug) BOYS by GRADE AGE ' birihdcc( ) 11 in IV V VI VII VIII I IX X XI XII XIII / ) - H f Totol fierS ears and under <l 3 ears t'/'.f ... V- • <7 / ^  ' ears n S* i f . <?/ ears *1!,% 7 Mi . — - ;<•)' 516 ears t / W ears if '••'/'• ?>• ears 9 1 1 S ears y , *7 ;i ,..)• •ears .•J"< 67? £ 114-•% 1 /3/ 3 ears •*y £3 i n t o • ?. .v^"( I to 7 <L 1 : M ears / .?> ••in i II 's£ ears ! ) n .9 7t» .7 6(: I /';-?-ears; ft .•?,/:?'./ :i •?}>,'• ! ^ J <?/7 'ears, // ft •/?/'- *7'7r"- :170 0 'ears • / / ( r /.?_ r.'7> '!. C-10 7.^1; 3 9 I rears 0, / ) ? 9?- .f<3-rears and oyer / / / -7 ?'.> /?, < hi 3— n i -\ TO] •AL BOYS lb'.?: H. $ n 9:/S\ AGE fikcUf) tet\ GIRL .S by C RADE • / II in IV V VI VII VIII IX X -XI XII XIII Totol tz tears and under V .-* 'i . ^ rears f)L) O V rears C) i •//-'/'' 7 7~-"-/ / 7 / /; /'.';'if* rears id • •'/// u'C,/. ' •' '' ' / . , ? ^ / V.p "2.-rears / &1 #*/7 ^ 7 / ' / rears / ; /<"' i..: o: r j {/-,'. // rears 9 J 7 . / / ^.? reats -> / j , •7>l / \?7 •igft 7/ // rears 1 . / /? .':>/"> ! •'/.'/! (•Ml '1 : V .> 10 -'/ - • 7 7 rears ^ 7 / m 3.9 f /<? A* ,/_, rears / 7 3>!A i i ^ / rears /-it • '•/.tfiJ .3 17, />7 rears <T ;-/.'[ j < 1-7 A.? i o < i rears / /? VV( f 5 /• rea?£ ( y 12/ •7-.- / /J i /ears • '7 1$ ^Ciirs and over 1 if- / ' / i ^*~' *\ v •; 'i , i TO! AL GIRLS I ' l l VMFJII.7& fJ5B 3b£ (...) 1,160-2540 (2) f 6 E.2 NET ENROLMENT B Y SEX, G&ADE, A N D A G E (Must agree with B. 5 on reverse side.) Ages at June 30th, 19.-4.2 (For School-year 19.//-T 9.i_k.) 0 * B O Y S B Y G R A D E (LA A G E ST BIRTHDAY) KINDER-GAR-TEN i* H III IV V VI VII X XI XII SENIOR MATRIC-ULATION AUX-IL-IARY TOTAl BEGIN-NERS la VIII < IX 5 Y ears and Under ?tA \Q 1 '• 6Y ears ' i t (I b ' qcflq . 7 * ears Ab 8^ ears ' & " 9 Years ft ft i M i ' 1 \& „ 10 Years ' 1 to 334 \\1 11 Years $ &a ?> l3R - 12 Years \e)5 ^ 4 -t 13 Years rlO , ^ ) 14 Years I a- • 6 / i \1A v 15 Years i \\>l , 16 Years / 'A- 41 a s ^ A3 Ob tl 17 Years I 1 A ? /-5 • 18 Years 3 ' U> &:-7 • H $ , 19 Years 1 \5 ,5! 5:1 20 Years 1 .i i 3 ?ri m ' W y 21 Years and Over , • i 3 I V> .i J Total •• 4 1 i£>adc a. * < G I R L S B Y G R A D E k • A G E ( L A j S T B I R T H D A Y ) KINDER-GAR-TEN I* II in IV V VI VII VIM IX X XI XII SENIOR MATRIC-ULATION AUX-II-IARY TOTAL BEGIN-NERS ». 5 Yjsars and Under 33 \ 6 Ylears i ' 7 Y|ears 8' I , 8 Years •\^\& 9 Ylears to8a p ^ l a 10 Years | M AY' I r 11 Years 1 no 12 Y^ars I * 13 Years / % • \ ^ " . , 14 Years I 9 3 >a - V2 aPb »A1U 15 Ypars i I t S " 16Y^ars I • a \ i Qi I'm I- i *- 17 Years \ I IP ft? 18 Y^ars I \o tfQ * ^QA5, 1 19 Years i 5 1 • 20 Years a/ 13 * a 1 21 Years and Over A 3 \n \R 1' Total \Q%\6 ^ 5 ^ * In Column Is give the number of pupils who began Orade I a previous school-year but arc still Classify students in senior high school according to the English course they are taking. ^ 'Z l^f •doing worlc'Wt'the WrSde I level. 2° 25M-160-2340 (2) "OTAL * v PflOUjNCE E.3 (Must agree with B. 5 on reverse side.) Ages at June 30th, 1903 (For Sehool-year 1962-63) • V Age V (Last birthday) ** ? ? Boys by grade <f.\\) ,r Kinder-gar-ten II m IV V VI VII VIII DC X XI XII Senior matric-ulation Auxil-iary Total Begin-ner* 5 Years and under zpzc + / 7 ^Years * /9S1 So 12, 1 0.+2 7 Years 1 3S 99 3 36 •8 Years /?7 its ?rfc {,30 7 102. /C LT (94Years P. i /£> / 03 1SS7, t u $ >St / * " tc , L , S r ItT, Years "S 7 /9oL- ?/3S 5 W 7 /S. cit-J.1 Years 2 1 /? 77 3ZZ t 7.077 no 2. Hi 12 Years 1 / /? l<?s 3 n(-13 Years •t • . 57 iS<} <*ZZ t Z l 9 /M , f J4 Years 3 ? z /S / t c * Z l i A , 039/ 3 7 ( 1 7.0't t 2.20 1+73. 1$ Years 3 3 • t o u t 4 9 Z f Z I LZ5C 7 t+Dto &6»Years / t * $ f ?S 12.7:1 2.94} i f ! 2. 13 L 7\ 1>7 Years 2 f i 2; t* ZSO l/3f r*' * f ? 3 f J So 112. IC2\ i * Years 3 t I S s-f- 301 n i t • IS ,28 Years: S 2 IZ. s i 2.6Z is$c 3t ?0 Years / / z *t-o /.?? H-li ni / / <}C. 21 Yeats and over z t <(> 30 17 TOTAL 1 LIS I Z792 i f t t t n l t t /nit f S ? 2 2 I532Z 997* 7S?o JW3 HF+-23 ') i { 4 ? ' ' -~L~— ' ' J Girls'by grade ' ' '- ' ' I 8 ( r £ & > 3 1 i Age (Last birthday) >-Kinder-gar-ten I' 11 in IV V VI VII VIII DC X XI XII Senior matric-ulation Auxil-iary Total Begin-ners ^-S^Years and under 2033 ?7 2.121 ^6 Years 77/S 36,3 99 + i /o, Z2.' 7 Years T u 7 9 I t 113 7V-2? 6 Years — r ZZ7 2 33 11, t z 9 Years / >7 s i 111 it/if-T / 2.7S •? +1 10 Years Z Z2 iff l t o ( . "1 ' 72.97 SfS{ 27/ » Tl Years / z 7 3/ I l l HSf 7o+C ZoC ¥• 47 P K Years 1 '—• .. , I, / H- , )7 p3 •**r —;•* f 3 Z $ {,635 5000 U lt3 Years P le % Zi *~? ZIZ 9 J*H.M.'U. J /oo 2 13 0 fI4 Years 7 it Z3 fz /SC3 l t 9 7 13 </' yl5 Years J 7, z L 23 73 +2? /7+3 'tZS'l Z+3 • t z 16 Years ? 1 J 2.S" u 555 2 c c t t>IID 39 cS 311 / 111 I 17 Years 1 7 / s z z 1 17 1371 2513 73 ^18 Years 3 3 3 ZC 123 276 32C2 j t SC7< f • 19 Years * 1 f c /Co /,/! 179 IZ ^20 Years . 3 1 f 73 t>H i M 21 Years; and over 1 1 z 34- M TOTAL 1 2 * no* ii>i>27 i¥Z5L L't/1& l2J>*t. Ut9 9 ft 7C%L In Column l a give the number of pupils who began Grade Classify students in senior high school according to the 1 in a previous school-year but are still doing work at the Grade 1 level. English course they arc taking. 4 i c E.4. bY i t A, UKADfc, ANU A«ifc ^ <^J[Must agree with B. 5 on reverse side.) Nfcl fcNKULMfcNI FORM 1 / Age (Last birthday) Kinder* gar-ten 1» II in I V V V I Ele-men-tary ungrad-ed V I I VI I I I X X X I X I I Senior ma-ttlc-ula-tion Total Begin-ners 5 Years and under 3 Mi 6 Years M o fate 3'S I L 7 Years in 7330 *> /—^  17.56 8 Years tot U3o &f / in /7.Sn ¥ Years •> A Hi a t / / /6. [0 Years U J.< ISbX foil • J).fO. / ikns U.Years 1 (l Sit I f j o fro 2^ Years 3 % 3 ••/£ 7?$d r if, fac-Years - r 9X / / />'/ ^ / H- te. 5? 14 Years - I 3 If /& In IX 15 Years & •/• J/ /&<) l o C (-33S J&S3 > > 16 Years 3 ¥ f J.< • u US 1! 1 • 1^4; 17 Years 1 - . 1 7 3n . " ' . 0 331 77/ lft Years «2 / X -?* IW * f*> Years ' f / 1* • t m 2* Years • . /A 32 CI Years and over •• 7 *) / ? -Jz 57t TOTAL .'5','7r' l39'A fad *• Age v (Last birthday) . ' • •-' . Girls Vy grade* •'' •* * .-' y • ( Kinder-gar-ten V n m I V V Ele-men-tary ungrad-ed V I I VI I I I X X X I X I I Senior ma-tric-t)l a-non Total Begin-ners i> 5 Years and under V / ^ 6 Years Xf.C Boo n 3 - ? ' //. /;< >7 Years rH in*? /*> /1 1 7 .^8 Years 3 fas It'j -9 Years 1, v * rs ?!Xd< A / P Ass 10 Years S 1 a 1? •(oil 79/0 'pss /19. - V-1 11 Years 1 fa / ? -12 Years to 35 ' ^ i *13 Years 1 1 '•fa fir r. (3HZ 1* / MM 1l4 Years 3 9 IB 7 "15 Years l 5 ? h 7° i ? 3'h itn »16 Years M / 5 So ^ 7 fa? . / h .im r17 Years ) 1 1 / A ti-• • ^ I3r( teL •''An • /?, 1 i l u 18 Years . -» / ll // / >, IfoX r * JO 0 - m \ 19 Years • - - - 1 1 • 5 J /u. & / / . ' " > ' ' 11 tit 20 Year's / 3 l o .?/ it, 21 Years and over •) ri •*? r* [___T0TAL m IMV k m //aw • In Column l a give tlie prev tU» Knot' f » i u u s aLi iuui*)VHi-Liui « I « T sun doing wu i* *. m e U I H U C 1 i i : » c i i ' / ^ £ A rnurnf- tKev are takinV;;Inel\Kk>-<K>Gupaxiofla y [H'/ (Must agree with B 5 on reverse side) Age (Last birthday) BOYS by GRADE Kinder-garten I n III Primary Special IV V VI vn •inter-mediate Special TOTAL Begin-ners Repeat-ers ^5 years and under 1W 49 Z 3 6 years $9 HI $ o f i n M 7 ye^rs / .99' }3 • i f f /—•-—<—m. fx m 8 years n i '%% //9 / 2 $ ' 9*years 17 17 I f ? X / hO years i • 2 i f t f m - /33 X i n 17/?; • l i years 7 3 I 3?. . m 11$ 12 years i 7 Jt> - M it 7 '•.•.:/6t.0.?> 1^3v years £ V •ft 73 Ml /c. 7o i 1.4 years l& I ! £ 9 it n IS years 1 (3 X » * 16 years 1 , / 3 •Id ' IW> *> u 1 i 17 years 3 t> 1 S3 31 • Ac/ 1§ years and over- 6 ?• L n *" TOTAL 6 7 5#//. lfo$ i n n i $ t m Number in each grade wh reported in the same grac - June o were e last J 5. } //# J. ' > • J 7o? J 7 i 9 7{o\ V . (Last birthday) v. : V GIRLS by GRADE, . ' * • . . . Kinder-garten i n in Primary Special TV V VI 1 VII Inter-mediate Special TOTAL Begin-ners Repeat-ers '5 years and under / * 6 years ( A So n / -' <? years 7 7 S r 7 r • 8 years / z m i t ? i IZ& . ^ 9 years 3 1% 7f(-o /So 10 years II ? >77 mi lit i n 11 years 1 // i?y lo$ r t 12 years ,? % 5$ m f 72o! /¥<*> »-13 years 1 / f i t M* *1A years 3 ' ./o 1/77 zoy 1; L v15 years I . I \ 5 IS in ' ho years 9 7 n 7¥ - ji ' 7 5 y 17 years I / a : i7 • 2t / lfl years and over 6 • /' • 3 a i ' 1^ TOTAL I f f i l i7,m ILSPM Number in each grade who were reported in the same grade last^ June /- 7 to*/ * • in 1 - c / BY SEX, GRADE AND AGE (Must agree with B 5 on reverse side) •A BOYS by GRADE" vl1 / tj / Age p <"t ' • (Last birthday) \ ; I/O "i; Occupational vra X xi • XII Xffi TOTAL 1 2 Univer-sity Prog. Gen-. eral Prog. Univer-sity Prog. Gen-eral Prog. t ~ 10 years and under 11 years • • V 12 years J, faL 13 years / c y in 14 years 6 I/.ZS9 ^ 15 years ^ / f u & cm a w r 13.% I& k 16 years £ 0 3U m m 31 *17 years y i n St*) w r %M • 18 years 'V/f 'Mo t?t> 1 3H% 1?/° V 19 years ^ 3> 9 v/ f 36 m SoG %I3 20 years $ t I &. t II x M2 . '92f 21 years and over 1 1 3(2 So 3r] t ^ TOTAL /// im 073. tin tim w P-7: 7 ? U $031 l'h.i Number in each grade who were reported in the same grade last June $7. 1 t" c in ?// ) \ ui % v Age tj <v (Last birthday) b, J V .GIRL5 r>y GRADE* Occupational vm IX / X XI XII xra TOTAL 1 2 3 Univer-sity Prog. Gen-eral Prog. Univer-sity Prog. Gen-real Prog. f 10 years and under ••11 years / / I-f *12 years • m S t d 13 years 5 T33>3 (3 ' \ £:?2<? v 14 yeirs J y 5//-/ llo 1 1 /. / ; • 3U 130 23 • r m c m m 16 ye 3tf W WW y 17 ye its ^ Co n s . n i r 1 > u //. P' 18 ye< irs / 7 n '#& •j 3*. t\(>3o f,9/3 do 6 1336 v 19ye< irs / r — . J X 3/ 7 31 r/1 <' f. - 'IM' v 20 yet irs X 3 11 ^/ .135' ' • 21 ye; irs and over •l i- / C T T/ / i 73 * i OTAL */7 V1 i *>''! ti-ts Numb report lasr J ?r in each grade who were • ed in the same grade . • une //. 1°. 3 sn > 3*7 > •117 /> ',> HI •Clas sify students at senior academic levels according to the English course they afe taking. BY SEX, GRADE AND AGE schools enrolling only secondary pupils, this must agree with B5 on reverse side) FORM I Secondary . (Last birthday) V. . BOYS by GRADE* . Occupational i vm i IX X XI XII x m TOTAL i 2 Academic and Tech. Voc-ational Academic and Tech. Voc-ational 10 years and under / "/ 11 years • .. • • i 12 years 3 • , 3K 13 years I an — J6.£)b C4 years ^ / \%$ )!* 3 7,231 w 291 1$ 031 •IJ years '.:< JMi /f,pf7 M3 3o 3 / l4.*n', 1^6 years 3 3 *ty~0 ?>\V3 V% '3,r>{^ (17 years ? 1 ML 3% 5 . iff 33>fa 3,711* 13.091 18 years 'j L3 3L.\ f AH J3? • f,:doi /,m 3331 \vm 3? 31 % V27 19 years / 3' * if 13^ 373 m. C 3 3 20 years 3 / i H- si l(> 'l?X\ si? / £21 years and over / 1 X 1 1 3' 10 13 77 10% r TOTAL 1 0 6 L 3pq ??*? 1633 73.731 Number in each grade this June l.who were recorded in the same/ grade last June y i7 PI ' l<fo t o H 7 SPO, 3,973 Age ' v (Last birthday) GIRLS by GRADE* y • Occupational vm IX X ... XI XII XIII TOTAL 1 2 3 Academic and Techi Voc-ational Academic and Tech. Voc-ational 10 years and under V 11 years / 1 — :—-12 years in H-13 years L (if*- i,ivm.ii^jir;m' in. -1 fcl years '/ *J (* im 6^6 ' WW/ ^15 years / 1 <\/ IV 3 11 /, til & -7.0 I 7 i 16 years / 31 ¥ ) 1 0 f ft? 3>¥ 3 12 h • 17 ycaris '1 £L j?Z sat t6 V'/3 L039 H IP. i '7\ t |8 yeats / '? 3 40 I3& H u lb, lib i, in x!lH y 19 years i lie 13 \0D Jit 1.7 Gi 20 years i J I 33 (>. .* id • a 3 6 7)iD 21 year's and over 1 3' t V lb if ,, ^  TOTAL 'J't^y •a? Co? i&U /'/ m 3 . lid m Number in each grade this June i*" who were recorded in the samc_. grade 1 ist June / .3 o 17 /7. ' 'r " ' " 157 t U •Class 7002-81 (y students at senior academic levels according to the English course they arc talcing. ^ 0 h 3 ° ^ ^ 1 NET ENROLMENT OF ELEMENTARY PUPILS, 1965-66 BY SEX, GRADE AND AGE F 0 R M I Elementary (In schools enrolling only elementary pupils, this must agree with B 5 on reverse side) (Last birthday) s BOYS by GRADE Kinder-garten i II m Primary Special IV V VI vn inter-fflediate Special TOTAL Begin-ners Repeat-ers ^ 3 years and under [ 6 years 7? 39 6 w 7 years / f 7 10+ 10 Z3 C years 1,011 w Il3s ' 9 years / 11 Ui7 111 • llSCo *10 years f 3 W w $ / IH 17.33) f 11 years r Ufa 3I?17 17,791 XI years £o 1 1 7£> u i tlx 2,33/ ft* ' u r n i 13 years • 3% 71 5PI 7?YO II. .3 71 14 years / i> 1 f n 3. 336 15 years L •lb IP to/ {3^ /. 0 1(o S6 years 1 f 9 H 9i3 77- ' }9>7 17 years / Q 1 17 * £8 years and over & b X ¥• *• TOTAL l?,7iZ 11/3'i> ItPI lp?3> Number in each grade this June who weire recorded in the same grade last June 1031 3o0 7H fit i • i i 1 Age * * j (Last birthday) GIRLS by GRADE Kinder-garten i n m Primmy Special rv V VI vn Inter-mediate Special TOTAL Begin-ners Repeat-ers v 5 years and under xy ' / • 6 years S 3 u •/?.6>3 - years 3L II3 73 /¥- If. 6'c, 8 years /*/•'! i n 17 m. 9 years ^ // ft * I.C03 HP 1$ll go?? /ij 1 1 t 10 years / 7 ft Lift 1OQ3> /#7 11.7> (•> -11 years } £ / It 131 i '. 1,2*? 17. IZt \l years ^ "7 / 3' • 1(o!,L h 13 years /_3 /3 3ol Ufa W1 * 14 years /£" • 1* ik S3 33i JM? lit? 3 30} >• 15 years A' 7> 10 3ko 7& 4t> years * / ^ J 2, 3 If do 3 7 I3i ,. 17 years ^ & 1 / A 1 13 3-0 Li 18 years and over 3 1 / 1 3 3, TOTAL HZ i i r I ih.m i^m 137,71* Number in each grade this June who were recorded in the same, grade last June ir/o f3j fit 3 & '^3-(/I, 3 NET,ENROLMENT OF ELEMENTARY PUPILS, 1966-67 /JfyG <S&3) BY SEX, GRADE Afce •(In schools enrolling only elementary pupils, this must agree with B 5 on reverse side), BOYS by GRADE > Age (Last birthday) j^^K-I 7 Kinder-garten I n m Primary Special V Vt vn a' later-mediate Special TOTAL Begin-ners Repeat-ers 3 years and under ! 'MS bl / 3 3 11, |' 6 years ! MM - . 13 l i • ' 7 years _ j • IW <*/?> ? :M 4 7 *• 8 years | 3 7 7 3 71 f9 / A i It *S years- j \{p 107 777<j lObil' / 7V • 7 9 v 7 / : , 10 years j , L 7" W ? f c 3 l •11 17' 11 years ^ — 1 1 •/•/!• £U i 12 years 3 X H ^ ^ • ^ ray 13 years /•A 14 years / * ' /, 7, /*' /7 7? ^57 _ 15 years / ':• t4 3 7S"6 • .••"./ro ^ ^ "16 years / II 1^7 years • •? b , 3 f • " ^ 88 years and over . / - ID. . 1 . 3 4 TOTAL Number in each grade this June who were recorded in the same grade last June "ft • X m ^3r/ 3cll V I Ag^ e > » (Last birthday) i • ^ ! . .' ~ GIRLS by GRADE • • . . . ; . ^ / ^ ~ Kinder-garten i n in Primary Special rv V VI vn * *. Inter-mediate Special .- TOTAL Begin-ners Repeat-ers 5 years and under 3H1 1 1 6 years ! 12 5 7 3 7 3 A i _ J7 years £ 7 s T /<>'/ iff / f 8 years Sib iDO-si 221. / II 9 years j Jf *H 9-5-/ Z3I 7 7 V'/ ^1 10 years i to , %t> o 7'/'3 IbX ixl . ./frki 11 years | i 1 i t /30 ycUL • •iff __&2years . j / A ? 77 ill ' -m m "'13 year« / / > /C.7S t\4 years •,>• / !>}• /A 47 /^/? '0. ^ 7 : year* Ik . r ' / ^ 37/ • ' ^ 16 years .... A . / / a 7,? 17 years; } / 37 7 18 years and over > • . / • X . r TOTAL 1I1S m n / ^ , ? ' / / / . ^ Number in each grade this June who wetc recorded in the same ^grade la.st June- 31 • 41*3 144' a/7 317 1*1 341 /93 • 4 £ I'! • —J , E. 10 fyr$ittol>/% & Y $ E X » GRADE A N D A G E ' — (In schools'enrolling only secondary pupils, thi&'^ 'i.'.:> agree with B5 on reverse side) BOYS by GRADE* Age , (Last birthday) • Senior Special • * • Occupational vin IX X XI XII x i n TOTAL 1 2 3 Academic and Tech. Voc-ational Academic and Tech. Voc-ational *0 years and under i * J 11 years 3 1 f ' 12 years 10 \ * ~ *13 years X ID J 311 ' 84 years 3X X3 / to 14- .I2'3rf o • 15 years 35 / i y 2$ loVI • bo 7 IS.Vbi tl6 years ¥ ft Li f f / { 123 A* So 3a 4 7 v 17 years u-3 io r 2S3 3 * 7 lofl 13,15^ 18 years /•<?</ Ho A.o7 wsz if So •I 9 i 19 years f l< * f V 3 ifl ftp -h i •f7*f y?s ?.?7 fr- * 20 years A 1 2, S i 5 to* /97 7 7 ; - * 21 years and over 1 X i r • ./3 /(? •70 •-7*. TOTAL X/X /bis' •><f * '•13 U 7/3? Numbet in each grade this ^ June who were recorded in the same grade last June 1'3 JO 7.. • •.' 7 ' 731, is' •. -C b • / r • 3 ' y / ; GIRLS by GRADE* Age (Last birthday) > Senior Special • • Occupational -vm IX X XI xn XIII TOTAL 1 2 3 Academic .and Tech. Voc-ational Academic and Tech. Voc-ational ; i • — •• • ' 10 years and under % 11 years ll X 12 years . — , — 13 years s / X 633? SSI 10 14 years IX / 3198 LW3> a. 15 years If)/-, (n not 7i71 s m 33? fS 13 * 16 years J 3-t 3aX. .my 3.97 lot 3 • 11 * 17 years 35" 13 x h 93 3^3 31 :>« 3o3.9 U3o / , : . ?:•> ' 18 yea rs ••It- % • •3H 43 o 9?3 »W nw 3% •v 19 yet rs rs lQ 13 S-o (fa 3io 4lX 3X3 110, ^ 2 0 yea rs 4- 7 u 1 3 if,. I 37? A 9 • 71 3? •' <s ->? 21 yea rs and over 1 I $ If ZS 31 • • ' °, ' T OTAL " ' I'll' llo ito\%3 I&1/ ?¥/*? Mi Num tici June wl the sai in each grade this io were recorded In ne grade last June h 3 , c /1.' 13 '\ n ' j ° u . •Cla •Inclu fy students at senior academic levels according to the English course they are taking, de classes for New Canadians nt the secondary age leveL ..,-.-i / I, /id NET ENROLMENT OF ELEMENTARY PUPILS, 1967-68 (^/,?'.?3 • / ! BY SEX, GRADE AND AGE "(In' Schools enrolling only elementary pupils, this must agree with B 5 on reverse side) FORM I E lementory > Age * (Last birthday) ' ** BOYS by GRADE Kinder-garten i II Primary Special IV V vi VII * Inter-mediate Special T O T A L " Begin-ners Repeat-ers . \ "years and under •Hi s 6 years io,et>9> is hi, * 7 years So. — . Tin. (D0.Q 1 *8 years . 3 for mo it,-* -9 years 3 & im /0.99 V m / vIO years H Mat /o.W Uro / JoS/H 11 yea rs J. •• / ,•• •Sff LH10 M 'inn P J12 yea rs 7 ' / s " 7 f "m 3.ZDS im -l9:2oi V 13 yea •s / 1 to to 52 6 .. iol> •13. $4$ ^14 yea •s 1 (> 36 n til . 3-93 • 3.?ff-^ 15 yea •s 1 It A 79 155 m 16 yea rs 1 1 3 1/ ss 172 17 yea rs S Z ;4 3 i 18 yea s and over 3 / 57 I) TOT A L 7o.5H J3>4' ism »-V GIRLS by GRADE Age > (Last birthday) 1 Kinder-garten i ii in Primary Special IV V VI VII » Inter-mediate Special TOTAL Begin-ners Repeat-ers '* 5 years and under 3.%o •3? z * 6 years •3J77 / 3 * 7 years "11 9.76$ .lit 1 . 1 19. VI H »8 years 1 m I0.37X $M m ": ^ / \.3ti.)a >• v years 9 SO 9*7 >• 10 years 3 $ S2l ltd 'i.nl A •IH\ 19:79 •i J 1 years 1 3 IS III /.353 73 7.S64-m • J2 years / y 25 9./o7 l'/37 13 years • / z L 37 sm • k < ¥ 7 ^ 14 years 1 it- 7 o /7-y? 77,7.1. 15 years i. 7 ;3 loo 55 16 years ..3 ? 3f: III 17 years 1} 3* . • ^ 18 years and over 1 1 m TOTAL MS*' VMS 2 v,.U.'-j lW TV* Mi* 1.777. •Include classes for New Canadians at the elementary, age level. • Trtft - t o i l r .11 •.IJ ."1 .<r1 ft. y ^ \ t NET ENROLMENT OF SECONDARY PUPILS, 1967-68 /Jj£y BY SEX, GRADE AND AGE "(Iii schools enrolling only secondary pupils, this must agree with B5 on-reverse side) 6 tl Age (Last birthday) BOYS by GRADE* Senior Special __'/ Occupational 1 7 viii IX Academic and Tech. XI Other XII Academic and Tech Other XIII 10 years and under 11 years X 12 years_ 13 years 14 years X30 IU Z-73S 310 15 years 5'7X /99 J3L X9C1 1-21%. */.U$> X^ jo 16 years VX- I7X MIL MA XIL MO-17 years I3L 70 3% J3LL 173 xtos >/Q3f X1tL> 2 U"? 21L A3L 18 years JX_ XI 53L 4p(? J3L J1L 939 3lis- 3/^ 19 years a 3 3t /8S. Xt>7 ?S3> J/10 JZ3-20 years / / X- i/s ML *7S 21 years and over .8 72 37 9/ 5-G M3 TOTAL IBIS. 113 I. til.. If/31-GIRLS by GRADE* 171b 1M Age (Last birthday) r V Senior Special • • Occupational VIII IX XI XII XIII TOTAL 1 2 3 Academic and , Tech. Other Academic and Tech. Other + 10 yeajrs and under r 11 yea rs n V ; «? • -'• +12 yea rs 1 3t>3 7 y- «13 yea rs 6,-Csi sn ? • . " y-36'/ k. 14 yea rs </3 /A 9 II / Hi* 7/B L •Tr-770 rs 3o(c 11/ .1-008 7S9Z S*Cl7 29 C 70 • r / /&-/Z0 ^16 yea rs /ft' 3/7 1/C • 7io W9 (,nl 3>/32 ts/o -2 7/ 3?7 /S'376 . 17 yea rs 79 170 *77 $-3. S3 7 I3i1 3Ch xtiL 5 / 3 3 / j / / s-o. /3.7>Y.S 18 yea 'S 330 /3 37 777 11 >/}f >/7JL m 3X33 1-97¥ •3/X 19 yea :s IS ? 17 X 7 . ' 3 /X t>s- 399 C/7 • Jc3 7 /•7A3 20 yea s S~ 3 X 7 3 , / ' / /3 30 73 Cr- .. 30'/ * 21 yea^s and over 3 1 ' s~ / / If /O 30 xs- 37 33 ¥ TOTAL 3t$. liW- S$s£ inf. W. 72']. 7#3¥3 •Classify students at senior academic levels according to ••Include classes for New Canadians at the secondary age 7002 -8J.2 , / M l . i . the English course ,eve.'- • ~aA ., A ^ they are taking. ." 1\ t 3' E.13 t; NET ENROLMENT OF ELEMENTARY PUPILS, 1968-69 ' BY SEX, GRADE AND AGE (In schools enrolling only elementary pupils, this must agree with B 5 on reverse side) FORM I Elementary » ( Age 1 tier hirrhdflv^ . : : f SJ BOYS by GRADE Kinder-garten i • H I Primary Special IV V VI VII * Inter-mediate Special TOTAL 1 «. Begin-ners Repeat-ers 5 years and under 4SfX + / / 6 years 10,17 f J 1 % / lo3 / IS. 12 L 7 years I.il9 t& 7L s *S years / 34? 190 / 13 -fib ^4 9 years 9* hlol 7M 13/ 23 <* 1 • 52'*-. * 10 years /t f% J.c67 ibo 9 20.917 •i 1 years If 30/ 2 4-1 10.393 iJ'So 213 Y 1>2 years 1 4 J ? + 7* A 5II Li03 .... t.9-Z7$ • 1$ years / z 7 SI a sir uu SSZ h.40} J<t years / <Z lot, 634 39cZ 1^5 years 1 <7R IA 10 6 CA7 Hi j. 16 years IJ / 13 7 / 7 9 ^I 7 years . 13 /' H 30 U 0 18 years and over />|4 / 17 / 23 TOTAL &a}3i xii'si aoitf iW7> t (Last birthday) * " • ' * " GIRLS by GRADE Kinder-garten I ii III Primary Special IV V VI VII • Inter-mediate Special TOTAL Begin-ners Repeat-ers 5 years and under if sol / if Se-6 years / / .77 (,5 lf. SI "* » 7 years /o,co<r q.o7'o 117 1*4 3 ... /9.9'J ~ ; . v years M Mb? '$75? /U 141 v 9 years 11 io.su j/S 13? SI *" 1 0 year's 3 7 fMo /o.iU mo 197 / • >11 years 7 > IS ISO 1.374 p.o£S 7-fU -"77 2Zi7 12 year S / , 3 Si 3L332. ~i$*3 s*7 -J±0 f, v13 year S + 6 3S 34 *7S 1617 91'61 SIS //.Si •v 14 year s 3 9 n 44 A? 3 !l?4l r 1^5 year s . 13 V i. '3S+ s< ^ 16 year s ib 3 7 13 74 So Q 1 17 year s 1 9 1 8 year s and over 19 ! a 34 TOT AL 9W--Mi it in? aim's MX /S3#t« ' Incl v classes for New Canadians at the elementary age level. 1 T '.'. V V NET ENROLMENT OF SECONDARY PUPILS, 1968-69 BY SEX, GRADE AND AGE (In schools enrolling only secondary pupils, this must agree with B 5 on reverse side) FORM I Secondary: » » ' t '. Age • (Last birthday) BOYS by GRADE* Senior Special • * Occupational VIII IX . X XI XII XIII TOTAL 1 2 Academic and Tech. Other Academic and Tech. Other 10 years and under . „ 11 years „ 12 years 733, 70 • 13 years 7 / U37 73 6.1 S? 14 years 7S AbS" 23 n 67 *S 73/ 7JL 3 z tS. o ' ^ 15 years 71 7*\ 3/ft 17*3 S^3 32b fO t /Z. 093 • 16 years 33L 5i3 7So 3J3L 7iSI 3U3 .3 >t if 17. >'o9 . *• » 17 years 3ft> 2>3? 7J3J .2LA41 H7 ...l£....2>?3 V > 18 years n Sf 773 /S JO? 7/7> 7.0 9/ /7 na-3.etS&> 3/i 7D.X79 19 years 73 31 3 b" Z *f /s7 si* /•3.1 ? LJ3$£>~ 3 3 3/ • *• 20 years L $ 7 3 3 ? U //:+. 33s 3-53 /IF /. 0 57 2^1 years and over 3 3 3 IS /o2 3? TOTAL m m i 1 0 k 977* ? m 27SB1 r > * Age (Last birthday) r y GIRLS by GRADE* Senior Special • * Occupational VIII IX X XI XII XIII TOTAL 1 2 3 Academic and Tech. Other Academic and Tech. Other »• 10 years and under • 11 years 3 r> 0 »12 years SL7 /k. • Vi ,13 yea rs z 7 7& oo / 76 so-, v 14 yea rs 77 ,L S3%3 6 7 it 5 72. 73 / /L 7:TZ • „ 15 yea rs to / A T 3o 3fi9? I7oo 38? 7777 73 /?. ?37 t 16 yea rs ho /,?/ 33/ ¥73 7,352 /,U/ 397 93 7L" . 17 yea rs 3>3 54- /33 33 /J/6' 3.?a lib* 3.372-/ ^ 33 73 18 yea rs 31 // 97 /S 73 7/3 /M 3,4-oc' J3d- y ?j<7 V 19 yea rs i7 7 '¥ £7 / 7Z or7 ( / A o /U /. 7? 3 V 20 yea rs t / 3 3 / /o 73 3/f 6 7 ,t, < '/ ' • 3 A3 r »-21 yea rs and over Z ' A. 7 7 H C7 f~ ''7 f -TOT AL " •3 1 • 1 • ... ffj'i lasjsi **lncl dc classes for New Canadians at the secondary age level. "102-8 2.2 a 5 .4^ u O E.15 8<L. &(>j\0£ I B M . I36*LJG N E T E N R O L M E N T O F S E C O N D A R Y P U P I L S , <£9359Kaa. %Tf\L PROVINCE: . B Y S E X , G R A D E A N D A G E (In schools enrolling only secondary pupils, this must agree with B 5 on reverse side) • \ BOYS by G R A D E * . J /' t- f f i n S> Age . * (Last birthday) » Senior Special • * Occupational Vlft X XI XII XIII T O T A L 1 2 3 Academic and Tech. Other Academic and Tech. Other 10 yet i , 11 yei 'rs and un^cr 'rs ^12 years >jc4 IX t 13 years 31 6*33 47% i 617 14 years 4/ A 670 an s 4i7i 6IM 477 77 .5 77c S:: 1 5 yeajrs Us 7,tK 7k9 4a .1303 7/97S - S7iZ 33 i s7,. iA 1 ; 16 ye^rs Sj 447 I.S7X .1.1 f£ .7A9*. /7fi/, 4 4X6 .461 777: 7.<77,>7 • 17 yes 1 rs $0 41, .•?*/ }36 X'A7,-1137 44/1 1474 3*71S 74 18 yea rs • 1$ • s4 76' MS /I37, 77*1 447-2 IJ?a1 -J4k±L 77) 7-1 • * 19 yea rs /7 13 *4 1-71 SAL. ft<?77 .17?'. * 20 yei rs U- / 7 4 . .37, IAS7 433 771 773 *21 yes rs and over •3 3 II 44 rS'PJ /c4 9s .Si >- * TO rAL 7S7>7 411 17*9 M7Si J141S 7c#7j3 7/.??3 7A/42 S^-7 > V (La ' w Age st birthday) GIRLS by G R A D E * Senior Special • • Occupational VIII IX X •XI • XII XIII T O T A L 1 2 3 Academic and Tech. Other Academic and Tech. Other • 10 ye; us and under * 11 ye; irs ' » 12 ye: irs 7 1 7i/td /A ^13 years 10 • V 1 All Q . / .71* ,. 14 ye v 15 ye; us 3,2 141 l4 4m 1S>77 felS 77 * 71-7 us ',</ s4o lab 431 l/S A 3 / 16 years st> 133 14 434 >*-..1 79?7 *73iS /k<74 J7Z 9Si .0 _ 17 years •4? £? )4l S9. 4.17, l7/)l 7.0/1 —* *—r-,3746- iS'fO /? i4 9. 18 years • r '— 4r, 13 .79 9t iS 173 .393 S?3 113 77*7 19 years •y. ~ 4 (1 H lb 14 ?S J41 SXI 7a1 IIS 1 r — 7'7>-20 ye'ars 7 4 1 7 i il ' i4 /? / / 731 7 S3 33 J >- | 21 years and over h 1 i I 1 3 At .09 4^3 As •3 V TO TAL 377 t(r3 SSl i V / / 194*7 /77*M 6/s9 $7777 .32 S' fSS *ci4 •*lnc 7003-ssify students at senior academic levels according to lude classes for New Canadians at ihc secondary age 1 62.2 the English course they are taking, eve]. E.16 NET ENROLMENT OF ELEMENTARY PUPILS, BY SEX, GRADE AND AGE (In schools enrolling only elementary pupils, this must agree with B 5 on reverse 'side) r y > Age (Last birthday) BOYS by G R A D E Kinder-garten i *" HI Primary Special IV v VI VII Inter-mediate Special T O T A L Begin-ners Repeat-ers ^ 5 >'C ars. and under *I17- 9* 7 1 .*££ 6 y c ars m 3*Al Ifl/Al 19 ftH Jc4 /*9c 7 yejars IA,U<7 m 9 n7 .* 3 8 yc , 9 yc 1 nrs * ' \p*/. I'M 4 fi.X/SI HP # f_ 7i* IV) • A//,,-i ars ill /.S42 73-9 Stfll* H* / /?(, .0/76 * -10 years .1 17 194 ii..u7 .7#l* 7r> .31$ • *-11 years 1 AM •j at A All foft'6 i<7n A1X 3/43. 12 years 4 N 7sio 2 £.3*1 SOU Is; 7*m 4.1/1 .~1/jt* 13 years i J> 17 *Al 79J 1.4/<9 14 years 1 7A IXt SI .31/* A7k " • 1 5 years ' * • 7 -jn 9-7 S4* 7/7 ** 16 years • 17 7 7* 4-7 IS:. *• M 7 years 72 .3? Ii .33 f ' »18 years and over 19 3 77 3?L T O T A L /0-7*3 ai3<*y si£'j 7 $o<tl U6IS £/M*7 •3c*l3 3279 7^97^: y Age (Last birthday) GIRLS by G R A D E Kinder-garten i II III Primary Special IV V VI VII * Inter-mediate Special T O T A L Begin-ners Repeat-ers .5 years and under J4/4 9* - V S/)/c 6 years I'M 3(« /A 1 7 years 37 inikt, •If'7 ass-/ 7* 1*4 3 jd-7,0 8 years 3 7&z JA/S/) 117 &34> 3 1 7 " 75 a 0*9. 9 years II ••'77 //)/,/£ Jill $M/,. *~ ft 10 years 1 (< 161C 799 lfiU:lf. ,2 1*3 J?/J3 11 years 3 li /Si 1/3 hlii- >/oli J?/*b .39 (» / W, 1 J.07 12 years 3* *2. I44S 1,1.303. X/23 '£*C > 13 years i 3 23 a/,4 16/7 <mt 341 1/42. T 14 years 1 i 7 *3 . z>44 /713 3 Mi v 15 years / I (4 7 1/ .37 ,27/ J4 ;7a ' M6 yc Y t" yc ars f * •7 3 9 72 ars • n / 3 •34 *o 18 years and over I 1 / S£.-f— 4n 63 J O T A L /oxer? J7P.I 31332 13737 2137* HolC $6112. — 7 7 ' Include classes for New Canadians at the elementary age level APPENDIX F Copy of letter forwarded to The Comptroller, Workmen's Compensation Board of British Columbia dated November 29, 1971. Letter from Mr. J . Downing, Assessments, Workmen's Compensation Board of British Columbia dated December 7, 1971, with rates. APPENDIX G Letter dated December 20, 1971, to the author from Mr. W. Sawadsky, Director Statistics and Economics Division, British Columbia School Trustees Association covering other data included in this Appendix. Teacher Salary Scales in British Columbia, 1961-1971 (Provincial Means). B.C.S.T.A. Dues charges to School Districts from 1961 to 1971, Average dues per District and Average dues per Student. B.C.S.T.A. 1970 Scale of Membership Fees. B.C.S.T.A. 1967 Scale of Membership Fees. B.C.S.T.A. 1966 Scale of Membership Fees. B.C.S.T.A. 1963 Scale of Membership Fees. 6.2 TEACHERS SALARY SCALES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1961-1971 (Prov inc ia l Means) 1 /EC 2/EB 3/EA V P C 5/PB 6/PA 6/PA M 1961 MIN MAX 1962 MIN MAX 1963 MIN MAX 1964 MIN MAX 1965 MIN MAX 1966 MIN MAX 1967 MIN MAX 1968 MIN MAX 1969 MIN MAX 1970 MIN MAX 3016 3615 3032 3651 3085 3681 3169 3772 3334 3785 3538 3981 3929 4263 4207 4541 4425 4796 4986 5248 3498 5394 3508 5437 3601 5517 3735 5775 3897 6018 4137 6376 4507 6852 4804 7242 5111 7681 5542 8258 3871 5938 3887 5989 3996 6126 4147 6377 4354 6691 4636 7095 5039 7638 5357 8068 5701 8563 6163 9189 4300 6614 4319 6692 4465 6948 4620 7233 4848 7635 5152 8143 5576 8737 5936 9272 6320 9860 6823 10578 4770 7449 4790 7553 4954 7870 5134 8258 5388 8717 5710 9271 6190 9989 6599 10630 7019 11305 7563 12100 5191 8061 5213 8186 5384 8536 5569 8951 5844 9488 6189 10113 6705 10886 7131 M729 7582 12303 8152 13156 5595 8986 5745 9316 6014 9741 6318 10371 6889 11117 7319 11825 7847 12577 8424 13413 1971 MIN MAX 5521 5778 5998 8882 6658 9879 7363 11374 8149 13006 8783 14134 8974 14363 /ns Dec. 14/71 l O & i . H O W E STREET. V A N C O U V E R 1. BRITISH COLUWIB'IA. 68? JfiSi G. 3 Average Dues Average Dues Year BCSTA Dues Per D i s t r i c t Per.Student 1961 $ 75,349 (81) $ 930.23 $ .23 1962 92,980 (82) 1,133.90 .27 1963 100,775 + 6,800* = 107,575 (82) 1 . 3 H . 8 9 .30 1964 144,465 (84) 1 ,719.82 .38 1965 161,385 (83) 1,944.39 ; " -40 1966 178,180 (83) 2,146.74 .42 1967 327,010 (83) 3,939.87 • 73 1968 340,634 (81) 4,205.35 .73 1969 416,842 (81) 5,146.19 .85 1970 403,714 approved est . (80) 5,046.42 .78 1971 419,645 (75) 5,595.26 .83 Proposed es t . '» Members' spec ia l levies /ns Dec. 14/71 BRITISH COLUivlBIA SCHOOL TRUSi EES ASSOCIATION 1095 H O W E STREET. V A N C O U V E R 1. BRIT ISH C O L U M B I A . 682-2881. G. 4 1970 Scale of Membership fee* Pup: 1 Enrolment as at January 1, 1970 0 -50 -150 -215 -300 -. 340 -380 -425-475 -535 -595 -670 -750 -840 -940 -!Q55 -1180 -1320 -1480 -1660 -.L860 -. 2080 -2325 -2600 -2920 -3280 -3680 -4120 -4600 -5170 -5800 -6500 -7300 -8200 -9150 -10300 -1!500 -12800 -14400 -16100 -18000 -20200 -22500 -25250 -30000 -35000 -^9 5-0 149 ,00 214. k H '299. 339 379 424 474 . 534" 594 669 . 749 839 . 939 1054 . J ! 7 9 1319 1479 . 1659 '859__ 2079 2324 . 2599 2919 . 3279 3679 41 19 4599 5169 5799 6499 "72.99 8199 9149 10299 1 IU99 12799 14399 , . . 16099 17999 20199 2.2499 25249 29999 34999 and up Annual Membership ^ee 1970 125. 265-530-1210 1410 |465 1770 1965 2135 .2315: 2515 2695 2895 3075 3258 3450 3630 3725 L005 4_185 4375 4555 4-/40 • 4930 5123-5310 5490 5680 5865-6050 6235 6i* 15 6605 6790 6970 7160 73 L 5 75^0 7730 7915 8090 8280: 8465 86L5 882 5 1 14835 7 with minimum charge of 25-'- per pup'i 1 •* 3yt . October 31, 1969 BRITISH COLUMBIA SCHOOL TRUSTEES ASSOCIATION 1095 H O W E STREET. V A N C O U V E R 1, BRIT ISH C O L U M B I A . 682-2881. G. 5 1967 Scale of Membership Fees PupM Enrolment 100 I c / 2 1 5 . 0 i 5 0 be 300 < 340 ** 425 u 1 4 7 5 1 535 •J f c 670 £ . 7 5 0 ! o 840 1 0 0 940 1055 1)80 w * 1320 ' t c 1480 1660 ' " i 8 6 0 ^ 2080 %1> 2325 U 7 V 2600 3*° 2920 300 3 2 8 O >f 00 - - - -lie M0300 l l 500 12800 I*3* 14400 ' • ^ 16100 18600 ^ 2 0 2 0 0 22500 25250 3680 -4120 -4600 -5170 -5800 -6500 -7300 -8200 -9150 49 149 214 299 339 379 424 474 ; 534 . 594 669 749 839 939 1.054-1 !79 1319 1479 1659 1859 2079 2324 2599 29V9 3279 3679 4119 4599 5169 5799 6499 7299 8199 9149 10299 11499 12799 14399 16099 17999 20199 22499 25249 29999 3 Soon up Annual Membership Fee 3fm mini mum . of Jfyper G. 6 1966 Scale of 8CSTA Membership fees Pupil Enrolment 0 50 150 215 300 340 380 425 475 535 i 595 670 750 . 840 940 1,055 1,180 1,320 1,430 1,660 1,860 2,030 2,325 2,600 2,920 3,280 3.680 4,120 4,600 5,170 5,800 6,500 7,300 8,200 9,150 10,300 11,500 12,800 14,400 16,100 18,000 20,200 22,500 25,250 30,000 - < 4 9 - 149 - 2*4 - 299 - 339 - 379 - 424 - 474 - 534 - 594 - 669 -' 749 - 839 - 939 - 1,054 - 1.179 - 1,319 - 1^ 479 -•'"1,659 - 1,859 - 2,079 -2,324 - 2,599 - 2,919 - 3,279 - 3,6-79 - 4,119 - 4,599 - 5,169 - 5.799 - 6,499 - 7,299 - 8,199 - 9,149 -10,299 -11,499 -12,799 -14,399 -16,099 -17,999--20,'r99 -22,499 -25,249 -29,999 -and up U — « \ — . - I f f — ifeo Hn-L 4 *V — \>iC — n«. — Illtf —- fy-zo — • l ^ o — iW* — (7V»o I<i7e •.— -i».o y — ^ - j l O O J ^ O c O U — -(ofS* ' ' -— | * U « — lit** S Annual Membership Fee 55 a1 120-240 • - ^ 5 4 5 - ? ; 635-1 715 800 885-1 ft' f- ^ "I'H3 ^ 7 f / > * / — - [ f ^ — | o i 7 „..,y 965-H'» — H*7 11^ 7 * I .L 1,045 -/ — — \W — l ^ t -v> 1,135-11 — —• aof?'— i«fo7 *Wt 1,215-N , S o? w t > > — - JLW<? — 'US * .'P — — — - 3L7f? r' 30*02. >W*f M'fS >SV?<-cW 38ft. Afa^ t>U f o » f AiS^ ' — - — j^ty . 7/i .Jf'3i| , XVa • 2,475 Wrf" — 30l<? • ^ 7 2,560-1| Vtoj? 2,645~i/ — — ' m'l^ 2,730~/Ht-— ^  — a*** "J<>* l U ^ 2,815'fH s-617 3 ^ , misty* 2,895 • S i l l — a«q<>+ '-&'/ - s W . — ^ " **'7 .'— 38PI * ;v^ ' - i l t l . 3<j«x, - -— tfoof A$o7 " S f^c7 ijtn X~>P* • («V13 — 43v; ^t-S l,305-i)l> . 1,335-n' -^ 1,470-w -1,555-1' -i\t 1 , 6 3 5 - » ' -fc+ri,725-" -1 ,S05-i"» ;«2.1,890—\u 1 ~^i,Sf .1.975-1| M • fc+f 2 ,055-» ^1 2,140-H -2,225-HI -2 ,310-U -2,395-ltU 170 lis. IX0C lilf i»i< •ifeoc ^oS5 i u o ait* if?!* 3^065"^ • ^ : 3,145-1 -»Vl 3,230-1,-.^ 3.315 — 1 3,400-1 — 3,485-1 — 3,570 — . 3»650-| -*/7J7 IxERO I C O P Y ['"W." I 1" ' /Iff Die: 11-0 (S XERO COPY G.7 THE BRITISH COLUMBIA SCHOOL TRUSTEES ASSOCIATION Scale of Membership Fees as authorized by the Finance Committee Annual Membership En rolment . . Fee 1 - 149 $ 75 150 - 214 150 215 - 299 325 300 - 339 375 340 . - : 379 425 380 - 424 ^75 425 - 474 525 475 - 53^ 575 535. - 594 625 595 - 669 675 670 - 749 725 750 - 839 775 840 - 939 825 940 - 1054. 875 1055 - 1179 . 925 1180 - 1313 . 975 1320 - . 1^79 • 1025 1480 - 1659 1075 1660 - 1859 1125 i860 - 2079 1175 2080 - 2324 1225 2325 - .2599 1275 2600 - 2919 . 1325 2920 - 3279 1375 3230 - 3679 • 1425 368C - 4119 1475 4120 - ^599 1525 4600 - 5169 1575 5170 - 5799 1625 5800 - 6499 1675 6500 - 7299 1725 7300 - 819D 1775 3200 - 9149 1825 9150 - 10299 1075 10300 - 11499 1925 11500 - 12799 1975 12800 - 14399 2025 14400 - 16099 : 2075 16100 - 17999 2125 18000 -• 20199 2175 20200 -• 22499 2225 22500 -• 25249 2275 25250 -• .:. 29999 2325 30000 - and up 4000 APPENDIX H Data supplied during v i s i t with Director, Research and Standards Branch, Department Education, Victoria, B.C. Comparison of Expenditures and Grants for Education. Compound Annual Cost Increases 1958-1968 and 1968-1969 B.C. B.C. Provincial Expenditure PROVINCt CF 0DITI6H COLUMBIA D E P A R T M E N T O F E D U C A T I O N VICTORIA, DRiTISH C O L U M B I A Comparison o f Expenditures and Grants f o r Educat ion 1969 and 1970 Calendar Year D i s t r i c t Expenditures 1969 1970 L o c a l A d m i n i s t r a t i o n $13,945,235 $15,133 ,.280. T o t a l Teachers 1 S a l a r i e s 187,728,987 213,495,071 Other I n s t r u c t i o n 18,751,089 21,497,148 P lant Opera t ion Repair and Maintenance 28,451,607 16,319,749 31,232,710 18,123,652 Conveyance o f P u p i l s 5,891,894 6,556,422 A u x i l i a r y S e r v i c e s 3,477,585 3,683,264 Non-operat ing Expenses (Other) Co l lege 7,040,736 8,740,549 6,604,460 14,005,440 Debt S e r v i c e s 39,063,864 41,629,587 Current C a p i t a l 2,482,699 3,473,968 T o t a l School D i s t r i c t Expenditure-. 331,894,014 375,435,003 T o t a l Grants - Schools - Co l leges - 90% of H . O . G . 129,277,913 6,050,041 49,325,102 184,653,056 150,523,923 8,805,727 54,314,039 213,643~,739 L o c a l Tax r e q u i s i t i o n s 1 ( a f t e r 90% H .O.G. ) 181,837,538 132,512,436 200,978,132 146,664,043 T o t a l P u b l i c School Teachers (gross) 20,140 21,481 T o t a l P u b l i c School Enrolment- (June) 489,596 513,079 Net l o c a l school t a x / p u p i l ( a f t e r 90% H.O.G. ) $270.66 $285*85 T o t a l "government g r a n t s / p u p i l ( e x c l . c o l l e g e s , i n c l . H .O .G . ) $364.80 $399.23 s Jf.2. '• ' • or Tin.. cnrcTOtt ^ V,'^  CSrARCH A N D S T A N J A R D S MRANCH. (•«-/jr'i f'Aril.lAMfc'NT BUILDINGS ^ \ • .' , J PPOVINCK o r BRITISH COLUMBIA D E P A R T M E N T O F E D U C A T I O N VICTORIA, BRITISH C O L U M B I A Compound Annual Cost Increases, 1958-1968, and 1968-1969 B.C. Ratio: 1968/58 Cpd. Ann. % Incr. Increase 1969/68 Local Administration 3.54 13.57. 9,2% Teachers* Salaries (n.b. " t o t a l " not "average") 3.18 U.j 14.S Other Instruction 4.73 16.8 10.6 Plant Operation and Maintenance 2.66 10.3 8.5 Conveyance of Pupils 2.39 9.1 10.0 Total School Operating Costs 3.04 11.8 11.3 Auxiliary Services 1.53 4.3 , <"-18.1 Non-operating expenses (method of reporting (excluding college) changed, 1969) -j _286.5 Debt Services 3.38 13.0 5.0 Total School D i s t r i c t Expenditures ( i n c l . colleges) 3.13 12.1 16.2 Total Government Grants to school d i s t r i c t s for schools including college and home-owner grants 2.70 10.4 10.9 21.9 Local Tax Requisitions (after home-owner grant) 3.55 2.74 13.5 10.6 13.5 5.5 Total Teachers Total Enrolment 1.86 6.4 5,9 6.6 4.7 Net local school tax/pupil (after home-owner grant) 1.55 4.5 3.4 Total government grants/pupil (excl. colleges, incl HOG) 2.01 7.2 17.9 PEOVIKCIAL E;-PESDITURE Province of Brir.ish Columbia Provincial Government Expenditure for Education Grants ror Tear . Ending Mar. 31 Oper. Sch's. + Hcae Owner Grant Universities, Cc lieges, & Nitfit Schs. Admin. Superv., Schs. for Handicapped Total Education (Provincial E.ipenditurs) Transportation (HW73., Whvs. & Subsidies) Health and Hospitals Social Welfare (All including adialnl s t rat ion) Total Gross Provincial Expenditure I960 60,764,248 . P., 707,080 4,835,311 74,306,63? 77,924,847 76,000,369 39,590,505 364,671,73-'; 1961 73,552,164 11,382,131 4,747,338 89,681,633 95,587,984 83,306,298 49,321,634 3?5,5i?6,793 1562 78,635,822 13,648,167 4,509,214 96,793,203 83,562,115 88,753,328 53,822,397 408,558,698 1963 82,395,646 *20,902,300 4,754,551 *108,052,497 99,463,585 93,696,851 55,283,468 435,898,803 „ 1964 95,419,057 25,823,284 5,560,590 126,302,931 122,897,572 ICO,721,961 58,239,165 494,703,155 1965 110,111,723 31,700,561 6,137,385 147,949,669 102,525,910 1C9.367.331 60,292,932 507,737,959 1966 123,942,064 46,319,746 5,921,020 176,182,830 °139,955,540 123,223,090 67,558,615 645,416,575 1967 139,038,848 51,852,159 6,308,992 197,199,999 98,131,266 151,546,683 74,805,714 660,476,944 1958 152,087,731 73,553,827 6,691,296 232,332,8.'4 104,261,978 178,472,816 79,9^8.463 758,633,503 1969 176,365,926 S4,290,698 7,675,687 268,332,311 127,705,962 227,242,457 98,315,551 910,813,889 1970 206,411,465 112,370,118 8,062,168 326,843,7;.l 171,585,148 271,301,506 108,524,211 1,175,759,606 Ratio: 1970/1960 3.396 12.906 1.667 4.399 2.202 3.570 ' 2.741 3.224 Cpd. ann. X incr. 13.00 29.15 5.24 15.97 8.21 13.57 10.61 12.42 •Vocational School programme *.' Xr.cI-j.Jlng B.C. Ferries APPENDIX I Statistics Canada Correspondence. Preliminary Geographical Distributions of. Personal Income and i t s Main Components. Statist ics Statist ique C a n a d a C a n a d a I. 1. Attached please find preliminary geographical distributions of personal income and i t s main components. Veuillez trouver ci-joint les estimations preliminaires de distribution geographique du revenu personnel et de ses principales composantes. Ottawa, C a n a d a TABLE 1. Personal Income, Geographical Distribution, 1961-1970 (1) TABLEAU 1. Repartition geographique du revenu personnel, 1961-1970 (1) 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 millions of dollars - millions de dollars i N e w f o u n d l a n d 4 2 ? 4 4 5 4 ? 5 ,• • 5 1 7 5 6 3 6 2 8 6 9 9 7 5 5 8 3 1 9 24 Terre-Neuve Prince Edward Island / 9 9 1 1 2 u 4 1 2 7 1 3 6 1 4 9 1 6 5 1 8 6 2 0 1 2 1 5 Ile-du-Pnnce Edouard Nova Scotia 926 975 1,029 1,096 1,181 1,295 1,442 1,576 1,759 1,901 Nouvelle-Ecosse u New Brunswick 6 5 ? 6 9 4 y 4 l g 0 1 g ? 1 g 6 g 0 7 g g 2 1 3 Q 5 1 4 2 0 Nouveeu-Brunswick 5 Quebec ^ 7,654 8,226 8,702 9,547 10,555 11,820 13,140 14,276 15,750 16,893 Quebec 6 2 n J a r i ° 11 ,896 12,745 13,679 14,736 16,353 18,433 20,315 22,385 25,120 27,370 Ontario ? miii vutx ^ 2 5 1 2 • 7 ? 9 0 Q 2,318 2,581 2,783 2,939 Manitoba 8 Saskatchewan _ 1 060 1,492 1,668 1,522 1,785 2,057 2,001 2,300 2,414 2,252 Saskatchewan 9 Tiwl\ • 2 ' 1 4 1 2 ' 3 4 3 2 ' 4 7 9 2 ' 6 0 2 2,888 3,337 3,604 4,056 4,555 4,919 1 Q British Columbia • . 3 3 4 • 4 4 & ? Colombie-Britannique . u Yukon and Northwest Territ. _ 5 5 5 6 6 4 & 4 ^ ? 2 1 2 2 1 2 g Yukon et Territ. du Nord-Ouest 1 2 Foreign Countries (2) ' 6 g g 2 g 3 g 6 g g ; • 1 Q 2 Pays Etrangers (2) 13 Canada 29,411 31,966 34,109 36,618 40,591 45,702 50,208 55,213 61,398 66,100 (1) Geographical distributions of the main components only of personal income, are given in Tables 4 to 8 in-clusive; these tables, therefore, do not add to the total of personal income as shown in this table. (1) La repartition geographique des principales composantes seulement du revenu personnel est donnee aux tableaux 4 a 8 inclusiveraent. C'est pourquoi leurs totaux ne concordent pas avec ceux du present tableau. (2) Income of Canadians temporarily abroad, including pay and allowances of Canadian armed forces abroad. (2) Revenu des Canadiens se trouvant temporairement a l'etranger. Y compris les traitements et les allocations des militaires. TABLE 2. Personal Income Per Person, Geographical Distribution, 1961-1970 TABLEAU 2. Repartition geographique durevenu personnel par habitant, 1961-1970 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 dollars 1 Newfoundland Terre-Neuve 932 951 998 1,070 1,154 1,274 1,398 1,489 1,617 1,784 2 Prince Edward Island Ile-du-Prince Edouard 943 1,047 1,056 1,165 1,248 1,367 1,514 1,691 1 ,827 1,955 3 Nova Scotia Nouvelle-Ecosse 1,256 1,307 1,370 1,452 1,562 1,713 1,905 2,074 2,305 2,482 4 New Brunswick Nouveau-Brunswick ' *.* "•"'* " ' ' ' . 1,099 1,147 . 1,217 1,311 i ,416 1,571 1,739 1,910 2,088 2,276 5 Quebec Quebec , 1,455 1,532 1,588 •1,710 1,857 2,045 2,239 2,409 2,632 2,809 6 Ontario Ontario 1,908 2,037 2,111 2,222 2,409 2,648 2,842 3,064 3,371 3,584 7 Manitoba Manitoba , 1,546 1,712 1,727 1,853 1,969 2,153 2,407 2,658 2,843 2,996 8 Saskatchewan Saskatchewan ' 1,146 1,604 1,788 1,616 1,879 2 , 1 5 4 2,089 2,396 2,517 2,391 9 Alberta Alberta 1,607 1,711 1 ,767 1,821 1,992 2,281 2,419 2,658 2,918 3,074 10 British Columbia Colombie-Britannique . 1,843 1,924 2,022 2,145 2,334 2,542 2,693 2,835 3,120 3,293 11 Yukon and Northwest Territ. Yukon et Territ. du Nord-Ouest 1,486 1,400 1,561 1,524 1,610 1,674 2,182 2,304 2,596 2,612 12 . 1,613 1 ,720 1,802 1,898 2,066 2,283 2,461 2,662 2,915 3,092 TABLE 3. Personal Disposable Income, Geographical Distribution, 1961-1970 (1) TABLEAU 3. Repartition geographique du revenu personnel disponible, 1961-1970 (1) 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 millions of dollars - millions de dollars 1 Newfoundland Terre-Neuve 391 406 434 470 510 558 616 655 709 787 2 Prince Edward Island Ile-du-Prince Edouard 91 103 104 116 125 134 148 165 177 188 3 Nova Scotia Nouvelle-Ecosse 842 885 932 988 1,057 1,135 1,246 1,354 1,484 1,590 4 New Brunswick Nouveau-Brunswick 597 632 672 726 781 852 942 1,035 1,111 •1,201 5 Quebec Quebec . 6*913 7,414 7,841 8,533 9,478 10,365 11,350 12,165 13,239 14,041 6 Ontario Ontario , 10,431 11,187 12,030 12,818 14,119 15,624 17,027 18,396 20,177 21,572 7 Manitoba Manitoba 1,272 1,441 1,474 1,588 1,701 1,821 2,010 2,227 2,341 2,444 8 Saskatchewan Saskatchewan 951 1,367 1,529 1,369 1,606 1,832 1,735 2,014 2,106 1,903 9 Alberta Alberta 1,935 2,117 2,245 2,336 2,588 2,944 3,112 3,476 3,807 4,048 1° British Columbia Co1ombie-Britannique 2,682 2,847 3,059 3,314 3,683 4,090 4,442 4,763 5,225 5,641 11 Yukon and Northwest Territ. Yukon et Territ. du Nord-Ouest 48 49 57 55 57 60 77 88 94 97 12 Foreign Countries (2) Pays Etrangers (2) "' 58 70 71 72 82 84 87 89 87 83. 13 . 26,211 28,518 30,448 32,385 35,787 39,499 42,792 46,427 50,557 53,595 (1) Personal disposable income consists of total persona 1 income less personal direct taxes and other current transfers to government from persons. (1) Le revenu personnel disponible egale le revenu personnel total raoins les impots directs et les autres transferts courants verses par les personnes au secteur gouvernemental. (2) Taxes and other transfers paid by Canadians temporarily abroad, with the exception of employer and employee contributions to public service pensions from the year 1951 on, cannot be estimated separately and are in-cluded in the provincial estimates. (2) A partir de 1951 les impots et les autres transferts provenant des Canadiens se trouvant temporeireraent & l'etranger,a l'exception des cotisations des eraployeurs et des employes au regime de pensions de la fonction publique, ne pouvant etre evalues independamnent, ontete compris dans les estimations provinciales. TABLE 4. Wages, Salaries, and Supplementary Labour Income, Geographical Distribution, 1961-1970 TABLEAU 4. Repartition geographique de la remuneration des salaries, 1961-1970 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 millions of dollars - millions de dollars 1 Newfoundland Terre-Neuve 292 302 327 356 401 451 484 531 581 649 2 Prince Edward Island Ile-du-Prince Edouard 52 57 58 63 68 78 91 98 109 119 3 Nova Scotia Nouvelle-Ecosse 549 581 610 656 719 798 883 972 1,111 1,214 4 New Brunswick Nouveau-Brunswick 420 447 478 521 575 650 723 782 879 957 5 Quebec Quebec . 5,411 5,863 6,246 6,916 7,713 8,759 9,663 10,396 11,461 12,289 6 Ontario Ontario . 8,437 9,057 9,716 10,616 11,875 13,428 14,755 16,193 18,216 20,005 7 Manitoba Manitoba 940 993 1,049 1,106 1,197 1,315 1,486 1,661 1,864 2,006 8 Saskatchewan Saskatchewan 635 663 700 749 829 927 1,058 1,168 .1,241 1,276 9 Alberta Alberta . 1,333 1,430 1,504 1,624 1,821 2,073 2,334 2,604 3,057 3,383 10 British Columbia Co1ombie-Britannique . 2,009 2,142 2,300 2,540 2,906 3,338 3,685 3,962 4,537 4,990 11 Yukon and Northwest Territ. Yukon et Territ. du Nord-Ouest . 45 47 52 53 55 62 83 93 108 114 12 Foreign Countries Pays Etrangers 13 15 17 19 22 28 30 33 39 41 13 . 20,136 21,597 23,057 25,219 28,181 31,907 35,275 38,493 43,203 47,043 TABLE 5. Net Income Received by Farm Operators from Farm Production, Geographical Distribution, 1961-1970 TABLEAU 5. Repartition geographique du revenu net recu par les exploitants agricoles au t i t r e de la production agricole, 1961-1970 ^ Newfoundland Terre-Neuve *"" 2 Prince Edward Island Ile-du-Prince Edouard ^ Nova Scotia Nouvelle-Ecosse ^ New Brunswick Nouveau-Brunswick ^ Quebec Quebec ............... ^ Ontario Ontario ' 7 Manitoba Manitoba g Saskatchewan Saskatchewan ' "" g Alberta Alberta British Columbia Colombie-Britannique ^ Yukon and Northwest Territ. Yukon et Territ. du Nord-Ouest 12 Canada . . 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 millions of dollars - millions de dollars 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 6 10 8 13 13 9 7 13 10 10 19 17 17 15 16 16 13 15 24 24 10 15 10 17 18 8 9 16 9 13 141 153 136 125 142 192 169 187 245 193 285 310 284 270 308 407 336 367 450 405 4 6 140 98 147 158 155 165 180 116 63 60 396 521 302 447 572 341 447 420 158 185 233 265 214 269 , 352 262 365 276 207 58 63 62 63 62 81 . 75 98 92 87 812 1,339 1,403 1,168 1,435 1,794 1,379 1,690 1,644 1,162 TABLE 6. Net Income of Non-Farm Unincorporated Business Including Rent, Geographical Distribution, 1961-1970 TABLEAU 6. Repartition geographique du revenu net des entreprises non agricoles non constitutes en societes, loyers compris, 1961-1970 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 millions of dollars - millions de dollars Newfoundland Terre-Neuve 37 36 37 43 42 41 46 48 51 52 Prince Edward Island Ile-du-Prince E d o u a r d " 13 11 13 14 16 16 17 18 18 20 Nova Scotia Nouvelle-Ecosse 96 94 101 108 118 119 129 140 143 150 New Brunswick Nouveau-Brunswick 59 58 67 , 66 69 73 78 86 92 94 Quebec Quebec 653 661 716 765 806 853 920 982 1,041 1,069 Ontario Ontario 1,116 1,098 1,227 1,267 1,359 1,446 1,566 1,683 1,751 1,800 Manitoba Manitoba 144 140 148 158 164 177 191 205 219 228 Saskatchewan. Saskatchewan 119 140 165 159 177 197 205 221 243 255 Alberta Alberta 234 225 241 255 268 295 314 338 355 369 British Columbia Colombie-Britannique 326 326 355 377 401 430 457 494 494 510 Yukon and Northwest Territ. 9 o L o o U Yukon et Territ. du Nord- J J J H J J J Ouest 2,800 2,791 3,073 3,215 3,424 3,650 3,926 4,218 4,410 4,551 TABLE 7. Interest, Dividends and Miscellaneous Investment Income of Persons, Geographical Distribution, 1961-1970 TABLEAU 7. Repartition geographique des interets, dividendes et revenus divers de placements, 1961-1970 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 millions of dollars - millions de dollars 1 Newfoundland Terre-Neuve 14 17 17 20 20 22 25 28 33 37 2 Prince Edward Island Ile-du-Prince E d o u a r d ' 5 7 7 7 8 9 9 10 11 12 3 Nova Scotia Nouvelle-Ecosse 55 67 71 78 81 89 94 101 114 122 4 New Brunswick Nouveau-Brunswick 36 42 45 50 53 60 64 68 76 84 5 Quebec Quebec 578 617 671 753 827 913 957 1,044 1,183 1,304 6 Ontario Ontario 968 1,126 1,228 1,290 1,429 1,615 1,744 1,919 2,171 2,339 7 Manitoba Manitoba 106 123 138 148 157" 178 189 208 234 254 8 Saskatchewan Saskatchewan 82 101 116 133 142 159 176 195 220 242 9 Alberta Alberta 140 170 178 200 211 238 258 299 339 380 10 British Columbia Co1orabie-Britannique 234 272 316 333 367 417 463 504 577 623 11 Yukon and Northwest Territ. Yukon et Territ. du Nord-Ouest 1 1 1 1 1 .1 '.- 2 2 3 3 12 2,219 2,543 2,788 3,013 3,296 3,701 3,981 4,378 4,961 5,400 CO TABLE 8. Government Transfer Payments to Persons (I), Geographical Distribution, 1961-1970 TABLEAU 8. Repartition geographique des transferts gouvernementaux aux personnes (D» 1961-1970 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 millions of dollars - millions de dollars 1 Newfoundland Terre-Neuve 72 77 80 84 88 101 131 134 151 170 2 Prince Edward Island Ile-du-Prince Edouard 18 20 20 21 22 27 30 35 39 40 3 Nova Scotia Nouvelle-Ecosse 113 121 126 135 143 157 192 212 230 250 4 New Brunswick Nouveau-Brunswi ck 95 97 103 108 115 127 146 180 190 215 5 Quebec Quebec 760 810 8i3 870 938 969 1,283 1,502 1,636 1,840 6 Ontario Ontario 857 906 971 1,031 1,116 1,247 1,606 1,887 2,163 2,452 7 Manitoba Manitoba 141 157 154 163 168 184 213 249 284 321 8 Saskatchewan Saskatchewan 147 174 147 160 170 181 197 241 260 291 9 Alberta Alberta 194 224 228 242 255 309 363 369 451 494 10 British Columbia Colombie-Britannique 310 324 334 358 383 416 474 532 647 724 11 Yukon and Northwest Territ. Yukon et Territ. du Nord-Ouest 2 2 3 2 3 2 3 3 6 5 12 Foreign Countries Pays Etrangers — •' — 1 1 2 2 2 3 2 13 2,709 2,912 2,979 3,175 3,402 3,722 4,640 5,346 6,060 6,804 (1) Excludes interest on the public debt and capital assistance. (1) Exclut les interets de la dette publique et les subventions de capital. APPENDIX J Index Numbers of Average Wage Rates by Industry 1966-1970 . Extracted from "Wage Rates, Salaries and Hours of Labour" Report No. 53, Economics and Research Branch, Canada Department of Labour. J. 1 SUMMARY O F G E N E R A L WAGE T R E N D S Trends in wage rales, as measured by the October 1 survey, are reflected in the index numbers for individual industries and for certain main industries shown in tables A and 13 of this report. The General Index which applies to all industries moved from 155.1 to 167.8 for a 8.2 per cent rise between 1969 and 1970. For the eight main industrial groups, movement in the index numbers from 1969 to 1970 was as follows: Per cent Industry Group Index Number . change (1961 = 100) 1969 to 1970 1969 1970 % Logging 179.8 192.8 + 7.2 Mining 146.2 159.4 + 9.0 Manufacturing 151.2 162.9 + 7.7 Construction 167.0 195.5 + 17.1 Transportation, Communication and Other Utilities 154.9 166.2 .7.4 Trade 155.2 166.1 + 7.0 Service 154.0 166.4 + 8.1 Local Administration 163.4 183.3 + 12.2 General Index — All Industries 155.1 167.8 + 8.2 Within the manufacturing sector, the index for wage rates in the durable goods industries rose by 8.4 per cent from 1969 to 1970, while the index number for the non-durable goods industries advanced by 7.1 per cent during the same period. J. 2 Table A - INDEX NUMBERS O F A V E R A G E WAGE R A T E S BY INDUSTRY, 1966 - 19701 (1961 = 100) Industry 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 LOGGING . •Kastcrn Cnnnda British Columbia, Coastal . MINING Metal Mining Colli Quartz Mines Iron Minos Other Mcta 1 Mines Coal Mines MANUFACTURING. Food and Beverage Industries Slaughtering and Meat Processing Dairy Factories Fish Products Grain Mil l Products'. Biscuits Bakeries Confectionery Soft Drinks Breweries . . . . . Tobacco Products Industries. Rubber Industries Iluhher Footwear . Rubber Tires and Tubes Other Rubber Products Maintenance Trades, Service Occupations and Labourers, a l l Rubber Industries . . . . . . . . . . Leather Industries... leather Tanneries . . . Shoe Factories . . . . . . . . . Textile Industries (Except Clothing) Cotton Yarn and Cloth Woollen Yarn and Cloth Synthetic Textiles Knitting and Clothing Industries. . . . Hosiery and Other Knitted Goods . Men's Clothing Women's Clothing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Children's Clothing Fur Goods Wood Industries Sawmills and Planing Mills . . . Veneer and Plywood Mills Sash, Door and Flooring Mi l l s . Furniture Industry Household,.Office and Other Furniture Paper and Allied Industries • . . • • Pulp and Paper. P u l p . . . Newsprint Other Pulp and Paper • • Maintenance Trades, Service Occupations and Labourers, a l l Pulp and Paper Industries . Paper Boxes and Bags • Printing, Publishing, and Allied Industries . Printing and Publishing . . . . . . . Daily Newspapers Primary Metal Industries • Iron and Steel Mills ..' Iron Foundries . . . . • Smelting and Refining. 140.2 143.5 126.9 122.7 122.7 134.6 121.0 118.4 121.6 121.1 111.9 121.5 122.0 118.4 125.8 124.5 125.4 126.5 120.2 133.4 120.5 116.3 124.9 115.2 123.3 127.5 119.7 128.9 125.9 128.2 123.5 124.3 118.7 126.5 123.1 108.3 136.6 127.4 128.1 128.2 125.0 122.4 122.4 122.4 122.9 126.3 118.8 122.3 122.9 120.3 116.5 118.2 116.5 156.0 j 160.7 137.1 130.2 130.2 142.7 129.0 125.6 130.5 132.9 132.2 131.1 132.5 • 126.3 136.5 137.5 135.7 136.0 126.4 140.8 128.7 131.6 129.7 119.4 130.9 137.4 127.3 139.2 136.1 136.7 133.7 136.8 . 124.4 130.9 127.2 115.9 144.1 137.3 137.7 139.6 134.9 132.4 132.4 132.4: 133.3 137.9 128.0 132.0 133.2 128.8 127.5 128.9 126.5 123.1 123.6 121.2 162.5 165.9 149.1 138.9 138.9 154.5 133.2 134.1 140.6 145.2 137.9 148.6 141.4 135.4 149.8 151.9 149.3 150.1 135.6 156.4 140.4 139.0 141.4 130.1 146.5 147.5 137.8 149.2 144.4 142.0 150.0 144.3 135.7 138.8 137.9 128.2 158.1 149.3 149.9 150.1 147.2 143.2 143.2 139.9 140.0 143.4 135.0 139.1 140.3 139.6 136.4 139.9 133.9 128.5 128.1 129.8 179.8 184.6 160.7 146.2 146.2 161.6 147.1 140.0 151.2 158.1 148.5 161.1 150.0 154.6 166.7 166.1 160.3 160.5 154.0 169.0 151.5 147.8 153.5 137.6 160.6 158.5 149.9 160.0 155.0 154.6 ' 160.2 152.7 145.0 147.5 150.3 135.4 161.2 161.2 162.7 160.0 157.2 153.6 153.6 150.9 150.8 156.0 144.6 148.0 151.2 151.4 145.9 152.5 141.2 135.1 133.7 140.4 192.8 198.8 168.6 159.4 159.4 171.3 158.1 155.1 162.9 168.7 160.1 169.3 158.3 165.7 185.7 178.7 170.4 168.7 164.5 188.9 161.5 150.3 165.9 149.6 173.6 166.2 166.5 166.1 169.0 173-0. 166.7 152.2 159.8 156.7 141.6 170.8 174.5 174.6 177.1 172.8 165.9 165.9 162.0 162.3 167.0 155.8 161.2 162.6 160.5 156.6 166.5 149-5 154.5 153.9 156.6 J. .3 Table A - INDEX NUMBERS OF A V E R A G E WAGE R A T E S BY INDUSTRY, 1966 - 1970' - Continued (1961 = 100) Industry 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 125.0 131.2 140.4 151.9 162.7 — — — — — — — — — • — OrntiiiKMiliil anil Architectural MeUil — — — — — - - - ' — -— ' — — — — Moating Equipment — — — - — — 125.0 131.2 140.4 151.9 162.7 Machinery Industries (Excopt Electrical Machinery) 122.7 ' 131.0 140.5 151.8 163.3 127.8 132.6 145.5 154.3' 165.9 120.0 129.5 139.1 151.9 163.5 125.0 134.8 136.5 145.8 156.8 122.5 131.7 142.1 152.8 164.2 121.6 129.7 142.0 ,154.0 162.3 126.7 134.6 145.4 156.0 170.7 120.1 129.8 138.3 148.5 160.1 120.9 128.2 135.9 144.6 154.1 119.4 134.3 144.6 155.6 167.3 . 112.3 123.4 133.8 141.7 151.0' Major Appliances (Electric and Non-Electric) . . — - — — — — — — — — Household Radio and Television Receivers . . . 112.5 118.7 131.3 137.9 149.1 112.3 124.9 133.3 142.5 153.4 117.3 123.5 136.0 142.4 147.8 — - . - ' - -— — — • — — - - • - — — 123.1 131.4 139.3 146.2 162.0 Chemical and Chemical Products Industries . . . . . 121.9 131.1 140.9 152.6 166.7 Pharmaceuticals, Medicines and Toilet 122.5 133.8 142.2 155.5 171.8 115.7 124.6 135.1 . 146.9 159.2 125.2 131.7 142.9 152.3 164.4 121.2. 130.0 139.7 149.7 162.3 121.9 131.0 • 141.4 152.5 163.2 CONSTRUCTION (Buildings and Structures only) . . 129.8 142.0 154.9 167.0. 195.5 TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION AND OTHER UTILITIES 122.3 132.8 143.4 154.9 166.2 123.1 133.0 143.8 154.4 165.1 116.4 123.4 129.3 130.7 132.5 122.4 . 132.8 141.5 150.8 160.8 126.0 136.4 149.7 165.3 178.7 — • — — — — 123.3 131.5 152.6 162.5 177.3 119.6 127.5 139.5 159.1 170.3 124.2 127.5 138.0 150.9 165.2 — — — — — 118.3 127.5 138.0 150.9 165.2 124.2 139.8 149.3 162.4 174.6 123.9 132.5 144.5 155.2 166.1 118.9 127.6 136.1 148.7 .160.8 125.9 134.5 148.0 157.9 168.3 126.6 133.8 149.8 163.0 177.7 124.9 137.3 147.3 163.4 169.1 125.9 134.1 147.5 154.6 165.0 ' 125.5 133.9 141.8 154.0 166.4 — — — — — 131.2 140.9 150.4 160.9 170.7 124.4 132.6 140.2 152.7 165.6 116.2* 121.2* 130.0* 138.4* 148.5 123.2 133.0 139.6 152.9 162.8 J. 4 Table A - INDEX NUMBERS O F A V E R A G E WAGE R A T E S BY INDUSTRY, 1966 - 1970'Concluded (1961 = 100) Industry i 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 Service (Continued) 130.7 139.8 147.0 161.7 174.2 L O C A L GOVERNMENT (Municipol Government Only) 124.6 136.9 146.7. 163.4 183.3 GENERAL INDEX - A L L INDUSTRIES... 124.0 133.4 143.8 155.1 167.8 'Index numbers for the years 1962-65 have been recalculated for most of the industries included in this Report using the buse year 1961 = 100, so as to form a continuous scries to 1966 that incorpo-rates all the changes made in the survey of wage rates in 1966; for certain industries (marked "—"), sufficient historical information to calculate an index series was not available. 'Durable Goods: include Wood, Furniture, Primary Metal, Metal Fabricating, Machinery (ejecept elec-trical), Transportation Equipment, and Electrical Products Industries. . 'Non-Durable Goods: include the remaining manufacturing industries. * Revised Figure. ** Railway Hotels Included. Table B - INDEX NUMBERS OF AVERAGE WAGE RATES FOR • NON-OFFICE OCCUPATIONS BY INDUSTRY DIVISION 1961 -(1961 Tableau B - INDICES DE TAUX DE SALAIRE MOYENS POUR EMPLOIS HORS-BUREAU PAR BRANCHE INDUSTRIELLE 1970' 100) Year Annee Logging Abattage Mining Mines' > Manufacturing Industries Monufacturieres Construction. Transportation, •tc. Trade Commerce Service Service Local Government Administration Locale General Index' Indice genera I1 All ' Manufacturing Toute la fabrication ' Durable Goods Marchandiscs . durobles Non-Durable Goods Marcharidises non-durables • Construction Transports, etc.. 1961 100.0 1 1O0.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1962 103.9 104.0 102.7 102.1 103.3 105.0 103.1 103.5 101.9 103.3 103.1 1963 1.10.1 107.0 106.0 105.1 106.7 109.1 106.0 107.9 106.6 107.4 107.0 1964 117.5 109.6 109.7 108.9 110.5 113.9 109.8 111.0 111.7 111.5 110.9 1°65 126.4 113.3 115.0 114;4 115.5 119.8 114.3 116.9 118.4 118.1 116.5 1966 140;2 122.7 121.6 121.2 121.9 129.8 122.3 123.9 125.5 124.6 124.0 ..: 1967 156.0 130.2 130.5 130.0 131.0 142.0 132.8 132.5 133.9 136.9' 133,4 1968 162.5 138.9 140.6 139.7 141.4 154.9 143.4 144.5 141.8 146.7 113.8 1969 179.8 146.2 151.2 149.7 152.5 167.0 154.9 155.2 154.0 163.4 155.1 1970 192.8 159.4 162:9 162.3 163.2 195.5 . 166.2 166.1 166.4 183.3 167.8 ^ndex numbers of average wage rates for certain main industries for the period 1901 to 1949 as base year appear in the report Wage Rates, Salaries and Hours of Labour, 1%: no. 48, p.p. 30-31. xGeneral Index derived from industries shown In Table A. 1965, with 'Les indices de taux de salairc nioyens pour certaines industries principales pou i Report allant de 1901 a 1965, avec 1949 comme anne'e de base, apparaisscnt au rapport Salaire, Traitemenls et Heures de Travail, 1965, rapport no. 48, p.p. 30—31. 'Indice genera! pbtenu des industries indiquees dans le tableau A. r la periode. Taux de APPENDIX K Population data copied from D.B.S. Publication 92-610 March, 1968 CHART -1 GRAPHIOUE-1871 (i) PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION OF THE POPULATION BY 5 YEAR AGE GROUPS AND SEX.CANADA,1871-1966 REPARTITION PROPORTIONNELLE DE LA POPULATION PAR GROUPE QUINQUENNAL D'AGE ET SELON LE SEXE,CANADA, 1871 —1966 1881 AGE-AGE. 19 11 1921 i i i 80+ 7 5 - 7 9 7 0 - 7 4 6 5 - 6 9 6 0 - 6 4 5 5 - 5 9 50 -54 4 5 - 4 9 4 0 - 4 4 3 5 - 3 9 3 0 - 3 4 2 5 - 2 9 2 0 - 2 4 15 -19 10-14 5 - 9 0 - 4 1951 1956 80+ 75 - 7 9 70 - 7 4 65 - 6 9 60 - 6 4 55 - 5 9 50 - 5 4 45 - 4 9 40 - 4 4 35 - 3 9 30 - 3 4 25 - 2 9 20 - 2 4 1 5 - 1 9 10 - 1 4 5 - 9 ' 0 - 4 t % 8 ^Four original provinces only. Ouatre provinces du deb'jt seuiement. I AGE-AGE 80+ 7 5 - 7 9 70 -74 65 -69 60-64 55-59 50-54 45 -49 40-44 35-39 30-34 25 -29 20-24 15-19 10-14 5 - 9 0 - 4 1891 80+ . 75-79 70-74 65-69 60^64 , 5 5 - 5 9 . 50-54 . 45 -49 40-44 . 35-39 30-34 25-29 . 2 0 - 2 4 15-19 10-14 . 5 - 9 0 - 4 80+ 75-79 70-74 65-69 60-64 55 -59 50-54 45 -49 40-44 35-39 30-34 25-29 20-24 15-19 10-14 5 -9 0 - 4 1931 1961 ! AGE-AGE( 80+ 7 5 - 7 9 7 0 - 7 4 6 5 - 6 9 6 0 - 6 4 55 -59 50-54 4 5 - 4 9 4 0 - 4 4 35 -39 30 -34 2 5 - 2 9 20-24 15-19 10-14 5 - 9 0 - 4 8 80+ 7 5 - 7 9 70-74 6 5 - 6 9 6 0 - 6 4 55-59 50 -54 4 5 - 4 9 4 0 - 4 4 35 -39 30 -34 25 -29 20 -24 15-19 10- 14 5 - 9 0 - 4 80+ 7 5 - 7 9 70-74 6 5 - 6 9 60-64 55-59 50 -54 4 5 - 4 9 40 -44 35-39 30-34 25 -29 20 -24 15-19 10-14 5 - 9 0 - 4 1 9 0 ! 1941 8 % ' 8 % TOTAL POPULATION = 100 PERCENT*-POPULATION TOTALE = ICO P.CENT. K. 2 ' TABU! 19. POPULATION BY FIVE-YEAR AGE CROUPS AND SEX, FOR PROVINCES AND TERRITORIES, 1966 AND 1961 PROVINCE AND CENSUS YEAR NEWFOUNDLAND PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND NOVA SCOTIA NEW BRUNSWICK QUEBEC SASKATCHEWAN BRITISH COLUMBIA NORTHWEST TERRITORIES NEWFOUNDLAND PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND NOVA SCOTIA NEW BRUNSWICK QUEBEC SASKATCHEWAN BRITISH COLUMBIA NORTHWEST TERRITORIES TOTAL 0-4 . 5-9 10-14- 15-19 . 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 T. 20 014,880 2,197,387 2,300,857 2,093,513 1,837,725 1,461,298 1,241,794 1,241,697 1,286,144 1.257,028 M. 10,054,344 1,128,771 1,172,821 1,071,255 928,958 727,115 619,462 630,498 649,769 624,709 F. 960,536 1,068,616 1,128,036 1,022,258 908,767 .734,183 622,332 611,199 636,375 632,319 T. 493,396 68,545 67,007 63,531 54,107 35,976 27,931 25,368 25,276 23,751 K. 252,125 35,301 34,090 32,199 27,252 17,668 14,246 13,211 13,196 12,523 F. 241,271 33,244 32,917 31,332 27,055 18,308 13,685 12,157 12,080 11,228 T. 108,535 12,587 13,023 12,023 11,061 6,781 5,715 5.341 5,374 5,538 Mi »4,li74 f.,471 0 ,11' 2,fl'>t» 0 .0 " * ' « , « 7 » , « n F, 53,561 6,116 6,441 5,908 5,501 3,306 2,823 2,646 2,627 2,719 T. 756,039 85,521 87,433 81,600 74,142. 52,596 43,015 41,357 41,609. 42,509 M. 380,517 43,884 44,618 .41,766 37,751 26,411 21,735 20,962 20,611 20,969 F. 375,522 41,637 42,815 39,834 36,391 26,187 21,280 20,395 20,998 21 ,540 T. 616,788 72,859 76,295 72,908 65,567 42,331 33,241 31,957 32,761 33,936 M. 310,145 37,531 39,042 37,102 33,154 21,444 16,622 15,855 16,196 16,796 F. 306,643 35,326 37,253 35,806 32,413 20.B87 16,619 16,102 16,565 17,140 T. 5 780,845 632,489 682,874 628,210 566,315 474,158 380,745 372,250 376,227 354,645 M. 2 885,927 325,695 347,537 321,780 284,079 234;230 188,884 186,412 186,669 175,646 F. 2 894,918 306,794 335,337 306,430 2B2.236 239,928 191,861 185,838 169,538 178,999 T. 6 960,870 745,744 770,061 688,270 599,197 485,053 433,856 447,155 472,616 469,358 M. 3 479,149 382,522 393,449 351,680 304,654 240,675 215,413 226,605 239,638 232,958 F. 3 481,721 363,222 376,612 336,390 294,543 244,378 218,443 220,550 232,978 236,400 T. 963,066 102,425 105,327 99,227 87,846 66,899 . 55,200 54.260 57,440 59,625 M. 484,266 ' 52,476 53.862 50,701 44,404 33,787 27,710 27,545 28,569 29,195 F. 478,800 49,949 31,665 48,526 43,444 33,112 27,490 26,715 28,871 30,430 T. 935,344 107,513 110,130 103,304 88,412 62,150 52,412 52,239 55,027 53,386 M. 489,040 54,979 56,128 53,042 44,786 31,551 26,492 26,763 28,196 27,856 P. 466,304 52,536 54,002 50,262 43,626 30,599 25,920 25,476 26,831 27,530 T. 1 ,463,203 173,568 179,540 . 157,658 128,999 102,005 92,200 94,481 95,496 89,036 M. 746,245 89,078 91,627 61,038 64,826 49,933 45,737 48,767 49,421 44,701 F. 716,958 84,490 87,913 76,620 64,173 52,072 46,463 45,714 46,075 44,335 T. 1 873,674 188,778 203,068 182,424 158,406 129,761 113,885 113,869 121,480 120,915 M. 948,585 . 96,974 102,977 93.419 80,684 65,950 57,753 59,640 62j876 59,929 F. 925,089 91,804 100,091 89,005 77,722 .63,811 56,132 54,229 38,604 61 .Olio T. 14,382 2,124 1,848 1,437 1,017 ' 1,116 1,241 1,098 1 ,083 933 M. ' 7,805 1,144 878 740 531 584 694 599 620 518 F.' 6,577 980 970 697 486 532 547 499 463 415 T. 28,738 5,232 4,051 2,921 2,454 2,470 2,353 2,122 1,755 1,376 M. 15,566 2,716 2;03l 1,473 1,277 1,407 1,284 1,244 1,010 799 F. 13,172 2,516 2,020 1,448 1,177 1,063 1,069 878 745 577 T. 18 ,238,247 2,256,401 2,079,522 1,855,999 1,432,559 1,183,646 1,209,297 1,271,810 1,270,924 1,118,961 M. 9 218,893 1,154,091 1,063,840 948,160 729,035 587,139 613,897 . 644,407 631,072 559,996 P. 9,019,354 1,102,310 1,015,682 907,839 703,524 596,507 595,400 627,403 639,852 558,965 T. 457,853 67,695 64,404. 59,464 43,829 30,238 26,719 25,571 24,823 24,141 M. 234,924 34,402 32,622 30,255 21,941 15,288 14,058 13,274 12,971 12,843 F. 222,929 33,293 31,782 ' 29,209 21,888 14,950 12,661 12,297 11,852 11,298 T. 104,629 13,221 12,216 12,264 8,875 6,344 5,685. 5.364 5,727 5,680 M. 53,357 6,669 6,228 6,221 4,583 3,292 2,980 2,752 2,836 2,876 F. 51,272 6,352 3,988 6,043. 4,292 3,052 2,705 2,612 2,891 • 2,804 T. 737,007 91,239 84.760 80,329 64,239 49,311 43,956 43,360 45,041 44,577 M. 374,244 46,680 43,419 41,098 33,166 25,543 22.43T 21,590 22,238 22,253 F. 362,763 • 44,559 41,341. 39,231 31,073 23,768 21,525 21,770 22,803 22,324 T. 597,936 78,560 73,882 72,745 53,514 37,419. 33,621 33,856 35,983 33,626 M. 302,440 40,430 38,666 37,003 27,437 18,777 16,880 16,713 17,762 17,056 F. 295,496 38,130 37,216 .35,742 26,077 .18,642 16,741 17,143 18,221 16,770 T. 5 259,211 671,236 624,074 568,065 467,426 369,633 362,567 373,258 357,641- 308,093 M. 2 631,856 342,573 319,002 289,651 235,792 181,076 180,795 185,262 176,928 152,351 F. 2 627,355 328,683 305,072 278,414 231,634 188,557 181,772 187,996 180,713 155,742 T. 6 236,092 740,193 674,519 593,037 436,883 386,966 422,651 459,825 469,312 397,251 M. 3,134,528 379,206 345.308. 303,966 223,059 190,368 213,587 233,839 232,827 199,991 F. 3 101,564 360,987 329,211 289,071 213,624 196,598 209,064 225,986 236,485 197,260 T. 921,686 107,574 '101,382 91,150 70,808 59,007 57,545 59,772 .62,912 57,862 M. 468,503 55,055 51,902 46,439 36,287 29,714 29,792 30,171 30,618 28,939 F. 453,183 52,519 .49,480 44,711 34,521 29,293. 27,753 29,601 32,094 28,923 T. 925,181 113,755 106,886 94,273 72,864 56,996 55,147 58,409 58,885 56,948 M. 479,564 58,343 34,785 48,122 37,461 28,973 28,435 30,164 29,789 2S.786 F. .445,617 55,412 52,101 46,151 35,403 28,023 26,712 28,245 29,096 28,162 T. 1 331,944 179,888 159,053 130,383 99,004 89,154 95,730 96,841 91,693 80,930 M. 689,383 92,230 . 81,633 66,680 50,296 44,403 49,720 50,694 46,305. '41 ,2flS F. 642,561 B7.636 77,420 63,703 48,708 44,751 46,010 46,147 45,388 39,642 T". 1 629,082 186,793 171,661 150,689 112,653 95,230 102,088 112,181 116,217 107. V>« M. 829,094 93,289 87,860 76,904 57,726 . 47,758 53,133 57,924 57,029 52,3\>l F. 799,988 91,504 83,801 73,785 34,927 . 47,472 48,955 54,257 ;59,188 55,204 T. • 14,628 2,337 . 1,761 1,187 765 1,109 1,432 1,524. 1,207 911 M. 8,178 1,218 883 606 382 637 806 901 694 bib F. 6,450 1,119 878 581 383 472 626 623 513 363 T. 22,998 3,890 2,924 2,413 1,699 2,239 2,156 1,849 1,483 1 , 14., M. 12,822 1,976 >1,332 1,215 . 905 1,310 1,280 1,123 875 674. F. 10,176 1,914 . 1,392 1,198. 794 929 876 726 608 472 . 1 K. 3 19-2 TABLEAU 19. POPULATION PAR CROUrE QU1NQUKNNAL D'ACE ET SE1OT LK SEXE, PROVINCES ET TERRITOIKES, 1966 ET 1961 . ';v >' t<\.tlV . '.•»,'l'\'\!)"t f, KM fc<it«n«l|< 1966 t,089.915 988,264 816,300 663,410 531,709 427,207 300,365 177,319 76,790 21,755 4,403 1 542,752 498,283 413,389 330,006 254,938 198,808 138,967 80,664 3 3 ,073 8,554 1,552 2 547,163 489,981 402,911 333,404 276,771 228,399 161,398 96,655 43,717 13,201 2,851 3 23,114 20,753 16,358 12,307 10,261 B.1B8 3,575 3,268 1,378 424 78 4 12,175 10,910 8,783 6,343 5,057 3,989 2,709 1,614 643 190 26 5 10,939 9,843 7,575 5,964 5,204 4,199 2,866 1,654 735 234 52 6 5,475 5,371 4,617 3,740 .1,395 3,237 2,299 1.511 73B 249 Ml 7 2,740 2,710 2,473 1,929 1,848 1,534 1,077 670 . 311 104 22 8 2,735 2,661 2,144 1,811 1,747 1,703 1,222 841 427 145 38 9 41,863 39,275 32,323 25,515 21,642 18,657 ' 13,114 8,230 3,98? 1,321 326 10 20,709 20,036 17,011 12,762 10,440 8,688 6,126 3,712 1,693 511 120 11 21,154 19,239 15,312 12,753 11,202 9,969 6,986 4,518 2,296 810 206 12 31,743 28,852 24,509 19,511 16,623 14,103 9,709 6,041 2,795 846 201 13 15,847 14,685 12,629 9,671 7,963 6,672 4,362 2,754 1,212 347 61 14 15,896 14,167 11,860 9,840 8,660 7,431 5,147 3,287 1,583 499 140 15 298,260 267,553 220,371 175,094 133,813 99,722 64,199 34,808 14,388 4,014 710 16 147,396 132,771 109,447 84,419 62,749 46,103 28,806 .15,408 6,047 1,590 239 17 150,864 134,782 110,924 90,675 71,064 53,619 35,393 19,400 8,341 2,424 471 18 390,983 353,402 293,325 244,128 199,206 • 159,047 108,536 63,193 27,908 8,116 1,716 19 195,482 178,967 147,103 119,649 93,141 70,431 46,593 25,994 V0.681 2,775 537 2G 195,501 174,435 146,220 124,479 106,065 88,616 61,943 37,199 17,227 5,341 . 1,179 21 55,116 51,636 43,455 35,550 28,668 24,603 18,330 11,040 4,650 1,297 270 MANITOBA 22 27,287 25,875 21,975 17,906 14,059 11,793 9,023 5,261 2,181 542 115 23 27,829 25,761 21,480 17,644 14,609 12,810 9,307 5,779 2,469 755 155 24 53,593 49,677 42.29B, 34,319 . 27,264 24,022 19,098 ' 11,885 5,053 1,323 237 25 26,904 25,386 22,164 18,188 ' 14,057 12,573 10,222 6,447 2,594 618 94 26 26,689 24,291 20,134 16,131 13,207 11,449 8,876 5,438 2,439 705 143 27 77,885 6 7 , 3 3 9 55,265 45,721 35,195 27,900 21,284 12,704 5,291 . 1,335 301 28 39,476 34,454 28,727 24,366 18,352 14,465 11,229 6,622 2,645 644 137 29 38,409 32,885 26,538 21,355 16.843 13,435 , 10,055 6,082 2.646 691 164 3C 110,069 102,990 82,613 66,730 54,902 47,373 38,016 24,519, . 10,549 2,812 495 31 53,690 51,685 42,333 34,323 26,946 22,343 . 18,487 12,116 5.039 1,224 197 3 ; 56,379 51,305 40,280 32,407 .27,956 25,030 19,529 12,403 5,510 1,588 298 3: 723 517 438 294 216 ' 124 79 55 22 11 6 3J 417 298 280 175 147' 72 .55 30 13 6 4 35 306 219 158 119 69 52 24 25 9 5 2 36 1,091 899 728 501 324 231 126 65 29 7 3 37 629 506 462 275 179 145 76 36 14 3 - 3« 462 393 266 226 145 86 50 29 15 4 3 39 1961 1,015,316 863,188 705,635 583,635 487,102 402,175 274,237 146,817 60,784 16,695 3,344 4C 515,516 442,909 362,145 292,569 239,685 196,076 • 134,186 69,046 27,178 6,722 1,224 41 499,800 420,279 343,690 291,066 247,417 206,099 140,051 77,771 33,606 '9.973 2,120 4; 21,737 17,606 13,325 11.406 9,684 7; 366 5,469 2,765 1,263 297 51 4: 11,438 9,545 6,968 5,766 4,860 3,681 2,831 1,415 621 127 18 u 10,299 8,061 6,357 5,640 4,824 3,685 2,638 1,350 642 170 33 4: 5,624 4,877 4,008 3,814 3,582 2,949 2,220 1,281 635 209 54 ILE-DU-PRINCE-EDOUARD 4f 2,899 2,629 2,103 2,014 1,789 1,468 1,070 587 263 82 16 u; 2,725 2,248 1,905 1,800 1,793 .1,481 1,150 694 372 127 38 4J 41,139 34,742 2 7 , 3 3 3 23,564 .. 21,341 17,399 12,493 7,285 3,537 . 1,113 249 NOUVELLE-EC0SSE '. 45 21,058 18,543 14,016 11,822 10,454 8,473 6,012 3,396 . 1,549 418 85 5( 20,081 16,199 13,317 11,742 10,887 8,926 6,481 3,889 1,988 695 164 51 30,608 26,068 20,881 18,056 16,216 13,105 9,184 5,232 2,262 759 159 5: 15,660 13,650 • 10,646 8^943 8,076 6,404 4,470 2,474 1,028 310 55 5: 14,948 12,418 .10,235 9,113 8,140 6,701 4,714 2,758 1,234 449 104 5' 275,074 236,260 189,663 149,900 116,923 88,230 55,902 29,619 12,047 2,993 587 SI 137,795 118,350 94,155 73,426 56,708 41,549 26,211 , 13,567 5,294 1,147 224 5( 137,279 117,910 95.508 76,474 60,215 46,681 29,691 16,052 6,753 1,846, 363 5" 360,749 309,795 258,327 218,511 180,063 146,322- 97,734 53,466 22,618 6,581 1,289 51 183,907 157,849 131,026 107,830 85,855 66,880 44,219 22,860 9,063 2,455 433 5< 176,842 151,946 127,301. 110,681 94,208 . 79,442 53,515 30,606 13,555 4,126 856 6( 54,390 46,110 38,044 31,842 26,169 24,608 17,034 8,688 3,575 1,006 208 61 27,473 23,617 19,684 16,255 14,213 12,700 8,773 4,361 1,783 436 91 6: 26,917 22,493 . 18,360 15,587 13,956 11,90S . 8,261 4,327 1,792 570 ' 117 6: 52,581' 44,849 37,176 30,842 28,208 25i288 17,959 9,382 3,663 893 177 6< 27,070 23,739 20,153 16,366 15,244 14,139 10,346 5,161 1,982 427 79 25,511 21,110 17,023 14,476 12,964 11,149 7,613 4,221 1,681 . 466 98 61 70,274 58,273 48,817 38,826 31,724 27,603 19,170 9,568 3,630 . 978 203 6' 36,342 30,870 26,670 21,182 17,166 15,413 10,649 5,170 1,918 456 78 61 33,932 27,403 21,947 .17,644 ' 14,558 12,392 8,521 4,398 1,712 522 125, 6! 101,508 83,315 67,319 56,216 30,732 48,814' 36,905 19,427 7,500 1,851 367 7( 50,911 43,298 33,927 28,536 23,068 23,173 19,507 9,992 3,643 858 145 7: 50,597 40,017 31,392 27,660 23,684 23,639 17,398 9,435 3,857 993 , 222 7; 702 541 391 286 180 123 88 39 35 8 _ 7: 417 337 254 196 101 89 56 23 25 5 — 7. 285 204 137 90 79 36. 32 16 .10 3 - 7: 930 752 551 372 260 164 79 65 19 7 _ 71 • 546 482 343 213 151 103 A2 40 9 1 — 7 384 270 208 1S9 109 59 37 25 10 6 — 71 APPENDIX L National and Inter-provincial Cost Comparisons Table No. Page LXXXV B.C. Public School Price Indexes Compared to National Public School Price Indexes 1 LXXXVI Public School Revenue and Expenditure, British Columbia 2 LXXXVII Public School Revenue and Expenditure, Alberta 3 LXXVIII Public School Revenue and Expenditure, Saskatchewan 4 LXXXIX Public School Revenue and Expenditure, Manitoba 5 XC Public School Revenue and Expenditure, Ontario 6 XCI Public School Revenue and Expenditure, Quebec 7 XCII Public School Revenue and Expenditure, New Brunswick 8 XCIII Public School Revenue and Expenditure, Prince Edward Island 9 XCIV Public School Revenue and Expenditure, Nova Scotia 10 XCV Public School Revenue and Expenditure, Newfoundland 11 XCVI Public School Revenue and Expenditure, Yukon 12 XCVII Public School Revenue and Expenditure, Northwest Territories 13 XCVIII Public School Revenue and Expenditure, Canada 14 XCIX Fiscal Year Enrolments by Province 15 C Cost Per Pupil - Teachers* Salaries. Inter-provin-c i a l Comparison 16 CI Cost Per Pupil - Instructional Supplies. Interprovincial Comparison 17 CII Cost Per Pupil - Administration, Interprovincial Comparison 18 Cost Per Pupil - Plant Operation and Maintenance, Interprovincial Comparison Cost Per Pupil - Transportation Interprovincial Comparison Cost Per Pupil - Auxiliary Services Interprovincial Comparison Cost Per Pupil - Total School Board Operational Expenditures Interprovincial Comparison Cost Per Pupil - Departmental Services, Interprovincial Comparison Cost Per Pupil - Pensions, Interprovincial Comparison Municipal and Provincial Government's Cost Per Pupil, Interprovincial Comparison TABLE LXXXV B.C. Public School Price Indexes Compared To National Public School Price Indexes Teachers' Salaries 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 B.C. Price Index National Price Index (1) 100.0 100.0 101.0 103.6 104.9 107.9 108.5 119.0 114.5 129.9 123.0 141.6 133.3 158.2 142.4 176.5 152.9 199.4 B.C. Total School Index Teachers' Salaries Component Residual Component Residual Weight 100.0 66. 32 33.68 33.68 101.2 67.33 33.87 33. 34 104.7 70.35 34. 35 32.94 108.0 72.97 35.03 32.75 114.8 76.61 38.19 33.09 123.8 81.22 42.58 33.97 133.4 88.36 45.04 33.71 141.6 94.58 47.02 33.58 155.3 101.83 53.47 33.40 B.C. Residual Price Index National Residual Price Index (1) 100.0 100.0 101.6 100.4 104.3 101.6 107.0 101.0 115.4 102.3 125.3 105.8 133.6 110.5 140.0 115.3 160.1 121.7 (1) Source: National price indexes in Appendix C. TABLE LXXXVI Public School Revenue And Expenditure B r i t i s h Columbia 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965. 1966 1967 1968 1969 School Board Revenues Municipal Government 59,494 64,102 69,092 77,692 . . 88,266 101,807 116,706 U3,099l 160,221 180,170 Pro v i n c i a l Government 55,043 58,934 62,600 68,698 71,718 77,500 89,641 97,184 116,569 129,27e Federal Government - _ - - - . - . 3,055 3,287 3,343 Fees _ _ _ - - - - 257. 218 178 Other 2,332 2,560 2,655 2,720 3,990 4, 395 6,030 3,834 4,811 9,542 Total Revenue 116,869 125,596 134, 347 149,110 163,994 183,702 212,, 377 247,429 285,106 322 , 511 School Board Expenditures Teachers' Salaries 67,901 72,505 77,536 85,572 94,257 105,759 121,100 191,482 162,973 187,087 Instructional Supplies 4,436 4,850 5,568 6,318 7,206 8,533 10,469 13,310 16,954 18,751 Administration 4,803 5,348 5,296 5,664 6,280 6,938 ' 9,477 10,891 12,769 13,945 Maintenance 19,833 20,829 21,872 2 3,419 25,147 27,374 30,856 36 , 357 41,275 44,771 Transportation 2,477 2,611 2,722 2,887 3,126 3,476 4,009 4,610 5,355 5,892 Other 3,089 3,184 3,329 3,754 4,152 5,980 7,455 . 6,795 6,066 10,513 Sub-Total 102,539 109 , 327 116,32 3 127,614 140,168 158,060 183,366 213,445 245, 392 280,964 Capital Outlay 700 814 1,050 1,864 2,623 3,482 3,051 3,032 2,502 2,483 Debt Charges 14,295 16,543 18,057 20,171 21,924 23,79 27,348 30,952 37,212 39,064 Sub-Total of Cap. Items 14,995 17,357 19,107 22,035 24,547 27,274 30,399 , 33,984 39,714 41,547 Total 117,534 126,684 135,430 149,649 164,715 .185,334 213,765 247,429 285,106 322 , 511 Departmental Expenditures on Public Schools Departmental Services 1,602 1,773 2,000 2,330 2,443 2,877 5,665 5,771 5,890 6,655 Contributions to Pension Plan 3,428 3,493 3,658 3,881 4,111 4,339 4,635 5,021 5,453 6,160 Total School Board & Dept. Expenses 122,564 131,950 . 141,088 155,860 171,269 192,550 224,065 258,221 296,449 335,326 June Enrolment 306,021 321,312 341,219 359,320 378,387 399,944 420,847 445,633 468,659 490,930 Cost Per Pupil 384 394 397 416 435 463 508 555 608 657 Includes p r o v i n c i a l homeowners' grants 30,000 36,608 51,388 Source: Copied from photocopies of o r i g i n a l worksheets supplied by the Education Division, S t a t i s t i c s Canada. TABLE LXXXVTI Public School Revenue And Expenditure Alberta 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 School Board Revenues Municipal Government 54,354 52,445 67,779 71,036 76, 243 82,238 83,921 98,293 119,571 135,421 Pro v i n c i a l Government 56,118 63,547 75,483 76,068 70, 925 78,470 100,980 119,639 135,180 154,941 Federal Government - - - . - - - - 2,486 3,237 4,920 Fees ' 118 90 51 61 87 381 . 334 1,369 1,757 1,958 Other 1,241 1,242 1,440 1,556 1, 355 1,420 3,073 2,426 3,069 3,634 Total Revenue 111,831 117,324 144,753 148,721 148, 610 162,509 188,308 224,213 262,814 300,874 School Board Expenditures Teachers Salaries 56,914 64,939 70,967 77,500 85, 778 95,991 111,018 131,492 155,969 179,970 Instructional Supplies 33) 3,360) 4,067 4,694 5,075 6, 128 6,142 8,084 10,644 11,729 13,304 Admini s t r a t i o n 2,372 2,708 2,915 3,214 3, 655 4,381 5,540 7,061 8,117 9,501 Maintenance 13,220 14,314 15,409 16,594 19, 422 21,256 24,623 27,980 31,816 35,513 Transportation 9,272 9,808 10,355 10,841 112, 753 12,677 13,916 15,795 17,605 19,137 Other 268) 865) 928 1,169 1,213 371 511 583 430 1,207 808 Sub-Total 86,304 96,764 105,509 114,437 127, 107 140,958 163,764 193,402 226,443 258,233 Capital outlay 12,922 11,749 25,711 19,351 5, 295 4,378 4,992 5,587 4,871 6,021 Debt Charges 12,881 14,397 14,676 16,231 18, 504 19,561 22,068 25,438 29,756 35,195 Sub-Total of Cap. Items 25,803 26,146 40,387 35,582 23, 799 23,939 27,060 31,025 34,627 41,216 Total 112,107 122,910 145,896 150,019 150, 906 164,897 190,824 224,427 261,070 299,449 Departmental Expenditures on Public Schools Departmental Services 2,034 2,037 2,374 2,330 2, 619 2,814 5,957 6,779 7,591 8,710 Contributions to Pension Plan 2 1 1 1 1 731 2,736 3,400 3,365 3,360 Total School Board & Dept. Expenses 114,143 124,998 148,271 152,350 153, 526 168,442 199,517 234,606 272,206 312,019 F a l l Enrolment 277,920 294,435 307,702 322,227 336, 652 350,906 362,159 372,894 385,972 401,587 Cost Per Pupil 430 417 474 466 448 470 527 602 676 746 Source: Copied from photocopies of o r i g i n a l worksheets supplied by the Education Division, S t a t i s t i c s Canada. TABLE LXXXVTII Public School Revenue and Expenditure Saskatchewan 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 School Board Revenues Municipal Government 38,815 40,454 43,246 46,156 49,150 53,795 57,396 65,720 73,578 83,004 Pro v i n c i a l Government 28,965 31,285 33,300 37,449 38,437 42,815 50,399 53,498 58,961 62,162 Federal Government - . - - - - - - - - -Fees 365 267 426 286 349 637 1,044 1,434 2,311 2,657 Other 1,336 1,569 1,057 1,338 1,423 1,701 1,574 1,760 2,395 2,460 Total Revenue 69,481 73,575 78,029 85,229 89,359 98,948. 110,413 122,412 137,245 150,273 School Board Expenditures Teachers Salaries 38,438 41,822 42,460 45,565 49,758 55,250 63,031 71,685 80,321 91,173 Instructional Supplies 1,930 2,099 2,592 2,865 3,077 4,139 4,722 5,726 7,324 8,375 Admini s t r a t i o n 1,893 2,021 1,967 1,962 2,196 2,579 2,667 3,068 3,693 3,966 Maintenance 8,819 9,094 9,587 10,240 10,893 11,864 12,858 13,761 15,162 15,476 Transportation 5,727 6,405 7,350 8,134 9,550 11,301 12,117 13,279 14,009 14,234 Other 246 240 975 1,202 1,142 1,903 1,553 1,279 1,490 1,577 Sub-Total 57,053 61,681 64,931 69,968 76,616 86,226 96,948 108,798 121,999 134,801 Capital Outlay 9,139 9,060 4,218 5,448 5,243 5,916 4,238 3,800 3,292 3,607 Debt Charges 3,858 5,025 5,682 6,366 6,942 7,629 8,655 10,092 11,081 11,878 Sub-Total of Cap. Items 12,997 14,085 9,900 11,814 12,185 13,545 12,893 13,892 14,373 15,485 Total 70,050 75,766 74,831 81,782 88,801 99,771 109,841 122,690 136,372 150,286 Departmental Expenditures on Public Schools Departmental Services 1,496 1,508 1,602 1,676 • 1,759 1,861 3,417 3,847 3,784 4,165 Contributions to Pension Plan 901 1,065 1,095 1,281 1,444 1,391 1,651 1,399 1,438 1,580 Total School Board & Dept. Expenses 72,447 78,339 77,528 84,739 92,004 103,023 114,909 127,936 141,594 156,031 F a l l Enrolment 202,310 208,679 215,625 220,345 227,641 233,213 238,320 242,137 245,526 249,662 Cost Per Pupil 346 363 347 371 390 428 461 507 555 602 Source: Copied from photocopies of o r i g i n a l worksheets supplied by the Education Division, S t a t i s t i c s Canada. TABLE LXXX1X Public School Revenue And Expenditure Manitoba 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 School Board Revenues Municipal Government 30,899 35,974 38,104 41,389 43,836 48,039 53,827 48,193 61,384 63,870 Provincial Government 24,776 25,186 27,301 28,527 30,132 32,635 37,135 61,699 66,261 79,478 Federal Government _ _ _ - - - 268 319 733 593 Fees _ _ _ - - - 536 652 847 Other 82 58 126 44 378 240 213 2,615 1,955 2,184 Total Revenue 55,757 61,218 65,531 69,990 74,346 80,914 91,443 113,362 130,985 146,972 School Board Expenditures Teachers' Salaries 32,263 35,231 37,497 40,277 42,911 46,040 51,812 63,817 75,583 86,257 Instructional Supplies 2,230 2,493 2,708 3,046 3,502 4,636 5,602 8,087 10,728 9,143 Administration 1,889 2,048 2, 349 2,676 2,953 3,255 3,937 6,805 9,242 11,126 Maintenance 6,492 7,133 7,727 8,000 8,667 9,156 10,251 12,938 14,095 15,437 Transportation 2,892 3,242 3,511 3,791 4,168 4,647 5,305 6,554 7,921 8,397 Other 516 554 642 731 736 967 1,331 1,406 1,576 2,026 Sub-Total 46,282 50,701 54,434 58,521 62,937 68,701 68,238 99,607 119,145 132,386 Capital Outlay 3,519 3,724 3,084 3,423 3,057 2,217 3,373 7,059 5,026 4,302 Debt Charges 4,939 6,011 7,041 7,601 8,245 9,856 10,282 8,042 9,913 11,505 Sub-Total of Cap. Items 8,458 9,735 10,125 11,024 11,302 12,073 13,655 15,101 14,939 15,807 Total 54,740 60,436 64,559 69,545 74,239 80,774 91,893 114,708 134,084 148,193 Departmental Expenditures on Public Schools Departmental Services 900 995 1,051 1,135 1,255 2,881 4,343 4,939 5,724 6,230 Contributions to Pension Plan 496 516 536 306 470 462 843 1,190 1,341 1,460 Total School Board & Dept. Expenses 56,136 61,947 66,146 70,986 75,964 84,117 97,079 120,837 141,149 155,883 Fall Enrolment 178,116 189,573 194,854 204,172 212,644 218,770 222,249 224,531 231,650 240,132 Cost Per Pupil 307 319 331 341 349 369 413 511 579 617 Source: Copied from photocopies of original worksheets supplied by the Education Division, Statistics Canada. TABLE XC Public School Revenue And Expenditure Ontario 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 School Board Revenues Municipal Government Provincial Government Federal Government Fees Other Total Revenue School Board Expenditures Teachers' Salaries Instructional Supplies Administration Maintenance Transportation Other Sub-Total Capital Outlay Debt Charges Sub-Total of Cap. Items Total 267,041 160,791 1,570 11,400 440,802 294,049 181,546 1,660 11,619 488,874 316,948 204,548 3,275 1,689 22,522 548,982 345,371 233,689 3,650 2,335 ' 14,026 599,071 368,747 298,316 4,145 3,512 11,400 686,120 395,985 332,034 4,965 2,782 13,656 749,422 458,256 386,351 3,847 2,902 21,825 873,181 550,362 469,555 6,346 4,275 22,698 1,053,236 632,971 571,099 7,012 4,069 27,131 739,573 685,647 10,032 3,942 20,203 1,242,282 1,459,397 246,112 270,167 296,014 327,338 361,499 412,530 483,897 569,675 710,492 860,740 18,100 19,890 21,588 27,006 35,965 38, 789 46,073 48,015 . 61,186 87,885 15,138 16,637 18,057 22,589 30,084 32,444 38,992 46,432 56,245 45,273 43,084 47,349 51,391 64,290 85,618 92,337 105,954 124,153 150,619 174,144 13,268 15,014 16,970 19,118 21,617 25,526 30,401 35,853 41,840 51,985 18,173 19,972 21,859 14,985 15,289 23,970 20,474 45,381 45,861 55,188 353,875 389,029 425,879 475,326 550*072 625,596 625,791 869,509 1,066,243 1,275,215 23,069 23,813 27,483 29,474 35,754 37,613 50,279 58,412 58,993 31,623 57,467 65,976 70,581 78,478 86,484 93,172 100,518 118,070 134,771 152,559 80,536 89,789 98,064 107,952 122,238 130,785 150,797 176,482 193,764 184,182 434,411 478,818 523,943 583,278 672,310 756,381 876,588 1,045,991 1,260,007 1,459,397 Departmental Expenditures on Public Schools  Departmental Services 4,715 5,421 5,687 6,531 7,533 7,369 Contributions to Pension Plan 15,586 17,409 19,007 20,758 22,000 39,472 Total School Board & Dept. Expenses 454,712 501,648 548,637 612,567 701,843 803,222 11,070 42,939 13,146 47,751 15,870 54,952 18,250 63,200 930,597 1,106,888 1,330,829 1,540,847 Fall Enrolment Cost Per Pupil 1,319,225 329 1,389,163 345 1,462,230 358 1,528,607 382 1,597,374 421 1,673,774 452 1,738,781 504 1,800,897 581 1,868,788 1,931,397 674 756 Source: Copied from photocopies of o r i g i n a l worksheets supplied by the Education Division, S t a t i s t i c s Canada. TABLE XCI Public Schcol Revenue And Expenditure Quebec 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 School Board Revenues Municipal Government Provincial Government Federal Government Fees Other Total Revenue' 162,446 76,838 3,532 3,728 246,544 160,235 114,725 1,945 8,962 285,867 154,984 169,277 2,425 1,950 11,447 340,083 190,398 197,678 2,815 1,980 13,400 406,271 230,154 257,354 3,200 2,000 3,300 496,508 289,600 291,292 3,750 2,500 3,750 590,892 313,067 319,469 3,466 3,030 4,860 643,892 330,563 402,389 4,500 3,481 5,067 746,000 388,412 489,088 5,000 4,000 5,500 424,868 588,897 5,807 4,645 6,383 892,000 1,030,600 School Board Expenditures Teachers' Salaries Instructional Supplies Admini stration Maintenance Transportation Other Sub-Total Capital Outlay Debt Charges Sub-Total of Cap. Items Total 132,223 161,678 196,432 237,683 293,000 309,520 328,092 445,966 533,246 616,103 10,231 12,095 14,924 17,019 20,440 34,004 42,986 29,353 35,098 40,551 8,658 10,236 12,631 14,403 17,298 28,778 36,380 44,034 52,652 60,832 23,528 27,816 34,320 39,140 47,006 78,200 98,855 64,016 76,545 88,439 6,751 7,981 9,848 11,230 13,487 22,437 28,364 55,727 66,633 76,987 4,546 5,375 6,637 7,566 8,769 15,111 19,103 5,939 7,102 8,206 185,937 225,181 274,792 327,041 400,000 488,050 553,780 645,035 771,276 891,118 17,054 23,612 23,920 25,120 26,500 27,550 5,623 3,701 4,425 5,113 54,537 58,834 62,839 67,238 73,500 76,400 84,087 97,264 116,299 134,369 71,591 82,446 86,759 92,358 100,000 103,950 89,710 100,965 120,724 139,482 257,528 307,627 361,551 419,399 500,000 592,000 643,490 746,000 892,000 1,030,600 Departmental Expenditures on Public Schools  Departmental Services 6,512 11,709 14,186 16,414 17,546 21,449 15,949 9,102 Contributions to Pension Plan 1,671 780 69 759 1,444 367 818 859 Total School Board & Dept. Expenses 265,711 320,116 375,806 435,054 516,102 613,082 660,257 754,243 8,657 604 11,100 700 901,261 1,042,400 Fall Enrolment 1,043,059 1,098,057 1,158,848 1,208,754 1,258,688 1,311,728 1,383,962 1,441,087 1,505,289 1,568,991 Cost Per Pupil 247 280 312 347 397 451 465 518 593 657 Source: Copied from photocopies of original worksheets supplied by the Education Division, Statistics Canada. Public School Revenue ar.c Expenditure New Eruns'.-zick 1960 1961 1962 1963 1954 1955 1966 1967 1963 1969 School Board Revenues Municipal Government Provincial Government Federal Government Fees Other 17,830 9,135 120 1,080 19,567 9,350 113 712 22,452 12,055 155 166 25,075 11,335 142 330 27,062 10,940 93 263 31,177 10,020 330 232 33,197 9,349 316 1,023 47,865 551 379 55,166 155 64,279 11 185 Total Revenue 28,165 29,742 34,338 35,345 38,353 41,359 44,385 48,795 55,321 64,475 School Board Expenditures Teachers Salaries Instructional Supplies Admini stration Maintenance Transportation Other Sub-Total Capital Outlay Debt Charges Sub-Total of Cap. Items 17,156 50 ) 483 ) 589 3,722 1,334 23 23,357 1,934 2,801 4,725 13,660 65 ) 507 ) 639 3,900 1,450 33 24,254 1,353 3,056 4,909 20,499 72 ) 491 ) 723 4,044 1,552 42 27,413 2,195 3,232 5,477 22,497 104 ! 567 ) 314 4,440 1,503 40 30,070 2, "55 2,^39 6,555 24,323 79 ) 640 ) 319 4,539 1,651 40 32,096 2,019 4,025 5,044 26,392 843 1,017 5,479 1,906 414 36,051 306 4,069 4,375 29,305 861 1,211 5,557 2,246 957 40,637 791 4,803 5,594 33,186 867 2,147 6,053 3,149 547 45,949 67 2,613 2,680 39,618 1,089 3,364 6,766 4,013 893 55,743 55,743 45,451 1,247 4,014 7,700 4,651 1,161 64,224 64,224 Total 28,082 30,153 32,895 36,525 35,140 40,926 46,231 48,629 55,743 64,224 Departmental Expenditures Schools on Public Departmental Services Contributions to Pension Plan 795 126 362 135 954 268 35 3 316 1,441 454 . 1,465 595 1,657 852 1,880 460 2,276 792 2,615 910 Total School Board & Dept. Expenses 29,003 31,220 34,117 37,504 40,045 42,989 48,740 50,969 58,811 67,749 Fall Enrolment 147,336 152,239 155,216 155,491 150,301 164,124 165,228 166,750 169,703 172,337 Cost Per Pupil 190 193 212 234 237 249 280 292 328 373 Source: Copied from photocopies of o r i g i n a l v.'orksheets supplied by the Education Division, S t a t i s t i c s Canada. TABLE XCIII Public School Revenue and Expenditure • Prince Edward Island I960, . 1961 1962 196 3 1954 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 School' Board Revenues Municipal Government 1,333 1,412 1,566 2,149 2,207 2,500 2,727 3,010 3,410 3,710 Provincial Government . 2,154 2,47= 2,937 3,502 3,=34 4,107 4,898 7,249 8,320 8,936 Federal Government ' - - - - - - - - -Fees • • 52 . 53 33 15 20 52 40 49 55 60 Other . . 13 44 61 31 43 52 59 80 95 100 Total Revenue 3,557 3,937 4,602 5,697 6,104 5,711 7,724 10,388 11,880 12,806 School Board Expenditures Teachers' Salaries •2,356' '.' 2,527 3,031 3,668 3,647 3,887 4,878 6,060 7,098 7,388 Instructional Supplies 69 74 91 111 133 115 146 458 405 470 Admini stration 119 . 129 159 194 235 205 246 586 711 770 Maintenance 346 374 451 562 "678 897 987 1,758 2,055 2,192 Transportation . ' • •114 123 151 185 223 586 624 570 675 793 Other • ' 4 ' 4 6 7 9 21 31 27 27 44 Sub-Total 3,008 3,251 3,899 4,727 5,125 4,711 6,912 9,459 10,971 11,657 Capital Outlay 189 315 220 265 198 207 168 162 163 141 Debt Charges 279 361 493 631 754 767 681 603 746 1,008 Sub-Total of Cap. Items 468 676 713 916 952 974 849 765 909 1,149 •Total ' .3,476 '. . 3,907 4,612 5,643 6,077 6,685 7,761 10,224 11,880 12,806 Departmental Expenditures on Public Schools Departmental Services 152' 169 193 203 473 350 799 605 614 685 Contributions to Pension Plan 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 1 1 1 Total School Board & Dep. Expenses 3,631 4,079 4,308 5,349 6,553 7,038 8,562 10,830 12,495 13,492 F a l l Enrolment 24,151 24,450 25,664 26,193 27,212 27,740 27,787 28,536 29,174 29,368 Cost Per Pupil 144 160 180 215 223 241 279 358 407 436 Source: Copied from photocopies of original worksheets supplied by the Education Division, Statistics Canada. TABLE XCIV Public School Revenue And Expenditure Nova Scotia 1960 1961 1962 1962 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 School Board Revenues Municipal Government •19,185 20,550 2 3,6 51 24, , 740 26,605 25,451 30,466 32,672 36,919 41,817 Provincial Government 15,859 16,56 2 20,36S 21. ,299 23,689 25,860 • 25,186 37,184 44,225 50,432 Federal Government - 255 325 347 354 372 1,132 555 683 795 Fees 44 43 45 73 115 127 178 81 45 29 Other 449 905 325 103 135 117 181 111 233 405 Total Revenue 35,537 39,C56 44,715 46, ,562 51,095 54,927 61,183 70,503 82,105 93,478 School Board Expenditures Teachers' Salaries 21,566 23,763 25,550 28, ,305 31,951 34,483 38,539 46,140 54,418 62,449 Instructional Supplies 126 192 135 261 339 281 113 1,153 1,361 1,744 Administration 674 697 754 738 761 864 961 1,229 1,639 1,524 Maintenance 4,674 5,177 5,559 6, ,002 6,747 7,214 7,989 7,573 8,550 9,826 Transportation 2,274 2,637 2,900 3, ,012 3,350 3,753 4,279 4,569 5,694 7,195 Other . I l l 105 146 190 142 31 259 604 754 728 Sub-Total 29,425 32,571 35,104 38, ,508 43,290 46,631 52,140 61,268 72,416 83,466 Capital Outlay 1,666 1,207 2,432 1. ,776 862 871 1,398 1,299 925 1,061 Debt Charges 4,445 5,162 5,574 p ,494 6,990 7,177 7,593 8,103 8,636 9,231 Sub-Total of Cap. Items 6,111 6,369 9, 2C6 8, ,270 7,852 8,043 8,991 9,402 9,561 10,292 Total 35,536 38,940 44,410 46, ,773 51,142 54,679 61,131 70,670 81,977 93,758 Departmental Expenditures on Public Schools Departmental Services 1,667 1,292 1,222 1, 312 1,449 1,713 2,408 2,796 2,790 3,180 Contributions to Pension Plan 1,640 1,533 2,02 / 2, 257 2,455 2,502 2,726 3,153 3,511 4,000 Total School Board & Dept. Expenses 38,843 42,06; 47,5 59 50, 347 55,086 58,894 66,265 76,619 88,278 100,938 Fall enrolment 177,092 175,395 156,326 190,527 194,410 197,496 199,856 200,681 204,607 208,838 Cost per Pupil 201 217 2.35 246 263 277 306 352 401 449 Source: Copied from photocopies of or i g i n a l worksheets supplied by the Education Division, S t a t i s t i c s Canada. TAELE ZC7 Public School Revenue Ar.d Exper. Newfoundland 1960 1961 1962 196 3 1964 196 5 1966 1967 1963 1969 School Board Revenues Municipal Government Provinci a l Government Federal Government Fees Other Total Revenue School Board Expenditures Teachers' Salaries Instructional Supplies Administration Maintenance Transportation Other Sub-Total Capital Outlay Debt Charges Sub-Total of Cap. Items Total Departmental Expenditures on Public Schools  Departmental Services Contributions to Pension Plan Total School Board & Dept. Expenses F a l l enrolment Cost per pupil 212 205 272 363 455 617 654 540 562 648 14,575 15, ,735 16, ,621 15,746 20,790 22,674 26,334 34,916 44,001 49,186 776 773 SS5 1,092 1,242 1,203 1, 354 295 62 3 906 1,297 1, , 276 1, , 345 1,170 1,429 1,501 773 1,555 1,955 1,844 17,164 18, ,091 19, ,126 21,371 2 3,916 26,100 29,615 37, 306 47,141 52,584 10,519 11, , 337 12, ,254 14,271 15,567 16,960 18,842 22,482 27,899 32 , 226 260 295 330 339 44S 496 358 607 753 870 314 357 399 410 542 599 603 1,529 1,897 2,191 1,689 1, ,920 2, ,145 2,205 2,916 3,225 .3,958 3,732 4,631 5,350 586 663 746 767 1,014 1,122 1,809 1,532 2,267 2,960 127 145 162 166 22C 243 378 562 697 806 13,497 14, ,722 16, ,036 18,153 20,707 22,645 25,948 30,444 38,144 44,403 1,217 695 267 986 665 468 760 4,334 5,45 4,607 2.45C 2, ,671 2, ,82 3 2,227 2,544 2,9e7 2,907 2,528 3, 544 3,574 3,657 3, ,269 3, ,090 3,212 3,209 3,455 3,667 6,862 8,997 8,181 17,164 13, ,091 19, ,126 21,371 23,916 26,100 29,615 37,306 47,141 52,584 1,475 ,6ca 1, ,567 1,607 1,660 1,676 2,159 2,320 5,114 5,625 25 47 75 57 387 429 471 513 13,551 ,644 20, ,646 22,903 25,439 27,705 32,161 40,055 52,726 58,727 l24,567 125, ,917 133, ,747 137,700 140,725 144,129 146,503 148,352 151,976 156,757 137 140 143 155 170 1S1 202 251 310 335 Source: Copied from photocopies of or i g i n a l worksheets supplied by the Education Division, S t a t i s t i c s Canada. TABLE XCVI Public School Revenue and Expenditure Yukon 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 School Board Revenues Municipal Government _ _ - - - - - - - -Provincial Government 951 1,416 ?, 346 1. ,306 1, 370 1,372 2,329 2,808 3,448 4,828 Federal Government 439 179 4?S 431 423 444 269 225 314 Fees _ - - - - . 2 26 37 53 Other 5 6 11 12 14 13 7 224 113 226 Total Revenue 1,395 1,601 2,785 2. ,308 1,515 2,408 2,782 3,377 3,823 5,421 School Board Expenditures Teachers Salaries 460 534 587 737 521 926. 1,101 1,638 1,792 2,122 Instructional Supplies 53 76 111 99 141 58 64 176 193 213 Adminstration 22 31 46 46 58 109 120 37 42 50 Maintenance 151 218 319 319 406 448 493 396 433 459 Transportation 30 44 64 64 81 293 323 206 225 250 Other 1 2 3 2 4 10 . 11 3 3 1 Sub-Total 737 905 1,130 ,267 1,511 1,844 2,112 2,456 2,688 3,095 Capital Outlay 658 696 1,655 1, ,041 304 564 670 921 1,135 2,326 Debt Charges - - - - - - - - — — Sub-Total of Cap. Items 658 696 1,655 ,041 304 564 670 921 1,135 2,326 Total 1,395 1,601 2,785 2, ,305 2,405 2,782 3,377 3,823 5,421 Departmental Expenditures on Public Schools Departmental Services - - - - - - 1 1 4 5 Contributions to Pension Plan - - • - - - - — — Total School Board & Dept. Expenses 1,395 1,601. 2,785 2 - 2,408 2,783 3,378 3,827 5,426 F a l l Enrolment 2,293 2,607 2,731 2< . 992 3.177 3,001 3,164 3,365 3,456 3,617 Cost Per Pupil 608 614 1,020 771 571 802 S79 1,004 1,106 1,499 ro Source: Copied from photocopies of o r i g i n a l worksheets supplied by the Education Divsion, S t a t i s t i c s Canada. TABLE XCVT.I Public School Revenue and Expenditure. Northwest T e r r i t o r i e s -1960 1961 196? 1962 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 School Board Revenues Municipal Government Provincial Government Federal Government Fees Other Total Revenue 150 164 314 163 284 14 461 241 215 10 466 214 133 41 240 179 • 272 195 282 244 4 60 590 293 301 54 656 339 353 11 60 768 401 432 6 43 882 School Board Expenditures Teachers Salaries Instructional Supplies Administration Maintenance Transportation Other Sub-Total Capital Outlay Debt Charges Sub-Total of Cap. Items Total 139 6 12 24 8 3 192 125 22 147 339 149 10 23 • 45 . 16 7 250 214 36 250 500 218. • 15 33 66 23 11 366 64 " 36 ' 100 466 204 15 34 67 23 11 354 66 10 ." 76 430 224 • •le-ss 69 24 1? 330 -11 391 274 18 28 76 36 9 441 21 16 27 473 278 24 36 102 47 9 496 31 43 74 570 353 25 49 123 46 9 605 50 43 93 698 446 29 65 127 45 22 734 49 31 80 814 507 37 63 122 45 31 805 23 39 62 867 OJ Departmental Expenditures on Public • Schools  Departmental Services 241 160 Contributions to Pension Plan -Total School Board & Dept. Expenses 530 660 224 690 279 670 771 100 670 445 1,143 421 4 1,239 463 5 1,335 F a l l enrolment Cost per Pupil 488 695 597 653 610 764 301 537 395 437 341 932 612 964 724 1,056 771 1,062 810 Source: Copies from photocopies of o r i g i n a l worksheets supplied by the Education Division, S t a t i s t i c s Canada. TABLE XCVTII Public School Revenue and Expenditure Canada 1960 1961 1962 1963 1564 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 School Board Revenues Municipal Government 651,759 639,566 733,365 824,523 912,935 1,024,481 1. ,150,499 1, ,272,745 1. ,477,367 1, ,673,432 Provincial Government 445,673 521,345 627,028 699,033 527.554 919,574 1. ,057,305 1. ,334, ,287 1. ,592,676 1, ,878,436 Federal Government 4 39 464 6,453 7,302 5,120 5,512 9,211 18,089 20,188 25,310 Fees 6,577 4,944 5,243 5,984 7,413 5,167 9,200 11, ,803 13,767 15,286 Other 22,963 29,069 41,171 34.741 24,263 27,130 39,678 40, ,853 47,472 47,209 Total Revenue 1 ,127,416 1,245,392 1,418,260 1,571,583 1. ,780,630 1,598,914 2,265,893 2, ,677, ,777 3, ,151,470 3, ,640,273 School Board Expenditures Teachers Salaries 626,067 703,312 783,075 883,617 1, ,003,941 1,108,017 1. ,252,393 1, ,533, ,976 1, ,849,855 2, ,171,473 Instructional Supplies 41,367 46,713 53,309 62,825 78,114 9e,054 119,502 118, ,421 146,849 182,590 Admini s t r a t i o n 36,483 40,874 45,334 52,744 64,516 81,197 100,170 123, ,868 150,436 153,255 Maintenance 125,532 138,169 152,930 175,273 212,103 257,526 302,483 298, ,840 352,074 399,429 Transportation 44,735 49,599 56,192 61,660 70,044 87,760 103,440 141, ,890 166,282 192,526 Other 27,972 30,549 34,981 29,867 30,386 48,360 52,144 62, ,982 65,698 81,094 Sub-Total 902,206 1,009,616 1,125,821 1,265,991 1, ,460,009 1,630,914 1, ,930,132 2, ,279, ,977 2, ,731,194 3, ,180,367 Capital Outlay 72,182 77,755 93,299 91,600 32,520 84,093 75,374 88, ,424 86,834 61,307 Debt Charges 157,974 173,072 191,384 205,236 229,922 245,426 268,985 303, ,748 351,989 398,422 Sub-Total of Cap. Items 230,156 284,633 300,836 312,44 2 329,519 344,359 392, ,172 438,823 459,729 Total 1, ,132,362 1,265,443 1,410,504 1,566,5/7 i . ,772.452 2,010,433 2, ,274,491 2, ,672, ,149 3, ,170,017 3, ,640,096 Departmental Expenditures on Public Schools Departmental Services 21,539 2 7,534 31,060 34,641 25,457 44,751 53,525 51,631 58,735 67,683 Contributions to Pension Plan 23, 795 25,240 26,617 27,565 29,457 45,057 57,589 61, 945 71,932 82,394 Total School Board & Dept. Expenses 1, ,177,746 1,215,267 1,463,151 1,625,437 1 /540,266 1,104,241 2, 335,605 2,785, 725 3, 300,634 3, 790,173 F a l l Enrolment''' 3, ,303,373 2,559,626 4,134,772 4,358,129 4, 522,616 4,725,666 4, 905,788 5, 075, 827 5, 265,856 5, 454,687 Cost per Pupil 255 317 327 360 291 425 463 526 602 . 667 Except i n B.C., where the June enrolment i s taken into consideration. Source: Copied from photocopies of or i g i n a l worksheets supplied by the Education Division, S t a t i s t i c s Canada. TABLE XCIX Fi s c a l Year Enrolments By Province 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 British Columbia 329,275 348,459 366,947 387,010 403,305 430 , 761 454,843 477,563 499,817 Alberta 284,526 299,742 313,512 327,997 242,352 255,408 366,453 378,125 392,218 Saskatchewan 204,858 211,457 217,513 223,263 229,870 225,256 239,847 243,492 247,181 Manitoba 182,699 191,636 198,581 207,561 215,094 220,152 223,161 227,379 235,043 Ontario 1, 347,200 1 ,418,390 1,488,731 1,556,114 1,627,924 1,699,776 1,763,628 1,828,053 1 ,893,832 Quebec 1, 065,058 1 ,122,373 1,178,811 1,228,727 1,279,904 1,340,622 1,406,812 1,466,768 1 ,530,769 New Brunswick 149,618 153,459 155,726 153,215 162,121 164,565 165,837 167,931 170,757 Prince Edward Island 24,271 24,936 25,875 26,601 27,423 27,759 28,086 28,792 29,251 Nova Scotia 178,013 182,167 188,007 192,080 195,644 198,440 200,186 202,252 206,299 Newfoundland 126,487 130,849 135,323 138,914 142,093 145,078 147,243 149,801 153,889 Yukon 2,419 2,656 2,836 3,066 3,106 3,106 3,244 3,401 3,521 «"crthwest Territories 597 699 636 839 872 873 945 1,000 1,062 •Canada 3, 895,021 4 ,086,873 4,272,603 4,450,387 4,634,720 4,821,772 5,000,285 5,174,562 5 ,363,6 39 ^All provinces except B.C. based on fa l l enrolment and adjusted by adding .6 of previous year to .4 of current year. B.C. based on June figures and adjusted by adding .6 of current year to .4 of future year. TABLE C Cost Per Pupil - Teachers1 Salaries Interprovincial Comparison Index 1961=100 Province 1961 1965 1969 1969 Index $ $ $ British Columbia 220.20 259.02 374.31 170.0 Alberta 228.24 280.39 458.85 201.0 Saskatchewan 204.15 240.35 368.85 180.7 Manitoba 192.84 214.05 366.98 190.3 Ontario 200.54 253.41 454.50 226.6 Quebec 151.80 241.83 402.48 265.1 New Brunswick 124.72 162.78 266.17 213.4 Prince Edward Island 104.12 141.74 252.57 242.6 Nova Scotia 133.49 176.28 302.71 226.8 Newfoundland 89.63 119.36 209.41 233.6 Yukon 220.75 298.13 602.67 273.0 Northwest Territories 249.58 313.86 477.40 191.3 Canada 180.57 239.07 404.85 224.2 TABLE CI Cost Per Pupil - Instructional Supplies Interprovincial Comparison Index 1961=100 Province 1961 1965 1969 1969 Index British Columbia $ 14.73 $ 20.90 $ 37.52 254.7 Alberta 14.29 17.94 33.92 237.4 Saskatchewan 10.25 18.01 33.88 330.5 Manitoba 13.65 21.55 38.90 285.0 Ontario 14.76 23.83 46.41 314.4 Quebec 11.36 26.57 26.49 233.2 New Brunswick 3.82 5.20 7.30 191.1 Prince Edward Island 3.05 4.19 16.07 526.9 Nova Scotia 1.08 1.44 8.45 782.4 Newfoundland 2.33 3.49 5.65 242.5 Yukon 31.42 18.67 60.49 192.5 Northwest Territories 16.75 20.62 34.84 208.0 Canada 11.99 21.16 34.04 283.9 TABLE CII Cost Per Pupil - Adrninistration Interprovincial Comparison Index 1961=100 Province 1961 1965 1969 1969 Index $ $ t British Columbia 16.24 16.99 27.90 171.8 Alberta 9.52 12.80 24.22 254.4 Saskatchewan 9.87 11.22 16.04 162.5 Manitoba 11.21 15.13 47.34 422.3 Ontario 12.35 19.93 23.91 193.6 Quebec 9.61 22.48 39.74 413.5 New Brunswick 4.27 6.27 23,51 550.6 Prince Edward Island 5.31 7.48 26.32 495.7 Nova Scotia 3.92 4.42 7.39 188.5 Newfoundland 2.82 4.22 14.24 505.0 Yukon 12.82 35.09 14.20 110.8 Northwest Territories 38.53 32.07 59.32 154.0 Canada 10.49 17.52 28.57 272.4 TABLE C M Cost Per Pupil - Plant Operation & Maintenance Interprovincial Comparison Index 1961=100 Province 1961 1965 1969 1969 Index i $ $ British Columbia 63.26 67.04 89.57 141.6 Alberta 50.31 62.09 90.54 180.0 Saskatchewan 44.39 51.61 62.61 141.0 Manitoba 39.04 42.57 65.68 168.2 Ontario 35.15 56.72 91.95 261.6 Quebec 26.12 61.10 57.77 221.2 New Brunswick 26.07 33.79 45.09 173.0 Prince Edward Island 15.41 32.71 74.94 486.3 Nova Scotia 29.08 36.87 47.63 163.8 Newfoundland 15.18 22.70 34.77 229.1 Yukon 90.12 144.24 130.36 144.7 Northwest Territories 75.38 87.06 114.88 152.4 Canada 35.47 55.56 74.47 210.0 TABLE CIV Cost Per Pupil - Transportation Interprovincial Comparison Index 1961=100 Province 1961 1965 1969 1969 Index British Columbia .$ 7.93 $ 8.51 $ 11.79 148.7 Alberta 34.47 37.03 48.79 141.5 Saskatchewan 31.27 49.16 57.59 184.2 Manitoba 17.75 21.60 35.73 201.3 Ontario 11.14 15.68 27.45 246.4 Quebec 7.49 17.53 50.29 671.4 New Brunswick 9.69 11.76 27.24 281.1 Prince Edward Island 5.07 21.37 27.11 534.7 Nova Scotia 14.81 19.18 34.88 235.5 Newfoundland 5.28 7.90 19.23 364.2 Yukon 18.19 94.33 71.00 390.3 Northwest Territories 26.80 41.24 42.37 158.1 Canada 12.84 18.94 35.89 279.5 TABLE CV Cost Per Pupil - Auxiliary Services Interprovincial Comparison Index 1961=100 Province 1961 1965 1969 1969 Index British Columbia $ 9.67 $ 14.65 $ 21.04 217.6 Alberta 3.26 1.49 2.06 63.2 Saskatchewan 1.17 4.75 6.38 545.3 Manitoba 3.03 4.50 8.62 284.5 Ontario 14.82 14.72 , 29.14 196.6 Quebec 5.05 11.81 5.36 106.1 New Brunswick .22 2.55 6.80 3,090.9 Prince Edward Island .16 .72 1.50 937.5 Neva Scotia .59 .16 3.53 598.3 Newfoundland 1.15 1.71 5.24 455.7 Yukon .83 3.22 .28 33.7 Northwest Territories 11.73 10.31 29.19 248.8 Canada 7.84 10.43 15.12 192.9 TABLE CVT Cost Per Pupil - Total School Board Operational Expenditures Interprovincial Comparison Index 1961=100 Province Rank 1961 1965 Rank 1969 1969 Index British Columbia (4) 332.02 387.11 (7) i 562.13 169.3 Alberta (3) 340.09 411.73 (4) 658.39 193.6 Saskatchewan (5) 301.09 375.11 (8) 545.35 181.1 Manitoba (7) 277.51 319.40 (6) 563.24 203.0 Ontario (6) 288.77 384.29 (3) 673.35 233.2 Quebec (8) 211.43 381.32 (5) 582.14 275.3 New Brunswick (10) 162.11 222.36 (11) 376.11 232.0 Prince Edward Island (11) 133.12 171.79 (10) 398.52 299.4 Nova Scotia (9) 182.97 238.35 (9) 404.59 221.1 Newfoundland (12) 116.39 159.37 (12) 288.54 247.9 Yukon (2) 374.12 593.69 (1) 879.01 235.0 Northwest Territories (1) 418.76 505.15 (2) 758.00 181.0 Canada 259.21 362.68 592.95 228.8 TABLE CVTI Cost Per Pupil - Department Services Interprovincial Comparison Index 1961=100 Province 1961 1965 1969 1969 Index $ $ $ British Columbia 5.38 7.05 13.31 247.4 Alberta 7.34 8.22 22.21 302.6 Saskatchewan 7.36 8.10 16.85 228.9 Manitoba 5.45 13.39 26.51 486.4 Ontario 4.02 4.53 9.64 239.8 Quebec 10.99 16.76 7.25 66.0 New Brunswick 5.76 9.05 15.31 265.8 Prince Edward Island 6.96 12.76 23.42 336.5 Nova Scotia 7.26 8.76 15.41 212.3 Newfoundland 12.71 11.80 36.55 287.6 Yukon _ 0 — _ Northwest Territories 268.01 335.62 435.97 162.7 Canada 7.08 9.66 12.62 178.2 TABLE CVIII Cost Per Pupil - Pensions Interprovincial Comparison Index 1961=100 Province 1961 1965 1969 1969 Index $ J $ British Columbia 10.61 10.63 12.32 116.1 Alberta .01 2.14 9.84 -Saskatchewan 5.20 6.05 6.39 122.9 Manitoba 2.82 2.15 6.21 220.2 Ontario 12.92 24.25 33.37 258.3 Quebec .73 -.29 .46 63.0 New Brunswick 1.30 3.67 5.33 410.0 Prince Edward Island .12 .11 .03 25.0 Nova Scotia 10.30 12.79 19.39 188.3 Newfoundland -.43 -.50 3.37 -Yukon - 0 . - -Northwest Territories - 0 4.71 -Canada 6.48 10.58 15.36 237.0 TABLE CIX Municipal and Provincial Governments' Costs Per Pupil Interprovincial Comparison Index 1961=100 1961 1965 1969 Rank Cost Rank Cost 1965 Index Rank Cost 1969 Index 1969 Index Ratio Municipal Costs by Province British Columbia Alberta Saskatchewan Manitoba Ontario Quebec New Brunswick Prince Edward Island Nova Scotia Newfoundland Yukon Northwest Territories Canada Provincial Costs by Province British Columbia Alberta Saskatchewan Manitoba Ontario Quebec New Brunswick Prince Edward Island Nova Scotia Newfoundland Yukon. Northwest Territories Canada (4) (5) (2) (3) (1) (6) (0) (8) (7) (0) (0) (0) (2) (1) (3) (4) (5) (6) (0) (7) (8) (0) (0) (0) 194.68 184.22 197.47 196.90 218.27 150.45 130.78 58.18 117.74 1.62 0 273.03 177.04 178.98 223. 34 152.72 137.86 134.76 107.72 62.49 102.10 94.72 124.40 585.37 475.71 133.85 (1) (3) (4) (6) (2) (5) (0) (8) ' (7) (0) (0) (0) (4) (1) (5) (6) (3) (2) (0) (7) (8) (0) (0) (0) 249.34 240.21 234.02 223.34 243.24 226.27 192.30 91.16 145.42 4.34 0 311.57 223.20 189.81 229.21 186.26 151.7? 203.96 227.59 61.80 149.76 132.18 159.57 634.90 223.37 198.41 128.1 130.3 116.5 113.4 111.4 150.4 147.0 156.7 123.5 267.9 114.1 126.1 106.1 102.6 122.0 110.1 151.4 211.3 98.9 146.7 139.5 128.3 108.5 47.0 148.2 (2) (3) (4) (6) (1) (5) (0) (8) (7) (0) (0) (0) (6) (1) (7) (40 (3) (2) (0) (5) (8) (0) (0) (0) 360.47 345.27 335.80 271.74 390.52 277.55 0 126.e3 202.70 4.21 0 377.59 312.00 258.65 395.04 251.44 338.14 362.04 384.71 376.44 305.49 244.46 319.62 1,371.20 406.78 350.23 185.2 187.3 170.1 138.0 178.9 184.5 0 218.0 172.2 259.9 138.3 176.2 144. 176. 164. 245. 268. 357. 602. 299. 258. 256.9 234.2 85.5(2) 261.7 1.28 1.06 1.03 .56 .67 .52 0 .73 .67 (1.01) 0 (2) .67 '^The index r a t i o divides the municipal index by the provincial index as a measure of the degree of increased burden borne by respective l e v e l s of government. I f share of increased costs was borne equally r a t i o would equal 1.00, a r a t i o of less than or.e indicates greater burden to province, a r a t i o greater than one indicates a greater burden to municipality. cn (2) Northwest T e r r i t o r i e s cannot be compared to other provinces, note the per pupil cost of department services i n Table CVII. 

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