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Nomad explorations v 2.1 : genesis, eden and the grail in modernity. Barnesmoore, Luke R. 2016

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Nomad Explorations V 2.1: Genesis,  Eden and The Grail  in Modernity by  Luke R. Barnesmoore  B.A. San Francisco State University, 2014  A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF  MASTER OF ARTS in THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE AND POSTDOCTORAL STUDIES (Geography)  THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA (Vancouver)  August 2016  © Luke R. Barnesmoore, 2016		 ii	 Abstract  ‘Genesis’, ‘The Garden of Eden’ and ‘The Holy Grail’ are stories that have captivated the western mind (and the human mind in the iterations of these archetypal narratives in other cultures) for millennia. Though many view Modernity and Modernism as marking the death of religion and religious dogma, we argue that Modernism simply rearticulates Abrahamic-Hellenic (more generally Paternalist) social dogmas within its own logics and axioms (especially cosmological, ontological, teleological and epistemological axioms that reduce humanity to a discrete, biological, materially rational being and reduce reality to the finite world of motion, passing time and physical space); the rationalizations for social dogmas like the notion that ‘order is to be created through hierarchical domination’ may change, but the class relations therein retain their basic form. We illustrate this argument through conducting a Nomad Exploration (NE) of Foucault’s The Order of Things, which illustrates the rearticulation of Genesis in the axioms and logics of Modernity, Haraway’s Primate Visions, which illustrates the rearticulation of the Garden of Eden, and finally the nexus of primatology, transhumanism, ‘vampire therapy’, etc. (attempts at material immortality via ‘curing death’) that typify the Modernist rearticulation of the quest for the Holy Grail (san  grail, sang rail). In the ethos of Nomad Exploration (NE) our teleological imperative in this journey is not to ‘answer questions’ by ‘accumulating and analyzing facts’; rather, our goal is to broaden understandings and deepen questions by providing the reader with dimensionally transformative ideas that provide access to new plateaus of perspective—in short, our purpose lies in the production of intimate, inner experience with dimensionally transformative ideas and a concomitant reinvigoration of meaning rather than in accumulating and analyzing facts.                      		 iii	 Preface  As will become apparent in the below text, many of UBC’s requirements for the preface are incommensurable with our project. For example, the first three bullet points on the UBC template are as follows: “Identification and design of the research program; Performance of various parts of the research; Analysis of the research data.” This presumes that we approached our research with a set telos (design and research program), with a set method for tangible ‘data collection’, and with a static method for analyzing accumulated, tangible data. What happens when our research program involves ideas and practices that fundamentally challenge the axioms and logics from which these Modernist standards for thought and writing are derived? Our method moves without fixed telos, does not have a set method for data collection beyond daily experience and operationalizes a nonlinear method that is optimal for analyzing the many forms of intangible data (e.g. ontological regime(s)) that we analyze in our study.  Parts of the theoretical and methodological models presented in this thesis have been published or are in the publication processes within the following articles: “Conscious vs. Mechanical Evolution: Transcending Biocentrist Social Ontologies”; “Conscious Evolution, Social Development and Environmental Justice”; “The Obfuscation of Individualist Historical Narratives: Reviving Rational Generalization and Leaving The Irrational Generalization of Bigotry in the Past”; “Machine Learning Methodologies and Large Data Text Corpora”; “Machine Learning Methodologies: Histories of Asembalge and Representations of Women in the Bible”; “Media Imaginations of the City”; “Silence and Historical Context in Ontologies of Data”; “Planning for a New Social Ontology”. Parts of this research were also presented at academic conferences including the International Studies Assocaition and the Association of American Geographers: “Datascopes and Dimensional Incommensurability in the History of Assemblages”; “Neoliberal Governmentality: Appropriating Religion to Fulfill the Bottom Line”; “Machine Learning Methodologies and Large Data Text Corpora”; “Machine Learning Methodologies: Digital Humanities”. In all of the above my contributions encompass development of the theoretical and methodological models by which the analyses were conducted. In multi-author papers I have also made small contributions to the empirical work (for example, adding an empirical analysis of Libertarian Christianity to the conference paper “Neoliberal Governmentality: Appropriating Religion to Fulfill the Bottom Line”). In short, this study—its core theoretical innovations, its key themes, its major arguments, etc.—is an individually conceived, original (as much as originality is possible given the actual nature of human thought) and unpublished text.                 		 iv	Table of Contents  Abstract:………………………………………………………….……………………………………………………………………....ii  Preface:…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..iii  T