Open Collections

UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Bioavailability assessment of trace metal contaminants in urban soils and partitioning of zinc, cadmium,… Thomas, Elisabeth Chere 2013

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2013_fall_thomas_elisabeth.pdf [ 11.86MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0071965.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0071965-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0071965-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0071965-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0071965-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0071965-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0071965-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0071965-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0071965.ris

Full Text

Bioavailability	
  assessment	
  of	
  trace	
  metal	
  contaminants	
  in	
   urban	
  soils	
  and	
  partitioning	
  of	
  zinc,	
  cadmium,	
  lead,	
  nickel,	
   and	
  copper	
  in	
  the	
  roots,	
  shoots,	
  foliage,	
  and	
  seeds	
  of	
   Chenopodium	
  quinoa	
   by	
   Elisabeth	
  Chere	
  Thomas	
   	
   B.A.,	
  Columbia	
  University,	
  2006	
   	
   A	
  THESIS	
  SUMITTED	
  IN	
  PARTIAL	
  FULFILLMENT	
  OF	
   THE	
  REQUIREMENTS	
  FOR	
  THE	
  DEGREE	
  OF	
   	
   MASTER	
  OF	
  SCIENCE	
   in	
   The	
  Faculty	
  Of	
  Graduate	
  Studies	
   (Soil	
  Science)	
   	
   THE	
  UNIVERSITY	
  OF	
  BRITISH	
  COLUMBIA	
   (VANCOUVER)	
   	
   May	
  2013	
   ©	
  	
  Elisabeth	
  Chere	
  Thomas,	
  2013	
    Abstract	
   This	
  paper	
  presents	
  two	
  studies	
  on	
  urban	
  soils	
  in	
  Vancouver	
  –	
  the	
  first	
  is	
  a	
  case	
  study	
  for	
   assessment	
  of	
  trace	
  metals	
  in	
  urban	
  soils,	
  with	
  particular	
  emphasis	
  on	
  brownfield	
   reclamation	
  and	
  food	
  production.	
  	
  Three	
  single-­‐extraction	
  procedures	
  are	
  evaluated	
  for	
   their	
  usefulness	
  for	
  identifying	
  the	
  bioavailable	
  fractions	
  of	
  trace	
  metals	
  in	
  soil.	
  	
  Plant-­‐ available	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  and	
  Cu	
  were	
  estimated	
  using	
  elemental	
  analysis,	
  pH,	
  organic	
   matter,	
  and	
  soil	
  texture.	
  	
  Specific	
  geochemical	
  factors	
  such	
  as	
  oxidizing	
  conditions	
  and	
  the	
   presence	
  of	
  Fe-­‐,	
  Al-­‐,	
  and	
  Mn-­‐oxides	
  suggest	
  trace	
  metal	
  mobility	
  in	
  the	
  soils.	
  	
  The	
  use	
  of	
   0.1M	
  HCl	
  for	
  estimating	
  the	
  risk	
  of	
  trace	
  metal	
  bioaccumulation	
  in	
  crop	
  urban	
  plants	
  is	
   recommended.	
  	
  	
  The	
  second	
  study	
  assesses	
  selected	
  phytoremediation	
  technology	
  for	
   removing	
  trace	
  metals	
  from	
  soil	
  through	
  successive	
  cultivation	
  of	
  trace	
  metal-­‐accumulating	
   crop	
  plants.	
  	
  	
  A	
  pot	
  study	
  was	
  conducted	
  using	
  Chenopodium	
  quinoa	
  (quinoa)	
  to	
  extract	
  Zn,	
   Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  and	
  Cu	
  from	
  variously	
  spiked	
  brownfield	
  soil.	
  Chenopodium	
  quinoa	
  is	
  a	
  grain	
  that	
   may	
  be	
  a	
  high-­‐value	
  specialty	
  crop	
  in	
  British	
  Columbia.	
  	
  	
  Previous	
  research	
  suggested	
  that	
   Chenopodium	
  quinoa	
  may	
  be	
  a	
  useful	
  plant	
  for	
  phytoextraction	
  of	
  trace	
  metals.	
  	
  The	
  reasons	
   for	
  using	
  quinoa	
  in	
  the	
  present	
  experiment	
  are	
  twofold	
  –	
  (1)	
  to	
  evaluate	
  potential	
  human	
   health	
  risks	
  involved	
  with	
  growing	
  a	
  metal-­‐accumulating	
  crop	
  in	
  potentially	
  contaminated	
   urban	
  soils,	
  and	
  (2)	
  to	
  assess	
  the	
  above-­‐ground	
  partitioning	
  and	
  accumulation	
  of	
  trace	
   metals	
  for	
  evaluating	
  the	
  usefulness	
  of	
  Chenopodium	
  quinoa	
  for	
  phytoextraction	
  in	
   Vancouver,	
  British	
  Columbia.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  found	
  that	
  quinoa	
  is	
  a	
  hyperaccumulator	
  and	
  there	
  is	
  a	
   	
   potential	
  concern	
  that	
  grains	
  may	
  contain	
  harmful	
  levels	
  of	
  trace	
  metals	
  for	
  human	
   consumption.	
   	
    	
   ii	
   	
    Table	
  of	
  contents	
   Abstract…………………………………………………………………………………………………..………………..……ii	
   Table	
  of	
  contents…………………………………………………………………………………………………….……..iii	
   List	
  of	
  tables……………..…………………………………………………………………………………………………….v	
   List	
  of	
  figures………………………..………………………………………………………………..………………….…..vi	
   List	
  of	
  abbreviations……………….……………………………………………………………………..………………vii	
   Acknowledgements…………………………………………………………………….………….…………………….viii	
   1	
   General	
  introduction	
  .......................................................................................................................................	
  1	
   1.1	
   Problem	
  statement	
  ..................................................................................................................................	
  1	
   1.2	
   Scope	
  and	
  objectives	
  ...............................................................................................................................	
  2	
   1.3	
   Research	
  plan	
  and	
  organization	
  ........................................................................................................	
  3	
   1.3.1	
   Preliminary	
  case	
  study	
  .....................................................................................................................................................	
  3	
   1.3.2	
   Phytoextraction	
  pot	
  study	
  ..............................................................................................................................................	
  4	
    2	
   Factors	
  affecting	
  trace	
  metal	
  bioavailability	
  in	
  urban	
  soils	
  of	
  Vancouver,	
  British	
   Columbia:	
  A	
  case	
  study	
  ..........................................................................................................................................	
  5	
   2.1	
   Introduction	
  ...............................................................................................................................................	
  5	
   2.1.1.	
   Brownfields	
  ..........................................................................................................................................................................	
  5	
   2.1.2	
   Trace	
  metal	
  contamination	
  ............................................................................................................................................	
  6	
   2.1.3	
   Bioavailability	
  assessment	
  .............................................................................................................................................	
  7	
   2.1.4	
   Evaluation	
  of	
  single-­‐extraction	
  procedures	
  ............................................................................................................	
  8	
   2.1.5	
   Soil	
  factors	
  affecting	
  trace	
  metal	
  availability	
  .......................................................................................................	
  10	
    2.2	
   Objectives	
  ..................................................................................................................................................	
  12	
   	
   2.3	
   Materials	
  and	
  methods	
  ........................................................................................................................	
  13	
   2.3.1	
   Sampling	
  strategy	
  .............................................................................................................................................................	
  13	
   2.3.2	
   Assessment	
  parameters	
  ................................................................................................................................................	
  14	
   2.3.3	
   Statistical	
  analysis	
  ............................................................................................................................................................	
  15	
    2.4	
   Results	
  and	
  discussion	
  .........................................................................................................................	
  16	
   2.4.1	
   Total	
  concentrations	
  .......................................................................................................................................................	
  16	
   2.4.2	
   ‘Available’	
  concentrations	
  ............................................................................................................................................	
  17	
   2.4.3	
   Influence	
  of	
  parent	
  material	
  ........................................................................................................................................	
  18	
   2.4.4	
   Organic	
  matter	
  ...................................................................................................................................................................	
  21	
   	
   iii	
   	
    2.4.5	
   Influence	
  of	
  pH	
  ..................................................................................................................................................................	
  23	
    2.5	
   Conclusions	
  ...............................................................................................................................................	
  24	
   3	
   Phytoextraction	
  and	
  partitioning	
  of	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  and	
  Cu	
  in	
  Chenopodium	
  quinoa	
  .........	
  25	
   3.1	
   Introduction	
  .............................................................................................................................................	
  25	
   3.1.1	
   Phytoextraction	
  .................................................................................................................................................................	
  25	
   3.1.2	
   Hyperaccumulator	
  plants	
  .............................................................................................................................................	
  27	
    3.2	
   Objectives	
  ..................................................................................................................................................	
  30	
   3.3	
   Materials	
  and	
  methods	
  ........................................................................................................................	
  31	
   3.3.1	
   Experiment	
  design	
  ...........................................................................................................................................................	
  32	
   3.3.2	
   Assessment	
  parameters	
  ................................................................................................................................................	
  33	
   3.3.3	
   Elemental	
  extraction	
  .......................................................................................................................................................	
  34	
   3.3.4	
   Statistical	
  analysis	
  ............................................................................................................................................................	
  36	
    3.4	
   Results	
  and	
  discussion	
  .........................................................................................................................	
  36	
   3.4.1	
   Changes	
  in	
  soil	
  concentrations	
  ...................................................................................................................................	
  37	
   3.4.2	
   Metal	
  concentrations	
  in	
  leaves	
  and	
  shoots	
  ...........................................................................................................	
  38	
   3.4.3	
   Seed	
  concentrations	
  ........................................................................................................................................................	
  41	
   3.4.4	
   Element	
  interactions	
  .......................................................................................................................................................	
  43	
   3.4.5	
   Phytoextraction	
  potential	
  for	
  C.	
  quinoa	
  ..................................................................................................................	
  47	
    3.5	
   Conclusions	
  ...............................................................................................................................................	
  49	
   4	
   Conclusions	
  and	
  recommendations	
  .......................................................................................................	
  50	
   4.1	
   Recommendations	
  for	
  further	
  research	
  .......................................................................................	
  50	
   4.2	
   Recommendations	
  for	
  partnerships	
  ..............................................................................................	
  51	
   References……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………52	
   Appendices……………………………………………………………………………...……………………..………...…..60	
   	
   Appendix	
  A:	
  Statistical	
  information	
  for	
  chapter	
  2	
  ..............................................................................	
  60	
   Appendix	
  B:	
  Statistical	
  information	
  for	
  chapter	
  3	
  ..............................................................................	
  64	
   Appendix	
  C:	
  Case	
  study	
  details	
  for	
  chapter	
  2	
  ........................................................................................	
  72	
   Appendix	
  D:	
  Experimental	
  details	
  for	
  chapter	
  3…………………………………………….....…………74	
   	
   	
    	
   iv	
   	
    List	
  of	
  tables	
   Table	
  2.1:	
  	
  Selective	
  extraction	
  methods	
  and	
  target	
  soil	
  fractions………………...………………………..9	
   Table	
  2.2:	
  Total	
  concentrations	
  of	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  &	
  Cu	
  at	
  selected	
  sites	
  compared	
  with	
  BC	
   	
   standards	
  for	
  agricultural	
  use……………………………………………………………………...………….16	
   Table	
  2.3:	
  Mean	
  percentage	
  of	
  available	
  trace	
  metals	
  among	
  sites	
  and	
  parent	
  material	
   groups……………………………………………………………………………………………………………...…………20	
   Table	
  2.4:	
  Summary	
  of	
  soil	
  pH,	
  texture,	
  percent	
  organic	
  matter,	
  and	
  parent	
  material	
  by	
  site.. 	
  ...................................................................................................................................................................................	
  21	
   Table	
  2.5:	
  Available	
  Zb,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  Cu,	
  &	
  Mn	
  by	
  site	
  compared	
  with	
  YTC	
  compost….	
  ...........................	
  22	
   Table	
  3.1:	
  Trace	
  metal	
  concentrations	
  for	
  treatment	
  groups	
  A,	
  B,	
  and	
  C,	
  compared	
  with	
   	
   British	
  Columbia	
  guidelines	
  for	
  agricultural	
  land	
  use………………………………...………….…32	
   Table	
  3.2:	
  Mean	
  decrease	
  in	
  plant-­‐available	
  concentrations	
  of	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  Cu,	
  Cd,	
  &	
  Zn	
  at	
  110	
   	
   DAT…………….…………………………………………………………………...……………………………….……..37	
   Table	
  3.3:	
  Correlations	
  between	
  soil	
  concentrations	
  and	
  biometric	
  characters……………..……..38	
   Table	
  3.4:	
  	
  Upper	
  intake	
  limits	
  for	
  human	
  consumption	
  compared	
  with	
  mean	
  amounts	
  of	
  Zn,	
   	
   Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  &	
  Cu	
  in	
  quinoa	
  seeds…………………...………………………………………………...………...42	
   Table	
  3.5:	
  Translocation	
  factors	
  (TF)	
  at	
  30	
  &	
  110	
  DAT…………………………………………………….….47	
   Table	
  3.6:	
  Mean	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  &	
  Cu	
  content	
  (mg)	
  per	
  plant	
  part………………………………………...48	
   	
    	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   v	
   	
    List	
  of	
  figures	
   Figure	
  2.1:	
  Brownfield	
  site	
  on	
  E.	
  Hastings	
  Street,	
  Vancouver,	
  BC…………..……………………...………..5	
   Figure	
  2.2:	
  Urban	
  soil	
  showing	
  natural	
  and	
  anthropogenic	
  contributions………………...…………...6	
   Figure	
  2.3:	
  Map	
  of	
  soil	
  parent	
  materials	
  in	
  Vancouver,	
  BC…………………………………….…...………..11	
   Figure	
  2.4:	
  Map	
  showing	
  sampled	
  sites……………………………………………………………………………….13	
   Figure	
  2.5:	
  Total	
  and	
  available	
  concentrations	
  of	
  Zn,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  Cu,	
  and	
  Mn	
  by	
  site…………………...19	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Figure	
  3.1:	
  Concentrations	
  of	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  and	
  Cu	
  in	
  roots,	
  shoots,	
  foliage,	
  and	
  seeds	
  at	
  110	
   	
   DAT…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..……….40	
   Figure	
  3.2:	
  Partitioning	
  of	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
  Ni,	
  Cu	
  and	
  Pb	
  in	
  roots,	
  shoots,	
  and	
  foliage	
  at	
  30	
  DAT……….41	
   Figure	
  3.3:	
  Seed	
  concentrations	
  of	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni	
  and	
  Cu	
  at	
  110	
  DAT……….………………….………42	
    	
    	
   vi	
   	
    List	
  of	
  abbreviations	
   	
   	
  BC	
  	
  	
  -­‐	
   	
    British	
  Columbia	
    BCF	
  	
  	
  -­‐	
  	
    Bioconcentration	
  factor	
    C	
  	
  	
  -­‐	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    Concentration	
    CEC	
  	
  	
  -­‐	
  	
    Cation	
  exchange	
  capacity	
  	
    DAT	
  	
  	
  -­‐	
  	
    Days	
  after	
  transplant	
    EC	
  	
  	
  -­‐	
   	
    Electroconductivity	
    GHG	
  	
  	
  -­‐	
    Greenhouse	
  gas	
    ICP-­‐OES	
  	
  	
  -­‐	
    Inductively	
  Coupled	
  Plasma	
  Optical	
  Emission	
  Spectrometer	
    nd	
  	
  	
  -­‐	
  	
  	
   	
    Undetectable	
    ns	
  	
  	
  -­‐	
   	
    Not	
  significant	
    PAH	
  	
  	
  -­‐	
  	
    Polycyclic	
  aromatic	
  hydrocarbon	
    PCB	
  	
  	
  -­‐	
  	
    Polychlorinated	
  biphenyl	
    TF	
  	
  	
  -­‐	
   	
    Translocation	
  factor	
    UBC	
  	
  	
  -­‐	
  	
    University	
  of	
  British	
  	
  Columbia	
    USDA	
  	
  	
  -­‐	
    United	
  States	
  Department	
  of	
  Agriculture	
    YTC	
  	
  -­‐	
   	
    Yard	
  trimmings	
  compost	
    	
   vii	
   	
    Acknowledgements	
   I	
  am	
  deeply	
  honoured	
  to	
  have	
  had	
  the	
  opportunity	
  to	
  study	
  with	
  Dr.	
  Les	
  Lavkulich,	
  my	
   supervisor.	
  	
  His	
  guidance,	
  laughter,	
  and	
  expertise	
  have	
  shaped	
  both	
  this	
  project	
  and	
  my	
   approach	
  to	
  learning.	
  	
  	
  I	
  am	
  continually	
  inspired	
  by	
  his	
  sense	
  of	
  ethics	
  and	
  his	
  commitment	
   to	
  public	
  service	
  through	
  the	
  practice	
  of	
  science.	
  	
   	
    My	
  sincere	
  thanks	
  to	
  Dr.	
  Gary	
  Bradfield,	
  member	
  of	
  my	
  supervisory	
  committee,	
  for	
  his	
   tremendous	
  commitment	
  to	
  teaching	
  and	
  his	
  important	
  help	
  experimental	
  design,	
  data	
   collection,	
  and	
  statistical	
  analysis.	
  	
  	
   	
    I	
  would	
  also	
  like	
  to	
  thank	
  Dr.	
  Sean	
  Smukler,	
  member	
  of	
  my	
  supervisory	
  committee,	
  for	
  his	
   relevant	
  perspective	
  and	
  helpful	
  suggestions	
  with	
  this	
  project.	
   	
    My	
  thanks	
  to	
  Dr.	
  Art	
  Bomke,	
  for	
  sharing	
  his	
  agronomic	
  expertise	
  and	
  knowledge	
  of	
   community	
  garden	
  projects	
  in	
  Vancouver.	
   	
    Thanks	
  also	
  to	
  Martin	
  Hilmer	
  and	
  Dr.	
  Sandra	
  Brown	
  for	
  their	
  technical	
  help	
  and	
   encouragement	
  during	
  lab	
  work,	
  and	
  to	
  Maureen	
  Soon	
  for	
  her	
  help	
  with	
  the	
  ICP.	
   	
    Thanks	
  to	
  my	
  friends	
  and	
  colleagues	
   	
   in	
  Soil	
  Science	
  for	
  their	
  help	
  and	
  guidance,	
  particularly	
   Gladys	
  Oka,	
  Emma	
  Holmes,	
  Melissa	
  Iverson	
  and	
  Dru	
  Yates.	
   	
    I	
  greatly	
  appreciate	
  support	
  for	
  this	
  project	
  by	
  the	
  Silverhill	
  Institute	
  for	
  Environmental	
   Research	
  and	
  Conservation.	
   	
    Special	
  thanks	
  to	
  my	
  family	
  and	
  friends	
  for	
  their	
  unwavering	
  encouragement.	
   	
   	
   viii	
   	
    1 General	
  introduction	
   1.1 Problem	
  statement	
   Urban	
  agriculture	
  is	
  recognized	
  as	
  a	
  positive	
  activity	
  that	
  provides	
  ecosystem	
  services,	
   connections	
  to	
  nature,	
  and	
  the	
  offering	
  of	
  fresh	
  local	
  food	
  to	
  urban	
  communities.	
  	
  Yet	
  there	
   are	
  concerns	
  about	
  the	
  environmental	
  hazards	
  to	
  which	
  urban	
  crops	
  are	
  exposed.	
  	
  As	
  urban	
   agriculture	
  gains	
  popularity	
  in	
  Vancouver,	
  underutilized	
  land	
  parcels	
  are	
  increasingly	
  being	
   repurposed	
  as	
  farms	
  or	
  gardens.	
  	
  These	
  parcels,	
  known	
  as	
  ‘brownfields,’	
  are	
  often	
  vacant	
   when	
  contamination	
  caused	
  by	
  prior	
  uses	
  necessitates	
  expensive	
  and	
  time-­‐consuming	
   assessment	
  and	
  remediation.	
  	
  Brownfield	
  remediation	
  is	
  a	
  growing	
  concern,	
  and	
  with	
  4,000	
   to	
  6,000	
  brownfields	
  in	
  British	
  Columbia	
  alone	
  (BC	
  Brownfield	
  Renewal,	
  2013)	
  new	
   methods	
  of	
  low-­‐cost,	
  in-­‐situ	
  assessment	
  and	
  remediation	
  are	
  needed	
  in	
  order	
  transform	
   these	
  lots	
  into	
  useable	
  space.	
   	
   A	
  primary	
  impediment	
  to	
  site	
  reclamation	
  is	
  economic	
  -­‐-­‐	
  contaminated	
  sites	
  remain	
   undeveloped	
  when	
  the	
  cost	
  of	
  remediation	
  exceeds	
  the	
  estimated	
  value	
  of	
  the	
  land.	
  	
   Working	
  within	
  the	
  provincial	
  protocol,	
  property	
  managers	
  must	
  conduct	
  a	
  costly	
  risk	
   assessment	
  to	
  identify	
  and	
  evaluate	
  the	
  presence	
  of	
  harmful	
  substances	
  and	
  the	
  risk	
  of	
   human	
  exposure	
  to	
  those	
  substances.	
  This	
  assessment	
  is	
  used	
  to	
  develop	
  site-­‐specific	
   	
   health	
  risks	
  associated	
  with	
  land	
  use.	
  	
  The	
  most	
   hazard	
  indices	
  to	
  estimate	
  potential	
   common	
  accepted	
  solution	
  for	
  site	
  management	
  currently	
  involves	
  relocation	
  of	
  the	
   contaminated	
  material	
  (BC	
  Ministry	
  of	
  Environment,	
  1996).	
   	
   Excavation	
  and	
  relocation	
  are	
  labour-­‐	
  and	
  cost-­‐intensive.	
  	
  Further,	
  such	
  practices	
  do	
  not	
   remediate	
  the	
  valuable	
  existing	
  soil	
  but	
  rather	
  transport	
  the	
  problem,	
  disrupting	
   ecosystems	
  in	
  the	
  process.	
    	
   1	
   	
    Ideal	
  techniques	
  for	
  contaminant	
  removal	
  should	
  not	
  damage	
  soil	
  structure,	
  compromise	
   existing	
  fertility,	
  or	
  replace	
  native	
  soils	
  with	
  imported	
  fill.	
  Alternative	
  methods	
  for	
  in	
  situ	
   remediation	
  include	
  adding	
  metal-­‐binding	
  chelates	
  and	
  organic	
  matter,	
  increasing	
  soil	
  pH	
   to	
  make	
  metals	
  less	
  available	
  (which	
  may	
  also	
  diminish	
  availability	
  of	
  necessary	
   micronutrients),	
  or	
  sowing	
  plants	
  that	
  accumulate	
  metals	
  in	
  their	
  tissue,	
  either	
  to	
  remove	
   (phytoextraction)	
  or	
  to	
  bind	
  (phytostabilization)	
  the	
  contaminants	
  (Gupta	
  et	
  al.,	
  1996).	
  	
  For	
   water-­‐soluble	
  contaminants,	
  soil	
  can	
  be	
  leached	
  or	
  washed.	
  	
  	
   	
   Provincial	
  standards	
  for	
  trace	
  metal	
  concentrations	
  in	
  soil	
  are	
  given	
  in	
  terms	
  of	
  total	
  as	
   opposed	
  to	
  bioavailable	
  metals;	
  the	
  same	
  is	
  true	
  for	
  commercial	
  laboratory	
  analysis	
   (Iverson	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012).	
  	
  This	
  method	
  does	
  not	
  provide	
  information	
  on	
  the	
  binding	
  strength	
   or	
  solubility	
  of	
  heavy	
  metals,	
  and	
  thus	
  may	
  be	
  an	
  overestimation	
  of	
  the	
  risks	
  posed	
  by	
  soil	
   contaminants	
  to	
  crop	
  plants	
  and	
  human	
  health	
  (Houba	
  et	
  al.,	
  1996).	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   The	
  following	
  research	
  focuses	
  on	
  the	
  determination	
  of	
  a	
  useful	
  and	
  accurate	
  measurement	
   of	
  the	
  plant-­‐available	
  fractions	
  of	
  trace	
  metals	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  and	
  Cu	
  for	
  a	
  number	
  of	
  urban	
   soils	
  in	
  Vancouver,	
  BC.	
  	
  A	
  subsequent	
  study	
  builds	
  on	
  this	
  background	
  information	
  with	
  an	
   investigation	
  of	
  Chenopodium	
  quinoa	
  (quinoa)	
  as	
  a	
  potential	
  plant	
  for	
  phytoextraction	
  in	
   Vancouver,	
  BC.	
  	
   	
   	
    1.2	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Scope	
  and	
  objectives	
    	
    	
   Soil	
  contaminants	
  can	
  be	
  broadly	
  grouped	
  as	
  either	
  organic	
  or	
  inorganic.	
  	
  Organic	
   compounds	
  such	
  as	
  PAHs	
  (polycyclic	
  aromatic	
  hydrocarbons)	
  and	
  PCBs	
  (polychlorinated	
   biphenyls)	
  may	
  break	
  down	
  over	
  a	
  period	
  of	
  weeks	
  or	
  months	
  with	
  focused	
  application	
  of	
   remediation	
  technologies.	
  	
  Trace	
  metal	
  contaminants,	
  on	
  the	
  other	
  hand,	
  cannot	
  be	
  broken	
   down	
  by	
  biological	
  processes	
  and	
  therefore	
  cause	
  a	
  particular	
  environmental	
  pollution	
   problem,	
  as	
  they	
  accumulate	
  in	
  soil	
  over	
  time.	
  	
  Plants	
  may	
  be	
  exposed	
  to	
  trace	
  metal	
   	
   2	
   	
    contaminants	
  either	
  via	
  uptake	
  and	
  accumulation	
  from	
  the	
  soil	
  solution	
  or	
  via	
  atmospheric	
   deposition	
  of	
  contaminants	
  on	
  the	
  leaf	
  surfaces.	
  This	
  paper	
  focuses	
  on	
  the	
  trace	
  metal	
   contaminants	
  in	
  soil,	
  and	
  specifically	
  on	
  trace	
  metal	
  availability	
  and	
  plant	
  uptake	
  in	
  the	
   acidic	
  soils	
  common	
  to	
  Vancouver,	
  British	
  Columbia.	
   	
   The	
  general	
  objectives	
  of	
  this	
  work	
  are	
  to:	
   	
   (1) Determine	
  a	
  useful	
  single	
  extraction	
  method	
  for	
  assessing	
  the	
  bioavailability	
  of	
  trace	
   metals	
  in	
  Vancouver	
  soils,	
   (2) 	
  Compare	
  differences	
  in	
  trace	
  metal	
  plant-­‐availability	
  among	
  urban	
  soils	
  formed	
  on	
   different	
  parent	
  materials,	
  with	
  consideration	
  to	
  pH,	
  organic	
  matter	
  content,	
  and	
   soil	
  texture,	
   (3) 	
  Evaluate	
  Chenopodium	
  quinoa	
  as	
  a	
  potential	
  plant	
  for	
  phytoextraction	
  of	
  trace	
   metals	
  and	
  as	
  an	
  urban	
  specialty	
  crop	
  safe	
  for	
  human	
  consumption	
  through	
   investigation	
  of	
  plant	
  uptake	
  and	
  aboveground	
  partitioning	
  of	
  trace	
  metals	
  from	
  soil,	
   and	
   (4) Review	
  and	
  make	
  recommendations	
  for	
  provincial	
  contamination	
  standards	
  as	
  they	
   relate	
  to	
  site	
  remediation	
  and	
  farming	
  of	
  urban	
  brownfields	
  in	
  Vancouver.	
   	
   	
    1.3  Research	
  plan	
  and	
  organization	
    	
   1.3.1	
   Preliminary	
  case	
  study	
   An	
  initial	
  assessment	
  of	
  8	
  soils	
  from	
  current	
  and	
  future	
  food	
  growing	
  sites	
  around	
   Vancouver,	
  BC	
  was	
  conducted	
  to	
  investigate	
  potential	
  correlations	
  between	
  bioavailability	
   of	
  trace	
  metals	
  in	
  soils	
  of	
  different	
  parent	
  materials.	
  	
  	
  The	
  case	
  study	
  takes	
  into	
  account	
  past	
   and	
  future	
  land	
  use,	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  anthropogenic	
  additions	
  to	
  the	
  soil	
  at	
  each	
  site.	
  	
  Three	
   different	
  soil	
  extraction	
  procedures	
  were	
  considered	
  as	
  measurements	
  of	
  trace	
  metal	
   bioavailability	
  in	
  soil,	
  taking	
  into	
  account	
  the	
  geochemical	
  effects	
  of	
  pH,	
  organic	
  matter,	
  and	
   soil	
  parent	
  material.	
  	
  	
  A	
  review	
  of	
  relevant	
  literature	
  on	
  extraction	
  techniques	
  and	
  soil	
   	
   3	
   	
    factors	
  specific	
  to	
  Vancouver,	
  BC,	
  were	
  used	
  to	
  make	
  recommendations	
  for	
  the	
  adoption	
  of	
   a	
  0.1M	
  HCl	
  extraction	
  procedure	
  as	
  a	
  low-­‐cost,	
  reliable	
  assessment	
  of	
  trace	
  metal	
   availability.	
   	
   The	
  preliminary	
  case	
  study	
  is	
  presented	
  in	
  Chapter	
  2.	
   	
   1.3.2 Phytoextraction	
  pot	
  study	
   The	
  Hastings	
  site	
  from	
  the	
  preliminary	
  case	
  study	
  was	
  chosen	
  for	
  further	
  study	
  based	
  on	
  its	
   moderate	
  trace	
  metal	
  contamination	
  and	
  its	
  unique	
  status	
  as	
  a	
  potential	
  site	
  for	
  expansion	
   of	
  an	
  urban	
  farm.	
  	
  Topsoil	
  was	
  removed	
  from	
  the	
  site	
  for	
  use	
  in	
  a	
  pot	
  study	
  where	
   Chenopodium	
  quinoa	
  was	
  grown	
  both	
  in	
  the	
  original	
  soil	
  and	
  in	
  the	
  original	
  soil	
  spiked	
  with	
   two	
  different	
  amounts	
  of	
  a	
  multi-­‐metal	
  solution.	
  	
  Tissue	
  sampling	
  was	
  used	
  at	
  two	
  stages	
  of	
   growth	
  to	
  determine	
  both	
  the	
  aboveground	
  accumulation	
  of	
  trace	
  metals,	
  which	
  is	
  useful	
   for	
  phytoextraction	
  studies,	
  and	
  the	
  trace	
  metal	
  accumulation	
  in	
  the	
  edible	
  portions	
  of	
  the	
   plant,	
  which	
  is	
  useful	
  for	
  evaluating	
  potential	
  human	
  health	
  risks	
  should	
  this	
  plant	
  be	
   adopted	
  for	
  wider	
  cultivation	
  in	
  urban	
  areas.	
   	
   The	
  phytoextraction	
  study	
  is	
  described	
  in	
  Chapter	
  3.	
   	
    	
    	
    	
   4	
   	
    2	
   Factors	
  affecting	
  trace	
  metal	
  bioavailability	
   in	
  urban	
  soils	
  of	
  Vancouver,	
  British	
  Columbia:	
  A	
   case	
  study	
   	
    2.1	
    Introduction	
    Plant	
  uptake	
  of	
  trace	
  metal	
  contaminants	
  is	
  currently	
  of	
  concern	
  as	
  issues	
  of	
  industrial	
   contamination	
  cause	
  delays	
  in	
  municipal	
  policies	
  dealing	
  with	
  land	
  use	
  changes,	
  zoning,	
   urban	
  agriculture,	
  and	
  public	
  health.	
  	
   	
   	
   2.1.1. Brownfields	
   Vancouver,	
  British	
   Columbia	
  is	
  similar	
  to	
  other	
   North	
  American	
  cities	
   where	
  shifting	
  land-­‐use	
   from	
  industrial	
  and	
   manufacturing	
  to	
    	
    residential	
  and	
  commercial	
   has	
  left	
  numerous	
   brownfields	
  throughout	
  the	
   city.	
  	
  	
  Brownfields	
  are	
   defined	
  as	
  “abandoned,	
    Figure	
  2.1:	
  Brownfield	
  site	
  on	
  E.	
  Hastings	
  Street,	
  Vancouver	
  BC	
    vacant,	
  or	
  underutilized	
   commercial	
  or	
  industrial	
  properties	
  where	
  past	
  actions	
  have	
  resulted	
  in	
  actual	
  or	
  perceived	
   	
   5	
   	
    contamination	
  and	
  where	
  there	
  is	
  an	
  active	
  potential	
  for	
  redevelopment”	
  (BC	
  Brownfield	
   Renewal,	
  2013).	
  	
  As	
  a	
  result	
  of	
  the	
  high	
  costs	
  and	
  subsequent	
  delays	
  associated	
  with	
   traditional	
  remediation	
  practices,	
  managers	
  and	
  owners	
  of	
  brownfields	
  are	
  encouraged	
  to	
   seek	
  citizen	
  engagement	
  in	
  finding	
  interim	
  uses	
  for	
  these	
  parcels	
  (BC	
  Brownfield	
  Renewal,	
   2013).	
  	
  As	
  the	
  City	
  of	
  Vancouver	
  allocates	
  more	
  space	
  for	
  gardens	
  in	
  accordance	
  with	
  the	
   2010	
  Greenest	
  City	
  Action	
  Plan,	
  an	
  issue	
  of	
  increasing	
  concern	
  is	
  whether	
  brownfields	
  are	
   safe	
  sites	
  growing	
  produce	
  in	
  urban	
  farms	
  and	
  community	
  gardens	
  (City	
  of	
  Vancouver,	
   2012b).	
  	
   	
   2.1.2 Trace	
  metal	
  contamination	
   Trace	
  metal	
  contaminants	
  of	
  concern	
  to	
  urban	
  farmers	
  include	
  cadmium,	
  copper,	
   manganese,	
  nickel,	
  zinc,	
  arsenic,	
  and	
  lead,	
  which	
  variously	
  come	
  from	
  paints,	
  fertilizers,	
   batteries,	
  combustion,	
  pesticides,	
  electroplating,	
  preservatives,	
  and	
  other	
  human	
  industrial	
   applications	
  (Kabata-­‐Pendias,	
  2004).	
  	
  	
  Trace	
  metals	
  occur	
  naturally	
  in	
  soils,	
  but	
  usually	
  in	
   much	
  lower	
  concentrations	
   than	
  those	
  resulting	
  from	
   anthropogenic	
   contributions	
  (Craul,	
  1995).	
  	
   Further,	
  pedogenically	
   originated	
  trace	
  metals	
  are	
   often	
  bound	
  tightly	
  to	
   silicates	
  within	
  the	
  soil	
    	
    matrix,	
  rendering	
  them	
   relatively	
  immobile	
  and	
   therefore	
  less	
  likely	
  to	
   move	
  through	
  ecosystems	
   than	
  anthropogenic	
    Figure	
  2.2:	
  Urban	
  soil	
  showing	
  natural	
  and	
  anthropogenic	
  contributions	
    additions	
  	
  (Kabata-­‐Pendias,	
   2004).	
  	
  Plant	
  uptake	
  and	
  groundwater	
  leaching	
  tend	
  to	
  be	
  low,	
  therefore	
  metals	
  persist	
  in	
   	
   6	
   	
    soils	
  for	
  long	
  periods	
  of	
  time,	
  causing	
  a	
  unique	
  environmental	
  problem	
  (Dudka	
  et	
  al.,	
  1996).	
  	
   Potential	
  health	
  risks	
  to	
  humans	
  include	
  cancer,	
  liver	
  and	
  kidney	
  damage,	
  reproductive	
   aberrations,	
  growth	
  effects,	
  neurological	
  and	
  immune	
  disorders	
  (McIntyre,	
  2003;	
  Peralta-­‐ Videa	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009).	
  	
   	
   Pathways	
  of	
  exposure	
  to	
  these	
  contaminants	
  depend	
  on	
  the	
  both	
  the	
  organisms	
  and	
  the	
   ecosystems	
  concerned,	
  and	
  the	
  time	
  of	
  exposure	
  (McLaughlin	
  et.	
  al.,	
  2000).	
  	
  Trace	
  metal	
   contaminants	
  may	
  pollute	
  aquatic	
  systems	
  through	
  leaching	
  of	
  soluble	
  compounds	
  or	
   surface	
  erosion,	
  while	
  volatilization	
  of	
  particles	
  or	
  suspended	
  surface	
  dust	
  may	
  contribute	
   to	
  air	
  pollution.	
  	
  Plants	
  may	
  accumulate	
  trace	
  metal	
  contaminants	
  in	
  the	
  same	
  way	
  that	
   they	
  accumulate	
  essential	
  elements,	
  via	
  uptake	
  from	
  the	
  soil	
  solution.	
  	
  Bioconcentration	
  of	
   metals	
  in	
  tissues	
  of	
  the	
  plants	
  results	
  can	
  result	
  in	
  higher	
  concentrations	
  of	
  contaminants	
  in	
   plants	
  than	
  in	
  the	
  soil	
  (Kirkham,	
  2006).	
   	
   There	
  is	
  particular	
  concern,	
  therefore,	
  for	
  humans	
  consuming	
  vegetables	
  grown	
  in	
  urban	
   soils,	
  especially	
  in	
  urban	
  garden	
  plots	
  where	
  a	
  large	
  proportion	
  of	
  one’s	
  intake	
  may	
  come	
   from	
  the	
  same	
  area	
  of	
  land	
  (DeKimpe	
  &	
  Morel,	
  2000).	
  	
  	
  There	
  are	
  multiple	
  pathways	
  by	
   which	
  metals	
  can	
  contaminate	
  plant	
  tissue,	
  namely	
  through	
  uptake	
  from	
  the	
  soil	
  to	
  edible	
   plant	
  parts,	
  atmospheric	
  deposition	
  of	
  combustion	
  emissions	
  (i.e.	
  roadways,	
  vents)	
  or	
   adhesion	
  of	
  soil	
  particles	
  to	
  roots	
  or	
  leaf	
  surfaces	
  in	
  the	
  form	
  of	
  dust.	
  	
  While	
  accumulation	
   	
   in	
  plant	
  tissue	
  is	
  relatively	
  unlikely	
  for	
  Pb,	
  Cd	
  is	
  a	
  particular	
  concern	
  as	
  it	
  is	
  absorbed	
  from	
   the	
  soil	
  solution	
  and	
  can	
  cause	
  toxicity	
  in	
  relatively	
  low	
  quantities	
  (Dudka	
  et	
  al.,	
  1996).	
   	
   2.1.3 Bioavailability	
  assessment	
   Current	
  government	
  risk	
  assessment	
  standards	
  in	
  British	
  Columbia	
  provide	
  a	
  conservative	
   estimate	
  of	
  short-­‐term	
  risks	
  associated	
  with	
  plant	
  uptake	
  from	
  soil.	
  	
  This	
  is	
  because	
  the	
    	
   7	
   	
    standard	
  values	
  refer	
  to	
  the	
  total1	
  concentrations	
  of	
  trace	
  metals	
  in	
  the	
  soil,	
  which	
   represent	
  a	
  much	
  larger	
  fraction	
  than	
  those	
  relevant	
  for	
  interpreting	
  toxic	
  effects	
  (Houba	
  et	
   al.,	
  2000).	
  	
  In	
  other	
  words,	
  non-­‐reactive	
  forms	
  of	
  elements	
  in	
  the	
  soil	
  are	
  considered	
  just	
  as	
   hazardous	
  as	
  reactive	
  ones	
  (Sauvé	
  et	
  al.,	
  1996).	
  	
  These	
  ‘total’	
  values	
  are	
  useful	
  for	
   evaluating	
  long-­‐term	
  remediation	
  needs	
  as	
  they	
  represent	
  the	
  maximum	
  possible	
   environmental	
  contamination,	
  however	
  they	
  are	
  considered	
  excessively	
  conservative	
  for	
   short-­‐term	
  assessments	
  of	
  agricultural	
  risk	
  (Rao	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  	
   	
   ‘Bioavailable’	
  elements	
  are	
  easily	
  mobilizable	
  in	
  the	
  soil	
  solution,	
  and	
  therefore	
  available	
   for	
  plant	
  uptake	
  (Houba	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000).	
  	
  The	
  bioavailable	
  fraction	
  of	
  metals	
  in	
  soil	
  is	
   impossible	
  to	
  determine	
  as	
  a	
  fixed	
  concentration,	
  as	
  availability	
  is	
  subject	
  to	
  a	
  multitude	
  of	
   constantly	
  changing	
  soil	
  factors.	
  	
  These	
  include	
  cation	
  exchange	
  capacity	
  (CEC),	
  pH,	
  redox	
   potential,	
  organic	
  matter,	
  moisture,	
  and	
  texture	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  the	
  species	
  of	
  plant	
  and	
  metal	
   concerned	
  (Kabata-­‐Pendias,	
  2004).	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   2.1.4 Evaluation	
  of	
  single-­‐extraction	
  procedures	
   It	
  has	
  been	
  widely	
  recommended	
  by	
  researchers	
  that	
  soil	
  contamination	
  guidelines	
  used	
  by	
   governments	
  be	
  based	
  on	
  the	
  soil	
  metal	
  pool	
  that	
  actually	
  may	
  become	
  bioavailable,	
  rather	
   than	
  the	
  total	
  pool	
  (Sauvé	
  et	
  al.,	
  1996).	
  It	
  is	
  thus	
  important	
  to	
  have	
  an	
  understanding	
  both	
   of	
  the	
  pools	
  and	
  chemical	
  forms	
  of	
  elements	
  in	
  the	
  soil,	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  the	
  conditions	
  that	
  will	
   	
   subsequent	
  toxicity	
  to	
  plants	
  is	
  variable	
  by	
  element	
   affect	
  mobilization,	
  availability,	
  and	
   and	
  type	
  (MacNicol	
  &	
  Beckett,	
  1985).	
  	
  The	
  generally	
  accepted	
  idea	
  that	
  metal	
   phytoavailability	
  is	
  related	
  to	
  free	
  ion	
  activity	
  of	
  the	
  metal	
  in	
  the	
  soil	
  solution	
  has	
  been	
   challenged	
  in	
  the	
  last	
  decade	
  by	
  research	
  showing	
  that	
  metal-­‐organic	
  complexes,	
  changes	
   in	
  specific	
  metal	
  speciation	
  and	
  soil	
  types,	
  and	
  inorganic	
  functional	
  groups	
  can	
  increase	
  the	
   plant-­‐availability	
  of	
  trace	
  metals	
  in	
  soil	
  (Huang	
  et	
  al.,	
  1997;	
  McLaughlin	
  et	
  al.,	
  1997).	
  	
  	
   McLaughlin	
  et	
  al.	
  (2000)	
  point	
  out	
  that	
  just	
  as	
  agricultural	
  soil	
  nutrient	
  analyses	
  may	
  use	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   1	
  The	
  term	
  ‘pseudototal’	
  would	
  be	
  more	
  accurate	
  –	
  these	
  values	
  do	
  not	
  reflect	
  those	
  trace	
  metals	
  bound	
  in	
    	
   8	
   	
    one	
  of	
  a	
  number	
  of	
  extractants	
  based	
  on	
  soil	
  type,	
  cropping	
  plans,	
  and	
  environmental	
   conditions,	
  to	
  evaluate	
  nutrients	
  ‘available’	
  for	
  crop	
  plants,	
  so	
  should	
  risk	
  assessment	
  for	
   environmental	
  hazard	
  use	
  extraction	
  procedures	
  that	
  are	
  relevant	
  for	
  food	
  chain	
  and	
   ecosystem	
  effects.	
  	
  	
   	
   Selective	
  extraction	
  methods	
  can	
  be	
  used	
  to	
  target	
  soil	
  phases	
  or	
  compounds	
  bound	
  to	
   particular	
  exchange	
  sites	
  and	
  provide	
  site-­‐specific	
  information	
  for	
  assessing	
  effects	
  based	
   on	
  metal	
  species	
  mobility,	
  designated	
  land	
  use,	
  and	
  soil	
  type	
  (Rao	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  	
  The	
   frequently	
  used	
  five-­‐step	
  sequential	
  extraction	
  method	
  identifies	
  five	
  ‘pools’	
  of	
  elements	
  in	
   the	
  soil	
  matrix	
  in	
  the	
  order	
  of	
  their	
  binding	
  strength	
  and	
  subsequent	
  availability.	
  	
  These	
   are:	
  (1)	
  exchangeable,	
  (2)	
  bound	
  to	
  carbonates,	
  (3)	
  bound	
  to	
  Fe-­‐	
  and	
  Mn-­‐oxides,	
  (4)	
   oxidizable,	
  and	
  (5)	
  residual	
  (Peijnenburg	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007;	
  Tessier	
  et	
  al.,	
  1979).	
  	
  The	
  single	
   extraction	
  procedures	
  discussed	
  in	
  this	
  paper,	
  0.01M	
  CaCl2,	
  0.1M	
  HCl,	
  and	
  aqua	
  regia,	
   address	
  trace	
  metals	
  bound	
  in	
  phases	
  (1),	
  (3),	
  and	
  (4),	
  respectively.	
  	
  	
   Table	
  2.1:	
  Selective	
  extraction	
  methods	
  and	
  target	
  soil	
  fractions	
    Extraction	
  method	
   Target	
  Fraction	
   Aqua	
  regia	
    References	
    Mn	
  or	
  Fe	
  oxide	
  bound	
   (Peijnenburg	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007,	
  Tessier	
  et	
   al.,	
  1979)	
    	
    0.1M	
  HCl	
    Oxidizable	
    (Kashem	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007)	
    0.01M	
  CaCl2	
    Water-­‐soluble	
    (Houba	
  et	
  al.,	
  1996,	
  2000)	
    	
    Aqua	
  regia	
  is	
  a	
  concentrated	
  strong	
  acid	
  that	
  provides	
  an	
  estimate	
  of	
  the	
  ‘total,’	
  or	
  non-­‐ residual	
  fraction	
  of	
  elements	
  in	
  soil.	
  	
  This	
  is	
  the	
  extraction	
  procedure	
  used	
  for	
   contaminated	
  site	
  risk	
  standards	
  in	
  Canada	
  and	
  most	
  other	
  countries.	
  	
  Strong	
  acid	
   extractions	
  access	
  elements	
  tightly	
  bound	
  within	
  the	
  soil	
  matrix.	
  	
  The	
  resulting	
  high	
   concentration	
  values	
  are	
  not	
  useful	
  for	
  evaluating	
  the	
  immediate	
  environmental	
   availability	
  of	
  trace	
  metal	
  contaminants.	
  	
  This	
  extraction	
  was	
  therefore	
  used	
  for	
  this	
  study	
   	
   9	
   	
    only	
  to	
  provide	
  a	
  benchmark	
  for	
  comparing	
  values	
  to	
  those	
  used	
  in	
  the	
  BC	
  Contaminated	
   Sites	
  Regulation	
  (2012).	
  	
  	
   	
   A	
  number	
  of	
  authors	
  have	
  suggested	
  that	
  neutral	
  salt	
  extraction	
  using	
  0.01	
  CaCl2	
  or	
  0.1M	
   NaNO4	
  provides	
  the	
  most	
  accurate	
  assessment	
  of	
  ion	
  activity	
  and	
  mobilizable	
  trace	
  metals	
   in	
  the	
  soil	
  solution	
  (Gupta	
  et	
  al.,	
  1996;	
  Houba	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000).	
  	
  These	
  procedures	
  are	
  most	
   often	
  used	
  in	
  Sweden	
  and	
  the	
  Netherlands,	
  where	
  neutral	
  pH	
  and	
  redox	
  potential	
  render	
   these	
  oxides	
  more	
  stable;	
  consequently,	
  metals	
  bound	
  to	
  them	
  are	
  unlikely	
  to	
  become	
   available	
  (Kabata-­‐	
  Pendias,	
  2004).	
  	
  	
   	
   In	
  Vancouver,	
  British	
  Columbia,	
  where	
  soil	
  acidity	
  and	
  oxidizing	
  conditions	
  contribute	
  to	
   ion	
  exchange	
  and	
  metal	
  activity,	
  Fe-­‐,	
  Al-­‐,	
  and	
  Mn-­‐oxides	
  are	
  more	
  prevalent	
  and	
  thus	
  0.1M	
   HCl	
  is	
  considered	
  more	
  suitable	
  for	
  this	
  assessment	
  (Smith	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  	
  A	
  dilute	
  strong	
   acid,	
  0.1M	
  HCl	
  can	
  be	
  used	
  to	
  estimate	
  that	
  portion	
  of	
  minerals	
  bound	
  in	
  Mn-­‐	
  and	
  Al-­‐oxides	
   that	
  may	
  become	
  available	
  through	
  natural	
  weathering	
  and	
  decomposition	
  processes.	
  	
  It	
  is	
   used	
  here	
  to	
  refer	
  to	
  the	
  ‘plant-­‐available’	
  fraction	
  of	
  minerals	
  in	
  soil.	
  	
  This	
  is	
  a	
  relatively	
   low-­‐cost	
  extraction	
  procedure	
  often	
  used	
  in	
  site	
  specific	
  assessments	
  when	
  remediation	
   costs	
  are	
  limiting,	
  and	
  is	
  useful	
  for	
  the	
  extraction	
  of	
  metals	
  sorbed	
  to	
  Mn-­‐	
  or	
  Fe-­‐oxides	
   (McLaughlin	
  et.	
  al.,	
  2000;	
  Rao	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  	
   	
    	
    2.1.5 Soil	
  factors	
  affecting	
  trace	
  metal	
  availability	
   This	
  paper	
  focuses	
  on	
  organic	
  matter	
  content,	
  pH,	
  and	
  soil	
  parent	
  material	
  as	
  three	
  of	
  the	
   main	
  factors	
  affecting	
  plant-­‐availability	
  of	
  trace	
  metals	
  in	
  soil	
  (McBride	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009).	
  	
  Trace	
   metals	
  are	
  more	
  mobile	
  in	
  acidic	
  soils	
  where	
  H+	
  competition	
  results	
  in	
  metal	
  desorption	
   from	
  negatively	
  charged	
  binding	
  sites	
  along	
  clay	
  edges	
  (Lasat,	
  2000).	
  	
  Binding	
  and	
  sorption	
   with	
  carboxyl	
  groups	
  present	
  in	
  organic	
  matter	
  limits	
  the	
  mobility	
  of	
  trace	
  metals	
  (Dube	
  et	
   al.,	
  2001).	
  	
  	
  Parent	
  material	
  may	
  also	
  affect	
  the	
  clay	
  fraction	
  of	
  soil,	
  which	
  influences	
  the	
   	
   10	
   	
    plant-­‐availability	
  of	
  Ni,	
  Cd,	
  Cu,	
  Zn	
  and	
  Pb.	
  	
  	
  The	
  negatively	
  charged	
  clay	
  layers	
  in	
  the	
   inorganic	
  colloidal	
  fraction	
  soil	
  fraction	
  create	
  a	
  ‘sink’	
  for	
  trace	
  metals,	
  which	
  are	
   immobilized	
  through	
  adsorption	
  and	
  exchange	
  with	
  hydrous	
  Mn	
  and	
  Fe	
  oxide	
  polymer	
   chains	
  (Rao	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007,	
  Kabata-­‐Pendias	
  2004,	
  McLaughlin	
  et.	
  al.,	
  2000).	
  	
  	
  Vancouver	
  has	
   podzolic	
  soils	
  rich	
  in	
  Al,	
  Fe,	
  and	
  Mn,	
  and	
  leaching	
  during	
  the	
  rainy	
  winter	
  months	
  increases	
   acidity	
  (Iverson	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012).	
  	
  The	
  consequent	
  oxidizing	
  conditions	
  and	
  high	
  CEC	
  therefore	
   provide	
  adsorption	
  sites	
  for	
  the	
  binding	
  and	
  immobilization	
  of	
  trace	
  metals	
  (McLaughlin	
  et.	
   al.,	
  2000).	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Iverson	
  et	
  al.’s	
  (2012)	
  urban	
  soil	
  map	
  of	
  Vancouver	
  shows	
  that	
  the	
  soils	
  in	
  Vancouver	
  are	
   formed	
  on	
  glacial	
  till,	
  glacial	
  marine	
  till,	
  and	
  marine	
  parent	
  materials	
  rich	
  in	
  Mn,	
  Fe,	
  and	
  Al.	
  	
   Alluminosilicate	
  clays	
  formed	
  by	
  weathering	
  of	
  chlorite	
  parent	
  material	
  provide	
   opportunities	
  for	
  trace	
  metal	
  cations	
  to	
  adsorb	
  to	
  oxygen	
  or	
  hydroxide	
  anions	
  through	
   isomorphic	
  substitution	
  of	
  Al,	
  Mg,	
  or	
  Si	
  ions	
  (Dube	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001).	
  	
  	
  Manganese	
  is	
  prevalent	
  in	
   marine	
  environments	
  and	
  therefore	
  is	
  abundant	
  in	
  soils	
  formed	
  on	
  highly	
  weathered	
   marine	
  deposits.	
  	
  	
  Because	
  it	
   does	
  not	
  occur	
  as	
  the	
  free	
  metal,	
   Mn	
  forms	
  hydrous	
  oxides	
   within	
  the	
  clay	
  minerals,	
  where	
   it	
  moves	
  easily	
  among	
  oxidation	
   states.	
  	
  In	
  soils	
  with	
  pH	
  above	
   	
    6.0,	
  Mn	
  will	
  bond	
  with	
  organic	
   matter,	
  becoming	
  less	
  mobile,	
   but	
  in	
  soils	
  with	
  low	
  pH	
  and	
  low	
    Figure	
  2.3:	
  Map	
  of	
  soil	
  parent	
  materials	
  in	
  Vancouver,	
  BC	
   (Iverson	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012)	
    redox	
  potential,	
  Mn	
  is	
  highly	
   reactive.	
  	
  In	
  the	
  oxidizing	
    environments	
  common	
  for	
  Vancouver	
  soils,	
  Mn	
  exchangeability	
  has	
  a	
  major	
  effect	
  on	
  ion	
   activity	
  of	
  other	
  metals	
  (Nádaská	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   11	
   	
    2.2 Objectives	
   This	
  paper	
  presents	
  an	
  assessment	
  case	
  study	
  of	
  8	
  different	
  urban	
  agriculture	
  sites	
  in	
   Vancouver,	
  British	
  Columbia.	
  	
  	
  Estimates	
  of	
  total	
  and	
  bioavailable	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  and	
  Cu	
  for	
   each	
  site	
  were	
  determined	
  using	
  three	
  single	
  extraction	
  procedures.	
  	
  Results	
  were	
   compared	
  among	
  sites	
  and	
  with	
  BC	
  provincial	
  guidelines	
  for	
  contaminated	
  sites.	
  	
  The	
   differences	
  in	
  extraction	
  procedures	
  are	
  compared	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  the	
  geochemical	
  effects	
  of	
  pH,	
   organic	
  matter,	
  and	
  soil	
  parent	
  material	
  on	
  bioavailability	
  of	
  trace	
  metal	
  contaminants	
  in	
   soil.	
  	
  The	
  primary	
  objectives	
  of	
  this	
  study	
  were:	
   	
   (1) To	
  compare	
  the	
  total,	
  Fe-­‐	
  and	
  Mn-­‐	
  oxide	
  bound,	
  and	
  free	
  ion	
  metal	
   concentrations	
  of	
  8	
  different	
  urban	
  soils	
  in	
  Vancouver,	
  British	
  Columbia,	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   (2) To	
  recommend	
  the	
  addition	
  of	
  bioavailability	
  estimates	
  for	
  contaminated	
  sites	
   risk	
  assessments,	
   	
   (3) To	
  evaluate	
  geochemical	
  effects	
  of	
  soil	
  parent	
  material	
  on	
  bioavailability	
  of	
  trace	
   metals	
  in	
  urban	
  soils,	
  and	
   	
   (4) To	
  discuss	
  the	
  influence	
  of	
  pH	
  and	
  organic	
  matter	
  on	
  trace	
  metal	
  availability	
  in	
   soil.	
   	
    	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   12	
   	
    2.3 Materials	
  and	
  methods	
   Eight	
  sites	
  representing	
  a	
  range	
  of	
  parent	
  materials,	
  management	
  characteristics,	
  and	
   geographic	
  locations	
  were	
   sampled	
  within	
  the	
  city	
  of	
   Vancouver	
  based	
  on	
  their	
   status	
  either	
  as	
  current	
  or	
   planned	
  food-­‐producing	
   areas	
  [Figure	
  2.4].	
  	
  The	
  sites	
   included	
  three	
  community	
   gardens	
  (Pine,	
  60th	
  &	
  E.	
  Blvd,	
   and	
  16	
  Oaks),	
  two	
  urban	
   farms	
  (41st	
  &	
  Blenheim	
  and	
   UBC	
  Farm),	
  and	
  three	
  sites	
   where	
  garden	
  development	
   is	
  planned	
  but	
  has	
  not	
  yet	
    Figure	
  2.4	
  Map	
  showing	
  sampled	
  sites	
    begun	
  (Hastings,	
  Vernon,	
  and	
   UBC).	
  	
  This	
  case	
  study	
  demonstrates	
  several	
  methods	
  of	
  site	
  assessment	
  for	
  interpreting	
   trace	
  metal	
  bioavailability	
  for	
  urban	
  agriculture	
  in	
  Vancouver,	
  British	
  Columbia.	
   	
   2.3.1 Sampling	
  strategy	
   	
   The	
  subjective	
  random	
  sampling	
  used	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  is	
  recommended	
  for	
  urban	
  and	
   industrially	
  contaminated	
  sites	
  where	
  past	
  or	
  current	
  land	
  use	
  can	
  be	
  used	
  to	
  as	
  a	
  guide	
  for	
   choosing	
  representative	
  sampling	
  locations	
  (Rao	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  	
  At	
  each	
  site,	
  2x2m	
  quadrats	
   with	
  no	
  visible	
  soil	
  additions	
  (i.e.	
  compost	
  or	
  infill)	
  were	
  subjectively	
  chosen	
  in	
  an	
  effort	
  to	
   obtain	
  samples	
  that	
  accurately	
  represented	
  the	
  original	
  or	
  ‘native’	
  soil.	
  	
  	
  Six	
  soil	
  cores	
  to	
  a	
   depth	
  of	
  15cm	
  were	
  taken	
  from	
  random	
  points	
  within	
  each	
  sampling	
  quadrat,	
  and	
  mixed	
  in	
   a	
  clean	
  plastic	
  bucket.	
  	
  Composite	
  samples	
  were	
  air	
  dried	
  and	
  passed	
  through	
  a	
  2mm	
  sieve	
   for	
  analysis.	
   	
   13	
   	
    	
   2.3.2 Assessment	
  parameters	
   2.3.2.1 Organic	
  matter	
   Percent	
  organic	
  matter	
  was	
  estimated	
  using	
  the	
  loss-­‐on-­‐ignition	
  method	
  (Ball,	
  1964).	
  	
  Five	
  	
   grams	
  of	
  each	
  sample	
  was	
  dried	
  at	
  105°	
  C,	
  weighed,	
  then	
  heated	
  overnight	
  at	
  350°	
  C.	
  	
  The	
   ratio	
  of	
  change	
  in	
  mass	
  to	
  original	
  mass	
  represents	
  the	
  percent	
  organic	
  matter	
  removed	
   through	
  ignition	
  of	
  carbonaceous	
  material.	
   	
   2.3.2.2 Electroconductivity	
   Electrical	
  conductivity	
  was	
  measured	
  at	
  1.5	
  µMHO	
  scale	
  using	
  a	
  solution	
  of	
  0.01M	
  KCl	
  as	
   standard	
  and	
  a	
  1:2	
  soil	
  to	
  water	
  ratio	
  (Miller	
  &	
  Curtin,	
  1993.)	
  	
  	
   	
   2.3.2.3 pH	
   A	
  pH	
  meter	
  was	
  used	
  to	
  measure	
  soil	
  acidity	
  in	
  deionized	
  H2O	
  and	
  in	
  0.01M	
  CaCl2	
  at	
  a	
  ratio	
   of	
  10g	
  soil	
  per	
  20	
  mL	
  solution	
  (Hendershot	
  et	
  al.,	
  1993).	
   	
   2.3.2.4 Texture	
   Soil	
  texture	
  was	
  determined	
  by	
  hand	
  texturing	
  (USDA,	
  2001).	
   	
   	
   2.3.2.5 Aqua	
  regia	
  extraction	
   Soil	
  samples	
  previously	
  heated	
  at	
  350° C	
  and	
  weighing	
  0.5g	
  were	
  treated	
  with	
  15mL	
  of	
  1M	
   HNO3:	
  3M	
  HCl	
  (aqua	
  regia)	
  solution,	
  heated	
  to	
  dryness,	
  and	
  made	
  to	
  100	
  mL	
  volume	
  with	
   0.2M	
  HNO3.	
  	
  The	
  solution	
  was	
  then	
  passed	
  through	
  Whatman	
  #42	
  filter	
  paper.	
  	
  Samples	
   were	
  analyzed	
  for	
  metals	
  with	
  a	
  Varian	
  Inductively	
  Coupled	
  Plasma	
  Optical	
  Emission	
   Spectrometer	
  (ICP-­‐OES).	
    	
   14	
   	
    2.3.2.6 	
  0.1M	
  HCl	
  extraction	
   A	
  0.1M	
  HCl	
  solution	
  was	
  added	
  to	
  5g	
  of	
  sample,	
  shaken	
  for	
  4	
  hours	
  on	
  a	
  reciprocal	
  shaker	
   at	
  60	
  cycles	
  per	
  minute	
  and	
  covered	
  for	
  approximately	
  10	
  hours	
  before	
  passing	
  the	
   supernatant	
  solution	
  through	
  Whatman	
  #42	
  filter	
  paper	
  and	
  adding	
  0.1M	
  HNO3	
  to	
  a	
   volume	
  of	
  50mL	
  (Chen	
  &	
  Ma,	
  2001).	
  	
  Solutions	
  were	
  analyzed	
  by	
  ICP-­‐OES.	
   	
   2.3.2.7 	
  0.01M	
  CaCl2	
  extraction	
   Dry	
  soil	
  weighing	
  10g	
  per	
  sample	
  was	
  added	
  to	
  100	
  mL	
  0.01CaCl2	
  in	
  250	
  mL	
  polythene	
   bottles	
  and	
  shaken	
  for	
  2	
  hours	
  on	
  a	
  reciprocal	
  shaker.	
  	
  After	
  shaking	
  60mL	
  of	
  the	
   suspension	
  was	
  subjected	
  to	
  centrifugation	
  for	
  10	
  minutes	
  at	
  1800	
  relative	
  centrifugal	
   force	
  (RCF).	
  	
  10mL	
  per	
  sample	
  of	
  the	
  supernatant	
  was	
  transferred	
  to	
  a	
  test	
  tube	
  and	
   acidified	
  with	
  0.1mL	
  1M	
  HCl	
  (Houba	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000).	
  	
  Solutions	
  were	
  analyzed	
  by	
  ICP-­‐OES.	
   	
   2.3.3 Statistical	
  analysis	
   Linear	
  regression	
  analysis,	
  ANOVA,	
  and	
  Student’s	
  t-­‐tests	
  were	
  performed	
  for	
  statistical	
   analysis	
  using	
  JMP	
  10.0	
  statistical	
  software	
  to	
  test	
  the	
  following	
  hypotheses:	
   H0:	
  	
  There	
  is	
  no	
  difference	
  in	
  concentrations	
  of	
  0.1M	
  HCl-­‐extractable	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
   Pb,	
  Ni,	
  or	
  Cu	
  among	
  soils	
  formed	
  on	
  different	
  parent	
  materials.	
   	
   H0:	
  	
  There	
  is	
  no	
  difference	
  between	
  aqua	
  regia,	
  0.1	
  M	
  HCl,	
  and	
  0.02	
  CaCl2	
   extractions	
  for	
  estimating	
   bioavailability	
  of	
  trace	
  metals	
  in	
  Vancouver,	
  British	
   	
   Columbia.	
   	
   H0:	
  	
  There	
  is	
  no	
  correlation	
  between	
  aqua	
  regia	
  and	
  0.1M	
  HCl	
  	
   concentrations	
  of	
  trace	
  metals	
  at	
  the	
  sampled	
  sites.	
   	
    	
   15	
   	
    2.4 Results	
  and	
  discussion	
   2.4.1 Total	
  concentrations	
   Aqua	
  regia-­‐derived	
  trace	
  metal	
  concentrations	
  at	
  each	
  site	
  were	
  compared	
  with	
  the	
  BC	
   Ministry	
  of	
  Environment	
  guidelines	
  for	
  risk	
  assessment	
  of	
  contaminated	
  sites	
   (Contaminated	
  Sites	
  Regulation,	
  2011).	
  Of	
  the	
  sites	
  studied,	
  16	
  Oaks	
  and	
  Hastings	
  were	
  in	
   excess	
  of	
  these	
  values	
  for	
  Cu,	
  Pb,	
  and	
  Zn.	
  	
  Pine,	
  60th	
  &	
  E.	
  Blvd.,	
  and	
  41st	
  &	
  Blenheim	
  were	
  in	
   excess	
  of	
  these	
  values	
  for	
  Pb	
  and	
  Zn	
  only.	
  	
  Non-­‐significant	
  differences	
  in	
  total	
   concentrations	
  of	
  Zn,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  and	
  Cu	
  among	
  sites	
  and	
  among	
  parent	
  material	
  groups	
  suggest	
   similar	
  patterns	
  of	
  anthropogenic	
  contribution.	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    sites	
  as	
  well	
  as	
   among	
  parent	
    Cd	
    parent	
  material	
   in	
  the	
  urban	
   environment	
    76.5	
  	
    88.4	
  	
    117	
  	
    184	
    119	
    ±	
 599	
    ±	
 6.85	
    ±	
  4.32	
    ±	
  44.3	
    ±	
  16.8	
    ±	
  12.3	
    nd	
    nd	
    nd	
    nd	
    nd	
    nd	
    208	
  	
    124	
  	
    185	
    56.6	
  	
    75.3	
  	
    69.2	
  	
    105	
  	
    159	
  	
    ±	
  44.7	
    ±	
  34.5	
    	
  ±	
  28.6	
    ±	
  7.52	
    ±	
  6.08	
    ±	
 33.6	
    ±	
  7.92	
    ±	
  12.3	
    35.2	
  	
    37.7	
   	
   	
    26.3	
  	
    12.3	
  	
    35.5	
  	
    27.8	
  	
    11.6	
  	
    30.6	
  	
    ±	
  8.21	
    ±	
  22.8	
    ±	
  5.91	
    ±	
  3.09	
    ±	
  12.5	
    ±	
  3.05	
    ±	
  2.06	
    ±	
  10.9	
    482	
  	
    78.9	
  	
    127	
  	
    34.5	
  	
    40.9	
  	
    38.6	
  	
    68.5	
  	
    66.8	
  	
    ±	
 315	
    ±	
  19.7	
    ±	
  46.1	
    ±	
  5.44	
    ±	
  1.74	
    ±	
  13.3	
    M  279	
  	
    484	
  	
    490	
  	
    219	
  	
    249	
  	
    377	
  	
    885	
  	
    459	
  	
    n	
    ±	
  45.9	
    ±	
  143	
    ±	
  84.8	
    ±	
  63.3	
    ±	
  6.06	
    ±	
  55.0	
    ±	
  46.1	
    ±	
  25.9	
    Pb	
   Ni	
   Cu	
    BC	
   Standards	
    41st	
  &	
   Blenheim	
    ±	
 105	
   ±	
  63.7	
    887	
    nd	
    supporting	
  the	
   hypothesis	
  that	
    237	
  	
    	
    nd	
    material	
   groups,	
    419	
  	
    60th	
  &	
  	
  E.	
   Blvd.	
    0.05)	
  among	
    Zn	
    Vernon	
    different	
  (p	
  <	
    UBC	
   Campus	
    significantly	
    UBC	
  Farm	
    were	
    	
    16	
  Oaks	
    of	
  Mn	
  and	
  Fe	
    	
    Pine	
    concentrations	
   	
    Hastings	
    Mean	
  total	
    Table	
  2.2:	
  Mean	
  total	
  concentrations	
  (mg	
  kg-­‐1)	
  of	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  Cu	
  &	
  Mn	
  (±	
  SE)	
  at	
   	
   selected	
  sites	
  compared	
  with	
  BC	
  standards	
  for	
  agricultural	
  use	
  	
  (nd=not	
  detected)	
    150	
   1.5	
   100	
   100	
   90	
    ±	
 2.52	
   ±	
 11.5	
    N/A	
    influences	
  the	
  concentrations	
  in	
  the	
  surface	
  layers	
  (Rao	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007,	
  Kabata-­‐Pendias,	
  2004)	
   [Appendix	
  A-­‐1	
  &	
  A-­‐2].	
  	
  Total	
  concentrations	
  of	
  Pb	
  were	
  significantly	
  higher	
  at	
  those	
  sites	
   	
   16	
   	
    with	
  marine	
  or	
  glacial	
  marine	
  parent	
  material.	
  	
  However,	
  as	
  Pb	
  is	
  rarely	
  observed	
  in	
  high	
   concentrations	
  in	
  the	
  natural	
  environment	
  this	
  is	
  more	
  likely	
  a	
  consequence	
  of	
  greater	
   anthropogenic	
  activity	
  in	
  those	
  areas	
  than	
  of	
  parent	
  material	
  effects	
  (Table	
  2.2).	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   2.4.2 ‘Available’	
  concentrations	
   	
  ‘Available’	
  trace	
  metal	
  concentrations	
  (determined	
  by	
  0.1M	
  HCl	
  extraction)	
  were	
   correlated	
  with	
  total	
  concentrations	
  for	
  Fe,	
  Mn,	
  and	
  Cu,	
  but	
  were	
  not	
  correlated	
  with	
  total	
   concentrations	
  for	
  other	
  tested	
  elements	
  [Appendix	
  A-­‐3].	
  	
  These	
  results	
  support	
  Rao	
  et	
  al.’s	
   (2007)	
  statement	
  that	
  aqua	
  regia	
  is	
  a	
  poor	
  predictor	
  of	
  the	
  mobilizable	
  forms,	
  and	
   therefore	
  the	
  environmental	
  impact,	
  of	
  trace	
  metal	
  contaminants	
  in	
  soils.	
  	
  There	
  were	
   stronger	
  correlations	
  between	
  total	
  and	
  available	
  concentrations	
  of	
  essential	
  plant	
   minerals	
  K,	
  Mg,	
  and	
  Ca,	
  which	
  are	
  bound	
  to	
  a	
  more	
  easily	
  extractable	
  fraction	
  of	
  the	
  soil	
   matrix.	
  	
  	
  Concentrations	
  of	
  elements	
  extracted	
  with	
  the	
  0.01M	
  CaCl2	
  had	
  values	
  for	
  essential	
   elements	
  K,	
  P,	
  Mg,	
  and	
  Ca	
  that	
  were	
  roughly	
  commensurate	
  with	
  available	
  nutrient	
  levels	
  in	
   the	
  region	
  (Marx	
  et	
  al.,	
  1999)	
  [Appendix	
  C-­‐2].	
  	
  Mn,	
  however,	
  is	
  not	
  present	
  as	
  the	
  free	
  metal	
   in	
  the	
  soil	
  solution,	
  and	
  therefore	
  the	
  0.01M	
  CaCl2	
  extraction	
  is	
  insufficient	
  for	
  providing	
  an	
   estimate	
  of	
  those	
  metals	
  sorbed	
  to	
  Mn-­‐oxides	
  that	
  may	
  become	
  available	
  through	
   decomposition	
  (Nádaská	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  The	
  0.1M	
  HCl	
  extraction	
  was	
  therefore	
  considered	
   more	
  useful	
  for	
  evaluating	
  potential	
  trace	
  metal	
  risks	
  in	
  Vancouver	
  soils.	
  	
  	
   	
    	
    Based	
  on	
  the	
  dynamic	
  properties	
  of	
  Fe	
  and	
  Mn-­‐oxide	
  bonds,	
  it	
  is	
  suggested	
  that	
  a	
  0.1M	
  HCl	
   extraction	
  be	
  as	
  a	
  rapid	
  assessment	
  for	
  evaluating	
  potentially	
  mobilizable	
  trace	
  metal	
   contaminants	
  in	
  Vancouver,	
  BC.	
  	
  Mn,	
  Fe,	
  and	
  Al	
  form	
  hydrous	
  oxides	
  that	
  bind	
  heavy	
  metals	
   through	
  adsorption,	
  ion	
  exchange,	
  surface	
  complex	
  formation,	
  and	
  co-­‐precipitation	
   (McLaughlin	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000;	
  Rao	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  	
  	
  Of	
  the	
  soils	
  tested,	
  those	
  high	
  in	
  total	
  Mn	
  and	
  Al	
   had	
  lower	
  levels	
  of	
  available	
  heavy	
  metals,	
  particularly	
  when	
  parent	
  material	
  consisted	
  of	
   marine	
  origin	
  (Figure	
  2.5).	
  	
  Total	
  levels	
  of	
  Fe	
  showed	
  significant	
  negative	
  correlations	
  with	
   	
   17	
   	
    the	
  percent	
  of	
  available	
  Cu,	
  Ni,	
  and	
  Zn,	
  while	
  the	
  levels	
  of	
  Fe	
  extractable	
  by	
  0.1M	
  HCl	
  were	
   positively	
  correlated	
  with	
  the	
  percent	
  available	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  and	
  Cu	
  [Appendix	
  A-­‐3].	
  These	
   correlations	
  may	
  be	
  stronger	
  in	
  soils	
  with	
  marine	
  till	
  parent	
  material	
  because	
  Mn	
  is	
  more	
   prevalent	
  in	
  the	
  marine	
  environment.	
  	
   	
   2.4.3 Influence	
  of	
  parent	
  material	
   Using	
  Iverson	
  et	
  al.’s	
  (2012)	
  map	
  [Figure	
  2.3],	
  samples	
  were	
  grouped	
  by	
  parent	
  material	
  to	
   evaluate	
  geochemical	
  effects	
  of	
  clay	
  minerals	
  (including	
  Mn-­‐	
  and	
  Fe-­‐oxides)	
  on	
  trace	
  metal	
   availability.	
  	
  As	
  urban	
  soils	
  rarely	
  exhibit	
  the	
  type	
  of	
  layered	
  profile	
  common	
  for	
  natural	
   soils,	
  it	
  is	
  more	
  likely	
  that	
  mixing	
  of	
  parent	
  material	
  and	
  anthropogenic	
  soil	
  additions	
  may	
   occur,	
  resulting	
  in	
  a	
  surface	
  layer	
  often	
  as	
  deep	
  as	
  50cm	
  (DeKimpe	
  &	
  Morel,	
  2000,	
  Rao	
  et	
   al.,	
  2007).	
  	
  The	
  assumption	
  that	
  parent	
  material	
  was	
  incorporated	
  into	
  the	
  top	
  15cm	
  of	
  the	
   soils	
  sampled	
  is	
  supported	
  by	
  significant	
  differences	
  in	
  available	
  trace	
  metal	
  concentrations	
   among	
  sites	
  reflecting	
  different	
  parent	
  materials.	
  	
  Student’s	
  t-­‐test	
  was	
  applied	
  to	
  mean	
   concentrations	
  of	
  0.1M	
  HCl	
  extractable	
  metals,	
  revealing	
  significantly	
  higher	
   concentrations	
  of	
  HCl-­‐extractable	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  Fe,	
  and	
  Cu	
  in	
  the	
  sites	
  with	
  marine	
  parent	
  material	
   than	
  in	
  those	
  with	
  glacial	
  till	
  parent	
  material	
  [Appendices	
  A-­‐4	
  -­‐A-­‐7].	
  	
  This	
  is	
  likely	
  due	
  to	
   the	
  fact	
  that	
  soils	
  with	
  marine	
  or	
  glacial	
  marine	
  parent	
  materials	
  had	
  finer	
  texture	
  and	
   higher	
  clay	
  content	
  than	
  the	
  soils	
  formed	
  on	
  glacial	
  till	
  parent	
  material	
  (Valentine,	
  1986).	
   Tested	
  soils	
  formed	
  on	
  glacial	
  till	
  parent	
  material	
  had	
  significantly	
  higher	
  concentrations	
  of	
   HCl-­‐extractable	
  Al,	
  suggesting	
  that	
  trace	
  metals	
  in	
  those	
  sites	
  may	
  be	
  bound	
  to	
  Al-­‐oxides,	
   	
   rendering	
  them	
  less	
  available	
  for	
  plant	
   uptake.	
  	
  	
   	
    	
   18	
   	
    	
   	
    Figure	
  2.5:	
  BC	
  Standards	
  and	
  total/available	
  concentrations	
  (mg	
  kg-­‐1)	
  of	
  Ni,	
  Cu,	
  Mn,	
  Pb,	
  and	
  Zn	
  by	
  site	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
    	
   19	
   	
    In	
  the	
  soils	
  with	
  marine	
  or	
  glacial	
  marine	
  parent	
  materials,	
  the	
  level	
  of	
  HCl-­‐extractable	
  Fe	
  was	
   strongly	
  correlated	
  with	
  the	
  levels	
  of	
  extractable	
  Ni,	
  Pb,	
  and	
  Cu.	
  	
  Fe-­‐oxides	
  have	
  stronger	
  bonds	
   than	
  Mn-­‐oxides	
  in	
  the	
  soil	
  matrix,	
  and	
  thus	
  are	
  not	
  extensively	
  extractable	
  by	
  the	
  0.1M	
  HCl	
   technique.	
  	
  	
  Thus,	
  the	
  significantly	
  higher	
  HCl-­‐extractable	
  Fe	
  concentrations	
  in	
  marine	
  and	
   glacial	
  marine	
  soil	
  indicates	
  two	
  things	
  :	
  (1)	
  increased	
  mobility	
  as	
  a	
  result	
  of	
  acidic,	
  oxidizing	
   conditions,	
  and	
  natural	
  weathering	
  and	
  (2)	
  high	
  anthropogenic	
  additions	
  of	
  Fe	
  which	
  are	
  more	
   easily	
  mobile	
  than	
  natural	
  deposits	
  (Peijnenburg	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007;	
  Tessier	
  et	
  al.,	
  1979).	
  	
  	
   	
   An	
  approximate	
   percentage	
  value	
   for	
  trace	
  metal	
   availability	
  was	
   derived	
  by	
    Table	
  2.3:	
  Percentage	
  of	
  mean	
  available	
  trace	
  metals	
  among	
  sites	
  and	
  parent	
   material	
  groups	
    Parent	
  Material	
   Marine	
    Ni	
    Cu	
   Mn	
   Fe	
    Al	
    31.5	
   26.2	
   4.59	
   9.38	
    Hastings	
    22.0	
   32.3	
   15.5	
    38.1	
   44.9	
   2.73	
   14.0	
    16	
  Oaks	
    20.7	
   7.26	
   7.80	
   4.71	
   36.9	
   1.07	
   7.78	
    (n=7)	
    Glacial-­‐marine	
    (n=7)	
    60th	
  &	
  E.	
  Blvd.	
    28.0	
   25.7	
   33.6	
   34.9	
   27.5	
   2.11	
   14.8	
    (n=2)	
    concentrations	
   concentrations	
    Pb	
    (n=3)	
    HCl-­‐extractable	
   to	
  the	
  total	
    Zn	
    24.4	
   20.5	
   13.3	
    Vernon	
    calculating	
  the	
  	
   ratio	
  of	
  0.1M	
    Site	
    Pine	
    33.9	
   50.2	
   18.3	
   40.6	
   59.3	
   3.11	
   21.0	
    (n=3)	
    Glacial	
  till	
   	
    UBC	
  Campus	
    48.9	
   17.0	
   7.08	
   11.5	
   64.2	
   1.83	
   35.4	
    (n=4)	
   30.6	
   15.5	
   17.1	
   18.2	
   91.3	
   1.66	
   24.1	
    for	
  each	
  element	
    UBC	
  Farm	
    (Table	
  2.3).	
  	
  Sites	
    41st	
  &	
  Blenheim	
   15.8	
   16.2	
   4.03	
   13.4	
   29.3	
   0.11	
   13.2	
    with	
  marine	
    (n=5)	
    	
    (n=3)	
    parent	
  material	
  had	
  significantly	
  higher	
  percentages	
  of	
  available	
  Fe	
  and	
  Cu,	
  while	
  soils	
   formed	
  on	
  glacial	
  till	
  had	
  significantly	
  higher	
  percentages	
  of	
  available	
  Mn	
  [Appendices	
  A-­‐4	
  -­‐	
   A-­‐7].	
  	
  Concentrations	
  of	
  total	
  and	
  0.01M	
  HCl-­‐extractable	
  trace	
  metals	
  at	
  the	
  studied	
  sites	
   were	
  compared	
  with	
  Luttmerding’s	
  (1981)	
  background	
  study	
  on	
  trace	
  metals	
  in	
  the	
  Lower	
   Fraser	
  Valley.	
  	
  	
  Naturally	
  occurring	
  Fe,	
  Cu,	
  and	
  Mn	
  was	
  much	
  shown	
  to	
  be	
  much	
  lower	
  than	
   at	
  the	
  urban	
  sites	
  in	
  soils	
  of	
  corresponding	
  parent	
  materials	
  [Appendix	
  A-­‐10].	
  	
  This	
    	
   20	
   	
    suggests	
  greater	
  anthropogenic	
  contributions	
  of	
  those	
  metals	
  at	
  the	
  tested	
  sites,	
  which	
   would	
  increase	
  the	
  mobility	
  of	
  trace	
  metals	
  bound	
  to	
  those	
  Fe	
  and	
  Mn	
  oxides.	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   2.4.4 Organic	
  matter	
   Organic	
  matter	
  was	
  significantly	
  lower	
  in	
  the	
  marine	
  sites	
  than	
  at	
  the	
  glacial	
  till	
  and	
  glacial	
   marine	
  sites	
  –	
  this	
  is	
  likely	
  because	
  the	
  only	
  sites	
  representing	
  marine	
  parent	
  material	
   those	
  where	
  food	
  production	
  was	
  not	
  yet	
  active,	
  and	
  therefore	
  had	
  less	
  biomass	
  available	
   for	
  natural	
  decomposition	
  in	
  the	
  soil	
  [Appendix	
  A-­‐8].	
  	
  Although	
  samples	
  were	
  taken	
  from	
   areas	
  that	
  appeared	
  to	
  have	
  had	
  minimal	
  additions	
  to	
  the	
  soil,	
  it	
  is	
  possible	
  that	
  higher	
   levels	
  of	
  organic	
   matter	
  reflect	
   the	
   incorporation	
  of	
   compost	
  or	
   mulching	
   materials	
  (Table	
   2.4).	
    Table	
  2.4:	
  Summary	
  of	
  soil	
  pH,	
  texture,	
  percent	
  organic	
  matter,	
  and	
   parent	
  material	
  by	
  site	
   	
    pH	
   Texture	
    OM	
  %	
    Parent	
  material	
    16	
  Oaks	
   Hastings	
   Pine	
   Vernon	
   Blenheim	
  &	
  41st	
   60th	
  &	
  E.	
  Blvd.	
   UBC	
  Farm	
   UBC	
  Campus	
    6.2	
   4.9	
   5.3	
   5.9	
   5.8	
   5.4	
   6.8	
   6.1	
    11.5	
   3.2	
   9.1	
   4.1	
   6.0	
   16.9	
   10.1	
   5.4	
    Glacial	
  marine	
  	
   	
  Marine	
   Glacial	
  marine	
   Marine	
   Glacial	
  till	
   Glacial	
  marine	
   Glacial	
  till	
   Glacial	
  till	
    Sandy	
  clay	
  loam	
   Fine	
  sandy	
  loam	
   Sandy	
  loam	
   Loamy	
  sand	
   Loamy	
  sand	
   Sandy	
  loam	
   Sandy	
  loam	
   Sandy	
  loam	
    	
   Sites	
  with	
  glacial-­‐marine	
  parent	
  material	
  showed	
  significantly	
  higher	
  concentrations	
  of	
  Mn	
   	
   for	
  both	
  aqua	
  regia	
  and	
  HCl	
  extractions.	
  	
  In	
  this	
  case,	
   than	
  either	
  marine	
  or	
  glacial	
  till	
  sites	
   site	
  history	
  and	
  land	
  management	
  may	
  be	
  a	
  factor	
  –	
  the	
  sites	
  with	
  glacial	
  marine	
  parent	
   material	
  (16	
  Oaks,	
  60th	
  &	
  E.	
  Blvd.,	
  Pine)	
  are	
  the	
  only	
  established	
  community	
  gardens	
   represented	
  in	
  this	
  case	
  study.	
  	
  The	
  City	
  of	
  Vancouver	
  offers	
  yard	
  trimmings	
  compost	
  (YTC)	
   to	
  community	
  gardens	
  at	
  no	
  cost	
  (City	
  of	
  Vancouver,	
  2012a).	
  	
  As	
  a	
  result,	
  it	
  has	
  been	
  used	
   as	
  a	
  soil	
  amendment	
  in	
  many	
  community	
  gardens	
  and	
  its	
  presence	
  may	
  be	
  linked	
  to	
  some	
   of	
  the	
  higher	
  levels	
  of	
  Mn	
  in	
  those	
  gardens.	
  	
  In	
  a	
  review	
  of	
  the	
  agricultural	
  use	
  of	
  municipal	
   solid	
  waste	
  compost,	
  Hargreaves	
  et	
  al.	
  (2008)	
  determined	
  through	
  sequential	
  extraction	
   	
   21	
   	
    that	
  total	
  Mn	
  concentrations	
  in	
  soil	
  increased	
  with	
  addition	
  of	
  municipal	
  solid	
  waste	
   compost,	
  the	
  largest	
  portion	
  of	
  which	
  was	
  bound	
  in	
  the	
  Fe-­‐	
  or	
  Mn-­‐oxide	
  fraction.	
  Compost	
   is	
  routinely	
  tested	
  to	
  confirm	
  that	
  elemental	
  concentrations	
  fall	
  within	
  acceptable	
  limits,	
   yet	
  metals	
  may	
  accumulate	
  in	
  soils	
  over	
  time,	
  particularly	
  as	
  the	
  decomposition	
  of	
  organic	
   matter	
  renders	
  them	
  more	
  available	
  in	
  the	
  soil	
  solution	
  (Forgie	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004).	
  	
  Hargreaves	
  et	
   al.	
  (2008)	
  also	
  noted	
  that	
  both	
  total	
  and	
  neutral-­‐salt	
  extractable	
  concentrations	
  of	
  Cu,	
  Pb,	
   and	
  Zn	
  increased	
  with	
  the	
  application	
  of	
  municipal	
  solid	
  waste	
  compost.	
  	
  A	
  preliminary	
   analysis	
  of	
  Vancouver	
  YTC	
  compost	
  was	
  used	
  as	
  a	
  reference.	
  	
  Yard	
  trimming	
  compost	
  may	
   have	
  contributed	
  to	
  anthropogenic	
  additions	
  of	
  Mn	
  at	
  the	
  tested	
  sites.	
  	
  Mn	
  binds	
  with	
   organic	
  matter,	
  accounting	
  for	
  the	
  higher	
  percentage	
  of	
  0.1M	
  HCl	
  extractable	
  Ni,	
  Pb,	
  and	
  Zn	
   at	
  community	
  garden	
  sites	
  (16	
  Oaks,	
  Pine,	
  60th	
  and	
  E.	
  Blvd.)	
  where	
  YTC	
  compost	
  may	
  have	
   been	
  added	
  (Table	
  2.5).	
  	
   	
    UBC	
  Campus	
    UBC	
  Farm	
    Vernon	
    	
    Zn	
    19.1	
    51.4	
    121	
    69.8	
    42.8	
    40.1	
    27.7	
    ±	
  7.78	
    ±3.80	
    ±	
  5.35	
    ±	
  43.8	
    ±	
  1.32	
    ±	
  2.80	
    ±	
  15.1	
    ±	
  10.1	
    13.2	
    26.2	
   	
   26.0	
    87.6	
    50.7	
    12.6	
    12.4	
    15.1	
    ±	
  5.64	
    ±	
  4.46	
    ±	
  12.6	
    ±	
  30.0	
    ±	
  4.47	
    ±	
 0.50	
    ±	
  5.80	
    ±	
  8.27	
    2.19	
    1.00	
    2.96	
    10.1	
    3.01	
    1.88	
    1.1	
    3.6	
    ±	
  0.12	
    ±	
  3.52	
    ±	
  0.20	
    ±	
  0.07	
    ±	
  0.74	
    ±	
  1.16	
    	
   	
    Pb	
    	
   	
    Ni	
    	
   Cu	
   Mn	
    ±	
 0.69	
   ±	
 0.14	
    Blvd.	
    Pine	
    	
    60th	
  &	
  E.	
    65.3	
    16	
  Oaks	
    	
    	
    Hastings	
    	
    	
    41st	
  &	
    	
    Blenhiem	
    	
    3.49	
    8.50	
    23.2	
    115	
    25.6	
    4.71	
    21.7	
    11.6	
    ±	
 0.99	
    ±	
  0.31	
    ±	
  17.8	
    ±	
  31.9	
    ±	
  9.07	
    ±	
  0.23	
    ±	
  18.9	
    ±	
  3.05	
    235	
    135	
    249	
    150	
    246	
    159	
    171	
    99.8	
  	
    ±	
  74.8	
    ±	
 13.2	
    ±	
  136	
    ±	
  21.6	
    ±	
  61.9	
    ±	
 3.23	
    ±	
  25.1	
    ±	
 18.7	
    YTC	
  Compost	
    Table	
  2.5:	
  Mean	
  available	
  concentrations	
  (±	
  SE)	
  of	
  Zn,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  Cu,	
  &	
  Mn	
  at	
  tested	
  sites	
   	
   compared	
  with	
  reference	
  values	
  for	
  available	
  concentrations	
  in	
  yard	
  trimmings	
   	
   compost	
  (mg	
  kg-­‐1)	
    181	
    58	
    4.6	
    54	
   184	
   	
   22	
    	
    2.4.5 	
  Influence	
  of	
  pH	
   Total	
  concentrations	
  of	
  Cu	
  and	
  Zn	
  were	
  negatively	
  correlated	
  with	
  pH	
  [Appendix	
  A-­‐9],	
   however	
  there	
  were	
  no	
  significant	
  relationships	
  noted	
  between	
  pH	
  and	
  trace	
  metal	
   availability,	
  although	
  this	
  trend	
  has	
  been	
  widely	
  documented	
  in	
  the	
  literature	
  (McBride	
  et	
   al.,	
  2009).	
  	
  This	
  may	
  be	
  due	
  to	
  the	
  fact	
  that	
  pH	
  was	
  similar	
  at	
  most	
  of	
  the	
  sites	
  studied.	
  	
  	
  The	
   values	
  for	
  pH	
  across	
  all	
  sites	
  ranged	
  from	
  4.9-­‐6.8,	
  with	
  a	
  mean	
  of	
  5.4;	
  the	
  lack	
  of	
  noticeable	
   effect	
  of	
  pH,	
  therefore,	
  on	
  the	
  availability	
  of	
  trace	
  metals	
  suggests	
  that	
  this	
  slightly	
  acidic	
   value	
  is	
  not	
  sufficient	
  for	
  affecting	
  metal	
  availability	
  to	
  plants.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    	
   23	
   	
    2.5 Conclusions	
   In	
  summary,	
  the	
  conclusions	
  of	
  this	
  case	
  study	
  are:	
   	
   (1) Contaminant	
  risk	
  assessment	
  of	
  urban	
  brownfields	
  for	
  development	
  and	
  interim	
   uses	
  in	
  Vancouver,	
  BC	
  should	
  take	
  into	
  account	
  the	
  bioavailability	
  of	
  trace	
  metals.	
   The	
  0.1M	
  HCl	
  extraction	
  technique,	
  in	
  addition	
  to	
  the	
  standard	
  strong	
  acid	
   extractions,	
  may	
  provide	
  a	
  first	
  approximation	
  of	
  bioavailable	
  trace	
  metals.	
  	
  This	
   echoes	
  recommendations	
  by	
  other	
  authors	
  that	
  government	
  guidelines	
  should	
  be	
   based	
  on	
  the	
  soil	
  metal	
  pool	
  that	
  actually	
  poses	
  a	
  threat	
  to	
  organisms	
  (Sauvé	
  et	
  al.,	
   1996;	
  Kabata-­‐Pendias,	
  2004).	
   	
   (2) Soils	
  formed	
  from	
  marine	
  or	
  glacial-­‐marine	
  till	
  are	
  richer	
  in	
  Mn-­‐oxides,	
  which	
   contributes	
  to	
  the	
  binding	
  capacity	
  and	
  subsequent	
  mobility	
  of	
  trace	
  metals.	
   	
   (3) In	
  acidic,	
  oxidizing	
  soil	
  conditions	
  like	
  those	
  common	
  to	
  Vancouver,	
  BC,	
  extraction	
   with	
  0.1M	
  HCl	
  provides	
  an	
  estimate	
  of	
  those	
  trace	
  metals	
  that	
  may	
  become	
   available	
  through	
  ion	
  exchange	
  and	
  breakdown	
  of	
  Mn	
  hydrous	
  oxides.	
  	
  This	
   extraction	
  may	
  therefore	
  be	
  a	
  more	
  accurate	
  indicator	
  of	
  trace	
  metal	
  availability	
   than	
  aqua	
  regia	
  or	
  0.01M	
  CaCl2.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
   24	
   	
    3 Phytoextraction	
  and	
  partitioning	
  of	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
   Pb,	
  Ni,	
  and	
  Cu	
  in	
  Chenopodium	
  quinoa	
   	
    3.1  Introduction	
    Trace	
  metal	
  contamnation	
  of	
  soils	
  poses	
  a	
  long-­‐term	
  land	
  management	
  problem	
  requiring	
   human	
  intervention.	
  	
  Elemental	
  pollutants	
  persist	
  in	
  soils	
  causing	
  health	
  risks	
  to	
  humans	
   and	
  ecosystems	
  (Luo	
  &	
  Rimmer,	
  1995;	
  MacNicol	
  &	
  Beckett,	
  1985).	
  	
  	
  In	
  rural	
  areas,	
   bioaccumulation	
  on	
  agricultural	
  land	
  can	
  reduce	
  crop	
  yields	
  and	
  quality	
  (Wuana	
  &	
   Okieiman,	
  2011).	
  	
  In	
  urban	
  areas,	
  soil	
  contamination	
  results	
  in	
  costly	
  redevelopment	
  delays	
   as	
  land	
  use	
  patterns	
  change	
  from	
  industrial	
  to	
  residential	
  and	
  agricultural.	
  	
  	
   	
   Industrial	
  activity,	
  mining	
  waste	
  disposal	
  and	
  biosolids	
  application	
  are	
  some	
  of	
  the	
   anthropogenic	
  activities	
  causing	
  multi-­‐metal	
  contamination	
  scenarios	
  with	
  high	
   concentrations	
  of	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni	
  and	
  Cu	
  in	
  the	
  soil	
  (Luo	
  &	
  Rimmer,	
  1995).	
  	
  Although	
   potential	
  mobility	
  and	
  ecosystem	
  toxicity	
  depends	
  both	
  on	
  environmental	
  conditions	
  as	
   well	
  as	
  the	
  chemical	
  forms	
  of	
  contaminants,	
  Cd,	
  Zn,	
  and	
  Ni	
  are	
  generally	
  bioavailable	
  in	
  soil	
   (Kabata-­‐Pendias,	
  2004).	
    	
    	
   3.1.1 Phytoextraction	
   Chemical	
  immobilization,	
  soil	
  washing,	
  and	
  phytoremediation	
  are	
  cost-­‐effective	
   technologies	
  for	
  rehabilitating	
  contaminated	
  sites	
  (Wuana	
  &	
  Okieiman,	
  2011;	
  Lasat	
  1999).	
  	
   Phytoremediation	
  is	
  an	
  appealing	
  land	
  management	
  option	
  as	
  it	
  can	
  be	
  practiced	
  in-­‐situ	
   and	
  therefore	
  causes	
  minimal	
  ecosystem	
  disruption.	
  	
  The	
  term	
  ‘phytoremediation’	
  can	
   refer	
  to	
  phytostabilization,	
  in	
  which	
  contaminants	
  are	
  immobilized	
  via	
  sequestration	
  in	
   	
   25	
   	
    plant	
  roots,	
  or	
  phytoextraction,	
  in	
  which	
  contaminants	
  are	
  concentrated	
  in	
  aboveground	
   plant	
  parts,	
  harvested,	
  and	
  removed	
  for	
  safe	
  disposal	
  (Padmavathiamma	
  &	
  Li,	
  2009).	
  	
   Phytomining	
  is	
  an	
  application	
  of	
  phytoextraction	
  in	
  which	
  the	
  ashed	
  plant	
  residues	
  are	
   smelted	
  to	
  recover	
  valuable	
  metals	
  (McGrath	
  &	
  Zhao,	
  2003).	
  	
  This	
  paper	
  deals	
  with	
   phytoextraction,	
  which	
  is	
  a	
  promising	
  technology	
  despite	
  several	
  limitations.	
  	
   	
   Phytoextraction	
  requires	
  several	
  sequential	
  crops	
  of	
  hyper-­‐accumulating	
  plants	
  to	
  reduce	
   soil	
  metal	
  concentrations	
  to	
  levels	
  appropriate	
  for	
  most	
  land	
  uses	
  (Kumar,	
  et	
  al.,	
  1995).	
  	
  	
   The	
  technique	
  is	
  most	
  effective	
  for	
  moderate	
  to	
  lightly	
  contaminated	
  soils,	
  as	
  plants	
  are	
   unlikely	
  to	
  thrive	
  in	
  extremely	
  toxic	
  soil.	
  	
  Plants	
  must	
  be	
  easily	
  harvestable,	
  produce	
   significant	
  biomass,	
  and	
  have	
  extensive	
  root	
  systems	
  (Kumar	
  et	
  al.,	
  1995).	
  	
  Uptake	
   efficiency	
  can	
  be	
  improved	
  by	
  amending	
  soil	
  with	
  synthetic	
  chelates,	
  however	
  this	
  also	
   increases	
  bioavailability	
  of	
  essential	
  plant	
  nutrients	
  that	
  may	
  subsequently	
  out-­‐compete	
   metals	
  for	
  plant	
  uptake.	
  	
   	
   Phytoextraction	
  is	
  a	
  time-­‐consuming	
  procedure	
  that	
  is	
  limited	
  by	
  the	
  uptake	
  efficiency	
  of	
   the	
  plants	
  used.	
  	
  Even	
  in	
  hyperaccumulating	
  plant	
  species,	
  metal	
  removal	
  is	
  highly	
  variable	
   depending	
  on	
  the	
  soil	
  condition,	
  extent	
  of	
  contamination,	
  and	
  metal	
  species	
  present	
  (Cobb	
   et	
  al.,	
  2000).	
  	
  Many	
  metal-­‐tolerant	
  plants	
  documented	
  in	
  the	
  phytoextraction	
  literature,	
   most	
  notably	
  Thlaspi	
  caerulescens,	
  are	
  slow-­‐growing	
  and	
  produce	
  insufficient	
  biomass	
  to	
  be	
   immediately	
  useful.	
  	
  McGrath	
  and	
  Z	
  hao	
  (2003)	
  point	
  out	
  that	
  even	
  if	
  plants	
  used	
  for	
   phytoextraction	
  were	
  to	
  produce	
  the	
  same	
  average	
  biomass	
  as	
  an	
  agricultural	
  crop,	
  it	
   would	
  still	
  take	
  at	
  least	
  10	
  crops	
  to	
  effectively	
  halve	
  metal	
  concentrations.	
  	
  Affected	
  plant	
   material	
  cannot	
  be	
  composted	
  or	
  returned	
  to	
  the	
  soil,	
  posing	
  a	
  problem	
  for	
  farmers	
  or	
   community	
  operations	
  without	
  access	
  to	
  proper	
  mechanisms	
  for	
  disposal	
  (Huang	
  &	
   Cunningham,	
  1996).	
   	
   	
   26	
   	
    Recent	
  interest	
  in	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  field	
  crops	
  for	
  removal	
  of	
  metals	
  from	
  contaminated	
  soils	
  has	
   led	
  to	
  wide	
  adoption	
  of	
  the	
  idea	
  that	
  high	
  biomass-­‐yielding	
  species	
  may	
  be	
  more	
  promising	
   for	
  phytoextraction	
  than	
  those	
  plants	
  considered	
  to	
  be	
  hyperaccumulators	
  (Chaney	
  et	
  al.,	
   1997;	
  Vamerali	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  	
  Fast	
  growing,	
  easily	
  cultivated	
  agronomic	
  crops	
  like	
   sunflower	
  (Helianthus	
  annus),	
  Indian	
  mustard	
  (Brassica	
  juncea),	
  and	
  maize	
  (Zea	
  mays)	
  may	
   therefore	
  be	
  better	
  for	
  phytoextraction	
  of	
  trace	
  metals	
  than	
  traditional	
  hyperaccumulators,	
   as	
  their	
  high	
  biomass	
  compensates	
  for	
  lower	
  metal	
  accumulation	
  (Zuang	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  	
  Such	
   observations	
  support	
  McGrath	
  &	
  Zhao’s	
  (2003)	
  suggestion	
  that	
  metal	
  accumulation	
  and	
   biomass	
  production	
  be	
  the	
  main	
  criteria	
  for	
  a	
  plant’s	
  phytoextraction	
  suitability,	
  rather	
   than	
  numerical	
  concentrations	
  and	
  translocation	
  factors.	
  	
   	
   Perhaps	
  the	
  most	
  pressing	
  problem	
  related	
  to	
  phytoextraction	
  is	
  the	
  lack	
  of	
  practical	
   adoption	
  of	
  the	
  technology	
  by	
  municipalities	
  and	
  remediation	
  efforts.	
  	
  Baker	
  (2002)	
  points	
   out	
  that	
  despite	
  abundant	
  scientific	
  research	
  on	
  the	
  potential	
  of	
  phytoremediation,	
  since	
   the	
  early	
  1980s,	
  large-­‐scale	
  and	
  even	
  pilot	
  applications	
  of	
  the	
  technology	
  are	
  few.	
  	
   Remediation	
  of	
  contaminated	
  sites	
  in	
  BC	
  tends	
  toward	
  harsh,	
  ex-­‐situ	
  techniques	
  such	
  as	
   soil-­‐washing2,	
  vitrification3,	
  and	
  soil	
  excavation4	
  and	
  replacement.	
  	
  Such	
  techniques	
  are	
   expensive	
  and	
  damaging	
  to	
  soil,	
  yet	
  mild	
  in-­‐situ	
  techniques	
  like	
  phytoremediation	
  are	
   infrequently	
  used	
  (Gupta	
  et	
  al.	
  1996).	
   	
   3.1.2 Hyperaccumulator	
  plants	
   	
   The	
  ability	
  to	
  concentrate	
  trace	
  metals	
  in	
  aboveground	
  tissue	
  is	
  both	
  an	
  indicator	
  of	
  a	
   plant’s	
  usefulness	
  for	
  phytoextraction	
  and	
  its	
  potential	
  health	
  risk	
  for	
  human	
  consumption	
   of	
  crop	
  plants	
  (Kumar	
  et	
  al.,	
  1995).	
  	
  	
  Plants	
  respond	
  to	
  trace	
  metals	
  in	
  the	
  soil	
  solution	
  by	
   three	
  known	
  physiological	
  pathways:	
  exclusion,	
  passive	
  accumulation,	
  and	
   hyperaccumulation.	
  Excluder	
  species	
  tolerate	
  high	
  metal	
  concentrations	
  in	
  soil	
  by	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   2	
  Squamish	
  (British	
  Columbia	
  Ministry	
  of	
  Environment,	
  2009a)	
   3	
  Burnaby	
  (British	
  Columbia	
  Ministry	
  of	
  Environment,	
  2009b)	
   4	
  Trail	
  (British	
  Columbia	
  Ministry	
  of	
  Environment,	
  2009c)	
    	
   27	
    	
    restricting	
  metal	
  uptake	
  to	
  the	
  roots.	
  	
  Passive	
  accumulators	
  store	
  metals	
  in	
  the	
  roots,	
   sequestering	
  non-­‐essential	
  elements	
  in	
  cell	
  walls	
  and	
  vacuoles	
  as	
  a	
  defense	
  mechanism	
  to	
   prevent	
  transport	
  to	
  leaves	
  and	
  shoots	
  (Kirkham,	
  2006).	
  	
  Most	
  plants	
  adapted	
  to	
  soils	
  with	
   high	
  concentrations	
  of	
  metals	
  exclude	
  these	
  elements	
  from	
  the	
  aerial	
  plant	
  parts,	
  but	
   hyper-­‐accumulating	
  species	
  actually	
  translocate	
  high	
  quantities	
  -­‐	
  in	
  concentrations	
  10	
  to	
   100	
  times	
  those	
  tolerated	
  by	
  normal	
  accumulators	
  -­‐	
  from	
  the	
  soil	
  solution	
  to	
  leaf	
  and	
  shoot	
   tissue	
  	
  (Krämer	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000;	
  Baker	
  &	
  Brooks,	
  1989;	
  Kirkham,	
  2006).	
  	
  	
  To	
  date,	
  less	
  than	
   0.2%	
  of	
  all	
  angiosperms	
  are	
  thought	
  to	
  be	
  natural	
  hyperaccumulators	
  of	
  trace	
  metals,	
  and	
   Environment	
  Canada	
  maintains	
  a	
  database	
  of	
  776	
  vascular	
  plants	
  worldwide	
  that	
  are	
   thought	
  to	
  have	
  some	
  capacity	
  for	
  extraction	
  and	
  remediation	
  of	
  19	
  different	
  trace	
  metal	
   contaminants	
  (McGrath	
  &	
  Zhao,	
  2003;	
  Environment	
  Canada	
  2003).	
  	
   	
   The	
  concept	
  of	
  hyperaccumulating	
  plants	
  was	
  first	
  presented	
  in	
  the	
  early	
  1980s,	
  but	
  still	
   there	
  is	
  no	
  set	
  of	
  unified	
  criteria	
  for	
  determining	
  which	
  plants	
  fall	
  into	
  this	
  category	
  (Baker,	
   1981).	
  Increasingly	
  research	
  suggests	
  that	
  the	
  plant	
  mechanisms	
  for	
  tolerating	
  high	
   concentrations	
  of	
  toxic	
  elements	
  are	
  related	
  to	
  vacuolar	
  sequestration	
  and	
  internal	
   detoxification	
  in	
  leaves,	
  however	
  a	
  multitude	
  of	
  factors	
  affect	
  a	
  plant’s	
  usefulness	
  for	
   phytoextraction	
  (McGrath	
  &	
  Zhao,	
  2003).	
  	
  	
  The	
  translocation	
  factor	
  (TF),	
  or	
  root	
  to	
   shoot/leaf	
  quotient	
  is	
  commonly	
  used	
  as	
  a	
  metric	
  -­‐	
  TF	
  greater	
  than	
  1	
  indicates	
  preferential	
   partitioning	
  of	
  metals	
  in	
  aboveground	
  plant	
  parts	
  (Baker,	
  1981;	
  Pourrut,	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
  Many	
   hyperaccumulator	
  plants	
  with	
  efficient	
  root	
  to	
  shoot	
  transport	
  efficiency,	
  however,	
  are	
   limited	
  by	
  small	
  size	
  or	
  slow	
  growth,	
  making	
  them	
  less	
  effective	
  for	
  metal	
  removal	
  than	
  a	
   	
   plant	
  with	
  a	
  lower	
  translocation	
  factor	
  that	
  produces	
  more	
  aboveground	
  biomass.	
  	
   Identifying	
  accurate	
  concentrations	
  of	
  metals	
  in	
  root	
  tissue	
  can	
  further	
  compound	
  the	
   calculation	
  of	
  efficiency	
  as	
  it	
  is	
  difficult	
  to	
  distinguish	
  by	
  root	
  concentration	
  values	
  those	
   ions	
  absorbed	
  by	
  cells	
  from	
  those	
  adsorbed	
  at	
  the	
  negatively-­‐charged	
  sites	
  along	
  root	
  cell	
   walls	
  (Lasat,	
  1999).	
   	
    	
   28	
   	
    Padmavathiamma	
  and	
  Li	
  (2009)	
  evaluated	
  the	
  suitability	
  of	
  5	
  plant	
  species	
  for	
  heavy	
  metal	
   phytoextraction	
  using	
  variously	
  spiked	
  soil	
  from	
  roadsides	
  near	
  Vancouver,	
  BC.	
  	
  Based	
  on	
   similarities	
  in	
  scope	
  and	
  regional	
  soil	
  characteristics,	
  their	
  study	
  and	
  results	
  were	
  used	
  as	
  a	
   guide	
  for	
  comparison.	
  	
  This	
  experiment	
  builds	
  on	
  a	
  field	
  study	
  by	
  Bhargava	
  et	
  al.	
  (2008)	
   comparing	
  the	
  bioconcentration	
  and	
  speciation	
  of	
  Cu,	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
  Ni,	
  and	
  Pb	
  in	
  the	
  roots,	
  shoots,	
   seeds,	
  and	
  foliage	
  of	
  Chenopodium	
  quinoa	
  (quinoa)	
  plants	
  in	
  three	
  multi-­‐metal	
   contamination	
  scenarios.	
  	
  This	
  research	
  assesses	
  the	
  potential	
  of	
  quinoa	
  (Chenopodium	
   quinoa)	
  for	
  remediating	
  metal-­‐contaminated	
  sites	
  in	
  British	
  Columbia	
  and	
  investigates	
   health	
  risks	
  associated	
  with	
  human	
  consumption	
  of	
  quinoa	
  grown	
  on	
  contaminated	
  soils.	
  	
   	
   Bhargava	
  et	
  al.	
  (2008)	
  found	
  18	
  genotypes	
  of	
  quinoa	
  to	
  hyperaccumulate	
  heavy	
  metals	
  in	
  a	
   soil	
  moderately	
  contaminated	
  with	
  Fe,	
  Zn,	
  Cu,	
  Ni,	
  Cr,	
  and	
  Cd,	
  suggesting	
  the	
  plant’s	
   usefulness	
  for	
  land	
  remediation	
  through	
  phytoextraction.	
  	
  Samples	
  of	
  the	
  edible	
  foliage	
   were	
  harvested	
  and	
  analyzed	
  for	
  trace	
  metals	
  at	
  30	
  days	
  after	
  germination.	
  	
  The	
  study	
  did	
   not	
  analyze	
  the	
  plants	
  at	
  maturity,	
  nor	
  address	
  partitioning	
  of	
  metals	
  in	
  different	
  plant	
   parts.	
  	
  Both	
  areas	
  are	
  of	
  particular	
  interest	
  as	
  the	
  nutritious	
  quinoa	
  seeds	
  are	
  commonly	
   eaten.	
  	
  Trace	
  metal	
  accumulation	
  and	
  partitioning	
  at	
  different	
  growth	
  stages	
  and	
  various	
   contamination	
  levels	
  has	
  yet	
  to	
  be	
  investigated	
  in	
  Vancouver’s	
  acidic	
  mineral	
  soils.	
  	
  	
   	
   Quinoa	
  may	
  be	
  particularly	
  suited	
  for	
  remediation	
  of	
  trace	
  metal-­‐contaminated	
  soils	
  in	
   	
   British	
  Columbia	
  as	
  it	
  thrives	
  in	
  temperatures	
  between	
  18°	
  C	
  and	
  25°	
  C,	
  which	
  are	
  typical	
  of	
   the	
  southern	
  coastal	
  growing	
  season.	
  	
  In	
  its	
  native	
  Bolivia,	
  quinoa	
  is	
  generally	
  grown	
  in	
  the	
   shoulder	
  season	
  after	
  potato	
  harvest,	
  where	
  it	
  relies	
  on	
  residual	
  fertilizers	
  and	
  occasional	
   rainwater	
  for	
  survival.	
  	
  Morphological	
  traits	
  like	
  a	
  deep	
  taproot	
  and	
  fibrous	
  root	
  system	
   allow	
  quinoa	
  plants	
  to	
  access	
  soil	
  water	
  and	
  nutrients	
  unavailable	
  to	
  other	
  plants	
  (Jacobsen	
   et	
  al.,	
  2003).	
  	
  This	
  may	
  improve	
  uptake	
  efficiency	
  for	
  trace	
  metals,	
  which	
  are	
  often	
   absorbed	
  by	
  plant	
  roots	
  via	
  substitution	
  when	
  essential	
  nutrients	
  are	
  not	
  readily	
  available	
   (Das	
  et	
  al.,	
  1997).	
  	
  Further,	
  quinoa	
  shares	
  some	
  of	
  the	
  halophytic	
  properties	
  common	
  in	
  the	
   	
   29	
   	
    Chenopodaceae	
  family	
  and	
  this	
  tolerance	
  for	
  saline	
  conditions	
  may	
  allow	
  it	
  to	
  thrive	
  in	
  soils	
   where	
  chelating	
  agents	
  have	
  been	
  added	
  to	
  chemically	
  enhance	
  phytoextraction	
  efficiency	
   (Jacobsen	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003).	
  	
   	
   	
   	
    3.2 Objectives	
   The	
  research	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  evaluates	
  the	
  usefulness	
  of	
  Chenopodium	
  quinoa	
  as	
  a	
  potential	
   plant	
  for	
  phytoextraction	
  of	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  and	
  Cu	
  in	
  urban	
  soils	
  of	
  Vancouver,	
  BC.	
  	
   Additional	
  consideration	
  is	
  given	
  to	
  partitioning	
  of	
  contaminants	
  in	
  the	
  aboveground	
  plant	
   portions	
  for	
  the	
  purpose	
  of	
  evaluating	
  potential	
  human	
  health	
  risks	
  involved	
  with	
  eating	
   plants	
  grown	
  on	
  contaminated	
  sites.	
  	
  The	
  specific	
  objectives	
  of	
  this	
  study	
  are	
  as	
  follows:	
   	
   (1) Determine	
  bioconcentration	
  factor	
  (BCF)	
  of	
  roots,	
  foliage,	
  shoot	
  and	
  seeds	
  and	
   translocation	
  factor	
  (TF)	
  for	
  shoots,	
  foliage,	
  and	
  seeds	
  in	
  a	
  multi-­‐metal	
   contamination	
  scenario	
  at	
  two	
  stages	
  of	
  growth	
  for	
  one	
  genotype	
  of	
  C.	
  quinoa	
   grown	
  in	
  soil	
  collected	
  from	
  a	
  single	
  brownfield	
  site	
  in	
  Vancouver	
  BC,	
   	
   (2) Compare	
  total	
  and	
  plant-­‐available	
  trace	
  metals	
  in	
  soil	
  with	
  guidelines	
  provided	
   	
    by	
  the	
  British	
  Columbia	
  Contaminated	
  Sites	
  Regulation,	
   	
   (3) Determine	
  total	
  metal	
  uptake	
  and	
  total	
  plant	
  concentration	
  at	
  two	
  sampling	
   stages	
  30	
  DAT	
  (days	
  after	
  transplant)	
  and	
  110	
  DAT	
  (Padmavathiamma	
  &	
  Li,	
   2009),	
   	
   (4) Assess	
  the	
  usefulness	
  of	
  Chenopodium	
  quinoa	
  as	
  an	
  urban	
  agricultural	
  crop	
   and/or	
  a	
  hyperaccumulator	
  of	
  trace	
  metals	
  in	
  Vancouver,	
  British	
  Columbia,	
    	
   	
   30	
   	
    (5) Evaluate	
  trace	
  metal	
  concentrations	
  in	
  seeds	
  as	
  compared	
  with	
  international	
   upper	
  intake	
  limits	
  for	
  human	
  health,	
  and	
  	
  	
   	
   (6) Evaluate	
  potential	
  for	
  phytoextraction	
  of	
  trace	
  metals	
  in	
  urban	
  soils	
  of	
   Vancouver,	
  BC.	
   	
   	
   	
    3.3 Materials	
  and	
  methods	
   Approximately	
  60kg	
  from	
  the	
  0-­‐30cm	
  portion	
  of	
  the	
  soil	
  was	
  collected	
  from	
  the	
  brownfield	
   site	
  on	
  Glen	
  and	
  East	
  Hastings	
  (discussed	
  in	
  the	
  previous	
  chapter).	
  The	
  soil	
  was	
  formed	
  on	
   marine	
  parent	
  material,	
  with	
  mineral	
  clays	
  characteristic	
  of	
  Vancouver’s	
  iron-­‐rich	
  podzols.	
  	
   Partly	
  because	
  of	
  leaching	
  during	
  the	
  wet	
  winter	
  months,	
  these	
  soils	
  are	
  acidic,	
  low	
  in	
   organic	
  matter,	
  and	
  nutrient-­‐poor	
  (Iverson	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012).	
  	
  	
   	
   Soil	
  was	
  taken	
  to	
  the	
  laboratory,	
  mixed,	
  dried	
  and	
  sieved	
  through	
  a	
  2mm	
  sieve,	
  and	
  divided	
   into	
  treatment	
  groups	
  A,	
  B,	
  and	
  C.	
  	
  Group	
  A	
  is	
  the	
  original	
  un-­‐amended	
  soil	
  collected	
  on-­‐ site,	
  while	
  groups	
  B	
  and	
  C	
  were	
  spiked	
  with	
  multi-­‐metal	
  solutions	
  based	
  on	
  guidelines	
   corresponding	
  to	
  the	
  BC	
  Contaminated	
  Sites	
  Regulation	
  (Padmavanthiamma	
  &	
  Li,	
  2009;	
   	
   Contaminated	
  Sites	
  Regulation,	
  2011).	
  	
  Metals	
  were	
  added	
  to	
  air-­‐dried	
  soil	
  by	
  wetting	
  soil	
   with	
  a	
  solution	
  of	
  trace	
  metals	
  and	
  carrier	
  salts	
  [Appendix	
  D-­‐1]	
  dissolved	
  in	
  1000mL	
   distilled	
  water	
  (Padmavanthiamma	
  &	
  Li,	
  2009).	
  	
  Because	
  soil	
  A	
  was	
  already	
  moderately	
   contaminated	
  with	
  trace	
  metals,	
  it	
  is	
  considered	
  a	
  comparison	
  rather	
  than	
  a	
  control	
  (Table	
   3.1).	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   31	
   	
    Table	
  3.1:	
  	
  Mean	
  trace	
  metal	
  concentrations	
  (±	
  SE)	
  for	
  treatment	
  groups	
  A,	
  B,	
  and	
  C,	
   compared	
  with	
  British	
  Columbia	
  guidelines	
  for	
  agricultural	
  land	
  use	
  (mg	
  kg-­‐1)	
   Treatment	
   Group	
    Zn	
    Cd	
    Pb	
    Ni	
    Cu	
    BC	
  Standards	
   moderate*	
    150	
    1.5	
    100	
    100	
    90	
    level	
  C**	
    1500	
    20	
    1000	
    500	
    500	
    A	
    252	
  	
   ±	
  157	
   309	
  	
   ±	
  140	
   552	
  	
   ±	
  144	
    223	
  	
   ±	
  4.58	
   233	
  	
   ±	
  4.78	
   242	
  	
   ±	
 3.33	
    307	
  	
   ±	
  6.52	
   375	
  	
   ±	
  8.94	
   858	
  	
   ±	
  48.0	
    243	
  	
   ±	
  5.32	
   260	
  	
   ±	
  5.39	
   293	
  	
   ±	
  6.98	
    373	
  	
   ±	
  6.26	
   389	
  	
   ±	
  8.62	
   472	
  	
   ±	
  14.9	
    B	
   C	
   	
    *	
  	
  	
  levels	
  above	
  which	
  soil	
  must	
  be	
  relocated	
  to	
  non-­‐agricultural	
  land	
  (BC	
  Contaminated	
  Sites	
  Regulation,	
   Schedule	
  7,	
  2011)	
    **	
  For	
  exclusive	
  commercial	
  or	
  industrial	
  land	
  use,	
  level	
  C	
  is	
  the	
  remediation	
  standard.	
  	
  For	
  soils	
  containing	
   contaminants	
  exceeding	
  this	
  level,	
  all	
  uses	
  of	
  the	
  land	
  will	
  be	
  restricted	
  until	
  remediation	
  measures	
  have	
   reduced	
  concentrations	
  to	
  levels	
  less	
  than	
  those	
  given.	
   	
    	
   3.3.1 Experiment	
  design	
   Each	
  16cm	
  diameter	
  plastic	
  pot	
  was	
  weighed,	
  labeled,	
  and	
  filled	
  with	
  approximately	
  2kg	
   soil	
  from	
  group	
  A,	
  B,	
  or	
  C.	
  	
  	
  Thirty	
  pots	
  with	
  ten	
  replicates	
  of	
  each	
  treatment	
  were	
  arranged	
   in	
  a	
  completely	
  randomized	
  design	
  for	
  the	
  greenhouse	
  study.	
  	
  Chenopodium	
  quinoa	
  Willd.	
   	
   PI	
  510532	
  was	
  seeded	
  in	
  sterile	
  starting	
  mix	
  and	
  transplanted	
  into	
  the	
  treatment	
  pots	
  after	
   emergence	
  but	
  before	
  development	
  of	
  true	
  leaves	
  (Raven	
  et	
  al.,	
  1996).	
   	
   Two	
  quinoa	
  seedlings	
  were	
  planted	
  per	
  pot	
  to	
  facilitate	
  comparisons	
  between	
  growth	
   stages	
  for	
  each	
  sample.	
  	
  Thirty	
  days	
  after	
  transplant	
  (DAT)	
  one	
  plant	
  per	
  pot	
  was	
  removed	
   and	
  prepared	
  for	
  analysis,	
  along	
  with	
  roots	
  and	
  surrounding	
  soil.	
  	
  	
  Remaining	
  plants	
  and	
   soil	
  were	
  harvested	
  at	
  110	
  DAT,	
  following	
  seed	
  set.	
  	
  Destructive	
  sampling	
  at	
  these	
  two	
   	
   32	
   	
    stages	
  of	
  growth	
  allowed	
  for	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  paired	
  t-­‐tests	
  to	
  evaluate	
  changes	
  in	
  uptake	
  and	
   concentration	
  within	
  each	
  sample	
  over	
  the	
  plants’	
  lifecycles.	
  	
  Two	
  pots	
  per	
  treatment	
  group	
   were	
  not	
  planted	
  to	
  provide	
  a	
  reference	
  for	
  measuring	
  natural	
  changes	
  in	
  soil	
   concentrations	
  over	
  time.	
   	
   3.3.2 Assessment	
  parameters	
   3.3.2.1 Biometric	
  characters	
   Dry	
  weight	
  of	
  seeds,	
  shoots,	
  leaves	
  and	
  foliage,	
  number	
  of	
  leaves,	
  stem	
  length,	
  and	
  longest	
   leaf	
  length	
  were	
  recorded	
  at	
  each	
  sampling	
  [Appendix	
  D-­‐8],	
  to	
  assess	
  the	
  effects	
  of	
  metal	
   concentration	
  on	
  biomass	
  and	
  seed	
  yield	
  (MacNicol	
  &	
  Beckett,	
  1985;	
  Padmavathiamma	
  &	
   Li,	
  2009).	
   	
   3.3.2.2 Organic	
  matter	
   Elemental	
  carbon	
  was	
  measured	
  using	
  loss	
  on	
  ignition;	
  the	
  resulting	
  value	
  was	
  used	
  as	
  an	
   estimate	
  of	
  organic	
  matter	
  percentage	
  in	
  the	
  soil	
  (Ball,	
  1964).	
  	
  Samples	
  were	
  dried	
   overnight	
  at	
  105°C,	
  weighed,	
  then	
  heated	
  for	
  16	
  hours	
  in	
  a	
  muffle	
  furnace	
  at	
  375°C	
  and	
   weighed	
  a	
  second	
  time.	
  The	
  percentage	
  of	
  weight	
  lost	
  between	
  first	
  and	
  second	
   measurement	
  is	
  presented	
  as	
  the	
  loss-­‐on-­‐ignition	
  value.	
   	
   3.3.2.3	
   pH	
   Soil	
  pH	
  was	
  measured	
  both	
  in	
  water	
   	
   and	
  a	
  dilute	
  salt	
  solution	
  (0.01M	
  CaCl2).	
  	
  	
  In	
  a	
  beaker,	
  	
   20mL	
  distilled	
  water	
  was	
  added	
  to	
  10g	
  air-­‐dried	
  soil	
  and	
  the	
  suspension	
  was	
  stirred	
  	
   periodically	
  over	
  30	
  minutes,	
  then	
  left	
  to	
  settle	
  for	
  one	
  hour.	
  	
  	
  Measurements	
  were	
  taken	
  	
   with	
  a	
  combined	
  electrode	
  pH	
  meter	
  and	
  values	
  recorded.	
  	
  To	
  each	
  beaker	
  was	
  then	
  added	
  	
   10mL	
  0.02M	
  CaCl2,	
  and	
  the	
  procedure	
  was	
  repeated	
  (Hendershot	
  et	
  al.,	
  	
   1993).	
   	
   	
   	
   33	
   	
    3.3.2.4 Electroconductivity	
   Electrical	
  conductivity	
  was	
  measured	
  at	
  1.5	
  mMHO	
  scale	
  using	
  a	
  2:1	
  ratio	
  with	
  a	
  solution	
  	
   of	
  0.01M	
  KCl	
  as	
  standard	
  (Miller	
  and	
  Curtin,	
  1993.)	
  	
  	
   	
   3.3.2.5 Bioconcentration	
  factor	
   In	
  order	
  to	
  assess	
  C.	
  quinoa’s	
  uptake	
  and	
  accumulation	
  of	
  soil	
  metals	
  in	
  plant	
  tissue,	
  the	
  	
   bioconcentration	
  factor	
  (BCF)	
  was	
  calculated	
  for	
  roots	
  (Croots/Csoil	
  =	
  ratio	
  of	
  	
  root	
  	
   concentration	
  to	
  soil	
  concentration),	
  shoots	
  (Cshoots/Csoil	
  =	
  ratio	
  of	
  shoot	
  concentration	
  to	
  	
   soil	
  concentration),	
  seeds	
  (Cseeds/Csoil	
  =	
  ratio	
  of	
  seed	
  concentration	
  to	
  soil	
  concentration),	
  	
   and	
  foliage	
  (Cfoliage/Csoil	
  =	
  ratio	
  of	
  leaf	
  concentration	
  to	
  soil	
  concentration)	
  at	
  30	
  DAT	
  and	
  	
   110	
  DAT	
  (Kumar	
  et	
  al.,	
  1995;	
  Padmavanthiamma	
  &	
  Li,	
  2009).	
   	
   3.3.2.6 Translocation	
  factor	
   The	
  translocation	
  factor	
  (TF)	
  refers	
  to	
  amount	
  of	
  metals	
  transferred	
  from	
  roots	
  to	
   aboveground	
  plant	
  parts,	
  and	
  is	
  an	
  indicator	
  of	
  the	
  phytoextraction	
  potential	
  for	
  a	
  given	
   plant	
  (Kumar	
  et	
  al.	
  1995;	
  Padmavanthiamma	
  &	
  Li,	
  2009).	
  	
  TF	
  was	
  calculated	
  for	
  shoots	
  and	
   (Cshoots/Croots)	
  foliage	
  (Cfoliage/Croots)	
  at	
  both	
  stages	
  of	
  plant	
  growth,	
  and	
  seeds	
  (Cseeds/Croots)	
   at	
  110	
  DAT.	
   	
   3.3.3 Elemental	
  extraction	
   	
   Elements	
  were	
  extracted	
  with	
  dilute	
  strong	
  acid	
  (0.1M	
  HCl)	
  and	
  concentrated	
  strong	
  acid	
   (aqua	
  regia)	
  to	
  estimate	
  concentrations	
  of	
  plant-­‐available	
  and	
  non-­‐residual	
  trace	
  elements,	
   respectively,	
  in	
  soil	
  (Peijnenburg	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007;	
  Tessier	
  et	
  al.,	
  1979).	
  	
  Samples	
  were	
  analyzed	
   using	
  a	
  Varian	
  Inductively	
  Coupled	
  Plasma-­‐Optical	
  Emission	
  Spectrometer.	
   	
    	
   34	
   	
    3.3.3.1 Plant	
  tissue	
  digestion	
   Plant	
  material	
  from	
  both	
  sampling	
  events	
  was	
  separated	
  into	
  roots,	
  shoots,	
  foliage	
  and	
   seeds	
  (where	
  applicable).	
  	
  Roots	
  were	
  defined	
  as	
  plant	
  parts	
  with	
  no	
  visible	
  chlorophyll,	
   shoots	
  included	
  the	
  main	
  stem	
  and	
  branches,	
  and	
  foliage	
  included	
  leaves	
  and	
  petioles	
   (Cobb	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000).	
  	
  Biometric	
  observations	
  of	
  stem	
  length,	
  number	
  of	
  leaves,	
  and	
  longest	
   leaf	
  length	
  were	
  recorded	
  for	
  each	
  sample.	
  	
  All	
  samples	
  were	
  washed	
  thoroughly	
  with	
  tap	
   water,	
  then	
  rinsed	
  with	
  distilled	
  water	
  before	
  drying	
  for	
  48	
  hours	
  at	
  70°C	
  (Kumar	
  et	
  al.,	
   1995;	
  Padmavathiamma	
  &	
  Li,	
  2009).	
  	
  A	
  dry-­‐ashing	
  technique	
  was	
  chosen	
  based	
  on	
   improved	
  accuracy	
  over	
  wet	
  ashing	
  methods	
  (Lambert,	
  1976).	
  	
  Samples	
  were	
  weighed	
   after	
  drying,	
  then	
  ashed	
  in	
  a	
  muffle	
  furnace	
  at	
  500°	
  C	
  for	
  6	
  hours	
  (Kumar	
  et	
  al.,	
  1995;	
  Hue	
   et	
  al.,	
  2000;	
  Richards,	
  1993).	
  	
  Following	
  ashing,	
  samples	
  were	
  ground	
  with	
  a	
  mortar	
  and	
   pestle	
  and	
  passed	
  through	
  a	
  2-­‐mm	
  sieve.	
  	
  Ashed	
  plant	
  material	
  was	
  digested	
  in	
  aqua	
  regia	
   to	
  determine	
  total	
  quantities	
  of	
  elements	
  in	
  tissue.	
   	
   3.3.3.2 Soil	
  digestion	
   For	
  the	
  strong	
  acid	
  digestion,	
  samples	
  weighing	
  approximately	
  0	
  .5g	
  were	
  dissolved	
  in	
  17	
   mL	
  aqua	
  regia	
  in	
  250mL	
  Erlenmeyer	
  flasks	
  and	
  heated	
  until	
  evaporation.	
  	
  The	
  remaining	
   residue	
  was	
  dissolved	
  in	
  20	
  mL	
  0.1M	
  HNO3	
  and	
  passed	
  through	
  Whatman	
  #42	
  filter	
  paper.	
  	
   Samples	
  were	
  brought	
  to	
  100mL	
  volume	
  with	
  0.02M	
  HNO3	
  (Chen	
  &	
  Ma,	
  2001).	
   For	
  the	
  dilute	
  strong	
  acid	
  digestion,	
  50	
  mL	
  of	
  0.1M	
  HCl	
  was	
  added	
  to	
  5.0g	
  air-­‐dried	
  soil	
  in	
  a	
   100	
  mL	
  plastic	
  centrifuge	
  tube,.	
  	
  Tubes	
  were	
  shaken	
  for	
  1	
  hour	
  and	
  the	
  resulting	
   	
   suspension	
  filtered	
  through	
  Whatman	
  #42	
  filter	
  paper	
  and	
  brought	
  to	
  100mL	
  volume	
  with	
   0.5M	
  HNO3	
  (Black,	
  1965).	
  	
  	
  As	
  mentioned	
  in	
  the	
  previous	
  chapter,	
  concentration	
  values	
   derived	
  from	
  the	
  0.1M	
  HCl	
  extraction	
  method	
  are	
  more	
  accurate	
  indicators	
  of	
  the	
  plant-­‐ available	
  portion	
  of	
  trace	
  metals	
  in	
  soil;	
  values	
  discussed	
  in	
  this	
  paper	
  are	
  therefore	
  given	
   in	
  terms	
  of	
  ‘available’	
  concentrations	
  unless	
  otherwise	
  indicated.	
   	
    	
   35	
   	
    3.3.4 Statistical	
  analysis	
   Paired	
  t-­‐tests	
  were	
  conducted	
  to	
  assess	
  the	
  significance	
  of	
  changes	
  in	
  concentration	
   between	
  30	
  DAT	
  and	
  110	
  DAT	
  for	
  each	
  sample,	
  and	
  Kruskal-­‐Wallis	
  comparison	
  of	
  means	
   test	
  were	
  used	
  to	
  evaluate	
  significant	
  (p	
  <	
  0.05)	
  differences	
  between	
  means	
  across	
   treatment	
  groups.	
  Linear	
  regression	
  analysis	
  was	
  used	
  to	
  evaluate	
  the	
  significance	
  of	
   correlations	
  between	
  soil	
  concentrations	
  and	
  biometric	
  characters.	
  	
  Principal	
  components	
   analysis	
  was	
  used	
  as	
  a	
  multivariate	
  test	
  to	
  compare	
  factors	
  accounting	
  for	
  major	
   differences	
  in	
  the	
  data.	
  	
  All	
  statistical	
  analyses	
  were	
  performed	
  using	
  JMP	
  10.0	
  statistical	
   software	
  to	
  test	
  the	
  following	
  hypotheses:	
   	
   H0:	
  	
  Seeds	
  of	
  quinoa	
  grown	
  on	
  metal-­‐contaminated	
  sites	
  are	
  safe	
  for	
  human	
  	
   	
  	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  consumption.	
   H0:	
  	
  There	
  are	
  no	
  differences	
  in	
  trace	
  metal	
  concentrations	
  among	
  roots,	
  	
    	
  	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  shoots,	
  seeds,	
  and	
  foliage	
  of	
  quinoa	
  grown	
  in	
  contaminated	
  soils.	
   H0:	
  	
  There	
  is	
  no	
  difference	
  between	
  the	
  BCFs	
  and	
  TFs	
  of	
  trace	
  metals	
  in	
  plant	
  	
    	
  	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  tissues	
  at	
  30	
  and	
  110	
  days	
  after	
  transplant.	
   	
    	
   	
    3.4  	
    Results	
  and	
  discussion	
    The	
  results	
  of	
  this	
  experiment	
  concern	
  changes	
  in	
  contaminant	
  concentrations	
  in	
  soil,	
   transport	
  and	
  accumulation	
  trends	
  metals	
  in	
  shoots	
  and	
  foliage	
  at	
  both	
  30	
  DAT	
  and	
  110	
   DAT,	
  and	
  the	
  concentration	
  and	
  corollary	
  health	
  risks	
  of	
  heavy	
  metals	
  in	
  quinoa	
  seeds.	
  	
   Also	
  of	
  interest	
  are	
  the	
  mechanisms	
  of	
  uptake	
  and	
  how	
  they	
  are	
  affected	
  by	
  interactions	
    	
   36	
   	
    among	
  essential	
  and	
  non-­‐essential	
  elements	
  at	
  various	
  growth	
  stages.	
  	
  These	
  factors	
  are	
   considered	
  in	
  evaluating	
  the	
  phytoextraction	
  potential	
  of	
  quinoa	
  for	
  Vancouver’s	
  soils.	
  	
  	
   	
   3.4.1 Changes	
  in	
  soil	
  concentrations	
   	
  Concentrations	
  of	
   plant-­‐available	
  Cd,	
   Ni,	
  Cu,	
  Pb,	
  and	
  Mg	
   were	
  significantly	
   decreased	
  from	
  the	
   original	
    Table	
  3.2:	
  	
  	
  Mean	
  decrease	
  in	
  plant-­‐available	
  concentrations	
  of	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  Cu,	
   Cd,	
  and	
  Zn	
  in	
  potted	
  soil	
  at	
  110	
  DAT	
  	
  (significance	
  at	
  p	
  <	
  0.05)	
    Treatment	
   Pb	
    Ni	
    Cu	
    Cd	
  	
    Zn	
    A	
    24.4	
  ±	
  4.3	
   12.9	
  ±	
  3.0	
   31.5	
  ±	
  5.2	
   11.3	
  ±	
  2.8	
   16.7	
  ±	
  2.6	
    B	
    48.1	
  ±	
  8.9	
   24.9	
  ±	
  5.1	
   35.6	
  ±	
  7.2	
   13.9	
  ±	
  3.6	
   ns	
    concentrations	
  by	
  110	
  DAT	
  in	
  all	
  treatment	
  groups	
  (Table	
  3.2).	
  	
  As	
  plants	
  in	
  treatment	
   group	
  C	
  did	
  not	
  survive	
  beyond	
  30	
  days,	
  only	
  the	
  changes	
  in	
  groups	
  A	
  and	
  B	
  are	
  discussed.	
  	
   Significant	
  differences	
  between	
  groups	
  A	
  and	
  B	
  were	
  only	
  observed	
  for	
  Pb	
  	
  [Appendix	
  2-­‐B].	
   	
   It	
  is	
  commonly	
  accepted	
  that	
  the	
  uptake	
  and	
  concentrations	
  of	
  metals	
  in	
  aboveground	
  plant	
   parts	
  does	
  not	
  occur	
  in	
  a	
  linear	
  response	
  to	
  the	
  metal	
  concentrations	
  in	
  soil	
  (Dudka	
  et	
  al.,	
   1996).	
  	
  	
  This	
  is	
  in	
  part	
  due	
  to	
  the	
  species	
  and	
  solubility	
  of	
  metals	
  in	
  soil	
  solution	
  –	
  Zn	
  and	
   Cd,	
  for	
  instance,	
  occur	
  primarily	
  as	
  free	
  ions,	
  making	
  them	
  easily	
  exchangeable	
  and	
  plant-­‐ available	
  (Lasat,	
  2000).	
  Plant	
  mechanisms	
  for	
  uptake	
  and	
  transport	
  of	
  non-­‐essential	
  trace	
   metals	
  are	
  the	
  same	
  as	
  for	
  essential	
  elements-­‐	
  once	
  contaminants	
  cross	
  the	
  root	
  cell	
  wall,	
   	
   translocation	
  to	
  aboveground	
  plant	
  parts	
  is	
  controlled	
  by	
  root	
  pressure	
  and	
  leaf	
   transpiration	
  (McLaughlin	
  et	
  al.,	
  1998;	
  Lasat,	
  2000).	
   	
   	
    	
   	
   	
   37	
   	
    	
   	
    Table	
  3.3:	
  Significant	
  (p<0.05)	
  correlations	
  between	
  soil	
  	
   	
    Of	
  the	
  biometric	
    concentrations	
  and	
  biometric	
  characters	
    	
    Zn	
    for	
  each	
  sample,	
  all	
    Leaf	
  Length	
    Decrease	
   	
    but	
  Pb	
  showed	
  at	
  least	
    (30	
  DAT)	
    one	
  relationship	
  with	
    Number	
  of	
  Leaves	
   	
    trace	
  metal	
    (30	
  DAT)	
    concentrations	
  in	
  soil	
    Leaf	
  Biomass	
    characters	
  recorded	
    Cd	
    r=-­‐0.47	
   n=17	
    Increase	
   r=0.76	
   n=17	
    Ni	
    	
  Cu	
    	
    	
    	
    Increase	
   r=	
  0.57	
   n=17	
    Decrease	
   	
    Decrease	
   Decrease	
   r=-­‐0.42	
   n=23	
    r=-­‐0.43	
   n=23	
    	
    Decrease	
    (Table	
  3.3).	
  	
  Pb	
  in	
  soil	
    (110	
  DAT)	
    r=	
  -­‐0.45	
   n=23	
    occurs	
  as	
  a	
  precipitate	
    Stem	
  Biomass	
    Decrease	
   	
    and	
  not	
  as	
  the	
  free	
  ion,	
    (110	
  DAT)	
    it	
  is	
  less	
  available	
  to	
    r=-­‐0.46	
   n=19	
    Seed	
  Yield	
    Decrease	
   Decrease	
   Decrease	
   Decrease	
    plants,	
  and	
  tends	
  to	
  be	
    (110	
  DAT)	
    poorly	
  correlated	
  with	
    r=-­‐0.47	
   n=23	
    r=-­‐0.50	
   n=23	
    r=-­‐0.51	
   n=23	
    r=-­‐0.53	
   n=19	
   r=-­‐0.53	
   n=23	
    plant	
  uptake	
  (Lasat,	
  2000).	
   	
   	
    	
   3.4.2 Metal	
  concentrations	
  in	
  leaves	
  and	
  shoots	
   The	
  specific	
  relationships	
  between	
  	
  tissue	
  concentrations	
  and	
  growth	
  stage	
  are	
  likely	
  the	
   result	
  of	
  synergisms	
  between	
  essential	
  plant	
  nutrients	
  involved	
  in	
  the	
  early	
  stages	
  of	
  plant	
   growth	
  (i.e.	
  P,	
  K)	
  and	
  certain	
  trace	
  metals.	
   	
   	
  Speciation	
  of	
  metals	
  in	
  plant	
  parts	
  is	
  variable	
  and	
  may	
  change	
  over	
  the	
  duration	
  of	
  plant	
   growth	
  (MacNicol	
  &	
  Beckett,	
  1985).	
  	
  Concentrations	
  of	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  and	
  Ni	
  in	
  foliage	
  were	
   significantly	
  higher	
  at	
  30	
  DAT	
  than	
  at	
  110	
  DAT.	
  The	
  change	
  in	
  leaf	
  concentrations	
  from	
  30	
   	
   38	
   	
    to	
  110	
  days	
  was	
  significantly	
  greater	
  in	
  group	
  B	
  for	
  Ni	
  and	
  Zn.	
  	
  There	
  were	
  no	
  significant	
   differences	
  in	
  BCF	
  for	
  foliage	
  between	
  the	
  two	
  sampling	
  times,	
  suggesting	
  that	
  plant	
  uptake	
   is	
  a	
  function	
  of	
  plant	
  size	
  [Appendix	
  B-­‐1].	
   	
   At	
  110	
  DAT,	
  Ni,	
  Pb,	
  and	
  Cd	
  had	
  the	
  highest	
  aboveground	
  concentrations	
  in	
  seeds,	
  while	
  Zn	
   and	
  Cu	
  were	
  highest	
  in	
  foliage	
  (Figure	
  3.1).	
  At	
  30	
  DAT,	
  aboveground	
  concentrations	
  were	
   highest	
  in	
  shoots	
  for	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  and	
  Cu,	
  and	
  Zn	
  concentrations	
  were	
  highest	
  in	
  foliage	
   (Figure	
  3.2).	
  	
  Of	
  the	
  elements	
  studied,	
  aboveground	
  concentrations	
  surpassed	
  root	
   concentrations	
  for	
  Pb,	
  Cd,	
  and	
  Ni	
  only	
  at	
  30	
  DAT.	
  	
    	
    	
   	
    	
    	
   39	
   	
    6000 1500  Pb Concentration (ppm)  Cu Concentration (ppm)  5000 4000 3000 2000  1000  500  1000 0  A  0  B  A  Treatment Group  B  Treatment Group  	
   1500 1250  Cd Concentration (ppm)  Zn Concentration (ppm)  1500  1000  500  1000 750 500 250  0  A  0  B  A  B  Treatment Group  Plant Part  	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
    Ni Concentration (ppm)  1500  	
    1000  500  0  A  B  Treatment Group  	
    	
    	
    Figure	
  3.1:	
  	
  Concentrations	
  (mg	
  kg-­‐1)	
  of	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  and	
  Cu	
  in	
  foliage,	
  shoots,	
  seeds	
   	
   and	
  roots	
  at	
  110	
  DAT	
    	
   	
   40	
    	
    	
    	
    	
   Figure	
  3.2:	
  Partitioning	
  of	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
  Ni,	
  Cu	
  and	
  Pb	
  in	
  foliage,	
  shoots,	
  and	
  roots	
  at	
  30	
  DAT	
    	
    	
    3.4.3 Seed	
  concentrations	
   The	
  concentrations	
  and	
  amounts	
  of	
  trace	
  metals	
  in	
  quinoa	
  seeds	
  are	
  important	
  human	
   health	
  considerations,	
  as	
  the	
  seeds	
  are	
  most	
  commonly	
  eaten	
  and	
  are	
  a	
  staple	
  of	
  many	
   diets.	
  	
  The	
  BCF	
  seeds	
  was	
  negatively	
  correlated	
  with	
  both	
  the	
  dry	
  weight	
  of	
  shoots	
  and	
  the	
   dry	
  weight	
  of	
  seeds	
  for	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  and	
  Cu,	
  indicating	
  that	
  the	
  more	
  biomass	
  produced,	
  the	
   lower	
  the	
  concentration	
  of	
  contaminants	
  	
  [Appendix	
  B-­‐2].	
  	
  	
   	
   41	
   	
    	
   The	
  results	
  of	
  this	
  experiment	
  showed	
   the	
  concentrations	
  of	
  elements	
  in	
   quinoa	
  seeds	
  follow	
  the	
  trend:	
  	
   Cu>Ni>Pb>Cd>Zn	
  [Figure	
  3.3].	
  	
  There	
   were	
  no	
  significant	
  differences	
  in	
  seed	
   concentration	
  across	
  treatment	
  groups.	
  	
  	
    Figure	
  3.3:	
  Seed	
  concentrations	
  of	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
   and	
  Cu	
  in	
  mature	
  quinoa	
  plants	
    	
   	
    	
   	
    	
  As	
  most	
  government	
  guidelines	
  for	
  human	
  consumption	
  of	
  heavy	
  metals	
  is	
  given	
  in	
  terms	
   of	
  total	
  amounts,	
  determining	
  the	
  actual	
  amounts	
  of	
  metals	
  in	
  plant	
  tissue	
  the	
  best	
  means	
   of	
  assessing	
  health	
  risks	
  related	
  to	
  ingestion	
  of	
  contaminated	
  plant	
  materials.	
  	
  The	
  weight	
   (mg)	
  in	
  mg	
  of	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  and	
  Cu	
  in	
  seeds	
  was	
  determined	
  based	
  on	
  mean	
  trace	
  metal	
   concentrations	
  per	
  1	
  gram	
  (mean	
  dry	
  weight	
  of	
  seeds	
  per	
  plant	
  was	
  1.81g	
  ±	
  0.35).	
  Metal	
   quantity	
  in	
  a	
  full	
   serving	
  of	
    Table	
  3.4:	
  	
  Upper	
  intake	
  limits	
  for	
  human	
  consumption	
  compared	
  with	
    quinoa,	
    mean	
  amounts	
  of	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  &	
  Cu	
  in	
  quinoa	
  seeds	
  (±	
  SE)	
   	
   Zn	
   Cd	
   Pb	
   Ni	
  	
   	
   Upper	
  intake	
  limit	
   25	
   0.15	
   0.03	
   0.72	
    however,	
   cannot	
  be	
   estimated	
   based	
  on	
  these	
   measurements,	
   as	
  the	
  results	
  of	
    (mg/day	
  for	
  a	
  person	
   weighing	
  60	
  kg)	
    mg/day	
    mg/day	
    mg/day	
    mg/day	
    Mean	
  concentration	
   (mg	
  kg	
  -­‐1)	
   Amount	
  (mg/g)	
  in	
   quinoa	
  seeds	
   (N=14)	
    294	
  ±	
   41.0	
    333	
  ±	
   37.4	
    383	
  ±	
   43.8	
    322	
  ±	
  	
   39.7	
    0.29	
  	
    0.33	
    0.38	
  	
    0.32	
  	
    Cu	
   5-­‐10	
   mg/day	
   660	
  ±	
   53.9	
   	
   0.66	
  	
   	
    this	
  study	
  indicate	
  that	
  seed	
  concentrations	
  decrease	
  with	
  increased	
  plant	
  production.	
  	
  	
   The	
  mean	
  total	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  and	
  Cu	
  per	
  plant	
  was	
  compared	
  with	
  the	
  European	
  Scientific	
   Commission’s	
  Health	
  Standards	
  (Scientific	
  Committee	
  on	
  Food,	
  2003;	
  European	
  Food	
   	
   42	
   	
    Safety	
  Authority,	
  2010).	
  	
  It	
  was	
  concluded	
  based	
  on	
  this	
  comparison	
  that	
  seeds	
  of	
  quinoa	
   grown	
  on	
  contaminated	
  sites	
  with	
  similar	
  levels	
  of	
  trace	
  metal	
  contamination	
  would	
  be	
  too	
   high	
  in	
  Cd	
  and	
  Pb	
  to	
  be	
  safe	
  for	
  human	
  consumption.	
   	
   3.4.4 Element	
  interactions	
   Interactions	
  between	
  essential	
  and	
  non-­‐essential	
  elements	
  in	
  the	
  soil	
  solution	
  can	
  influence	
   the	
  phytoavailability	
  of	
  some	
  heavy	
  metals	
  (Kabata-­‐Pendias,	
  2004).	
  	
  	
   Elemental	
  analysis	
  revealed	
  relationships	
  between	
  K,	
  P,	
  and	
  Ca	
  and	
  several	
  trace	
  metals	
   including	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  and	
  Zn.	
  	
  Additional	
  interactions	
  between	
  Cd	
  and	
  Zn	
  and	
  Zn	
  and	
  Cu	
   affect	
  plant	
  uptake.	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   3.4.4.1 Cadmium	
  and	
  potassium	
   Because	
  of	
  Cd’s	
  mobility	
  in	
  the	
  soil	
  solution	
  it	
  is	
  easily	
  taken	
  up	
  by	
  plants	
  and	
  transferred	
  to	
   aboveground	
  plant	
  parts	
  (Ciećko	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004).	
  	
  At	
  30	
  DAT,	
  Cd	
  had	
  the	
  highest	
  translocation	
   efficiencies	
  from	
  roots	
  to	
  leaves	
  and	
  shoots	
  than	
  any	
  other	
  heavy	
  metals,	
  although	
   translocation	
  and	
  concentration	
  was	
  still	
  less	
  than	
  that	
  of	
  essential	
  plant	
  nutrients	
  K,	
  P,	
  and	
   Mg.	
  	
  The	
  concentrations	
  of	
  K	
  in	
  quinoa	
  were	
  strongly	
  correlated	
  with	
  Cd,	
  but	
  the	
  nature	
  of	
   these	
  relationships	
  was	
  variable.	
  	
  Despite	
  strong	
  positive	
  relationships	
  between	
  the	
   	
   leaves,	
  seeds,	
  and	
  particularly	
  the	
  shoots,	
  there	
  were	
   bioconcentrations	
  of	
  Cd	
  and	
  K	
  in	
  the	
   strong	
  negative	
  correlations	
  between	
  Cd	
  and	
  K	
  in	
  the	
  soil.	
  	
  The	
  results	
  of	
  this	
  experiment	
   support	
  those	
  of	
  Ciećko	
  et	
  al.	
  (2004)	
  who	
  found	
  that	
  soil	
  contamination	
  with	
  Cd	
  caused	
   either	
  an	
  increase	
  or	
  a	
  decrease	
  in	
  K	
  content	
  depending	
  mainly	
  on	
  plant	
  species	
  and	
   specific	
  plant	
  organ.	
   	
    	
   43	
   	
    The	
  high	
  concentration	
  of	
  K	
  in	
  immature	
  quinoa	
  plants	
  shows	
  the	
  effect	
  of	
  growth	
  stage	
  on	
   translocation	
  of	
  essential	
  and	
  non-­‐essential	
  elements.	
  	
  Young	
  plants	
  actively	
  accumulate	
   high	
  concentrations	
  of	
  K	
  as	
  they	
  grow,	
  especially	
  in	
  the	
  shoots.	
  	
  At	
  30	
  DAT,	
  the	
  soil	
   concentration	
  of	
  K	
  was	
  negatively	
  correlated	
  with	
  the	
  concentration	
  and	
  translocation	
   efficiency	
  of	
  Cd	
  in	
  the	
  shoots,	
  suggesting	
  an	
  antagonistic	
  relationship	
  between	
  the	
  two	
   elements.	
  	
  	
  The	
  soil	
  concentrations	
  of	
  Cd	
  exhibited	
  corresponding	
  negative	
  relationships	
   with	
  the	
  uptake	
  and	
  bioconcentration	
  of	
  K	
  in	
  the	
  shoots,	
  seeds,	
  and	
  foliage	
  as	
  the	
  plants	
   reached	
  maturity	
  [Appendices	
  B-­‐3	
  –	
  B-­‐6].	
  	
  	
   	
   In	
  experiments	
  with	
  oat,	
  yellow	
  lupine,	
  and	
  radish,	
  Ciećko	
  et	
  al.	
  (2004)	
  reported	
  that	
  high	
   concentrations	
  of	
  Cd	
  in	
  the	
  soil	
  decreased	
  the	
  content	
  of	
  potassium	
  in	
  oat	
  grain	
  and	
  shoots	
   of	
  the	
  other	
  plants.	
  	
  In	
  addition	
  their	
  research	
  showed	
  that	
  the	
  content	
  of	
  K	
  was	
  positively	
   correlated	
  with	
  plant	
  yield.	
  	
  Building	
  on	
  that	
  observation,	
  this	
  study	
  found	
  that	
  neither	
  soil	
   nor	
  organ	
  concentrations	
  of	
  Cd	
  affected	
  quinoa	
  yield	
  (estimated	
  here	
  by	
  the	
  dry	
  weight	
  of	
   seeds).	
  	
  However,	
  K	
  concentrations	
  of	
  shoots	
  at	
  30	
  and	
  110	
  DAT	
  were	
  positively	
  correlated	
   with	
  total	
  plant	
  yield	
  [Appendix	
  B-­‐7].	
   	
   	
   3.4.4.2 Cadmium	
  and	
  zinc	
   	
   Plants	
  have	
  no	
  known	
  physiological	
  needs	
  for	
  Cd,	
  thus	
  it	
  has	
  been	
  hypothesized	
  that	
   interactions	
  during	
  uptake	
  result	
  from	
  plants’	
  inability	
  to	
  distinguish	
  Cd	
  ions	
  from	
  Zn	
  ions	
  	
   (Wuana	
  &	
  Okieiman,	
  2011;	
  Lasat,	
  1999).	
  	
  Both	
  are	
  mobile	
  elements	
  in	
  the	
  soil	
  solution,	
  as	
   they	
  occur	
  primarily	
  in	
  exchangeable	
  form.	
  	
  In	
  addition	
  to	
  their	
  chemical	
  similarities,	
  Cd	
   and	
  Zn	
  are	
  widely	
  observed	
  in	
  the	
  same	
  pollution	
  scenarios,	
  increasing	
  the	
  likelihood	
  of	
   interaction	
  (McKenna	
  et	
  al.,	
  1993).	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   44	
   	
    Studies	
  on	
  the	
  effects	
  of	
  Cd-­‐Zn	
  relationships	
  on	
  plant	
  uptake	
  have	
  shown	
  the	
  behavior	
  of	
   the	
  two	
  elements	
  to	
  be	
  synergistic	
  or	
  antagonistic	
  depending	
  on	
  plant	
  species	
  (Luo	
  &	
   Rimmer	
  1995;	
  McKenna	
  et	
  al.,	
  1993).	
  	
  Quinoa	
  showed	
  a	
  significant	
  positive	
  association	
   between	
  Cd	
  and	
  Zn	
  in	
  terms	
  of	
  plant	
  yield	
  (dry	
  weight	
  of	
  aboveground	
  plant	
  parts)	
  and	
   total	
  accumulation	
  of	
  both	
  metals	
  at	
  30	
  and	
  110	
  DAT.	
  	
  TFfoliage	
  and	
  TFshoot	
  for	
  each	
  element	
   were	
  significantly	
  higher	
  at	
  110	
  DAT	
  given	
  higher	
  concentrations	
  of	
  the	
  other	
  [Appendices	
   B-­‐8	
  &	
  B-­‐9].	
   	
   	
   3.4.4.3 Zinc	
  and	
  copper	
   The	
  concentrations	
  of	
  Cu	
  and	
  Zn	
  in	
  aboveground	
  tissues	
  were	
  approximately	
  the	
  same	
  for	
   plants	
  at	
  both	
  30	
  and	
  110	
  DAT,	
  suggesting	
  similar	
  mechanisms	
  for	
  uptake	
  of	
  the	
  two	
   elements.	
  	
  	
  Luo	
  and	
  Rimmer	
  (1994)	
  found	
  that	
  various	
  amounts	
  of	
  added	
  Cu	
  increased	
  Zn	
   uptake	
  by	
  barley	
  plants	
  (1994).	
  	
  The	
  Cu-­‐Zn	
  synergism	
  apparent	
  in	
  quinoa	
  echoes	
  their	
   hypothesis	
  that	
  Zn	
  and	
  Cu	
  would	
  effectively	
  substitute	
  for	
  each	
  other	
  based	
  on	
  their	
   chemical	
  similarity.	
  	
  	
   	
   The	
  Zn-­‐Cu	
  synergism	
  in	
  quinoa	
  is	
  demonstrated	
  by	
  increased	
  TFfoliage	
  values	
  at	
  both	
  stages	
   of	
  growth	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  increased	
  total	
  plant	
  uptake	
  of	
  both	
  elements	
  at	
  30	
  DAT.	
  	
  It	
  is	
   	
   interesting	
  to	
  note	
  that	
  this	
  relationship	
  is	
  significant	
  only	
  in	
  the	
  non-­‐spiked	
  soil	
   (treatment	
  A),	
  while	
  antagonistic	
  concentrations	
  of	
  Zn	
  and	
  Cu	
  in	
  the	
  treated	
  soil	
  (treatment	
   B)	
  were	
  significant	
  in	
  the	
  root	
  concentrations,	
  TFfoliage,	
  and	
  TFshoot	
  for	
  both	
  elements	
   [Appendices	
  B-­‐8	
  &	
  B-­‐9].	
  	
  	
  Based	
  on	
  McLaughlin	
  (1998)	
  the	
  evaluation	
  of	
  the	
  effects	
  of	
   sulfate	
  on	
  Cd	
  uptake	
  by	
  plants	
  from	
  soil,	
  it	
  can	
  be	
  posited	
  that	
  the	
  apparent	
  differences	
   between	
  treatment	
  groups	
  was	
  unrelated	
  to	
  increasing	
  concentrations	
  of	
  SO4	
  and	
  is	
   therefore	
  a	
  function	
  of	
  differences	
  in	
  Zn	
  and	
  Cu	
  concentrations	
  in	
  the	
  soils	
  of	
  each	
   treatment	
  group	
  [Appendix	
  B-­‐9].	
   	
   45	
   	
    	
   Soil	
  Zn	
  was	
  negatively	
  associated	
  with	
  total	
  plant	
  yield	
  (aboveground	
  dry	
  weight)	
  in	
   immature	
  plants.	
  	
  	
  This	
  relationship	
  is	
  likely	
  a	
  reflection	
  of	
  the	
  important	
  role	
  Cu	
  plays	
  in	
   water	
  transport	
  and	
  plant	
  growth;	
  substitution	
  of	
  Zn	
  for	
  Cu	
  at	
  this	
  early	
  growth	
  stage	
  may	
   be	
  responsible	
  for	
  diminished	
  growth	
  (Wuana	
  &	
  Okieiman,	
  2011)	
  [Appendix	
  B-­‐10].	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   3.4.4.4 Lead	
   Pb	
  is	
  difficult	
  for	
  phytoextraction,	
  as	
  it	
  occurs	
  primarily	
  as	
  a	
  soil	
  precipitate	
  rather	
  than	
  as	
   the	
  free	
  metal;	
  it	
  is	
  not	
  readily	
  absorbed	
  or	
  accumulated	
  by	
  plants	
  (Lasat,	
  2000;	
  Wuana	
  &	
   Okieiman,	
  2011).	
  	
  For	
  most	
  plant	
  species,	
  Pb	
  is	
  either	
  adsorbed	
  to	
  the	
  root	
  membrane	
  or	
   absorbed	
  by	
  the	
  roots	
  where	
  it	
  is	
  sequestered	
  or	
  excreted	
  by	
  plant	
  detoxification	
  systems.	
  	
   Thus,	
  only	
  a	
  minor	
  fraction	
  is	
  translocated	
  to	
  aboveground	
  plant	
  parts	
  (Pourrut	
  et	
  al.,	
   2011).	
  	
  When	
  Pb	
  does	
  successfully	
  enter	
  the	
  plant	
  system,	
  it	
  can	
  	
   inhibit	
  photosynthesis,	
  as	
  demonstrated	
  by	
  the	
  negative	
  correlation	
  between	
  Pb	
   concentration	
  in	
  roots	
  and	
  total	
  plant	
  yield	
  in	
  quinoa	
  [Appendix	
  B-­‐11].	
  	
  	
   Soil	
  Ca	
  can	
  have	
  an	
  effect	
  on	
  uptake	
  of	
  lead	
  from	
  the	
  soil	
  solution.	
  	
  Linear	
  regression	
   analysis	
  showed	
  negative	
  correlations	
  at	
  110	
  DAT	
  between	
  BCFroots	
  for	
  Ca	
  and	
  TFseed	
  for	
  Pb.	
  	
   These	
  observations	
  are	
  supported	
  b	
   y	
  Garland	
  and	
  Wilkins	
  (1980)	
  who	
  reported	
  	
  that	
   calcium	
  in	
  root	
  solutions	
  was	
  an	
  effective	
  repressor	
  of	
  Pb	
  uptake.	
  	
  (The	
  reduction	
  in	
  Pb	
   accumulation	
  in	
  their	
  experiments	
  was	
  significantly	
  greater	
  than	
  would	
  be	
  expected	
  from	
   merely	
  raising	
  soil	
  pH).	
   	
    	
   46	
   	
    3.4.5 Phytoextraction	
  potential	
  for	
  C.	
  quinoa	
   Concentrations	
  of	
  trace	
  metals	
  in	
  aboveground	
  plant	
  tissues,	
  total	
  elements	
  accumulated	
  in	
   harvestable	
  biomass,	
  and	
  the	
  TFfoliage,	
  TFshoot,	
  and	
  TFseed	
  were	
  evaluated	
  to	
  assess	
  the	
   phytoextraction	
  potential	
  of	
  quinoa	
  plants.	
  	
  According	
  to	
  Lasat	
  (1999),	
  hyperaccumulator	
   species	
  will	
  concentrate:	
   >100ppm	
  Cd,	
  	
   >1,000ppm	
  Cu	
  and	
  Pb,	
  and	
  	
   >10,000ppm	
  Ni	
  and	
  Zn.	
  	
    	
    	
    	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
    By	
  this	
  metric,	
  the	
  genotype	
  of	
  quinoa	
  studied	
  is	
  a	
  hyperaccumulator	
  of	
  Cd	
  in	
  shoots,	
  leaves	
   and	
  seeds	
  at	
  both	
  stages	
  of	
  growth,	
  and	
  Cu	
  and	
  Pb	
  during	
  early	
  growth.	
   	
   	
  Table	
  3.5:	
  Translocation	
  factors	
  at	
  30	
  and	
  110	
  DAT	
    	
  Translocation	
  (TF)	
  values	
  indicate	
   that	
  quinoa	
  may	
  be	
  a	
  more	
  efficient	
    30	
  DAT	
    	
    Foliage	
   Shoots	
   Foliage	
   Shoots	
   Seeds	
    accumulator	
  of	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  and	
  Cu	
   than	
  suggested	
  by	
  the	
  previous	
   assessment	
  (Table	
  3.5).	
  	
  Within	
  the	
   scope	
  of	
  this	
  experiment,	
  quinoa	
   	
   was	
  more	
  effective	
  at	
  concentrating	
   contaminants	
  in	
  tissues	
  during	
  the	
   early	
  stages	
  of	
  growth,	
  with	
  	
  TFshoot	
   >	
  1	
  for	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  and	
  Ni	
  in	
  shoots.	
  	
  At	
   maturity,	
  quinoa	
  seems	
  to	
   hyperaccumulate	
  Zn	
  in	
  tissues,	
   which	
  is	
  common	
  for	
    110	
  DAT	
    Zn	
   A	
    0.10	
    0.10	
    0.61	
    0.37	
    0.22	
    B	
   Cd	
   A	
    0.56	
    0.18	
    1.22	
    0.45	
    0.47	
    0.81	
    1.34	
    0.24	
    0.30	
    0.36	
    B	
   Pb	
   A	
    0.76	
   0.67	
    1.11	
   1.13	
    0.58	
   0.23	
    0.56	
   0.29	
    0.71	
   0.33	
    B	
   Ni	
   A	
    0.64	
   0.74	
    1.02	
   1.20	
    0.43	
   0.26	
    0.46	
   0.28	
    0.57	
   0.35	
    B	
   Cu	
   A	
    0.40	
   0.34	
    0.43	
   0.56	
    0.74	
   0.19	
    0.50	
   0.17	
    0.71	
   0.18	
    B	
    0.30	
    0.42	
    0.26	
    0.19	
    0.25	
   	
   47	
    	
    hyperaccumulators	
  of	
  Zn	
  due	
  to	
  vacuolar	
  sequestration	
  in	
  the	
  leaves	
  (McGrath	
  &	
  Zhao,	
   2003).	
  	
   	
    	
    The	
  results	
  of	
  this	
  study	
  clearly	
  show	
  that	
  although	
  BCFs	
  and	
  TCFs	
  of	
  metals	
  were	
   substantially	
  lower	
  after	
  110	
  days,	
  the	
  amount	
  of	
  total	
  metals	
  removed	
  was	
  considerably	
   higher.	
  	
  This	
  indicates	
  that	
  growing	
  one	
  crop	
  of	
  quinoa	
  plants	
  to	
  maturity	
  over	
  110	
  days	
   would	
  remove	
  greater	
  quantities	
  of	
  metals	
  from	
  soil	
  than	
  growing	
  3	
  or	
  4	
  crops	
  of	
  quinoa	
   over	
  successive	
  30-­‐day	
  periods.	
  	
  	
  Such	
  observations	
  further	
  suggest	
  total	
  metals	
   accumulated	
  in	
  above-­‐ground	
  plant	
  tissue	
  may	
  provide	
  a	
  more	
  accurate	
  assessment	
  of	
  a	
   plant’s	
  phytoextraction	
  potential	
  than	
  the	
  translocation	
  factor.	
   	
   	
  Bioconcentration	
  values	
  for	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
  Cu,	
  and	
  Ni	
  in	
  aboveground	
  plant	
  parts	
  were	
  compared	
   between	
  this	
  study	
  and	
  the	
  Bhargava	
  et	
  al.	
  (2008)	
  study	
  at	
  30	
  days	
  after	
  germination.	
  	
  Both	
   studies	
  used	
   the	
  same	
   genotype	
  of	
   quinoa,	
   however,	
  the	
   study	
  by	
   Bhargava	
  et	
   al.	
  did	
  not	
    Table	
  3.6:	
  Mean	
  total	
  accumulation	
  of	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  &	
  Cu	
  content	
  (mg)	
  per	
  plant	
  part	
    	
    30	
  DAT	
    	
    Zn	
  (mg)	
   Cd	
  (mg)	
   	
  Pb	
  (mg)	
   Ni	
  (mg)	
   Cu	
  (mg)	
    110	
  DAT	
    	
    Total	
   Shoots	
   Foliage	
    Total	
   Shoots	
   Foliage	
   Seeds	
    0.84	
   0.50	
    0.25	
   0.31	
    0.59	
   0.19	
    11.3	
   5.31	
    3.75	
   2.49	
    7.05	
   2.22	
    0.53	
   0.60	
    0.58	
    0.37	
    0.21	
    6.08	
    2.94	
    2.45	
    0.69	
    0.62	
    0.36	
    0.26	
    6.99	
    3.03	
    3.38	
    0.58	
    0.43	
    0.25	
    13.2	
    5.51	
    6.52	
    1.19	
    0.68	
    	
    distinguish	
  between	
  foliage	
  and	
  shoots,	
  but	
  combined	
  all	
  aboveground	
  plant	
  tissue.	
  	
  The	
   plants	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  had	
  higher	
  bioconcentrations	
  of	
  Ni	
  and	
  Zn,	
  but	
  lower	
  bioconcentrations	
   of	
  Cu	
  and	
  Cd	
  than	
  the	
  earlier	
  study.	
  	
  Different	
  levels	
  of	
  contamination	
  in	
  soil,	
  as	
  well	
  as	
   weather	
  and	
  environmental	
  effects	
  may	
  have	
  caused	
  these	
  differences.	
   	
    	
   48	
   	
    3.5 Conclusions	
   In	
  summary,	
  the	
  findings	
  of	
  this	
  research	
  are:	
   (1) The	
  seeds	
  of	
  Chenopodium	
  quinoa	
  grown	
  in	
  metal-­‐contaminated	
  soil	
  are	
   not	
  appropriate	
  for	
  human	
  consumption	
  based	
  on	
  current	
  limits	
  for	
   human	
  consumption	
  of	
  trace	
  metals	
  in	
  food.	
   	
   (2) Uptake	
  and	
  concentration	
  of	
  Zn,	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  and	
  Cu	
  in	
  roots	
  and	
  tissues	
  	
   varied	
  according	
  to	
  plant	
  growth	
  stage,	
  plant	
  organ,	
  and	
  concentrations	
  of	
   other	
  essential	
  and	
  non-­‐essential	
  elements.	
   	
   (3) Quinoa	
  is	
  a	
  hyperaccumulator	
  of	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  and	
  Ni	
  in	
  the	
  early	
  stages	
  of	
   growth,	
  however	
  it	
  removes	
  more	
  metals	
  from	
  soil	
  when	
  grown	
  to	
   maturity	
  (110-­‐120	
  days).	
  	
  Due	
  to	
  its	
  easy	
  cultivation	
  in	
  poor	
  soils	
  and	
   high	
  biomass	
  production,	
  it	
  is	
  recommended	
  for	
  phytoextraction	
  of	
  Cd,	
   Pb,	
  and	
  Ni	
  in	
  lightly-­‐	
  to	
  moderately-­‐contaminated	
  sites	
  with	
  multi-­‐metal	
   contamination	
  scenarios	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    	
   49	
   	
    4 Conclusions	
  and	
  recommendations	
   	
   This	
  research	
  project	
  was	
  inspired	
  by	
  the	
  questions	
  and	
  concerns	
  of	
  urban	
  gardeners;	
  the	
   conclusions	
  and	
  recommendations	
  that	
  follow	
  are	
  therefore	
  intended	
  for	
  practical,	
  as	
  well	
   as	
  academic	
  applications.	
  Despite	
   widespread	
  public	
  interest	
  in	
    “…	
  there	
  appears	
  to	
  be	
  a	
   widening	
  gap	
  between	
   science	
  and	
  practicality.	
  	
   Successful	
  applications	
  of	
   metal-­‐accumulating	
  plants	
   for	
  remediation	
  or	
  metal	
   recovery	
  purposes,	
  even	
  at	
   the	
  pilot	
  scale,	
  are	
  still	
   alarmingly	
  few	
  and	
  far	
   between.”	
    phytoremediation	
  technologies,	
  there	
   has	
  been	
  low	
  adoption	
  by	
  municipal	
   governments,	
  as	
  large-­‐scale	
  civil	
   engineering	
  technologies	
  are	
  often	
   required	
  for	
  quick	
  remediation	
  of	
   commercially	
  viable	
  properties.	
  	
   While	
  the	
  impediment	
  to	
  brownfields	
   re-­‐development	
  is	
  often	
  financial,	
  the	
   impediment	
  to	
  farmer/citizen-­‐	
  led	
   remediation	
  efforts	
  is	
  generally	
  a	
  lack	
  of	
   access	
  to	
  technical	
  guidance	
  and	
   scientific	
  resources.	
  	
  Some	
  additional	
    	
    	
    	
    	
    -­‐	
  	
  AJM	
  Baker,	
  2002	
    avenues	
  of	
  research	
  are	
  recommended,	
   as	
  are	
  municipal	
  and	
  university	
  partnerships	
  that	
  can	
  transform	
  phytoremediation	
   	
   research	
  into	
  safe,	
  scientifically	
  viable,	
  and	
  widespread	
  practice.	
  	
  	
   	
    4.1	
   Recommendations	
  for	
  further	
  research	
   Additional	
  studies	
  on	
  the	
  bioaccumulation	
  of	
  trace	
  metal	
  contaminants	
  in	
  the	
  edible	
   portions	
  of	
  common	
  crop	
  plants	
  is	
  an	
  area	
  of	
  increasing	
  interest	
  for	
  urban	
  farmers	
  and	
   gardeners,	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  for	
  those	
  who	
  purchase	
  their	
  produce	
  at	
  farmers’	
  markets	
  and	
  locally-­‐ 	
   50	
   	
    sourced	
  restaurants.	
  	
  In	
  addition,	
  a	
  comprehensive	
  and	
  thorough	
  review	
  of	
  existing	
   literature	
  on	
  that	
  subject	
  would	
  be	
  particularly	
  useful	
  for	
  practitioners,	
  and	
  may	
  be	
  used	
   inform	
  progressive	
  municipal	
  food	
  policies.	
  	
   	
   Continued	
  research	
  on	
  the	
  availability,	
  volume,	
  and	
  origin	
  of	
  atmospherically	
  deposited	
   trace	
  metals	
  on	
  soil	
  and	
  crop	
  tissue	
  is	
  particularly	
  timely	
  and	
  should	
  be	
  conducted	
  both	
  for	
   leaf	
  surface	
  contamination	
  and	
  soil	
  contamination	
  over	
  time	
  (Lum	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987;	
  McKendry	
  et	
   al.,	
  2001).	
  	
  	
   	
   A	
  comparison	
  of	
  the	
  trace	
  metal	
  contents	
  in	
  food	
  crops	
  produced	
  in	
  Vancouver	
  with	
  that	
  of	
   food	
  crops	
  produced	
  in	
  surrounding	
  rural	
  areas	
  would	
  also	
  be	
  a	
  useful	
  and	
  valuable	
  area	
  of	
   study.	
  	
  Such	
  a	
  comparison	
  might	
  build	
  on	
  De	
  Pieri	
  et	
  al.’s	
  (1997)	
  research	
  on	
  micronutrient	
   concentrations	
  in	
  crop	
  tissues	
  and	
  soils	
  in	
  the	
  Lower	
  Fraser	
  Valley.	
  	
  	
   	
    4.2	
   Recommendations	
  for	
  partnerships	
   Partnerships	
  between	
  government,	
  practitioners,	
  and	
  universities	
  are	
  highly	
  recommended	
   to	
  develop	
  practical	
  pilot	
  programs	
  in	
  urban	
  brownfields.	
  	
  Government	
  organizations	
  can	
   provide	
  assistance	
  with	
  initiating	
  these	
  partnerships,	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  with	
  identifying	
   	
   appropriate	
  pieces	
  of	
  land	
  and	
  arranging	
  for	
  proper	
  safe	
  disposal	
  of	
  contaminated	
  plant	
   material.	
  	
  Citizen	
  groups	
  may	
  provide	
  the	
  long-­‐term	
  commitment	
  needed	
  for	
  such	
  projects,	
   and	
  may	
  benefit	
  from	
  increased	
  access	
  to	
  vacant	
  land.	
  	
  University	
  partnerships	
  are	
   essential	
  for	
  the	
  necessary	
  soil	
  testing	
  and	
  interpretation	
  needed	
  for	
  evaluating	
  the	
  success	
   of	
  such	
  projects.	
  	
  	
    	
   51	
   	
    	
   	
    References	
   Baker,	
  AJM	
  (1981).	
  	
  Accumulators	
  and	
  excluders-­‐	
  strategies	
  in	
  the	
  response	
  of	
  plants	
  to	
   	
   heavy	
  metals.	
  	
  Journal	
  of	
  Plant	
  Nutrition,	
  2:	
  643-­‐654.	
   Baker,	
  AJM	
  &	
  R.R.	
  Brooks	
  (1989).	
  	
  Terrestrial	
  higher	
  plants	
  which	
  hyperaccumulate	
   	
   metallic	
  elements	
  –	
  a	
  review	
  of	
  their	
  distribution,	
  ecology,	
  and	
  phytochemistry.	
  	
   	
   Biorecovery,	
  1:81-­‐126.	
   Baker,	
  AJM	
  (2002).	
  	
  In	
  search	
  of	
  the	
  Holy	
  Grail	
  –	
  a	
  further	
  step	
  in	
  understanding	
  metal	
   	
   hyperaccumulation?	
  	
  New	
  Phytologist.	
  	
  155:	
  1-­‐7.	
   Ball,	
  D.F.	
  (1964).	
  	
  loss-­‐on-­‐ignition	
  as	
  an	
  estimate	
  of	
  organic	
  matter	
  and	
  organic	
  	
   	
   carbon	
  in	
  non-­‐calcareous	
  soils.	
  	
  Journal	
  of	
  Soil	
  Science,	
  15:1,	
  84-­‐92.	
   	
   BC	
  Brownfield	
  Renewal	
  (2013).	
  	
  A	
  community	
  resource	
  guide	
  for	
  brownfields	
  redevelopment:	
   	
   Case	
  studies.	
  	
  Retrieved	
  February	
  2,	
  2013	
  from: 	
   http://www.brownfieldrenewal.gov.bc.ca/Documents/BrownfieldsRedevelopment_CaseStudies_Web.pdf	
   BC	
  Ministry	
  of	
  Environment	
  (2009a).	
  	
  Profiles	
  on	
  remediation	
  projects:	
  Nexen:	
  Former	
   	
   chlor-­‐alkali	
  plant,	
  Squamish,	
  BC	
  (Report	
  no.	
  2).	
  	
  Retrieved	
  October	
  10,	
  2011	
  from:	
   	
   http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/epd/remediation/project-­‐profiles/pdf/nexen.pdf	
   BC	
  Ministry	
  of	
  Environment	
  (2009b).	
  	
  Profiles	
  on	
  remediation	
  projects:	
  Burnaby	
  gun	
  club,	
   	
   Burnaby,	
  BC	
  (Report	
  no.	
  3).	
  	
  Retrieved	
  October	
  10,	
  2011	
  from:	
   	
   http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/epd/remediation/project-­‐profiles/pdf/burnaby-­‐gun-­‐club.pdf	
   BC	
  Ministry	
  of	
  Environment	
  (2009c).	
  	
  Profiles	
  on	
  remediation	
  projects:	
  Teck	
  Cominco	
  lead-­‐ 	
   zinc	
  smelter,	
  Trail,	
  BC	
  (Report	
  No.	
  5).	
  Retrieved	
  October	
  10,	
  2011	
  from:	
   	
   http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/epd/remediation/project-­‐profiles/pdf/teck-­‐cominco.pdf	
   Bhargava,	
  Atul,	
  Sudir	
  Shulda,	
  Jatin	
  Srivastava,	
  Nandita	
  Singh,	
  Deepak	
  Ohri	
  (2008):	
   	
   Chenopodium:	
  a	
  prospective	
  plant	
  for	
  phytoextraction.	
  	
  Acta	
  Physiol	
  Plant,	
  	
   	
   30:	
  111-­‐120.	
   	
   	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    52	
    	
   Black,	
  Charles	
  Allen	
  (1965).	
  	
  Methods	
  of	
  Soil	
  Analysis,	
  Vol.	
  2.	
  	
  American	
  Society	
  of	
  	
   	
   Agronomy,	
  pp.	
  1087-­‐8.	
   	
   	
   Brooks,	
  R.R.	
  	
  (2008).	
  	
  Plants	
  that	
  hyperaccumulate	
  heavy	
  metals.	
  	
  In	
  Plants	
  and	
  the	
   	
   Chemical	
  Elements:	
  Biochemistry,	
  Uptake,	
  Tolerance	
  and	
  Toxicity	
  (ed.	
  M.E.	
  Farago),	
   	
   Wiley-­‐VCh	
  Verlag	
  GmbH,	
  Weinheim,	
  Germany.	
  	
  DOI:	
  10.1002/9783527615919.ch4	
   Burt,	
  Rebecca,	
  ed.	
  (2009).	
  	
  Soil	
  Survey	
  Field	
  and	
  Laboratory	
  Methods	
  Manual.	
  	
  	
   Lincoln:	
  National	
  Soil	
  Survey	
  Center,	
  USDA	
  Natural	
  Resources	
  Conservation	
  Service.	
  	
  	
   	
   Chen,	
  Ming,	
  &	
  Ma,	
  Lena	
  Q.	
  (2001).	
  Comparison	
  of	
  three	
  aqua	
  regia	
  digestion	
  methods	
  for	
  20	
   Florida	
  soils.	
  	
  Soil	
  Science	
  Society	
  of	
  America,	
  65:	
  491-­‐499.	
  	
  	
   Ciećko,	
  Z.,	
  Kalembasa,	
  S.,	
  Wyszowski,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Rolka,	
  E.	
  (2004).	
  	
  Effect	
  of	
  soil	
  contamination	
  by	
   	
   cadmium	
  on	
  potassium	
  uptake	
  by	
  plants.	
  	
  Polish	
  Journal	
  of	
  Environmental	
  Studies, 	
   13:3:	
  333-­‐337.	
   City	
  of	
  Vancouver	
  (2012a).	
  	
  Free	
  compost	
  for	
  community	
  gardens.	
  	
  	
  Retrieved	
  July	
  21,	
  2012	
   	
   from:	
  	
   	
   http://vancouver.ca/home-­‐property-­‐development/donations-­‐for-­‐community-­‐projects.aspx	
    	
   City	
  of	
  Vancouver	
  (2012b).	
  	
  Greenest	
  city:	
  2020	
  action	
  plan.	
  	
  Retrieved	
  January	
  20,	
  2013	
   	
   from:	
  	
   http://vancouver.ca/files/cov/Greenest-­‐city-­‐action-­‐plan.pdf	
   Cobb,	
  George	
  P.,	
  Kristin	
  Sands,	
  Melissa	
  Waters,	
  Bobby	
  G.	
  Wixson,	
  &	
  Elaine	
  	
   	
   Dorward-­‐King	
  (2000).	
  	
  Accumulation	
  of	
  heavy	
  metals	
  by	
  vegetables	
  grown	
   	
   in	
  mine	
  wastes.	
  	
  Environmental	
  Toxicology	
  and	
  Chemistry,	
  19:3	
  pp.	
  600-­‐607.	
   	
   Contaminated	
  Sites	
  Regulation,	
  B.C.	
  Reg.	
  375/96	
  (2011).	
  	
  Retrieved	
  February	
  15,	
  2012	
  	
   	
   from:	
  	
  	
   	
   http://www.bclaws.ca/EPLibraries/bclaws_new/document/ID/freeside/375_96_00	
   	
   Craul,	
  P.J.	
  (1992).	
  	
  Urban	
  soil	
  in	
  landscape	
  design.	
  	
  John	
  Wiley	
  and	
  Sons,	
  New	
  York,	
  NY.	
  	
  	
   	
   396	
  pp.	
   	
   Das,	
  P.,	
  S.	
  Samantaray,	
  &	
  G.R.	
  Rout	
  (1997).	
  	
  Studies	
  on	
  cadmium	
  toxicity	
  in	
  plants:	
  a	
  review.	
  	
   	
   Environmental	
  Pollution,	
  98:1,	
  29-­‐36.	
   DeKimpe,	
  Christian	
  R.	
  &	
  Morel,	
  Jean-­‐Lewis	
  (2000).	
  Urban	
  soil	
  management:	
  A	
  growing	
   concern.	
  Soil	
  Science,	
  165:1,	
  1-­‐10.	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    53	
    	
   De	
  Pieri,	
  L.A.,	
  Buckley,	
  W.T.,	
  &	
  Kowalenko,	
  C.G.	
  (1997).	
  	
  Cadmium	
  and	
  lead	
  concentrations	
   	
   of	
  commercially	
  grown	
  vegetables	
  and	
  of	
  soils	
  in	
  the	
  Lower	
  Fraser	
  Valley	
  of	
  British	
   	
   	
  Columbia.	
  	
  Canadian	
  Journal	
  of	
  Soil	
  Science,	
  77:1,	
  51-­‐57.	
   Dube,	
  A.,	
  R.	
  Zbytniewski,	
  T.	
  Kowalkowski,	
  E.	
  Cukrowska,	
  &	
  B.	
  Buszewski	
  (2001).	
   	
   Adsorption	
  and	
  migration	
  of	
  heavy	
  metals	
  in	
  soil.	
  	
  Polish	
  Journal	
  of	
  Environmental	
   	
   Studies,	
  10:1,	
  	
  1-­‐10.	
   	
   Dudka,	
  S.,	
  M.	
  Piotrowska,	
  &	
  H.	
  Terelak	
  (1996).	
  	
  Transfer	
  of	
  cadmium,	
  lead,	
  and	
  zinc	
  	
   from	
  industrially	
  contaminated	
  soil	
  to	
  crop	
  plants:	
  A	
  field	
  study.	
  	
  Environmental	
   Pollution,	
  94:2,	
  181-­‐188.	
   	
   EFSA	
  Panel	
  on	
  Contaminants	
  in	
  the	
  Food	
  Chain	
  (CONTAM).	
  Statement	
  on	
  tolerable	
  weekly	
   	
   intake	
  for	
  cadmium.	
  EFSA	
  Journal	
  2011,	
  9:2,	
  197.	
   European	
  Food	
  Safety	
  Authority	
  (2010).	
  Scientific	
  opinion	
  on	
  lead	
  in	
  food.	
  The	
  EFSA	
   	
   Journal,	
  8:4,	
  1-­‐570.	
   Forgie,	
  D.J.L.,	
  Sasser,	
  L.W.,	
  &	
  Neger,	
  M.K.	
  (2004).	
  	
  Compost	
  facility	
  requirements	
  guideline:	
   	
   How	
  to	
  comply	
  with	
  part	
  5	
  of	
  the	
  organic	
  matter	
  recycling	
  regulation.	
  	
  Retrieved	
   	
   December	
  11,	
  2012	
  from:	
  	
  	
   	
   http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/epd/mun-­‐waste/regs/omrr/pdf/compost.pdf	
   	
   Ge,	
  Y.,	
  Murray,	
  P.,	
  and	
  Hendershot,	
  W.H.	
  (2000).	
  	
  “Trace	
  metal	
  speciation	
  and	
  bioavailability 	
   in	
  urban	
  soils.”	
  	
  Environmental	
  Pollution.	
  	
  107:	
  137-­‐144.	
   Gupta,	
  S.K.,	
  M.K.	
  Vollmer,	
  and	
  R.	
  Krebs	
  (1996).	
  	
  “The	
  importance	
  of	
  mobile,	
  mobilisable,	
  and	
   	
   pseudo	
  total	
  heavy	
  metal	
  fractions	
  in	
  soil	
  for	
  three-­‐level	
  risk	
  assessment	
  and	
  risk	
   	
   management.”	
  The	
  Science	
  of	
  the	
  Total	
  Environment.	
  	
  178:	
  11-­‐20.	
   Hargreaves,	
  J.C.,	
  Adl,	
  M.S.,	
  and	
  Warman,	
  P.R.	
  (2008).	
  	
  A	
  review	
  of	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  composted	
   	
   municipal	
  solid	
  waste	
  in	
  agriculture.	
  	
  Agriculture,	
  Ecosystems,	
  and	
  Environment,	
  123: 	
   1-­‐14.	
   Hendershot,	
  W.H.,	
  H.	
  Lalande,	
  and	
  M.	
  Duquette	
  (1993).	
  	
  Soil	
  reaction	
  and	
  exchangeable	
  	
   acidity.	
  	
  Soil	
  Sampling	
  and	
  Methods	
  of	
  Analysis,	
  	
  Canadian	
  Society	
  of	
  Soil	
  Science,	
  	
   Lewis	
  Publishers.	
  	
  pp.	
  141-­‐146.	
   	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    54	
    	
   Huang,	
  J.W.,	
  &	
  S.D.	
  Cunningham	
  (1996).	
  	
  “Species	
  variation	
  in	
  lead	
  uptake	
  and	
   	
   translocation.”	
  	
  New	
  Phytologist.	
  134:	
  1:	
  75-­‐84.	
  	
   Huang,	
  J.W.,	
  Chen,	
  J.,	
  Berti,	
  W.R.,	
  &	
  Cunningham,	
  S.D.	
  (1997).	
  	
  Phytoremediation	
  of	
  lead-­‐ 	
   contaminated	
  soils:	
  Role	
  of	
  synthetic	
  chelates	
  in	
  lead	
  phytoextraction.	
  	
   	
   Environmental	
  Science	
  Technology,	
  31:800-­‐805.	
   Houba,	
  V.J.G.,	
  Th.M.	
  Lexmond,	
  I.	
  Novozamsky,	
  and	
  J.J.	
  van	
  der	
  Lee	
  (1996).	
  	
  State	
  of	
  the	
  art	
   	
   and	
  future	
  developments	
  in	
  soil	
  analysis	
  and	
  bioavailability	
  Assessment.	
  	
  The	
   	
   Science	
  of	
  the	
  Total	
  Environment,	
  178:	
  21-­‐28.	
   Houba,	
  V.J.G.,	
  Temminghoff,	
  E.J.M.,	
  Gaikhorst,	
  G.A.,	
  &	
  van	
  Vark,	
  W.	
  (2000).	
  	
  Soil	
  analysis	
   	
   procedures	
  using	
  0.01M	
  calcium	
  chloride	
  as	
  extraction	
  reagent.	
  	
  Communications	
  in	
   	
   Soil	
  Science	
  and	
  Plant	
  Analysis.	
  	
  31:9&10,	
  1299-­‐1396.	
  	
  	
   Hue,	
  N.V.,	
  Uchida,	
  R.,	
  &	
  Ho,	
  M.C.	
  (2001).	
  Sampling	
  and	
  analysis	
  of	
  soils	
  and	
  plant	
  tissues:	
   How	
  to	
  take	
  representative	
  samples,	
  how	
  the	
  samples	
  are	
  tested.	
  	
  In	
  J.a.	
  Silva	
  &	
  R	
   Uchida	
  eds.	
  Plant	
  Nutrient	
  Management	
  in	
  Hawaii's	
  Soils,	
  Approaches	
  for	
  Tropical	
   and	
  Subtropical	
  Agriculture,	
  University	
  of	
  Hawaii	
  at	
  Manoa.	
  	
  pp	
  23-­‐30.	
  	
   Iverson,	
  M.A.,	
  Holmes,	
  E.P.,	
  &	
  Bomke,	
  A.A.	
  (2012).	
  	
  Development	
  and	
  use	
  of	
  rapid	
   	
   reconnaissance	
  soil	
  inventories	
  for	
  reclamation	
  of	
  urban	
  brownfields:	
  A	
  Vancouver,	
   	
   British	
  Columbia,	
  case	
  study.	
  	
  Canadian	
  Journal	
  of	
  Soil	
  Science,	
  92:	
  191-­‐201.	
  	
  	
   Jacobsen,	
  S.-­‐E.,	
  Mujica,	
  A.,	
  &	
  Jensen,	
  C.R.	
  (2003).	
  The	
  resistance	
  of	
  quinoa	
  (Chenopodium	
   quinoa	
  Willd.)	
  to	
  adverse	
  abiotic	
  factors.	
  	
  Food	
  Reviews	
  International,	
  19:1&2,	
  99-­‐ 109.	
  	
  	
  DOI:	
  10.1081/FRI-­‐120018872	
   Kabata-­‐Pendias,	
  Alina	
  (2004).	
  	
  Soil-­‐plant	
  transfer	
  of	
  trace	
  elements	
  –	
  An	
  environmental	
   	
   issue.	
  	
  Geoderma,	
  122:143-­‐149.	
   Kirkham,	
  M.B.	
  (2006).	
  	
  Cadmium	
  in	
  plants	
  on	
  polluted	
  soils:	
  Effects	
  of	
  soil	
  factors,	
   	
   hyperaccumulation,	
  and	
  amendments.	
  	
  Geoderma,	
  137:	
  19-­‐32.	
   Krämer,	
  Ute,	
  Ingrid	
  J.	
  Pickering,	
  Roger	
  C.	
  Prince,	
  Ilya	
  Raskin,	
  and	
  David	
  E.	
  Salt	
  (2000).	
  	
   	
   Subcellular	
  localization	
  and	
  speciation	
  of	
  nickel	
  in	
  hyperaccumulator	
  and	
  non-­‐	
   	
   accumulator	
  Thlaspi	
  species.	
  	
  Plant	
  Physiology,	
  122,	
  1343-­‐1353.	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    55	
    	
   Kumar,	
  P.B.A.N.,	
  Dushenkov,	
  V.,	
  Motto,	
  H.,	
  &	
  Raskin,	
  Ilya	
  (1995).	
  	
  Phytoextraction:	
  The	
   	
   use	
  of	
  plants	
  to	
  remove	
  heavy	
  metals	
  from	
  soils.	
  	
  Environmental	
  Science	
   	
   Technology,	
  29,	
  1232-­‐1238.	
   Lambert,	
  Marcia	
  J.	
  (1976).	
  	
  Preparation	
  of	
  plant	
  material	
  for	
  estimating	
  a	
  wide	
  	
   	
   range	
  of	
  elements.	
  	
  Forestry	
  Commission	
  of	
  New	
  South	
  Wales.	
  	
  29:1-­‐60.	
   Lasat,	
  M.M.	
  (2000).	
  	
  Phytoextraction	
  of	
  metals	
  from	
  contaminated	
  soil:	
  A	
  review	
  of	
   	
   plant/soil	
  metal	
  interaction	
  and	
  assessment	
  of	
  pertinent	
  agronomic	
  issues.	
  	
  Journal	
   	
   of	
  Hazardous	
  Substance	
  Research,	
  2:5:	
  1-­‐25.	
   Lum,	
  Ken	
  R.,	
  Kokotich,	
  E.A.,	
  &	
  Schroeder,	
  W.H.	
  (1987).	
  	
  Bioavailable	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  and	
  Zn	
  in	
  wet	
   	
   and	
  dry	
  deposition.	
  	
  Science	
  of	
  the	
  Total	
  Environment,	
  63:	
  161-­‐173.	
   Luo,	
  Yongming	
  &	
  Rimmer,	
  David	
  L.	
  (1995).	
  Zinc-­‐copper	
  interactions	
  affecting	
  plant	
  growth	
   on	
  a	
  metal-­‐contaminated	
  soil.	
  	
  Enivronmental	
  Pollution,	
  88:	
  79-­‐83.	
  	
  	
  	
   Luttmerding,	
  H.A.	
  (1981).	
  	
  Technical	
  data:	
  Soil	
  profile	
  descriptions	
  and	
  analytical	
  data.	
  	
   	
   British	
  Columbia	
  Soil	
  Survey,	
  Soils	
  of	
  the	
  Langley-­‐Vancouver	
  Area.	
  Volume	
  6,	
  Report	
   	
   15.	
   Marx,	
  E.S.,	
  Hart,	
  J.,	
  &	
  Stevens,	
  R.G.	
  (1999).	
  	
  Soil	
  test	
  interpretation	
  guide.	
  	
  Oregon	
  State	
   	
   Extension	
  Service,	
  EC	
  1478,	
  1-­‐8.	
   MacNicol,	
  R.D.	
  &	
  Beckett,	
  P.H.T.	
  (1985).	
  	
  Critical	
  tissue	
  concentrations	
  of	
  potentially	
  toxic	
   	
   elements.	
  	
  Plant	
  and	
  Soil,	
  85:	
  107-­‐129.	
  	
  	
   McBride,	
  Murray	
  B.,	
  Masha	
  Pitiranggon,	
  and	
  Bojeong	
  Kim	
  (2009).	
  	
  A	
  comparison	
  of	
  tests	
  for	
   	
   extractable	
  copper	
  and	
  zinc	
  in	
  metal-­‐spiked	
  and	
  field-­‐contaminated	
  soil.	
  	
  Soil	
   	
   Science,	
  174:8:	
  440-­‐444.	
   McGrath,	
  Steve	
  P.	
  &	
  Fang-­‐Jie	
  Zhao	
  (2003).	
  	
  Phytoextraction	
  of	
  metals	
  and	
  metalloids	
  from	
   	
   contaminated	
  soils.	
  	
  Current	
  Opinion	
  in	
  Biotechnology,	
  14:	
  277-­‐282.	
   McIntyre,	
  T.	
  (2003).	
  	
  Phytoremediation	
  of	
  heavy	
  metals	
  from	
  soils.	
  	
  Advances	
  in	
  Biochemical	
   Engineering/Biotechnology.	
  78:	
  97-­‐123.	
   McKendry,	
  I.G.,	
  Hacker,	
  J.P.,	
  &	
  Stull,	
  R.	
  (2001).	
  	
  Long-­‐range	
  transport	
  of	
  Asian	
  dust	
  to	
  the	
   	
   Lower	
  Fraser	
  Valley,	
  British	
  Columbia,	
  Canada.	
  	
  Journal	
  of	
  Geophysical	
  Research,	
   	
   106:16,	
  361-­‐370.	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    56	
    	
   McKenna,	
  Ilda,	
  Melo,	
  Rufus	
  L.	
  Chaney,	
  &	
  Williams,	
  Frederick	
  (1993).	
  	
  The	
  effects	
  of	
   	
   cadmium	
  and	
  zinc	
  interactions	
  on	
  the	
  accumulation	
  and	
  tissue	
  distribution	
  of	
  zinc	
   	
   and	
  cadmium	
  in	
  lettuce	
  and	
  spinach.	
  	
  	
  Environmental	
  Pollution,	
  	
  79:113-­‐120.	
   McLaughlin,	
  M.J.,	
  Smolders,	
  E.,	
  Merckx,	
  R.,	
  &	
  Maes,	
  A.	
  (1997).	
  	
  Plant	
  uptake	
  of	
  cadmium	
  and	
   	
   zinc	
  in	
  chelator-­‐buffered	
  nutrient	
  solution	
  depends	
  on	
  ligand	
  type.	
  	
  pp.	
  113-­‐118.	
  In:	
   	
   T.	
  Ando,	
  K.	
  Fujita,	
  T.	
  Mae,	
  H.	
  Matsumoto,	
  S.	
  Mori	
  &	
  J.	
  Sekija	
  (eds.),	
  Plant	
  Nutrition	
  for	
   	
   	
  Sustainable	
  Food	
  Production	
  and	
  Environment.	
  	
  Kluwer	
  Academic	
  Publishers,	
   	
   Dordrecht,	
  the	
  Netherlands.	
   McLaughlin,	
  M.J.,	
  S.J.	
  Andrew,	
  M.K.	
  Smart,	
  &	
  E.	
  Smolders	
  (1998).	
  	
  Effects	
  of	
  sulfate	
  on	
   	
   cadmium	
  uptake	
  by	
  Swiss	
  chard:	
  I.	
  Effects	
  of	
  complexation	
  and	
  calcium	
  competition	
   	
   in	
  nutrient	
  solutions.	
  	
  Plant	
  &	
  Soil,	
  202:	
  211-­‐216.	
   McLaughlin,	
  M.J.,	
  Zarcinas,	
  B.A.,	
  Stevens,	
  D.P.,	
  &	
  Cook,	
  N.	
  (2000).	
  Soil	
  testing	
  for	
  heavy	
   	
   metals.	
  Communications	
  in	
  Soil	
  Science	
  and	
  Plant	
  Analysis,	
  31:11-­‐14,	
  1661-­‐1700.	
   Menzies,	
  Neal	
  W.,	
  Michael	
  J.	
  Donn,	
  and	
  Peter	
  M.	
  Kopittke	
  (2006).	
  	
  Evaluation	
  of	
  extractants	
   	
   for	
  estimation	
  of	
  the	
  phytoavailable	
  trace	
  metals	
  in	
  soils.	
  	
  Environmental	
  Pollution,	
   	
   145:	
  121-­‐130.	
   Nádaská,	
  Gabriela,	
  Lesný,	
  Juraj,	
  &	
  Michalík,	
  Ivan	
  (2010).	
  	
  Environmental	
  aspect	
  of	
  Mn	
   	
   chemistry.	
  	
  Hungarian	
  Electronic	
  Journal	
  of	
  Sciences,	
  ENV-­‐100702-­‐A:	
  1-­‐16.	
   	
   Retrieved	
  February	
  26,	
  2013	
  from:	
  	
   http://heja.szif.hu/ENV/ENV-­‐100702A/env100702a.pdf	
   	
   Padmavathiamma,	
  Prabha	
  K.	
  &	
  Li,	
  Loretta	
  Y.	
  (2009).	
  Phytoremediation	
  of	
  metal-­‐ 	
   contaminated	
  soil	
  in	
  temperate	
  humid	
  regions	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia,	
  Canada.	
  	
   	
   International	
  Journal	
  of	
  Phytoremediation,	
  	
  11:6,	
  575-­‐590.	
  	
   Peijnenburg,	
  Willie.	
  J.G.M.,	
  Marina	
  Zablotskaja,	
  and	
  Martinga	
  G.	
  Vijver	
  (2007).	
  Monitoring	
   	
   metals	
  in	
  terrestrial	
  environments	
  within	
  a	
  bioavailability	
  framework	
  and	
  a	
  focus	
   	
   on	
  extraction.	
  	
  Ecotoxicity	
  and	
  Environmental	
  Safety,	
  67:	
  163-­‐179.	
   Peralta-­‐Videa,	
  J.R.,	
  Lopez,	
  M.L.,	
  Narayan,	
  M.,	
  Saupe,	
  G.,	
  &	
  Gardea-­‐Torresdey,	
  J.	
  (2009).	
  	
  The	
   	
   biochemistry	
  of	
  environmental	
  heavy	
  metal	
  uptake	
  by	
  plants:	
  Implications	
  for	
  the	
   	
   food	
  chain.	
  	
  The	
  International	
  Journal	
  of	
  Biochemistry	
  &	
  Cell	
  Biology,	
  41:	
  1665-­‐1677.	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    57	
    	
   Pourrut,	
  Bertrand,	
  Muhammad	
  Shahid,	
  Camille	
  Dumat,	
  Peter	
  Winterton,	
  &	
  Eric	
  Pinelli	
   	
   (2011).	
  	
  Lead	
  uptake,	
  toxicity,	
  and	
  detoxification	
  in	
  plants.	
  	
  Reviews	
  of	
   	
   Environmental	
  Contamination	
  and	
  Toxicology.	
  	
  213:113-­‐136.	
   Rao,	
  C.R.M.,	
  A.	
  Sahuquillo,	
  &	
  J.F.	
  Lopez	
  Sanchez	
  (2007).	
  	
  A	
  review	
  of	
  the	
  different	
  methods	
   	
   applied	
  in	
  environmental	
  geochemistry	
  for	
  single	
  and	
  sequential	
  extraction	
  of	
  trace	
   	
   elements	
  in	
  soils	
  and	
  related	
  materials.	
  	
  Water	
  Air	
  Soil	
  Pollution,	
  189:291-­‐333.	
   Raven,	
  P.H.,	
  Evert,	
  R.F.,	
  &	
  Eichhorn,	
  S.E.	
  (1996).	
  The	
  angiosperm	
  life	
  cycle.	
  	
  In	
  Biology	
  of	
   Plants	
  (pp.	
  442-­‐227).	
  New	
  York:	
  W.H.	
  Freeman	
  &	
  Co.	
  	
   Richards,	
  John	
  E.	
  (1993).	
  	
  Chemical	
  characterization	
  of	
  plant	
  tissue.	
  	
  In	
  M.R.	
  Carter	
  (ed.),	
   	
   Soil	
  Sampling	
  and	
  Methods	
  of	
  Analysis,	
  Canadian	
  Society	
  of	
  Soil	
  Science,	
  Lewis	
   	
   Publishers.	
   Sauvé,	
  Sebastien, Cook,	
  Nicola,	
  Hendershot,	
  William	
  H.,	
  and	
  McBride,	
  Murray	
  B.	
  (1996).	
  	
   	
   Linking	
  plant	
  tissue	
  concentrations	
  and	
  soil	
  copper	
  pools	
  in	
  urban	
  contaminated 	
   soils.	
  	
  Environmental	
  Pollution,	
  94:2,	
  153-­‐157	
   Scientific	
  Committee	
  on	
  Food	
  (2003).	
  	
  	
  Opinion	
  of	
  the	
  scientific	
  committee	
  on	
  food	
  on	
   	
   the	
  tolerable	
  upper	
  intake	
  level	
  of	
  zinc.	
  SCF/CS/NUT/UPPLEV/62	
  Final.	
  	
  	
   	
   Retrieved	
  January	
  14,	
  2013	
  from:	
   http://ec.europa.eu/food/fs/sc/scf/out177_en.pdf	
   	
   Scientific	
  Committee	
  on	
  Food	
  (2003a).	
  	
  Opinion	
  of	
  the	
  scientific	
  committee	
  on	
  food	
  on	
   	
   the	
  tolerable	
  upper	
  intake	
  level	
  of	
  copper.	
  SCF/CS/NUT/UPPLEV/57	
  Final.	
  	
   	
   Retrieved	
  January	
  14,	
  2013	
  from:	
  	
   http://ec.europa.eu/food/fs/sc/scf/out176_en.pdf	
  	
   	
   Smith,	
  J.M,	
  Hall,	
  K.J.,	
  Lavkulich,	
  L.M.,	
  &	
  Schrier,	
  H.E.	
  (2007).	
  	
  Trace	
  metal	
  concentrations	
  in	
   	
   intensively	
  managed	
  agricultural	
  watersheds	
  in	
  British	
  Columbia,	
  Canada.	
  	
  Journal	
   	
   of	
  the	
  American	
  Water	
  Resources	
  Association,	
  44:	
  1455-­‐1467.	
   Tessier,	
  A.,	
  Campbell,	
  P.G.C.,	
  &	
  Bisson,	
  M.	
  (1979).	
  Sequential	
  extraction	
  procedure	
  for	
  the	
   	
   speciation	
  of	
  particulate	
  trace	
  metals.	
  	
  Analytical	
  Chemistry,	
  51:7,	
  844-­‐851.	
   United	
  States	
  Department	
  of	
  Agriculture	
  (2001).	
  	
  	
  Soil	
  quality	
  test	
  kit	
  guide.	
  Soil	
  Quality	
   	
   Institute,	
  23-­‐27.	
  	
  Retrieved	
  March	
  3,	
  2013	
  from:	
   	
   http://soils.usda.gov/sqi/assessment/files/chpt11.pdf	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    58	
    	
   Valentine,	
  K.W.G.	
  (1986).	
  	
  The	
  soil	
  landscapes	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia.	
  	
  BC	
  Ministry	
  of	
   	
   Environment,	
  Victoria	
  BC.	
  	
  197	
  pp.	
   Vamerali,	
  T.,	
  Bandiera,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Mosca,	
  G.	
  (2010).	
  	
  Field	
  crops	
  for	
  phytoremediation	
  of	
   	
   contaminated	
  land:	
  A	
  review.	
  	
  Environmental	
  Chemistry	
  Letters,	
  8:1-­‐17.	
   Wallace,	
  A.,	
  E.M.	
  Romney,	
  G.V.	
  Alexander,	
  S.M.	
  Soufi,	
  and	
  P.M.	
  Patel	
  (1977).	
  	
  	
  Some	
   	
   interactions	
  in	
  plants	
  among	
  cadmium,	
  other	
  heavy	
  metals,	
  and	
  chelating	
  agents.	
  	
   	
   Agronomy	
  Journal,	
  69:18-­‐20.	
   Wuana,	
  Raymond	
  A.	
  &	
  Felix	
  E.	
  Okieiman	
  (2011).	
  	
  Heavy	
  metals	
  in	
  contaminated	
  soils:	
  A	
   	
   review	
  of	
  sources,	
  chemistry,	
  and	
  best	
  available	
  strategies	
  for	
  remediation.	
  	
  ISRN	
   	
   Ecology,	
  2011:	
  Article	
  ID	
  402647,	
  20	
  pages,	
  2011.	
  DOI:10.5402/2011/402647	
   	
   Zuang,	
  P.,	
  Yang,	
  Q.W.,	
  Wang,	
  H.B.,	
  &	
  Shu,	
  W.S.	
  (2007).	
  	
  Phytoextraction	
  of	
  heavy	
  metals	
  by	
   	
   eight	
  plant	
  species	
  in	
  the	
  field.	
  	
  Water	
  Air	
  Soil	
  Pollution,	
  184:235-­‐242.	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    59	
    	
   	
    Appendix	
  A:	
  Statistical	
  information	
  for	
  chapter	
  2	
   	
    Appendix	
  A-­‐	
  1:	
  Connecting	
  letters	
  report	
  showing	
  significant	
  differences	
  among	
   	
   sites	
  for	
  mean	
  total	
  concentrations	
  of	
  Mn	
  and	
  Fe	
  (derived	
  using	
  Tukey-­‐ 	
   Kramer	
  Honestly	
  Significant	
  Difference	
  test)	
   Mn:	
    	
    Level	
   60th	
  &	
  E.	
  Blvd.	
   16	
  Oaks	
   Pine	
   41st	
  &	
  Blenheim	
   Vernon	
   Hastings	
   UBC	
  Campus	
   UBC	
  Farm	
    	
  	
   A	
   A	
   A	
   A	
   A	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
    	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   B	
   B	
   B	
   B	
   B	
   B	
   	
  	
    	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   C	
   C	
   C	
   C	
   C	
   C	
    	
   	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
   	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    Mean	
   884.9	
   574.4	
   484.1	
   458.7	
   377.4	
   360.3	
   248.6	
   149.4	
    	
    Fe:	
    Level	
   Hastings	
   16	
  Oaks	
   Vernon	
   Pine	
   41st	
  &	
  Blenheim	
   60th	
  &	
  E.	
  Blvd.	
   UBC	
  Farm	
   UBC	
  Campus	
    	
  	
   A	
   A	
   A	
   A	
   A	
   A	
   	
  	
   	
  	
    	
  	
   	
  	
   B	
   B	
   B	
   B	
   B	
   B	
   B	
    	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    Mean	
   36389	
   26775	
   22899	
   21601	
   21071	
   20801	
   15050	
   11729	
    	
    Appendix	
  A-­‐2:	
  	
  Significant	
  differences	
  among	
  parent	
  material	
  groups	
  for	
  mean	
   	
   total	
  concentrations	
  of	
  Mn	
  and	
  Fe	
  (derived	
  using	
  Tukey-­‐Kramer	
  Honestly	
   	
   Significant	
  Difference	
  test)	
   	
   	
    	
    	
    	
    	
    	
   Fe:	
    	
  Mn:	
    Level Glacial Marine Marine Glacial  A B B  Mean 603.6 365.4 259.8  Level Marine Glacial Marine Glacial  A A  B B  Mean 32342 24486 15448  	
   	
   	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    60	
    	
   	
    Appendix	
  A-­‐	
  3:	
  	
  Linear	
  correlations	
  between	
  total	
  and	
  available	
   	
   concentration	
  of	
  elements	
   	
    Linear	
  Fit	
    F	
  value	
   Prob	
  >	
  F	
    N	
    AR	
  Mg	
  =	
  2245.975	
  +	
  4.1622668*HCl	
  MG	
    31.5	
    .001	
    35	
    AR	
  Ca	
  =	
  -­‐3809.463	
  +	
  3.2151076*HCl	
  CA	
    149	
    .0001	
    36	
    	
    AR	
  Cu	
  =	
  64.284754	
  +	
  3.1458518*HCl	
  Cu	
    4.82	
    .04	
    35	
    	
    AR	
  K	
  =	
  494.27489	
  +	
  2.4618595*HCl	
  K	
    93.8	
    .0001	
    36	
    AR	
  Fe	
  =	
  16230.37	
  +	
  10.649688*HCl	
  Fe	
    4.63	
    .04	
    36	
    AR	
  Mn	
  =	
  118.06008	
  +	
  1.4776648*HCl	
  Mn	
    17.7	
    .0002	
    35	
    -­‐	
    	
   	
   	
    	
    	
    Appendix	
  A-­‐	
  4:	
  Significant	
  differences	
  in	
  mean	
  available	
  Mn	
  among	
  parent	
   	
   material	
  groups	
  determined	
  by	
  oneway	
  comparison	
  of	
  means	
  (determined	
   	
   with	
  Student’s	
  t-­‐test)	
   Level	
    -­‐	
  level	
    Difference	
   Std.	
  Error	
   p-­‐value	
   	
    Glacial-­‐Marine	
  	
    Marine	
   89.1	
    36.2	
    0.019*	
   	
    	
   	
    Appendix	
  A-­‐5:	
  Significant	
  differences	
  in	
  mean	
  available	
  Cu	
  by	
  parent	
  material	
   	
   (determined	
  with	
  Student’s	
  t-­‐test)	
   Level	
    -­‐	
  level	
    Marine	
   Glacial	
    Difference	
   Std.	
  Error	
   p-­‐value	
   	
   77.8	
    22.3	
    0.0013*	
   	
    Marine	
   Glacial-­‐Marine	
   76.3	
    21.9	
    0.0013*	
   	
    	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    61	
    	
    	
   Appendix	
  A-­‐6:	
  Significant	
  differences	
  in	
  mean	
  available	
  Ni	
  by	
  parent	
  material	
   	
   (Student’s	
  t-­‐test)	
   Level	
    -­‐	
  level	
    Difference	
   Std.	
  Error	
   p-­‐value	
   	
    Marine	
   Glacial	
    6.81	
    2.18	
    0.004*	
   	
    Marine	
   Glacial-­‐Marine	
   5.55	
    2.13	
    0.014*	
   	
    	
    	
   Appendix	
  A-­‐	
  7:	
  Significant	
  differences	
  in	
  mean	
  available	
  Fe	
  by	
  parent	
  material	
   	
   (Student’s	
  t-­‐test)	
   Level	
    -­‐	
  level	
    Difference	
   Std.	
  Error	
   p-­‐value	
   	
    Marine	
    Glacial	
    757	
    124	
    0.0001*	
   	
    Marine	
    Glacial-­‐Marine	
   503	
    121	
    0.0002*	
   	
    124	
    0.048*	
    Glacial	
  Marine	
   Glacial	
    254	
    	
    	
   	
    Appendix	
  A-­‐	
  8:	
  	
  Significant	
  differences	
  in	
  percent	
  organic	
  matter	
  by	
  parent	
  	
   	
   	
   material	
  (determined	
  using	
  Tukey-­‐Kramer	
  Honestly	
  Significant	
  	
   	
   	
   Differences	
  test)	
   	
   Level	
    -­‐	
  level	
   Difference	
   Std.	
  Error	
   p-­‐value	
   	
    Glacial-­‐Marine	
   Marine	
   8.03	
    2.13	
    0.006*	
    	
    Glacial	
    2.53	
    0.032*	
    	
    Marine	
   7.29	
    	
    	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    62	
    	
    Appendix	
  A-­‐9:	
  Negative	
  linear	
  relationships	
  between	
  pH	
  and	
  total	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   concentrations	
  of	
  Zn	
  &	
  Cu	
   Linear	
  Correlation	
    	
    F	
  Value	
   Prob.>F	
   N	
    AR	
  Zn	
  =	
  1257	
  –	
  194	
  *	
  pH	
  CaCl2	
   5.10	
    0.04*	
    17	
    AR	
  Cu	
  =	
  666	
  -­‐	
  108*pH	
  CaCl2	
    11.1	
    0.005*	
    17	
    	
    	
    	
    	
    	
   	
    Appendix	
  A-­‐10:	
  	
  Reference	
  values	
  for	
  trace	
  metal	
  concentrations	
  (ppm)	
  in	
  Lower	
   	
   Fraser	
  Valley	
  soils	
  of	
  different	
  parent	
  materials	
  compared	
  with	
  mean	
   	
   values	
  of	
  Cu,	
  Zn,	
  and	
  Mn	
  at	
  tested	
  urban	
  sites	
   	
    Parent	
   Material	
    Cu	
    Zn	
    Mn	
    Glacial	
  till	
  	
    55.8	
    108	
    260	
    Marine	
    458	
    384	
    361	
    Glacial	
   Marine	
    119	
    801	
    604	
    Glacial	
  till	
    10-­‐12	
    11-­‐26	
    0.10	
    Marine	
    10-­‐55	
    96-­‐130	
    214-­‐920	
    Glacial	
   Marine	
    20-­‐53	
    65-­‐85	
    99-­‐790	
    (n=12)	
    Vancouver	
    (n=11)	
    (n=12)	
    Lower	
  Fraser	
   Valley	
   (Luttmerding,	
   1981)	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    63	
    	
   	
    Appendix	
  B:	
  Statistical	
  information	
  for	
  chapter	
  3	
   	
    Appendix	
  B-­‐	
  1:	
  Significant	
  differences	
  in	
  foliage	
  concentrations	
  at	
  110	
  DAT	
  and	
  	
   	
   	
   30	
  DAT	
   	
   Difference	
   Cfoliage	
  Ni	
   Cfoliage	
  Cd	
   Cfoliage	
  Zn	
   Cfoliage	
  Pb	
   Cfoliage	
  Cu	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   •  t-­‐value	
   1.86	
   3.10	
   2.45	
   3.21	
   7.18	
    N	
   14	
   14	
   14	
   14	
   14	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    values	
  derived	
  using	
  paired	
  t-­‐test,	
  all	
  values	
  significant	
  at	
  t<.05	
    	
   	
   	
   	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    64	
    	
    Appendix	
  B-­‐	
  2:	
  	
  Significant	
  negative	
  correlations	
  between	
  seed	
  biomass	
  and	
  	
   	
   bioconcentration	
  of	
  Cd,	
  Pb,	
  Ni,	
  &	
  Cu	
   14 12 10 BCFseeds Pb  BCFseeds Cd  20  15  10  8 6 4 2  5  0  0  0.5  1  1.5 2 2.5 3 Dry Weight Seeds  N=15,	
  F=6.57,	
  Prob.>F	
  =	
  0.024	
    3.5  4  4.5  0  0.5  1  1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 Dry weight seeds (g)  	
  	
   	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
    	
    4  4.5  	
    	
  N=15,	
  F=4.66,	
  Prob.>F=	
  0.050	
    3  3  2.5  2.5 BCFseeds Ni  BCFseeds Cu  	
    2  1.5  2  1.5  1  1  0  	
  	
    0.5  1  1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 Dry weight seeds (g)  4  4.5  0  N=	
  15,	
  F=7.42,	
  Prob.>F=0.017	
    	
    	
    	
    	
    	
    	
    	
    	
    	
    	
    0.5  1  1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 Dry weight seeds (g)  4  4.5  	
    N=15,	
  F=	
  16.5,	
  prob>F	
  =	
  0.0014	
    	
   	
   	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    65	
    	
    Appendix	
  B-­‐	
  3:	
  Negative	
  correlation	
  between	
  soil	
  concentration	
  Cd	
  & 	
   bioconcentration	
  of	
  K	
  in	
  shoots	
  at	
  30	
  DAT	
    BCFshoots K (30 days)  600 500  F=	
  10.5	
    400  N=15	
    300  Prob.	
  >F	
  =	
  0.0065*	
    200 100 0 20  25  30 35 40 45 Soil Concentration Cd (ppm)  50  	
    	
   Appendix	
  B-­‐	
  4:	
  Negative	
  correlation	
  between	
  soil	
  concentration	
  K	
  and	
  	
   	
   bioconcentration	
  of	
  Cd	
  in	
  shoots	
  at	
  30	
  DAT	
    BCFshoots Cd (30 days)  60  F=	
  8.21	
    50 40  N=16	
    30  Prob.>F	
  =	
  0.013	
    20 10 0 450 500 550 600 650 700 750 800 850 900 Soil Concentration K (ppm)  	
    	
    	
    	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    66	
    	
    Appendix	
  B-­‐	
  5:	
  Negative	
  correlations	
  between	
  soil	
  concentrations	
  &	
   BCF	
  of	
  Cd	
  &	
   	
   K	
  in	
  shoots	
  at	
  110	
  DAT	
   700  8  BCFshoots Cd  BCFshoots K  600 500 400 300  6 4 2  200  0 100 20  25  30 35 40 45 Soil Concentration Cd (ppm)  450 500 550 600 650 700 750 800 850 900 Soil Concentration K (ppm)  50  	
    F	
  =	
  8.8	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  N=	
  15	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Prob.	
  >F	
  =	
  0.011	
    F	
  =	
  28	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  N=	
  16	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Prob.	
  >F	
  =	
  0.0001	
    	
   	
   	
    	
    Appendix	
  B-­‐	
  6:	
  Negative	
  correlations	
  between	
  soil	
  concentrations	
  &	
  BCF	
  of	
  Cd	
  &	
   	
   K	
  in	
  seeds	
  at	
  110	
  DAT	
   70 20  50  BCFseeds Cd  BCFseeds K  60  40 30  15 10 5  20 0  10 20  25  30 35 40 45 Soil Concentration Cd (ppm)  F	
  =	
  14	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  N=	
  15	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Prob.	
  >F	
  =	
  0.003	
    50  	
  	
  	
    450 500 550 600 650 700 750 800 850 900 Soil Concentration K (ppm)  F	
  =	
  5.6	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  N=	
  16	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Prob.	
  >F	
  =	
  0.033	
    	
   	
   	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    67	
    	
   	
    Appendix	
  B-­‐	
  7:	
  Pairwise	
  correlations	
  between	
  plant	
  uptake	
  of	
  Cd	
  &	
  K	
   Variable	
    By	
  Variable	
    R-­‐value	
   N	
    Significant	
  	
   Prob.	
    BCFshoot	
  K	
  (30	
  days)	
   BCFroot	
  Cd	
  (30	
  days)	
   BCFroot	
  Cd	
  (30	
  days)	
   TFfoliage	
  Cd	
  (30	
  days)	
   TFfoliage	
  Cd	
  (30	
  days)	
   Croot	
  Cd	
  (30	
  days)	
   BCFshoot	
  Cd	
  (110	
  days)	
   BCFshoot	
  Cd	
  (110	
  days)	
   BCFshoot	
  	
  Cd	
  (110	
  days)	
   BCFshoot	
  Cd	
  (30	
  days)	
   BCFshoot	
  	
  Cd	
  (30	
  days)	
   BCFfoliage	
  	
  Cd	
  (110	
  days)	
   BCFfoliage	
  Cd	
  (110	
  days)	
   BCFfoliage	
  	
  K	
  (110	
  days)	
   BCFfoliage	
  Cd	
  (30	
  days)	
   CFoliage	
  (30	
  days)	
   CFoliage	
  Cd	
  (30	
  days)	
   CFoliage	
  Cd	
  (30	
  days)	
   CFoliage	
  Cd	
  (30	
  days)	
   Csoil	
  Cd	
  (HCl)	
  	
   Csoil	
  Cd	
  (HCl)	
   Csoil	
  Cd	
  (HCl)	
   Csoil	
  Cd	
  (HCl)	
    Total	
  plant	
  Cd	
  (110	
  days)	
  	
   BCFshoot	
  K	
  (110	
  days)	
   BCFshoot	
  K	
  (30	
  days)	
   CFoliage	
  K	
  (30	
  days)	
   BCFfoliage	
  K	
  (30	
  days)	
   CFoliage	
  K	
  (110	
  days)	
   BCFseed	
  K	
  (110	
  days)	
   BCFshoot	
  K	
  (110	
  days)	
   BCFshoot	
  K	
  (30	
  days)	
   BCFseed	
  K	
  	
  (110	
  days)	
   BCFshoot	
  K	
  (30	
  days)	
   CFoliage	
  K	
  (30	
  days)	
   TFshoot	
  K	
  (110	
  days)	
   BCFseed	
  	
  K	
  (110	
  days)	
   CFoliage	
  K	
  (30	
  days)	
   Cfoliage	
  K	
  (30	
  days)	
   BCFshoot	
  	
  K	
  (110	
  days)	
   BCFshoot	
  K	
  (30	
  days)	
   BCFfoliage	
  1F	
  K	
  (30	
  days)	
   Cseed	
  K	
  (110	
  days)	
   BCFseed	
  	
  K	
  (110	
  days)	
   BCFshoot	
  K	
  (110	
  days)	
   BCFshoot	
  K	
  (30	
  days)	
    0.53	
   0.63	
   0.63	
   0.76	
   0.77	
   -­‐0.56	
   0.67	
   0.55	
   0.63	
   0.60	
   0.60	
   -­‐0.76	
   -­‐0.56	
   0.66	
   0.68	
   .071	
   0.67	
   0.69	
   0.74	
   0.63	
   -­‐0.72	
   -­‐0.64	
   -­‐0.67	
    .0403	
   .0128	
   .0124	
   .0011	
   .0009	
   .0395	
   .0066	
   .0351	
   .0116	
   .0171	
   .0173	
   .0011	
   .0370	
   .0076	
   .0056	
   .0030	
   .0087	
   .0086	
   .0016	
   .0207	
   .0026	
   .0109	
   .0065	
    	
    	
    	
    15	
   15	
   15	
   15	
   15	
   14	
   15	
   15	
   15	
   15	
   15	
   14	
   15	
   15	
   15	
   15	
   14	
   14	
   15	
   13	
   15	
   15	
   15	
   	
    	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    68	
    Appendix	
  B-­‐	
  8:	
  Cd	
  and	
  Zn	
  interaction	
  in	
  translocation	
  efficiency	
  of	
  shoots,	
  foliage, 	
   	
   	
   	
  and	
  total	
  uptake	
  at	
  110	
  DAT	
  	
   	
   1.5  	
    TFshoots Zn  1.25 1  F	
  =	
  7.8	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
    0.75  N=	
  13	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
    0.5  Prob.	
  >F	
  =	
  0.017	
    0.25  	
   	
   	
   	
    0 0  0.2  0.4  0.6 0.8 TFshoots Cd  1  1.2  1.4  	
    Total accumulation Zn  250 200  F	
  =	
  15.7	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   150  N=	
  13	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   100  Prob.	
  >F	
  =	
  0.002	
   50 20  30  40  50 60 70 Total accumulation Cd (mg)  80  90  100  	
    	
    4  F	
  =	
  15	
    TFfoliage Zn  3  N=	
  13	
  	
  	
    2  Prob.	
  >F	
  =0	
  .002	
    1 0 -0.2  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    0  0.2  0.4 0.6 0.8 TFfoliage Cd  1  1.2  1.4  	
    69	
    	
    	
   Appendix	
  B-­‐	
  9:	
  Synergistic	
  relationships	
  between	
  Cu	
  &	
  Zn	
   Leaf concentration Zn (ppm)  Total Zn accumulation (mg)  1100  250 200 150 100 50 50  100 150 200 Total Cu accumulation (ppm)  1000 900 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 300  250  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
    400  500 600 700 800 Leaf concentration Cu (ppm)  900  	
    	
   F=	
  11	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  N=15	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Prob.>	
  F	
  =0.006	
    F=	
  16	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  N=7	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
    	
    Prob.>	
  F=0.012	
    	
   	
    Dry weight (aboveground biomass)  Appendix	
  B-­‐	
  10:	
  	
  Negative	
  correlation	
  between	
  soil	
  Zn	
  and	
  overall	
  plant	
  yield	
  (g)	
  	
   	
   	
   at	
  30	
  DAT	
   2 1.75 1.5 1.25  F=6.4	
    1  N=16	
    0.75  Prob.>F=	
  0.025	
    0.5 0  10  20 30 40 50 60 70 Soil concentration Zn (ppm)  80  90  	
    	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    70	
    	
    Appendix	
  B-­‐	
  11:	
  Negative	
  correlation	
  between	
  Pb	
  root	
  concentration	
  &	
  seed	
   	
   yield	
  at	
  110	
  DAT	
   	
   4.5  Dry weight seeds (g)  4 3.5  F=6.0	
    3 2.5  N=13	
    2  Prob.>F=	
  0.033	
    1.5 1 0.5 0 0  500 1000 1500 2000 Root Concentration Pb (ppm)  2500  	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    71	
    	
    Appendix	
  C:	
  Case	
  study	
  details	
  for	
  chapter	
  2	
   	
    Appendix	
  C-­‐	
  1:	
  	
  Example	
  of	
  subjective	
  random	
  sampling	
  (red	
  areas	
  indicate	
   	
   random	
  points	
  for	
  composite	
  sampling)	
    	
   	
   	
   	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    72	
    	
    Appendix	
  C-­‐2:	
  	
  Mean	
  concentrations	
  (±	
  SE)	
  from	
  aqua	
  regia,	
  0.1M	
  HCl,	
  and	
  0.01M	
   CaCl2	
  extractions	
  for	
  Hastings	
  and	
  16	
  Oaks,	
  with	
  reference	
  values	
  for	
  regional	
   nutrient	
  analysis	
  (n=5)	
    	
   Low*	
   Med*	
   High*	
   Aqua	
  regia	
  	
   16	
  Oaks	
   0.1M	
  HCl	
  	
   16	
  Oaks	
   0.01M	
  CaCl2	
  	
   16	
  Oaks	
   Aqua	
  regia	
   Hastings	
   0.1M	
  HCl	
   Hastings	
   0.01M	
  CaCl2	
   Hastings	
    P	
   Mg	
   Ca	
   K	
   Cu	
   <20	
   <60	
   <1,000	
   <150	
   >0.6	
   20-­‐40	
   60-­‐180	
   1,000-­‐2,000	
   150-­‐250	
   40-­‐100	
   >180	
   >2,000	
   250-­‐800	
   1,546	
  	
   4,886	
  	
   17,545	
  	
   1,511	
   127	
   ±	
  508	
   ±	
  612	
   ±	
  5,594	
   ±	
  498	
   	
  ±	
  46.1	
   	
   203	
   925	
   9,291	
   	
   9.74	
   ±	
  54.0	
   ±	
  201	
   ±	
  2,304	
   ±	
  6.57	
   3.23	
   198	
   	
   	
   0.70	
   ±0.56	
   ±	
  35.0	
   ±0.48	
   268	
  	
   3,792	
  	
   3,818	
  	
   3,792	
  	
   446	
  	
   ±	
  55.2	
   ±	
  138	
   ±	
  230	
   ±	
  107	
   ±	
  107	
   60.7	
   304	
   1,482	
   	
   152	
   ±	
  14.9	
   ±	
  33.5	
   ±	
  181	
   ±	
  34.7	
   1.59	
   77.1	
   	
   	
   2.09	
   ±	
  0.19	
   ±	
  14.6	
   ±	
  0.33	
    Zn	
   >1.0	
    Mn	
   >1.5	
    887	
  	
   ±	
  599	
    490	
  	
   ±	
  84.8	
    141	
    ±	
  77.7	
    3.23	
    ±	
  0.56	
    391	
   	
  ±	
  99.9	
   126	
   ±	
  38.6	
   27.7	
   ±	
  9.34	
    127	
    ±	
  16.9	
    3.02	
    ±	
  0.36	
    282	
  	
    ±	
  42.1	
    151	
    ±	
  18.9	
    5.21	
   ±	
  0.67	
    Fe	
   	
   	
   	
   25,476	
  	
   ±	
  2,473	
   512	
   ±	
  20	
   5.13	
   28,780	
  	
   ±	
  5052	
   806	
   ±	
  99.0	
   1.71	
    	
   	
   *	
  	
  reference	
  values	
  based	
  on	
  Marx,	
  et	
  al.	
  1999	
   	
   	
   	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    73	
    	
    Appendix	
  D:	
  Experimental	
  details	
  for	
  chapter	
  3	
   	
  Appendix	
  D-­‐1:	
  	
  Quantities	
  of	
  trace	
  metals	
  and	
  carrier	
  salts	
  (g	
  kg-­‐1)	
  added	
  to	
  soil	
   for	
  treatments	
  A,	
  B,	
  &	
  C	
   Treatment	
   CuSO4	
   Group	
   n/a	
   A	
   0.10	
   B	
   0.57	
   C	
    Pb(C2H3O2)2	
   ZnSO4	
   CdNO3	
   NiNO3	
   	
   	
   n/a	
   n/a	
   n/a	
   n/a	
   0.15	
   1.13	
    1.51	
   1.61	
    0.002	
   0.02	
    0.11	
   0.31	
    	
   	
    Appendix	
  D-­‐2:	
  	
  Chenopodium	
  quinoa	
  seeds	
  were	
  started	
  in	
  sterile	
  potting	
  mix	
   	
   and	
  transplanted	
  after	
  germination	
    	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    74	
    	
    Appendix	
  D-­‐3:	
  	
  Replicates	
  1-­‐10	
  from	
  treatment	
  groups	
  A,	
  B,	
  &	
  C	
  were	
  arranged	
   	
   in	
  a	
  completely	
  random	
  block	
  design	
  in	
  the	
  UBC	
  Horticulture	
  greenhouse	
    	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    75	
    	
    Appendix	
  D-­‐4:	
  	
  Germplasm	
  for	
  Chenopodium	
  quinoa	
  Willd.	
  PI	
  510532	
  was	
   	
   assessed	
  from	
  USDA	
  Germplasm	
  Resources	
  Information	
  Network	
    	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    76	
    	
    	
   Appendix	
  D-­‐5:	
  	
  Chenopodium	
  quinoa	
  at	
  30	
  DAT	
  before	
  destructive	
  sampling	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    77	
    	
    Appendix	
  D-­‐6:	
  	
  Mean	
  bioconcentration	
  factors	
  (±	
  SE)	
 	
  for	
  foliage,	
  shoots,	
  roots,	
  	
   	
   	
   and	
  seeds	
  at	
  30	
  and	
  110	
  DAT	
  (n=8)	
   	
    	
    30	
  DAT	
   	
   Zn	
    	
   A	
    	
    B	
    Cd	
    A	
    	
    B	
    Pb	
    A	
    	
    B	
    Ni	
    A	
    	
    B	
    Cu	
    A	
    	
    B	
    Foliage	
   44.5	
   ±	
  22.4	
   31.8	
   ±	
  6.31	
   8.86	
   ±	
  2.68	
   8.69	
   ±0.89	
   5.33	
   ±1.67	
   2.72	
   ±	
  0.18	
   9.19	
   ±	
  2.63	
   9.12	
   ±	
  0.92	
   3.73	
   ±	
  1.05	
   3.37	
   ±	
  0.22	
    Shoot	
   24.8	
   ±	
  8.96	
   10.4	
   ±	
  2.13	
   21.0	
   ±	
  5.93	
   14.0	
   ±	
  5.08	
   12.2	
   ±	
  3.58	
   4.41	
   ±	
  1.33	
   20.9	
   ±	
  6.00	
   11.1	
   ±	
  3.56	
   8.10	
   ±	
  1.94	
   4.96	
   ±	
  1.41	
    110	
  DAT	
   Root	
   342	
   ±	
  69.4	
   53.8	
   ±	
  5.93	
   10.8	
   ±	
  1.10	
   11.5	
   ±	
  0.95	
   7.88	
   ±	
  0.74	
   4.22	
   ±	
  0.20	
   12.2	
   ±	
  1.19	
   24.0	
   ±	
  1.75	
   10.9	
   ±	
  0.73	
   11.4	
   ±	
  0.41	
    Foliage	
   30.0	
   ±	
  5.23	
   19.2	
   ±	
  3.04	
   5.71	
  	
   ±	
  1.01	
   6.66	
   ±	
  0.44	
   3.35	
   ±	
  0.58	
   2.09	
   ±	
  0.07	
   6.34	
   ±	
  1.13	
   7.87	
   ±	
  0.58	
   5.30	
   ±	
  1.01	
   5.33	
   ±	
  0.17	
    Shoot	
   16.4	
  	
   ±	
  5.67	
   8.18	
   ±	
  1.13	
   5.88	
   ±	
  0.99	
   6.61	
   ±	
  0.59	
   3.63	
   ±	
  0.61	
   2.27	
   ±	
  0.16	
   5.81	
   ±	
  0.97	
   5.83	
   ±	
  0.48	
   4.15	
   ±	
  0.72	
   3.89	
   ±	
  0.24	
    Seed	
   12.9	
   ±	
  6.33	
   6.12	
   ±	
  1.63	
   8.87	
   ±	
  1.87	
   10.4	
   ±	
  2.27	
   5.35	
   ±	
  1.08	
   3.49	
   ±	
  0.82	
   2.68	
   ±	
  1.40	
   1.84	
   ±	
  0.24	
   2.20	
   ±	
  0.63	
   1.75	
   ±	
  0.21	
    Root	
   38.1	
   ±	
  10.6	
   25.1	
   ±	
  8.25	
   26.2	
   ±	
  8.15	
   13.4	
   ±	
  3.30	
   17.2	
   ±	
  5.30	
   6.15	
   ±	
  1.49	
   26.4	
   ±	
  7.78	
   13.3	
   ±	
  3.10	
   32.8	
   ±	
  11.7	
   17.3	
   ±	
  4.77	
    	
   	
   	
    Appendix	
  D-­‐7:	
  Comparison	
  of	
  mean	
  bioconcentration	
  factors	
  at	
  30	
  DAT	
  for	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   Chenopodium	
  quinoa	
  Willd.	
  PI	
  510532	
  in	
  two	
  different	
  	
   	
   	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  studies	
  (±	
  SE,	
  n=8)	
   	
    Shoots	
  &	
   Foliage	
   	
   (Bhargava	
  et	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    Foliage	
   	
   	
    Foliage	
   	
   	
    Shoots	
   	
   	
    Shoots	
   	
   	
    78	
    	
   	
    Zn	
   Cu	
   Ni	
   Cd	
    Treament	
   Treatment	
   Treatment	
   Treatment	
   A	
   B	
   A	
   B	
    al.,	
  2008)	
   2.24	
   18.2	
   4.87	
    54.9	
  ±	
  22.4	
   3.78	
  ±	
  1.05	
   9.15	
  ±	
  2.63	
    31.8	
  ±	
  6.31	
   3.37	
  ±	
  0.22	
   9.12	
  ±	
  092	
    28.5	
  ±	
  8.99	
   6.50	
  ±	
  1.94	
   16.9	
  ±	
  6.00	
    10.4	
  ±	
  2,13	
   4.96	
  ±	
  1.41	
   11.1	
  ±	
  3.56	
    111.8	
    8.78	
  ±	
  2.68	
    8.69	
  ±	
  0.89	
    16.5	
  ±	
  5.93	
    14.0	
  ±	
  5.08	
    	
    Appendix	
  D-­‐8:	
  Mean	
  values	
  for	
  biometric	
  characters	
  recorded	
  at	
  30	
  and	
  110	
  DAT	
   (±	
  SE)	
    	
   5.76	
   23.8	
   Group	
  A	
   ± ± 0.34	
   2.20	
   	
   	
   5.20	
   24.8	
   Group	
  B	
   ± ± 0.33	
   1.06	
   	
    Dry	
  weight	
  seeds	
  (g)	
    Dry	
  weight	
  stem	
  (g)	
    Dry	
  weight	
  foliage	
  (g)	
    Number	
  of	
  leaves	
    Stem	
  length	
  (cm)	
    Longest	
  leaf	
  (cm)	
    Dry	
  weight	
  stem	
  (g)	
    110	
  DAT	
   Dry	
  weight	
  foliage	
  (g)	
    Number	
  of	
  leaves	
    Stem	
  length	
  (cm)	
    Longest	
  leaf	
  (cm)	
  	
    30	
  DAT	
    	
    	
    33.2	
   0.66	
   1.03	
   7.66	
   127	
   280	
   14.3	
   10.7	
   1.39	
   ± 3.94	
    ± 0.11	
    ± 0.55	
    ± 0.26	
    ±	
 	
   7.67	
    ± 53.3	
    ±	
   	
  5.37	
    ± 2.75	
    ± 0.47	
    29.5	
   0.53	
   0.44	
   8.51	
   129	
   294	
   11.8	
  	
   15.1	
   1.88	
   ± 2.66	
    ± 0.08	
    ±	
 	
   0.09	
    ± 0.44	
    ±	
 	
   9.19	
    ±	
   56.9	
    ±	
   1.46	
    ±	
   2.33	
    ±	
   0.50	
    	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    79	
    

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.24.1-0071965/manifest

Comment

Related Items