UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Enhancing the robustness of ESPI measurements using digital image correlation Bingleman, Luke 2010

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2010_fall_bingleman_luke.pdf [ 8.46MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0071157.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0071157-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0071157-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0071157-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0071157-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0071157-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0071157-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0071157-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0071157.ris

Full Text

 ENHANCING THE ROBUSTNESS OF ESPI MEASUREMENTS USING DIGITAL IMAGE  CORRELATION   by  Luke Bingleman B.E.Sc., The University of Western Ontario, 2008 A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF APPLIED SCIENCE in THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES (Mechanical Engineering)  THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA (Vancouver)  August 2010 © Luke Bingleman, 2010  Abstract Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) provides a sensitive technique for measuring  surface deformations.  The technique involves comparison of the speckle phase angles within  surface images measured before and after material deformation.  This phase angle comparison  requires that the speckle positions be consistent in all images.  A lateral shift between images  by just one pixel substantially degrades ESPI measurements, while a shift of two or more pixels  typically causes complete speckle decorrelation and compromises the measurement entirely.   To prevent such lateral motions, the specimen and the optical system must be rigidly fixed.   This requirement typically prevents use of the ESPI method in applications outside laboratories  or where it is necessary to remove the specimen from the optical setup between ESPI  measurements.  Here, Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is used to track speckle motion caused by  specimen displacement between ESPI measurements.  The measured images can then be  mathematically shifted to restore the original speckle locations, thereby recorrelating the ESPI  measurements.  Examples are presented where ESPI measurements are successfully made with  specimen shifts in excess of 60 pixels.  A novel ESPI measurement technique where the specimen  is removed in between ESPI measurements is also developed and validated.           ii     Table of Contents Abstract ............................................................................................................................................... ii  List of Tables ........................................................................................................................................ v  List of Figures ...................................................................................................................................... vi  Nomenclature ..................................................................................................................................... ix  Acknowledgements ............................................................................................................................ xi  Dedication ......................................................................................................................................... xii  1   2   3   Introduction ................................................................................................................................. 1  1.1   Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry ................................................................................... 1   1.2   Challenges of ESPI ......................................................................................................................... 3   1.3   Proposed Method:  Hybrid ESPI ‐ Digital Image Correlation ........................................................ 4   1.4   Residual Stresses and the Hole Drilling Method ........................................................................... 5   1.5   Literature Review .......................................................................................................................... 7   1.5.1   ESPI Robustness ........................................................................................................................ 7   1.5.2   Digital Image Correlation Using Laser Speckles ........................................................................ 9   1.6   Research Goals ............................................................................................................................ 10   1.7   Overview of Experiments ............................................................................................................ 11   Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) ........................................................................ 12  2.1   The Nature of Light and the Laser Speckle Phenomenon ........................................................... 12   2.2   Speckle Size ................................................................................................................................. 14   2.3   A Typical ESPI Optical Setup ........................................................................................................ 16   2.4   Phase Stepping ............................................................................................................................ 18   2.5   Fringe Patterns and Phase Unwrapping ...................................................................................... 22   2.6   Speckle Decorrelation and Its Effects ......................................................................................... 24   Digital Image Correlation & ESPI Fringe Correction ..................................................................... 27  3.1  3.1.1   Digital Image Correlation Using Painted Speckles .................................................................. 31   3.1.2   Digital Image Correlation Using Laser Speckles ...................................................................... 32   3.2  4   Digital Image Correlation ............................................................................................................ 27   ESPI Fringe Correction Procedure ............................................................................................... 33   Experimental Validation ............................................................................................................. 40  4.1   Hybrid ESPI – DIC Apparatus ....................................................................................................... 40   iii     4.2   ESPI System Validation ................................................................................................................ 42   4.3   DIC Measurements Using ESPI Images ....................................................................................... 45   4.4   Measuring Surface Motions Using EDIC & the Effect of Speckle Size ......................................... 50   4.5   Null Fringe Correction ................................................................................................................. 60   4.5.1   5   Phase Gradients – Cause and Correction ................................................................................ 62   4.6   Validation of ESPI Fringe Correction Using Hole Drilling ............................................................ 69   4.7   Specimen Removal and Replacement ......................................................................................... 74   Conclusions and Future Work ..................................................................................................... 80  5.1   Conclusions ................................................................................................................................. 80   5.2   Future Work ................................................................................................................................ 84   References ......................................................................................................................................... 86           iv     List of Tables Table 4.1 ‐ Apparatus components ............................................................................................... 42  Table 4.2 ‐ Calibrated vs. measured stresses ................................................................................ 44  Table 4.3 ‐ Camera parameters and speckle sizes ........................................................................ 51  Table 4.4 ‐ EDIC measurement standard deviation for painted and laser speckles ..................... 56  Table 4.5 ‐ Range and deviation of fringe correction process ...................................................... 73  Table 4.6 ‐ Removal and replacement vs. baseline numerical comparison ................................. 77      v     List of Figures Figure 1.1 ‐ A typical ESPI setup (Adapted from [7]) ...................................................................... 2  Figure 1.2 ‐ A laser speckle image ................................................................................................... 3  Figure 1.3 ‐ ESPI fringe data from hole drilling ............................................................................... 3  Figure 2.1 – The speckle phenomenon (Adapted from [13]) ....................................................... 13  Figure 2.2 – Specimen under coherent and incoherent illumination ........................................... 14  Figure 2.3 ‐ Speckle image optical setup (Adapted from [14]) ..................................................... 15  Figure 2.4 – Specimen image with various speckle sizes .............................................................. 15  Figure 2.5 ‐ A typical ESPI optical setup (Adapted from [15]) ...................................................... 17  Figure 2.6 ‐ ESPI setup including propagation vectors (Adapted from [15]) ................................ 22  Figure 2.7 ‐ Phase stepping schematic (Adapted from [18]) ........................................................ 19  Figure 2.8 – Fringe unwrapping .................................................................................................... 23  Figure 2.9 ‐ Speckle decorrelation ................................................................................................ 24  Figure 2.10 ‐ The effect of speckle decorrelation ......................................................................... 25  Figure 3.1 ‐ Digital image storage of a painted speckle image ..................................................... 27  Figure 3.2 ‐ The correlation coefficient (Adapted from [21]) ....................................................... 28  Figure 3.3 – Template matching using the correlation coefficient .............................................. 29  Figure 3.4 ‐ Determining template displacement ......................................................................... 30  Figure 3.5 ‐ The correspondence problem ................................................................................... 31  Figure 3.6 ‐ The ESPI fringe correction procedure ........................................................................ 34  Figure 3.7 ‐ DIC subset selection ................................................................................................... 35  Figure 3.8 ‐ NCC distribution and maximum ................................................................................. 35  vi     Figure 3.9 ‐ NCC maximum and surrounding pixels ...................................................................... 36  Figure 3.10 ‐ Information loss due to image shifting .................................................................... 38  Figure 4.1 ‐ Apparatus schematic ................................................................................................. 40  Figure 4.2 – ESPI beam splitter assembly ..................................................................................... 41  Figure 4.3 – Adjustable mirror ...................................................................................................... 41  Figure 4.4 ‐ Drill assembly ............................................................................................................. 41  Figure 4.5 ‐ Fringe result using calibrated specimen .................................................................... 43  Figure 4.6 ‐ Sections of a phase stepped set of images ................................................................ 45  Figure 4.7 ‐ Standard deviation of DIC displacement estimates vs. amount of image shift ........ 47  Figure 4.8 ‐ Average correlation coefficient R2 vs. amount of image shift................................... 48  Figure 4.9 ‐ Coordinate system used to describe specimen motion. ........................................... 50  Figure 4.10 ‐ X Direction EDIC Measurements.............................................................................. 52  Figure 4.11 ‐ Y Direction EDIC Measurements .............................................................................. 55  Figure 4.12 ‐ Measurement range vs. speckle size ....................................................................... 56  Figure 4.13 – Null fringe correction .............................................................................................. 61  Figure 4.14 ‐ Conical asymmetrical illumination of a flat specimen undergoing a shift d ........... 62  Figure 4.15 ‐ Path length change of beam 1 due to specimen shift ............................................. 62  Figure 4.16 ‐ Conical beam illumination ....................................................................................... 63  Figure 4.17 ‐ Conical beam phase gradient validation results ...................................................... 65  Figure 4.18 ‐ Phase gradients for various specimen shifts ........................................................... 66  Figure 4.19 – Phase gradient subtraction ..................................................................................... 68  Figure 4.20 ‐ Recovered stress solution vs. X direction specimen shift ....................................... 71  vii     Figure 4.21 ‐ Recovered stress solution vs. Y direction specimen shift ........................................ 71  Figure 4.22 ‐ Recovered stress solution vs. +Z direction specimen shift ...................................... 72  Figure 4.23 – Recovered stress solution vs. ‐Z direction specimen shift ...................................... 72  Figure 4.24 ‐ Removal & replacement baseline tests with the specimen fixed ........................... 75  Figure 4.25 ‐ Specimen fixture ...................................................................................................... 76  Figure 4.26 ‐ Removal and replacement residual stress results ................................................... 77  Figure 4.27 – Removal and replacement fringe results ................................................................ 78   viii     Nomenclature Am    Complex amplitude of light wave   am    Amplitude of light wave   m    Phase of wave   I  S    F  a  M  do    Light intensity  Speckle size  Source wavelength  Focal length of lens  Aperture diameter  Magnification   di    Distance from lens to imaging plane   f   f‐number of lens   A m1 , A m 2    I1 , I 2    Distance from object to lens   Complex amplitudes of reference and illumination beams  Intensities of reference and illumination beams         Phase of interference   I ,I '   Intensity distribution before and after surface displacement   Phase change of interference pattern due to surface displacement    '   Phase of interference after surface displacement   In    Intensity distribution of nth phase stepped image   A  B  n    Ks    Mean of phase stepped set  Modulation (amplitude) of phase stepped set    ds    k1 , k2      Phase step of nth phase stepped image (0°,90°,180°, 270°)  Sensitivity vector, bisector of illumination and reference beams  Surface displacement at specimen  Propagation vectors of reference and illumination beams  Fringe pattern, expressed on range of [0,1]   c( s, t )   f ( x, y )    Correlation coefficient   w( x , y )    Template being matched from the base image   NCC ( s, t )    z   Potential match area from the target image  Normalized cross correlation coefficient   Normalized cross correlation coefficient distribution   ix      x , y , xy    In plane stress components   Sy    Material yield strength   R2    Pearson product moment correlation coefficient (equivalent to NCC)   dp    Physical pixel size      1 , 2    Angles of incidence of reference and illumination beams (beam 1 and 2)    1 , 2    Cone angles of reference and illumination beams    L , R    Change in optical path length at right and left side of image    L , R       Change in phase at right and left side of image   D  d  L  P ,Q , R    Optical path length change   Phase change across image due to specimen shift  Image width at specimen  Specimen shift  Average beam path length (illumination and reference)  2D linear equation coefficients describing phase gradient         x     Acknowledgements I’d like to thank everyone at UBC who has helped me over the course of this research – faculty,  staff and my fellow students.  Your kindness and support was much appreciated and you have  my sincere gratitude.  In particular, many thanks to the mechanical engineering shop staff who  provided much needed instruction and advice during the apparatus design and fabrication  stages of my research.   Special thanks to Dr. Schajer, who has helped me expand my engineering knowledge immensely  and exposed me to the many facets of research in an academic setting.  I am especially grateful  for his patience, compassion and insight; without which this research would never have  reached fruition.  Finally thanks to my parents who have supported me unquestionably throughout my  endeavours.  Without their encouragement and support this would not have been possible and  I am always grateful.   xi     Dedication    To My Father               xii     1 Introduction 1.1  Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry  Interferometry is a powerful optical tool that has many applications within engineering and  physics.  When two at least partially coherent light waves are superimposed, a spatially  modulated intensity pattern is observed in the region of superposition.  A common example of  this phenomenon is the coloured fringes that occur at the surface of an oil slick.  Electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) is an interferometric technique that utilizes a  highly coherent light source, generally a laser.  The laser light is split and recombined at an  object’s surface.  The resulting interference, or speckle, pattern can then be used to infer  information about the surface itself.  Most commonly in‐plane or out‐of‐plane displacements  and or vibrations are measured.   Figure 1.1 shows a typical ESPI setup.  In this case  displacements occurring at the object’s surface in the direction of the sensitivity vector can be  measured.   Some typical applications of ESPI techniques include; full field measurement of surface  deformations [1], material defect detection [2,3] and vibration mode shape measurement.  [4]   Although these are typical uses of ESPI, the range of applications is extensive.  More unique  applications of ESPI include the detection of buried landmines [5] and the condition monitoring  of historical mosaics [6] for example.  Within this thesis the particular ESPI application studied is  the measurement of residual stress.     1       Figure 1.1 ‐ A typical ESPI setup (Adapted from [7])    The speckle images recorded within ESPI measurements are inherently random in nature.  The  phase of one speckle relative to its neighbours’ is completely random.  The speckle images are  interference patterns created by laser light and modulated by the laser light and surface  roughness of the object under investigation.  An enlarged view of a typical speckle image is  shown in Figure 1.2.  Although the speckle pattern itself is random, small surface deformations  cause each speckle to change phase consistently.  This phase shift is then visible by subtraction,  and the randomness of the images is effectively removed.  Problems arise when rigid body  2     motions cause the ob bject to shiftt significantlly,  changingg the pixel lo ocation of the speckles frrom  one set o of images to the other.  W When this  occurs, th he phase change inform mation is lostt  and the m measuremen nt is compro omised.     F Figure 1.2 ‐ A laser speck A kle image     1.2  C Challenge es of ESPI  One of th he major chaallenges inheerent to ESP PI measurem ments is that they are verry sensitive tto  environm mental disturrbances.  In order to obttain accuratee results from ESPI data, the specim men,  and in paarticular areaa under inveestigation, m must not shifft during the measuremeent.  Even sm mall  rigid‐bod dy motions ccan comprom mise the meaasurement eentirely.  If shifts do occu ur the  measurement can eaasily be lost.  This is due to the way ssurface information is reecorded.  Th he  e pattern creeated by thee surface feaatures of thee specimen u under  characteristic speckle investigation is comp pletely rando om.  Informaation  about thee surface deeformations is obtained by  comparin ng surface sp peckle patteerns before aand  after som me mechaniccal change.  TThese minutte  changes cause the sp peckle pattern to changee  phase accordingly wiith the surface, so that tthe  Figure e 1.3 ‐ ESPI frringe data frrom hole  drrilling    surface information can be extraccted in the fo orm  of a fringee pattern as shown in Figgure 1.3.  Eaach  3      light and dark fringe represents surface displacements of half the wavelength of the light source  used.  Problems can arise however when the surface, and therefore the speckle pattern, is shifted  significantly.  If a speckle physically moves from one pixel location to another from image to  image, the critical phase information is lost and the resulting fringe pattern is severely  damaged.  Often, due to the extremely small (micrometer) scale of ESPI measurements,  environmental disturbances such as air currents or vibrations are enough to induce rigid body  motions that result in speckle decorrelation and corrupt the ESPI measurement.  All of the preceding examples of ESPI applications are currently performed in a laboratory  setting, where the environment can be precisely controlled.  However, in an industrial or  outdoor environment, there exists disturbances that will cause rigid body motions during  measurements and this will corrupt the measurement data.  This problem seriously limits the  use of ESPI measurements in field applications.     1.3  Proposed Method: Hybrid ESPI - Digital Image Correlation  Digital Image Correlation  DIC is a well established, non contact optical technique.  It involves storing digital images of an  object in various states, and then mathematically comparing them to obtain information about  object displacements or deformations.  Frequently, DIC methods are used to compare many  sub regions of images to obtain full field displacement or deformation data. [8] In order to  compare and match images accurately, the surface of the object under investigation must   4     contain a pattern or optical features.  DIC can be performed with a wide variety of surface  patterns, including grids and dots, however it is most effective when using a completely  random pattern.  Recently, [9‐11] work has been done involving utilizing painted and laser  speckle patterns as the surface pattern for DIC measurements, leading to the emergence of  digital speckle correlation (DSC) measurements.     The method used within this thesis is a novel hybrid ESPI‐digital image correlation (EDIC)  technique.  An ESPI measurement is performed normally, and the specimen planar rigid body  motions that occur during measurement are determined from the existing ESPI speckle images  using DIC.  Any rotations that may have occurred are not addressed using this procedure.  Using  this DIC data, the ESPI images can be mathematically shifted to compensate for any rigid body  motions that may have occurred during measurement.  From these new corrected images,  accurate displacement data can be obtained.       1.4  Residual Stresses and the Hole Drilling Method  Residual stresses are self‐equilibrating stresses that are locked into a material and may exist  without any external loading or thermal gradients.  The majority of manufacturing operations,  including turning, grinding, heat‐treating, surface hardening and welding, introduce residual  stresses into the workpiece.  Residual stresses can be quite large and can significantly influence  the behaviour of a material, especially with respect to fatigue life and dimensional stability.   Additionally residual stresses can impair material strength, and in extreme cases cause major  structural failure.  Conversely, residual stresses can have beneficial effects, for example, fatigue  life improvement due to shot peening.     5     The hole drilling method for measuring residual stresses is a very popular, well‐established  method.  One of its main advantages is that it inflicts minimal damage to the specimen.  A small  hole, typically a few mm in diameter, is drilled into the specimen to a depth approximately  equal to its diameter.  The surface deformations around the hole that result due to residual  stress relaxation are then measured.   Traditionally strain gauges are used to measure these  surface displacements.  From these surface displacements, the stress that existed within the  removed material can then be determined via an inverse calculation.    With the advent of low cost, high resolution CCD cameras, ESPI has recently been applied to  measure surface deformations within the hole drilling method. [12] Using an optical method  such as ESPI presents many advantages when compared with traditional strain gauge methods.   The main advantages include the relatively high speed at which measurements can be  performed.  Since all the surface information is contained within images captured via the  camera, there is no need to attach anything to the surface of the specimen itself.  The per‐ measurement cost using an ESPI setup is also very low.  The initial cost is significantly higher  when comparing ESPI to traditional strain gauge methods; however in an industrial setting in  which many measurements need to be performed, the additional cost is easily mitigated.    The challenges of ESPI persist when performing hole drilling measurements; if the specimen  moves even slightly before and after the hole is drilled, the entire measurement is  compromised.  This necessitates elaborate, extremely rigid fixtures to hold the specimen  accurately, as well as careful control of the measurement environment.  As well, since the  specimen must be so rigidly fixed, the mechanism to drill the hole must be integrated into the   6     ESPI system.  The action of drilling the hole may itself cause the specimen to shift,  compromising the measurement.  More practically, the chips from the drilling can also damage  the specimen’s surface and interfere with the ESPI measurement.     If it were possible to relax the constraints on specimen shifting before and after hole drilling, it  would allow ESPI to be performed in less isolated environments.  It would also be possible to  perform much more rapid ESPI measurements by eliminating the need for a very rigid fixture to  hold the specimen.  By removing the specimen to drill the hole and then replacing it, the drilling  procedure could be separated from the ESPI system and performed in an area where the  vibrations, cutting forces and chips from the process would not disturb the measurement.   Currently due to the inherent sensitivity of the ESPI method this is almost impossible.  It  therefore would be very valuable to develop a method to mitigate the negative effects of these  rigid body motions so that accurate ESPI measurements can be performed even under non‐ ideal conditions, and so that specimen removal and replacement would be possible.    1.5 1.5.1  Literature Review ESPI Robustness  The sensitivity to outside disturbances and delicate nature of ESPI equipment and  measurements are well known.  Currently the predominant method of circumventing these  limitations is to perform measurements in a very controlled, isolated environment.  Some work  however has been done with the goal of increasing ESPI robustness to provide a more direct  solution to the delicate nature of the measurement.     7     Ritter et al. [13] first investigated using a small Michelson interferometer in conjunction with a  conventional out of plane ESPI system to remove the effect of out of plane vibrations between  the ESPI system and the specimen.  This was accomplished by using the information from the  Michelson interferometer as an additional signal fed into the phase stepper of the larger  system.  By synchronizing the phase stepping mechanism with the environmental vibrations,  detrimental effects of these vibrations could be reduced for environmental vibrations with  frequencies up to 100 Hz.   Chau [14] proposed an alternate method of correcting for environmental vibrations within  digital shearing speckle interferometry (DSSI), a measurement technique similar to ESPI.  This  process continually monitored a DIC subset relatively unaffected by the measured  displacements within the images acquired.  By continuously computing the correlation  coefficient, an algorithm was developed that only acquired images at moments when the  subsets happened to be well correlated.  Using this result, DSSI fringes were able to be obtained  for vibrations with an amplitude of up to 1 mm and frequencies of 25 Hz.  Findeis et al. [15] performed experiments using ESPI to measure thermal stresses in the  presence of mechanical environmental vibrations induced by a compressor.  By increasing the  shutter speed of the camera significantly and utilizing a variety of mechanical and opto‐ electrical shutters, the effect of the environmental vibrations was mitigated significantly and  reasonable measurements were possible for the environmental disturbances tested.   Mechanical shutters were constructed in the form of discs with various slots to mechanically  simulate pulsed laser illumination.  By synchronizing the frequency of the rotating slots with the   8     exposure time of the camera, the effects of the environmental vibrations were able to be  somewhat mitigated.  For the best performance however this type of solution was found to be  unwieldy and too large for more portable systems.  Optical shutters were also investigated in  the form of a liquid crystal modulator (LCM) and lithium niobate crystal.  The LCM proved too  slow to be effective, however the lithium niobate crystal was able to accommodate the much  shorter exposure times required to diminish the effect of the environmental vibrations.     Reu and Hansche [16] recently suggested that speckle correlation may be recovered for ESPI  measurements with displacements on the same order as the speckle size at the specimen.   Similar to the method developed in this thesis, by utilizing DIC data in conjunction with ESPI  images, they showed speckle correlation could be reasonably recovered. Unfortunately details  of the results and methods were not discussed and the idea appears not to have been pursued  any further.   1.5.2  Digital Image Correlation Using Laser Speckles  The use of laser speckles within DIC measurements has experienced rapid growth in recent  years, mainly due to the increased popularity and growth of digital image correlation methods  in general.  Initial work was performed by Peters, Ranson, Chu and Sutton [17‐19]  who first  examined using DIC methods in combination with laser speckles to measure full field  displacements and rigid body motions for specimens with optically rough surfaces.    Takai and Asakura [20]  examined the effectiveness of using laser speckle based DIC  measurements to measure full field displacements of a beam in bending and a specimen  undergoing thermal expansion.  They determined that the upper limit of measurable  9     displacement was controlled by the DIC subset size used for matching, and the lower limit of  displacement was somewhat controlled by the speckle size and pixel resolution of the imaging  system.  Chen and Chiang [21] as well as Sjödahl and Benckert [22] examined the optimum laser speckle  size for displacement, and work by both authors suggested speckle size selection according to  the Nyquist, or Shannon sampling theorem produced reasonably accurate results.  Chen and  Chiang examined in plane displacements of 200µm of an aluminum plate and performed  various measurements using a constant speckle size and varying the camera used in order to  vary the sampling frequency.  They determined using a camera with a physical pixel size of  approximately half (0.528) the speckle size produced the best results, where the correlation  coefficient peak was the best defined.  Another important conclusion from this work involved  identifying the spatial dependence of laser speckles; the pattern will not translate exactly with  the surface of a specimen. Taking a slightly different approach, Sjödahl and Benckert performed  a similar investigation.  They examined the effectiveness of DIC measurements on computer  generated speckle images with speckles of various sizes and using various subset sizes.  They  determined that using speckles of approximately twice the pixel dimensions of the camera  produced good results. Also, by keeping the ratio of subset to speckle size above 10, the DIC  measurement was successful about 80% of the time.   1.6  Research Goals  Currently ESPI is largely limited to laboratory use within very controlled environments.  In many  applications however, measurements must be performed in non‐ideal environments.  These  10     environments can introduce rigid body motions during measurements that completely  compromise the measurement itself.   Although previous work has been done to minimize the  effect of environmental displacements, specimen shifting still remains a significant problem for  ESPI measurements.  Therefore, the main goal of this research is to develop a method to  counteract the effect of rigid body motions on ESPI measurements, with the ultimate goal of  helping to move ESPI from a fragile laboratory technique to a more robust field measurement  method.    In the case of ESPI applied to hole‐drilling, this new method would provide better resistance to  environment‐induced rigid‐body motions.  By counteracting specimen shifting, specimen  removal and replacement would also be possible in simple fixtures.  This would allow drilling  and its negative effects to be separated from the ESPI system as well as increasing  measurement speed and accuracy.   1.7  Overview of Experiments  First, the performance and accuracy of DIC using ESPI speckle images (EDIC) will be evaluated  using the experimental apparatus.  The effectiveness of using DIC with both laser and painted  speckles will also be investigated.  The performance of the EDIC method for residual stress hole  drilling measurements will then be examined by performing measurements involving various  rigid body motions and disturbances.  Finally the possibility of the removal and replacement of  the specimen after drilling will be investigated.      11     2 Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) 2.1  The Nature of Light and the Laser Speckle Phenomenon  Light transmission can be modeled as the propagation of a harmonic plane wave. Its amplitude  and phase can be mathematically represented by a complex phasor:      where:        Am  a m exp i m    (2.1)   am = Amplitude of the wave  m = Phase of wave   CCD cameras and similar sensors measure light intensity, which can be expressed as:     2  I  Am    (2.2)   A random ‘speckle’ pattern is created when illuminating a surface with a coherent source, i.e., a  source where all parts of the light have fixed relative phase.  The pattern forms due to the  constructive and destructive interference of light waves reflecting from the surface features.  A  typical imaging setup with a detector array and lens is shown in Figure 2.1.  If light waves  interfere at the imaging plane constructively, then a bright speckle will be formed, if they  interfere destructively then a dark speckle will be formed.     12                         Figgure 2.1 – Th he speckle p phenomenon (Adapted from [26])  The coheerence of the e source is im mportant beecause witho out it there is no fixed phase  relationship between n the rays off light shown n in Figure 2.1, and thus no fixed positions of  constructtive or destrructive interference. Figure 2.2 (a) shows a speccimen illumin nated with aa  coherentt source and d the specklee pattern is cclearly visiblee.  It is charaacterized by the random m  dark and light speckles caused byy the cohereent interfereence.  Figuree 2.2 (b) show ws the samee  n illuminated d using convventional wh hite light.  Since the sourrce is not coherent, a  specimen speckle p pattern is no ot visible, and the only feeatures in th he image aree the physicaal markings o on  the surfaace itself.    Since thee phase or am mplitude of the light can nnot be meaasured directtly, the specckle pattern is  recorded d as values o of intensity, w which can bee expressed as shown in n equation (2 2.2).  The speckle  pattern ittself can be considered as a set of surface markkers virtuallyy attached to o the surfacee.  As  the surfaace moves, the speckles move with iit.  The speckkles also chaange intensitty with motiion   13     due to their spatial dependence; as the surface moves the incident light will interfere  differently causing the speckles to change phase from light to dark.  This is the governing  principle behind several speckle pattern techniques including ESPI.    (a)   (b)  Figure 2.2 – (a) Specimen illuminated with coherent light       (b) Specimen illuminated with white light     2.2  Speckle Size  The size of the speckles within an image can also be controlled by varying the optical setup  used. Considering the optical setup shown in Figure 2.3, the size of the speckles contained  within an image can be estimated as: [27]      where:        S   F (1  M )   f (1  M )   a   (2.3)   S = Speckle size   = Source wavelength  F = focal length of the lens  di a = aperture size  M = magnification, defined as   d o f = f number of lens defined as  F   a 14        Figure 2.3 ‐ Spe eckle image optical setu up (Adapted d from [27])    ptical system m with a set source and w with components fixed aat set distan nces, the speeckle  For an op size of an n image can be controlleed by varyingg the f numb ber of the im maging system.  Dependiing  on the tyype of measu urement, controlling thee size of the speckles witthin an imagge can be  advantaggeous ‐ the rresolution off several typ pes of speckle measurem ments is conttrolled by the  speckle ssize.  Figure 2 2.4 shows tw wo images taaken of the ssame specim men with only the f num mber   (aa)  (b)  Figure 2.4 ‐ Spe eckle image e taken with (a) f = 8 (b) f = 32  15     of the lens and the camera exposure time varied to let in equivalent amounts of light.   Comparing the two images it is quite apparent how varying the speckle size can affect the  resolution of the image – the hole clearly visible in Figure 2.4 (a) is nearly completely obscured  in Figure 2.4 (b).   2.3  A Typical ESPI Optical Setup  Figure 2.5 shows a typical optical setup used in ESPI measurements.  There are several main  components: a coherent light source, a beam splitter, a phase stepper and a camera to record  the speckle images.  ESPI is typically used to evaluate full‐field surface displacements or  vibrations.  The general procedure for an ESPI measurement is to record the speckle pattern  created by splitting and recombining light from a coherent source.   Speckle patterns are  recorded before and after some mechanical displacement.  These speckle pattern recorded  second is modulated by surface displacements; by examining the phase change of the speckles  before and after displacement occurs, information about the surface displacement can be  inferred.       16       Figgure 2.5 ‐ A ttypical ESPI optical setu up (Adapted from [28])  nsity distribu ution measured on the C CCD can be eexpressed ass the superp position of th he  The inten illuminattion and refe erence beam ms as:      I  A m1  A m 2  2  (2.4)   Applying equation (2 2.2),      I  I1  I 2  2 I1I 2 cos c   (2.5)   17     where    is the phase of the interference pattern created by the reference and illumination  beams and  I1 and I 2  are the intensities of the illumination and reference beams respectively.     For a surface displacement  d , the intensity distribution becomes:   I '  I1  I 2  2 I1I 2 cos           (2.6)   where    is the phase change caused by to the motion of the surface.  A challenge of ESPI  measurements is how to determine this phase change   .  Since the only measurable quantity  is intensity, an additional technique is needed to evaluate the phase change of the speckles due  to the movement of the measured surface.   2.4  Phase Stepping  The observed intensity distribution corresponding to the speckle pattern created by splitting  and recombining the coherent light source is described by equation (2.5). After surface  displacements occur, the phase difference between the two beams becomes:      I '  I1  I 2  2 I1I 2 cos  '    (2.7)   I1 I 2 where:      ,      = the intensities of the illumination and reference beam respectively   '      = phase of interference pattern after surface displacement     By combining equations (2.5)  and (2.7), it can be seen that:        '     (2.8)   18      Thus, the phase can be measureed before (  ) and after (  ' ) the surfface displaceement then the  phase change due to o the displacements    can be deteermined.  Sim mplifying, (2 2.5) can be  expresseed as:     I  A  B cos   (2.9)   To solve for the phasse differencee, a system o of equationss in the form m of (2.9) mu ust be formed.   This is do one by phase e stepping [2 29] schemattically shown n in Figure 2.6:     Figgure 2.6 ‐ Ph hase steppin ng schematic (Adapted ffrom [30])  Sets of im mages, I and J are record ded before aand after thee surface displacement.  Consideringg the  images b before displaacement, thee set of imagges can then n be written as:     I n  A  B cos(  n )  (2.10)   With   n  being a kno own set of ph hase steps, u usually in 90 0° incrementts.  Equation (2.10) can aalso  be rewrittten using th he additive ccosine identiity as:   19     I n  A  u cos  n  v sin  n       (2.11)   where:  u  B cos( )     v   B sin( )   The system of equations can be re‐written as:    I1  1 cos  1           I  1 cos  n  n   sin  1   A     u  sin  n   v         (2.12)   d d  Gm  0   dm  (2.13)   d  Gm where:      1 cos  1  I1     d     , G    I  1 cos  n  n   sin  1   A      , m  u  v  sin  n     Forming a least squares solution by minimizing the error yields:  error  d  Gm min d  Gm       GT Gm  GT d  Simplifying equation (2.13) yields:             n   cos  n  sin  n   cos  n  sin  n   A   In       cos2  n  sin  n cos  n   u    In cos  n    v    2    sin  I sin cos sin     n n n  n n      (2.14)   20     Equation (2.14) is the general form of a least squares solution for a phase stepping scheme  involving  n  steps.  In this work a common 5 step scheme [29] is used with   n =  [0°,90°,180°,270°,360°].  Using these values, equation (2.14) can be solved to yield the desired  phase difference between the illumination and reference beams as: [31]   tan       7( I 4  I 2 )   4 I1  I 2  6 I3  I 4  4 I5  (2.15)   By considering both phase stepped sets of images,    and   ' can be determined, yielding the  phase change due to the change in optical path length,        .  Finally, this change can be related     to actual surface displacement by using the sensitivity vector  K s :         2   Ks  d s      (2.16)      where:   K s  k2  k1  2 kn       k2  and  k1 are defined as the propagation vectors of the illumination and reference beams   respectively, as illustrated in Figure 2.7.          21                   Figure 2.7 ‐ ESPI setup including propagation vectors (Adapted from [28])    This phase difference can be plotted on the range of [0,1] forming a fringe pattern as:  1 2    (1  cos  )       (2.17)     Figure 2.8 (a) shows an example synthetic fringe pattern. The pattern can be visualized as a  topographic map of the surface displacement in the direction of the sensitivity vector, where  each pair of light and dark fringes represents a displacement of a wavelength of the light  source.     2.5  Fringe Patterns and Phase Unwrapping  The phase difference evaluated in equation (2.15) lies on the range of  [ ,  ] .  Angles outside  this range are “wrapped” into the range by addition or subtraction of multiples of 2π.  To  determine the absolute phase difference due to change in optical path length   over the  entire image this data must be unwrapped.  Figure 2.8 (b) shows the phase difference along the   22     line shown in Figure 2.8 (a).  The phase experiences several jumps as the unwrapped phase  reaches the limits of  [ ,  ] .  An “unwrapping” process is required to add  2 where these  jumps occur to restore the unwrapped “true” value of the phase difference that is not  constrained on the range  [ ,  ] .  This unwrapped phase is then used to determine the surface  displacements.  Here, a common phase unwrapping algorithm [32] is used.   (a)   (b)  (c)  (a)  Figure 2.8 ‐ (a) Fringe pattern (b) Wrapped phase difference (c) Unwrapped phase difference  (I made these figures myself using synthetic fringes and MATLAB)  23     2.6  S Speckle Decorrel D lation an nd Its Efffects   ESPI invo olves measu uring the phaase change o of speckles ccaused by su urface movem ment.  This  phase change can be e measured p providing th he speckles rremain at thee same pixel locations  during all measurements.  Speckkle decorrelaation occurs when the su urface movees far enough h so  that the sspeckle movves to a diffeerent pixel lo ocation.     (a)  ( (b)      (a)        F Figure 2.9 ‐ Speckle deco S orrelation  Figure 2.9 (a) illustrates a typicall speckle patttern.  One sspeckle in paarticular is m marked ‘X’  occupyin ng the pixels marked 1‐4 4.  If the speccimen displaces to the riight, the speeckle marked d “X”  could mo ove from the e upper left iin Figure 2.9 9 (a) to the u upper right  iin Figure 2.9 9 (b).  In thatt  case, thee pixels at the upper left then measu ure a different speckle w whose phase is random  relative tto the original speckle.  TThus, the speckle phase becomes deecorrelated and local  surface d displacement informatio on is lost.    Speckle d decorrelation is the reasson that ESPI measurements are so ssensitive to environmen ntal  disturban nces.  If the specimen sh hifts, even byy very small amounts, th he speckles b become  decorrelaated, the phase informaation is lost aand the fringge pattern is destroyed.    24     (a)    Undisturbed ESPI fringe  pattern    (b)   Shifted +1 pixel right after  drilling    (c)   Shifted +2 pixels right after  drilling    Figure 2.10 ‐ The effect of speckle decorrelation Figure 2.10 shows the effect of speckle decorrelation on an ESPI fringe pattern.  The white  circles and dimensions representing the hole drilled were added to the figure separately. Figure  2.10 (a) shows an undisturbed ESPI hole drilling fringe pattern where no rigid body motions  have occurred during the measurement. Figure 2.10 (b) shows the same fringe pattern if a  motion of one pixel (15  m ) to the right had occurred after drilling.  The pixel decorrelation has  introduced substantial noise and the quality of the fringe pattern is greatly decreased.  Figure  2.10 (c) shows the fringe pattern where the surface has moved 2 pixels (30  m ) to the right  after drilling.  The thin line in Figure 2.10 (c) is placed for scale and is 2 pixels wide.  In this case  the fringe pattern is completely destroyed with only noise remaining.  These figures clearly  illustrate how severely speckle decorrelation can affect ESPI measurements.  Even very small  motions of the surface can completely destroy the measurements.  Speckle motion can be caused by a number of factors.  These include air turbulence, mechanical  vibrations, specimen motion within its fixture or, in the case of hole drilling ESPI measurements,  the drilling process.  Simply touching the workpiece can even cause sufficient motion to  decorrelate the measurement.  Speckle decorrelation is a serious problem for ESPI  25        measurements that is currently preventing more widespread use of the method.  If specimen  motion could be counteracted, then the robustness of the ESPI method could be significantly  improved.  Being able to recover accurate measurements even in the presence of rigid body  motions would represent a solid step towards moving ESPI from a sensitive lab technique to  more robust field use.                            26     3 Digital Ima age Corrrelation & ESPI Fringe Correcti C ion 3.1  D Digital Im mage Corrrelation  Digital Im mage Correlaation (DIC) iss a popular o optical method used to d determine reelative motion  between n a pair of im mages.  It is b based on thee principle off image matcching; a tem mplate or sub bset  from the first image is selected aand a match is found witthin a second image afteer some  ment has occurred.  Digiital images aare recorded d as intensityy distribution ns, as shown n in  displacem Figure 3.1.  Each pixe el holds a value from 0 to a maximum value determined by the bit deptth of  the cameera used.  0 rrepresents b black, and th he maximum m value repreesents whitee.  Intermediiate  values reepresent shaades of grey.              Figu ure 3.1 ‐ Diggital image sstorage of a painted spe eckle image       27     A correlation coefficient which relates the template to its potential match can be defined as  [33]:           c ( s, t )    f ( x, y)w( x  s, y  t )   x     (3.1)   y    Figure 3.2 ‐ The correlation coefficient (Adapted from [33])  where the terms are defined as shown in Figure 3.2 and the sums are computed over the pixel  area currently covered by the template,  w( x  s, y  t ) .   f ( x, y )  represents the second image  where the template is being searched for, with size  M x N .   w( x, y )  is the template, or feature  of interest, selected from the first image.  By moving a template sized area,  w( x  s, y  t ) , over  28     some range of  s and  t  in f ( x, y ) , the distribution of the correlation coefficient can be built up.   For each position  (s, t )  of the template, the correlation coefficient,  c( s, t ) , can be computed.   This coefficient will reach a maximum where the best match of  w( x, y )  and  f ( x, y )  is found.   This process is illustrated in Figure 3.3.   (a)   (b)  (c)  Figure 3.3 – Template matching using the correlation coefficient   (a) Base image  f ( x, y ) (b) Template  w( x, y ) (c) Correlation coefficient distribution  c( s, t )    (Adapted from [34])     Figure 3.3 (c) shows the correlation coefficient distribution, with higher values represented as  brighter areas.  The correlation coefficient is shown to reach a maximum at the location where  the template is matched correctly; however areas where poorer matches were found, around  the other characters, appear as well.  One of the difficulties with equation (4.1) is its dependence on the amplitudes of  f ( x, y ) and  w( x, y ) .  If these functions change amplitudes the values of the coefficient will change   accordingly.  In order to remove this dependence, equation (4.1) can be normalized to form the  normalized correlation coefficient (NCC) [33]:     29       f ( x, y )  f   w( x  s, y  t )  w    NCC C ( s, t )   x      y 1//2     f ( x, y )  f     w( x  s, y  t )  w 2  x  y  x  y  2      (3.2)      Equation n (3.2) removves the depeendence on amplitude b by removing the mean in ntensities of the  templatee and area under review w and normalizing to a un nit magnitud de.  This new w coefficientt now  falls on the range of [‐1,1].  By fin nding the maximum of tthe NCC, thee displacemeent of the  templatee from one im mage to ano other can be determined d, as shown in Figure 3.4 4.    In this caase, the bounded area  enclosing the letter ‘A’ is the  templatee.  By determ mining its mo otion  using thee NCC within n image 2, th he    displacement   d  of the feature from  Figure e 3.4 ‐ Deterrmining tem mplate displaacement  image 1 to 2 can be determined.     By repeating this pro ocess for many small tem mplates, it is possible to build up a set of  ment data fo or the entiree image.  It should be noted howeveer that due to o the naturee of  displacem equation n (3.2), the m matching pro ocess sufferss near the ed dge of the im mages since tthe templatee will  partially be placed ovver areas wh here there are no imagee data.  In these cases th he images are  padded w with blank vaalues; however accuracyy still sufferss greatly.  Another important consideration n when perfforming DIC measuremeents is the ch haracter of the  features within the im mages.  Alth hough imagees with a variety of featu ures such as grids, lines o or   30     dots can be used in D DIC, the bestt results are obtained ussing random patterns wiith high  information content.  If a periodic pattern is used, it is p possible for tthe coefficient to registeer  several id dentical maxxima as the ttemplate is p periodically matched according to th he pattern.  This  is known as the corre espondence problem in image matcching and illu ustrated in FFigure 3.5.  If the tem mplate, indiccated by the dark box, iss moved  to any on ne of the possitions indicated by the vectors,  a perfectt match will be found.  TTherefore, in n this  case, thee motion of tthe templatee can only bee  determin ned as a scalar multiple o of the pattern size.    In order tto avoid thiss problem, h high information  random sspeckle pattterns are often used to eensure  that no faalse positive es are reportted and thatt the  templatee displaceme ent solution is unique.   FFigure 3.5 ‐ TThe correspondence  p problem   3.1.1 Digital D Ima age Correlation Usin ng Painted d Speckles s  A populaar choice for image correelation is a raandomly sprrayed painteed speckle paattern applieed to  the surfaace under invvestigation.  An examplee is given in Figure 3.1.  Painted speckle pattern ns  exhibit th he desired qualities for D DIC measureements – theey are rando om, and havee high  information content so long as the size of th he paint specckles is contrrolled.   Ofteen paint from m a  simple sp pray can is su ufficient.  Th he advantagee of a painteed pattern lies with the ffact that thee  speckles are physicall; they are durable and h have no spattial dependeence.  Their p positions alsso do  ntly as the su urface under investigatio on moves, u unless very laarge  not change significan 31     deformations occur.  This durability and consistency aids in producing accurate DIC results.   Because of the desirable characteristics, recently the use of painted speckle DIC has been  applied within various areas of experimental mechanics including tensile testing [9] , strain field  measurement [11] and residual stress measurement. [35,36]  3.1.2 Digital Image Correlation Using Laser Speckles  The characteristic speckle pattern created using a laser light source also contains many of the  same characteristics as a painted speckle pattern – the pattern is highly random, unique and  has dense information content.  All of these qualities make laser speckle images an attractive  choice as the basis for DIC measurements.  Laser speckles also have the added advantage of not  needing physical application; all that is required is a coherent monochromatic light source and  the object to have a suitable surface finish with roughness on the scale of the source  wavelength. The main disadvantage of using laser speckles is the impermanence of the pattern.   As the surface moves, the speckles move along with the surface.  However, the local  illumination gradually changes from place to place, and so the pattern of the speckles  correspondingly changes.  In addition, the phase of the speckle pattern can change, causing  light speckles to become dark, and vice‐versa.  These behaviours present obvious problems for  DIC measurements as the template matching process suffers due to both the change in phase  and speckle shape.  Despite these challenges, laser speckle DIC measurements have been  applied in similar areas to that of painted speckle DIC, with the majority of the applications  aimed at strain and displacement measurements [10,24]. Due to the influence of the surface  features on the laser speckle pattern, additional applications involving surface condition   32     monitoring [25] have also recently been explored.  These measurements involve monitoring the  correlation coefficient for a certain area as the surface condition changes.   3.2  ESPI Fringe Correction Procedure  Currently due to their inherent sensitivity to relative motions and environmental disturbances,  ESPI measurements are limited largely to laboratory use in very controlled environments.   Specimen rigid‐body motions cause speckle decorrelation, which corrupts the critical phase  information necessary to determine the surface displacement.  The ESPI fringe correction  procedure proposed here represents a method to correct rigid‐body motions by re‐correlating  speckle images and therefore restoring the ESPI fringe map.  A similar idea was first suggested  by Reu and Hansche [16] but was never pursued.  The procedure makes use of DIC methods to first determine the rigid‐body motions that have  occurred during the ESPI measurement.  This is done using the captured ESPI image sets as the  basis of DIC displacement measurements.  By using these laser speckle images, the rigid body  motions that occurred between the image sets can be determined.  Once these motions are  known, the affected ESPI image set can be mathematically shifted in order to ensure the  speckle phase information is re‐correlated. Figure 3.6 shows an outline of the fringe correction  procedure.    33       Figure 3.6 ‐ The ESPI fringe corre ection proce edure  body motions of the speccimen, correelation subseets, or patch hes,  In order tto determine the rigid b are seleccted circumfe erentially arround the ceentre of the m measurement; a 60x60 pixel subset is  used.  Th he search ran nge can be sset accordinggly, and the normalized cross correlation coefficcient,  in the equivalent form of the Peaarson product‐moment correlation coefficient, is formed ovver  the searcch area.  Figu ure 3.7 show ws an examp ple of how th he subsets are selected ‐‐ each box  represen nts a separatte subset.  Fo or each subsset, a NCC diistribution iss built up oveer the selectted  search arrea by shiftin ng the template pixel byy pixel over tthe search area.  From that distributtion,  the maximum value of the NCC is found.  Figgure 3.8 show ws a NCC disstribution an nd its maxim mum  for one ssubset.    34                Figure 3.7 ‐ DIC subset sselection   Figure e 3.8 ‐ NCC d distribution and maximum   35     Forming the NCC disttribution usiing equation n (3.2) allows matching tto integer piixel values.  TTo  achieve ssub‐pixel ressolution, a 2D quadratic function is ffit to the maaximum value and the  surround ding 8 pixels..  Starting with the geneeral form of aa 2D quadratic, there arre 6 unknown  constants, a‐f:   z  a  bx  cy  dx 2  exxy  fy 2     (3.3)   The NCC maximum aand surround ding pixels are defined aas shown in Figure 3.9, w with 5 being the  pixel wheere the maximum value of the NCC is located.              Figgure 3.9 ‐ NC CC maximum m and surrou unding pixells  unit spaced, a matrix equation can b be formed byy considering the co‐ Since thee pixels are u ordinatess of each of the 9 pixels as:   36         z1   1 z   1  2   z3   1     z4   1  z5    1     z6   1 z   1  7   z8   1 z   1  9   1 1  1  1  0  1  0  0  1  1  1  1  1  0  1  0  0  0  0  0  1  0  1  0  1 0  1 1  1 0  1 0  1  1  1  1  1 1  a 1    b 0   c 0     d 0   e 1    f  1 1   (3.4)   This system is overdetermined since there are 9 equations and only 6 coefficients.  Here, it is  chosen to fit the coefficients a b c d f exactly to the central five points 2 4 5 6 8 and coefficient e  to the average of the corner points 1 3 7 9.  This procedure focuses the fit on the central points.   The coefficients can then be determined by addition and subtraction as:  a  z5 b  ( z6  z 4 ) / 2     c  ( z8  z2 ) / 2 d  ( z4  z6 ) / 2  z5     (3.5)   e  ( z1  z3  z7  z9 ) / 4 f  ( z2  z8 ) / 2  z5  Once the quadratic is formed, directional derivatives are calculated in order to find its  maximum.  Continuing from equation (3.3):      z  b  2dx  ey  0 x   z  c  ex  2 fy  0 y  (3.6)   37     Equation ns (3.6) can ffinally be solved to yield the co‐ordin nates of the maximum o of the NCC  relative tto the maxim mum pixel ass:   x   y  2bf  ce 4df  e 2 be  2cd  (3.7)   4df  e 2  These ressults are add ded to the m maximum intteger pixel value to allow w sub‐pixel interpolation n.   Once thee relevant riggid body mo otions are deetermined, th he affected set of ESPI im mages is shifted  accordinggly.  Bi‐lineaar interpolatiion is used to account fo or the sub‐pixel image sh hifts.    Mathematical shiftin ng of the imaage sets to account for the rigid‐bod dy motions re‐establishees  speckle ccorrelation.  The specklees in the seco ond set of im mages now o occupy the same pixels aas  they origginally did wiithin the firsst set.  This p pixel re‐regisstration allow ws accurate phase data to  be recovered and the surface disp placement  solution to o be largely restored.  At the image  edge, therre is no inforrmation to m move into the  shifted areea, so imagee recorrelatio on is not  possible th here.  Figuree 3.9 shows aan example of   Figure e 3.10 ‐ Info ormation loss due to  image e shifting   the loss off pixels near the image eedge   This lo oss  can becom me quite largge for large image shifts..    To summ marize, digitaal image corrrelation hass been investtigated and a basic algorithm  developeed.  This algo orithm will b be used as th he main com mponent of the ESPI fringge correction n  process d discussed.  TThe aim of th he process iss to mitigatee the negativve effects of specimen rigid  38     body motions within ESPI measurements.  If this fringe correction process can be proven  effective, the robustness of ESPI measurements will be significantly improved, potentially  allowing measurements to be performed in more adverse environments as well as other  related benefits.        39     4 Experimental Validation 4.1  Hybrid ESPI – DIC Apparatus  An experimental apparatus capable of making hole drilling ESPI measurements was constructed  to test the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed DIC fringe correction procedure.  Figure  4.1 illustrates the layout and major components of the experimental apparatus.     Figure 4.1 ‐ Apparatus schematic    Table 4.1 lists the major components of the apparatus. The ESPI portion of the  apparatus – encompassing the beam splitter mirror and piezoelectric actuator, was custom  designed and built.  Chip suction was also implemented within the drilling apparatus to   40     minimizee the spread of the metaallic particless cut from th he hole and to reduce th heir adverse  impact on optical components and measured surfaces. TThe photos iin Figure 4.2 2‐ Figure 4.4 illustratee the apparattus.   F Figure 4.2 –  ESPI beam ssplitter assembly  Figgure 4.3 – A Adjustable m mirror            Figure 4..4 ‐ Drill asse embly  41     Table 4.1 ‐ Apparatus components  Component  Laser  Camera  Piezoelectric  Actuator  3‐Axis Stage  High Speed Drill  Drill Stage     Make/Model  JDS Uniphase  CDPS532M  Prosilica EC 750  Piezomechanik PSt  150/7x7/7  Daedal  NSK EMS‐3041  Newport CMA‐25CCCL   Specifications  532nm wavelength, 50mW  640 x 480 resolution, 8 bit grayscale color depth  with telecentric lens  9µm maximum extension  Drill and specimen mounting possible  25k rpm max speed  Spring return, lead screw driven   The objective of the apparatus design was flexibility.  Each beam can be adjusted  independently, as can the vertical mirror placed near the specimen.  This allows the area of the  specimen under investigation to be uniformly illuminated by coherent beams oriented with the  proper incidence angles.  By repositioning and adjusting the components, a range of specimens  can easily be accommodated.  Attaching the selected specimen directly to the 3 axis table  allows known specimen rigid‐body motions to be accurately created. This allows the  effectiveness of EDIC as well as the DIC fringe correction procedure to be explored  systematically.   4.2  ESPI System Validation  Upon completion of the ESPI apparatus, it was necessary to first validate that it provided  accurate measurements.  Since residual stress hole drilling measurements are used as the test  case for DIC fringe correction within this work, measurement of a specimen with a known  residual stress field was examined.     42     The speccimen used w was a ring an nd plug speccimen provid ded by Dr. M M. Steinzig off the Los Alamos  National Laboratory,, New Mexicco.  This speccimen had previously beeen calibrateed at Los Alamos.   By measu uring the spe ecimen using the newly constructed d experimen ntal apparatu us and  comparin ng the resultts to those o obtained in LLos Alamos tthe new apparatus could d be verified d.   Figure 4.5 shows the e ESPI fringe result from a hole drillin ng measurem ment performed on the  calibrated specimen..     ecimen  Figure 4.5 ‐ Fringe ressult using calibrated spe h frequently used to com mpare the acccuracy of ESSPI fringes w within this reesearch, the hole  Although drilling reesidual stresss solution w will not be discussed in d detail within this thesis.  The focus of this  work deaals with ESPI measuremeents; residuaal stress holee drilling is o only used as a test case tto  provide EESPI fringes.  All residual stresses calculated are done so exaactly in the m manner  described d in [12].     43     The induced stress field within the specimen according to the measurements and calculations  performed in Los Alamos is compared with the solution measured using the experimental  apparatus in Table 4.2.     Table 4.2 ‐ Calibrated vs. measured stresses              x  y   xy  Calibrated Stress (MPa)  35.6  57.5  ‐0.3   Measured Stress (MPa)  31.4  53.2  ‐2.9   Difference (MPa)   4.2  4.3  2.6   % Difference w.r.t.  S y (%)   1.5  1.5  0.9   The measured stresses agree with the calibrated values within about 4MPa.  This is an  encouraging result and gives credibility to the experimental system.  The stress difference is  modest compared with practical residual stresses, which can be in the range of some hundreds  of MPa.   Expressing the difference as a percentage of the yield strength of the material gives a  more relative indication of the scale of the differences in the measurement.  These errors are  all less than 2%, and this again indicates the measurements are in good agreement.  Comparing the two results they are shown to be in good agreement, differing by only a few  MPa when comparing each of the three in plane stress components.  Since the capacity of the  constructed system to measure residual stresses accurately has now been proven, the  investigation of ESPI fringe correction using this apparatus can be explored with greater  confidence.    44     4.3  DIC Measurements Using ESPI Images  Examining a typical ESPI measurement, a large amount of data is available for analysis.  When  using a 4‐step phase stepping algorithm, 8 total images are therefore available for each ESPI  measurement; 4 captured initially ‐ the reference set, and 4 captured after some mechanical  change ‐ the fringe set.  Each of the images within each set is phase stepped according to the  scheme described in section 2.4.  Due to the phase dependent nature of laser speckles, this  causes the images within each set to vary significantly.  Figure 4.6 shows sections from a set of  4 phase‐stepped images.  These sections are taken from the same location of each image.  The  phase‐ stepping among these images causes them to appear very different, even though they  share the same underlying speckle pattern.  Speckles are seen to change phase from light to  dark as well as to change shape from image to image.          Figure 4.6 ‐ Sections of a phase stepped set of images   This image variation becomes the first challenge when attempting to utilize ESPI images within  DIC measurements.  When examining an arbitrary pair of images, one from the reference set  and one from the fringe set, it is possible that the speckles could be in phase, out of phase, or  somewhere in between.  For successful DIC measurements it is imperative that the pattern  being matched remains consistent from image to image.  Because phase variation has a direct  effect on intensity, using these phase‐stepped images directly is not suitable for DIC image  45     analysis.  Therefore, it is essential to develop some means of mitigating this pattern fluctuation  due to phase variation.  Returning to equation (2.10), the intensity distribution created by the illumination and  reference beams within a phase stepped image can be expressed as:           I n  A  B cos(  n )          (4.1)   In order to construct images suitable for DIC analysis, the quantities  A  and  B  which are seen  to be phase independent, are of interest.  By solving equation (2.18) in the case of a 4 step  algorithm, these quantities can be expressed in terms of the four phase‐stepped image  intensities at a given pixel as:      A    I1  I 2  I 3  I 4 4  B    ( I 4 - I 2 ) 2  (I 3  I1 ) 2 2     (4.2)    Therefore,  A and  B ’images’ can be constructed from the 4 images within a phase stepped set.    To test the feasibility and effectiveness of utilizing these new phase independent images within  DIC measurements, statistical tests of DIC capabilities were conducted on an example specimen  mechanically displaced by eighteen 0.1mm increments up to 1.8mm using the three‐axis table.   In order to minimize the backlash errors within the table, the specimen was moved backwards  and forwards each time before recording images to take up slack in the table drive system.  Sets  of four phase‐stepped ESPI images were measured after each displacement.  For the  46     magnification used, a 0.1mm displacement corresponded to 6.1 pixels.  DIC evaluations of the  image displacement were done at one hundred 50x50 pixel patches in a 10x10 grid spanning  the images.  The standard deviations of these DIC evaluations and the average correlation  coefficients  R 2  within the patches gave indications of the statistical quality of the results.   Figure 4.7 shows the standard deviation of the DIC displacement estimates vs. amount of image  shift.  A lower standard deviation indicates less statistical uncertainty and hence greater  expected computational precision.  In general, the standard deviation increases with image  shift, indicating that the speckle pattern does not simply translate, as would happen with  images of displaced physical surface features.  ESPI speckle patterns from displaced surfaces  slowly change due to differences in the illumination at different points in space.       0.40  Standard Deviation (pixels)  0.35 0.30 0.25 0.20 0.15 "A" Image  0.10  Min. Image Max Image  0.05  "B" Image  0.00 0  20  40  60  80  100  120  Image Shift (pixels)  Figure 4.7 ‐ Standard deviation of DIC displacement estimates vs. amount of image  shift 47       The lowest of the four lines in Figure 4.7 shows the DIC results using the constant “A” from  equation (4.2).  The adjacent bold line shows the results from “B” image, which are comparable  to the “A” results but deteriorate at higher image shifts.  The “Min. Image” and “Max. Image”  lines respectively show the minimum and maximum standard deviations observed among the  16 possible combinations of four initial stepped images with four final stepped images.  The  “Min. Image” results derive from the ESPI images that happen to be in phase, and give results  similar to those from the “A” images.  However, it is not known in advance which particular ESPI  images are in phase.  Thus, it would be necessary to test all image combinations to find them,   0.9  Correlation Coefficient R2  0.8 0.7 "A" Image  0.6  Min. Image  0.5  Max Image "B" Image  0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0 0  20  40  60 80 Image Shift (pixels)   100  120  Figure 4.8 ‐ Average correlation coefficient R2 vs. amount of image shift  48     which is not a very practical procedure.  The “Max. Image” curve represents case when the  chosen images are out of phase, and thus are poorly correlated.  The large “Max. Image”  standard deviations at small image shifts occur because the speckle patterns remain mostly  intact in this range, and so adverse relative phase has a large effect.  At larger image shifts, the  speckle patterns become distorted, and so the additional distortion caused by adverse phase is  no longer so influential.  Figure 4.8 shows the average correlation coefficient  R 2  for the same correlation patches as in  Figure 4.7.  Higher  R 2  is desirable, and thus the trends in Figure 4.8 support the conclusions  from Figure 4.7.  The correlations decrease with amount of image shift, showing the changes in  speckle patterns with surface displacement.  The  R 2  values are much lower than the range 0.95  to 0.99 typically achieved with images of physical surface features [8].  This lower correlation  occurs because speckle patterns respond to local changes in illumination as well as to surface  displacements.  Image “A” in Figure 4.8 achieve the best (highest) correlation coefficients;  image “B” and the raw ESPI images are consistently lower.    Thus, based on both Figure 4.7 and  Figure 4.8, the general use of “A” images for DIC analysis is indicated. Based on this result  whenever an ESPI based DIC (EDIC) calculation is performed, an “A” image will first be formed  for each phase stepped set of images and then the DIC method will be applied.          49     4.4  Measurin M ng Surfac ce Motion ns Using g EDIC & the Effe ect of S Speckle Size S  Having now establish hed an effecctive method d of using ph hase stepped d ESPI imagees within DIC C  measurements, the ffringe correcction processs is one step p closer to reeality.  The n next logical sstep  is to inveestigate the rrange and acccuracy of th hese measurrements.  Off particular interest is ho ow  these qualities comp pare to thosee of physical feature bassed DIC.  In aaddition, preevious work  nal painted [37] and laseer [22] speckkle based DIC C measurem ments suggests  involvingg convention that the ssize of the speckles used d affects meeasurement accuracy.  Bearing this in mind, the  effect of laser speckle size on ED DIC measurem ments will also be investtigated.    To this end, a series of experiments was cconducted u using  a flat sspecimen m mounted on tthe 3‐axis motorized tab ble.   Consid dering a co‐o ordinate sysstem orienteed on the  specim men as show wn in Figure 4.9, the specimen was  nitial position n over a rangge of 3mm in  Figure 4.9 ‐ Coordinaate system u used  moved from an in to desscribe specim men motion n.  directions in n 0.1mm incrrements.  Aggain,  both tthe x and y d the tablee was run backwards and d forwards for each set iin order to m minimize thee slack errorss  inherent to the table e’s drive systtem.  For eacch phase steepped set, 18 8 60x60 pixeel subsets weere  selected as before on n a circular ggrid as show wn in Figure 3 3.6.   The cen ntral area off the image w was  used to aavoid measu urements lossing correlation due to th he search arrea being constrained byy the  edges of the image.  Using thesee subsets 18 individual D DIC measurem ments were performed and  d.   The DIC result was then compareed with the aapplied displlacement,  an averagge recorded converteed into pixel units using aa calibration n done by recording images of a preccision scale  50     placed on the surface of the specimen.  The entire process was then repeated for a range of  laser speckle sizes.  Recalling equation (2.3), the variation in speckle size was achieved by  changing the f# of the lens of the CCD camera.   In order to compensate for the change in light  incident to the CCD due to this change, the exposure time of the camera was adjusted  accordingly to achieve a consistent average intensity over the entire image.  The camera  parameters for the range of speckle sizes examined are listed in Table 4.3.  The speckle size  listed represents an estimate calculated using equation (2.3).   Table 4.3 ‐ Camera parameters and speckle sizes   f   5.6   8   11   16   22   27   32   Exposure time (ms)   1   3   7   18   40   70   125   Speckle Size,  S , (px/s)   0.61   0.87   1.19   1.73   2.38   2.92   3.46   Mean Intensity,  I    101   108   104.7   101.3   100.1   101.4   101.2     A higher f# represents a smaller aperture and therefore larger speckles.  By closing the aperture  down smaller speckles are unable to form and all that remains are the larger ones [38].  In  addition to laser speckles, a painted speckle pattern was also examined.  This pattern was  created directly on the surface of the specimen using a can of conventional black spray paint.   When recording images of the painted pattern, only a single image was required as no phase  stepping occurred. Specimen illumination was accomplished using diffuse white light from a  fluorescent lamp.  The experimental results for specimen shifts in the x direction are shown in  Figure 4.10.  The ideal results obtained from the table itself are shown as a line with unity slope.   The accuracy of the various EDIC measurements can then be measured by how closely the  51     corresponding data matches the table data.  Examining Figure 4.10, it becomes very evident  that speckle size has a significant effect on the effectiveness of the EDIC measurements.  Both   200  Table 0.61 px/s 0.87 px/s 1.19 px/s 1.73 px/s 2.38 px/s 2.92 px/s 3.46 px/s Painted  Measured Dispalcement (px)  150 100 50 0 ‐50 ‐100 0  50  100 Table Displacement (px)  150  200  Figure 4.10 ‐ X Direction EDIC Measurements  the largest and smallest speckles, 3.46px/s and 0.61px/s respectively, perform poorly.  The  large speckles maintain a reasonably accurate result until a displacement of 82.6 px, or 1.4mm.   Beyond that point the solution deteriorates rapidly and deviates from the true displacement  more than any speckle size tested.  On the other end of the size spectrum, the smallest speckles  lose accuracy at even smaller displacements, deviating at displacements of 70.9 px or 1.1mm.   When compared to the largest speckles, the smallest speckles tested did provide a closer  52     agreement with the applied displacements however.  Although neither the smallest or largest  speckles performed well, the results improved within the middle of the speckle size range.   Speckles 0.87px/s in size, the next smallest speckles, began deviating at displacements of  94.5px followed by the second largest speckles of 2.92px/s at 129px displacement.  It is evident examining the data that the trend is towards an optimum speckle size that  maximizes the EDIC effectiveness.   Consistent with this trend, the datasets representing the  midsize speckles, 1.19px/s and 1.73px/s are shown to perform the best, maintaining good  agreement with the table displacement right up to the maximum displacement measured of  3mm or 177.2px.   Over this range the calculation error remains sub pixel except in a few  outlying cases.   The painted speckles are shown to give accurate results, matching the applied displacements  very closely.  This increased accuracy is attributed to the fact that painted speckles are physical  features that move with the specimen surface.   They are subject to a different limitation  caused by the possible presence of geometrical distortions due to aberrations in the imaging  optics.  However, this is a minor effect with good quality optics.  This quality is in stark contrast  with laser speckles, which as previously discussed in section 2, do have a spatial dependence  relating to the phase of the interference.  This causes the speckle pattern to change as the  specimen moves, even though the phase dependence has been mitigated by using the  technique described in section 4.3.  Since DIC measurements rely on the consistency of the  pattern being matched this difference indicates that painted speckles will always yield more  accurate results than laser speckles.   This is confirmed in the experimental results.    53     When examining EDIC measurements in the y direction, much the same trend is observed.   These experimental results are shown in Figure 4.11.  Again, the largest and smallest speckles  lose accuracy the fastest but in this case 2.92px/s is the next speckle size to fail as opposed to  0.87px/s as in the x direction.  The general trend however remains the same, with 1.19px/s and  1.73px/s again performing the best of those speckle sizes tested.  It should be noted that the  last data points shown in Figure 4.11 are especially inaccurate because the search area of  several DIC subsets was curtailed by the bounds of the image causing the average  measurement to be severely affected.  This is due to the 4:3 aspect ratio of the image itself; the  increased data available in the x direction allows displacements to be measured at greater  distances than in the y direction.  This trend is clearly visible when examining the EDIC results.   Although painted DIC remains accurate to 2.8mm this is most likely due to the greater strength  of correlation when using painted physical features when compared to the spatially dependent  laser speckles.  Even with the subset being only partially matched, the correlation using painted  speckles is strong enough to maintain a reasonably accurate result.     54     250  Table 0.61 px/s 0.87 px/s 1.19 px/s 1.73 px/s 2.38 px/s 2.92 px/s 3.46 px/s Painted  Measured Displacement (px)  200 150 100 50 0 ‐50 ‐100 ‐150 0     50  100 Table Displacement (px)  150  200     Figure 4.11 ‐ Y Direction EDIC Measurements  Figure 4.12 shows the measurement range of each speckle size in both the x and y directions.   The trend towards an optimal speckle size around 1.19px/s and 1.73px/s, where the  measurement range is greatest, is clearly shown for both directions.        55     200 180 X Direction  Measurement Range (px)  160  Y Direction  140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 0  0.5  1  1.5 2 2.5 Speckle Size (px/s)  3  3.5  4  Figure 4.12 ‐ Measurement range vs. Speckle Size To examine more clearly the effectiveness of the most accurate speckle sizes F11 and F16 as  Examining the data for 1.19px/s, 1.73px/s as well as the painted speckles, the absolute average  error and total error were calculated as shown in Table 4.4, omitting the last measurements in  the y direction because of the aspect ratio issue.    Table 4.4 ‐ EDIC measurement standard deviation for painted and laser speckles     1.19px/s 1.73px/s Painted  Average Error (px)  0.60   0.58   0.46   Total Error (px)   32.01   30.56   25.10      56     These data yield much clearer results showing that the laser speckle size of 1.73px/s, where  f  16  yields speckles that are the most accurate when used within EDIC measurements.  Using   this size the average error of 0.58px is slightly lower when compared with the average error of  0.60px when using speckles 1.19px in size.  This trend is also echoed when considering the total  error across all measurements.  At 1.73px/s, the average speckle has a size that is larger than  the conventional size of 1px.  Also, at 1.2px/s the EDIC error is very similar.  This suggests  speckles 1‐2px in size are the most effective for EDIC measurements.  Painted speckles again, as  expected, are shown to be more effective than laser speckles, with both an average error and  total error lower than either laser speckle size.  The average error of 0.46px for painted  speckles is relatively high when compared with typical error associated with the DIC method,  however errors in the range of 0.001 to 0.5px have been reported within previous work [8,23],  which is consistent with this result.    The deterioration in DIC correlation accuracy at the extremes of speckle size conforms to  theoretical expectations.  For a given patch size, DIC correlation accuracy varies approximately  inversely with the average linear size of the features within the analyzed images.  Thus, the  larger speckle sizes associated with larger  f  give lower correlation accuracy.  The DIC accuracy  increases as the speckle size reduces with smaller f .  However, with the smallest values of  f ,  the average speckle size reduces below the CCD pixel size and cannot be adequately resolved  by the camera, thereby also reducing correlation accuracy.    This concept was investigated for single beam DSC measurements by Feiel and Wilksch [24]  who, based on the work of Sjödahl and Benckert [22] proposed an optimum f number be   57     chosen according to the following criteria, in order to minimize aliasing errors while maintaining  the highest resolution possible:   f 2     Where:   d p = Physical pixel size      M = Magnification   = Source wavelength      dp (1  M )     (4.3)   Equation (4.3) is based on the Nyquist criterion, which states that in order to accurately  measure a signal containing a maximum frequency of  Y , the signal must be sampled at a  frequency of  2Y .  Physically, the speckle pattern contains speckles at a frequency of the  inverse of the speckle size as defined in equation (2.3).  The sampling frequency in this case is  defined as the inverse of the pixel size.  By this reasoning, equation (4.3) was developed to yield  the corresponding f number in line with the Nyquist criterion and speckle size as defined by  equation (2.3).  Using equation (4.3) for the case of the experimental apparatus, the optimum  f  18.49 shows good agreement with the experimental result of  f  16 . This indicates that   EDIC measurements share similarities to single beam DSC measurements.    The particular DIC algorithm used here has been applied in recent work [39] with good results,  so the errors in displacement measurement are most certainly due to physical imperfections  within the measurement setup.  Determining the field of view using a scale introduces certain  inaccuracies inherent to the scale itself.  Due to physical constraints the camera itself had to be  placed at a slight angle to the specimen, decreasing the CCD surface sensitivity to planar  displacements.  Finally, the 3‐axis table itself is not perfectly accurate and the lead screw drive  58     system contains inherent backlash errors. DIC accuracy could be improved by using a higher  resolution camera with a smaller physical pixel size and greater bit depth with a higher  magnification lens [8]. In the fringe correction application discussed here, DIC is used only to  evaluate bulk specimen motions but not to measure specimen surface displacements directly.   Therefore, for this application, the lower accuracy achieved using ESPI images is acceptable.   Although more complex DIC algorithms exist [23], this particular one is attractive for its ease of  implementation as well as speed.  A typical DIC measurement encompassing 18 individual  subsets was completed in a few seconds on a 2.14 Ghz processor once the images were  recorded.    Through these experiments three key results are obtained.  First, using the constructed  experimental apparatus, surface displacements can be measured accurately with sub pixel  resolution using EDIC in excess of 3mm or 177.2px in the x direction and up to 2.1mm or  137.0px in the y direction.  This difference in measurement range can be attributed to the  aspect ratio of the images used as well as the optical setup.  Second, the size of the laser  speckles used has a very significant affect on the accuracy and range of the EDIC measurement,  with the best results being obtained for this setup using an f number of 16 which corresponds  to an average speckle size of approximately 1.73px.  Third, using painted speckles consistently  produces more accurate DIC results than the proposed EDIC method.  By comparison, using this  experimental apparatus, both painted DIC and EDIC measurements produce errors on the same  scale.  Considering the accuracy when using painted speckles, it is on the lower end of the  reported range.  This is mainly due to various inaccuracies inherent to the apparatus and  method itself.  The slightly lower accuracy of EDIC should not be a significant concern within the  59     ESPI fringe correction method since the hole drilling surface displacements are measured using  ESPI and DIC is used only to re‐correlate the ESPI images.       4.5  Null Fringe Correction  Previous experiments have shown that EDIC measurements are capable of measuring surface  displacements of significant distances with sub‐pixel accuracy.  This is an encouraging result and  bodes well for the fringe correction process.  A simplified fringe correction is now investigated –  one in which no measurement is actually performed and the data is blank.  Ideally if the fringe  correction is successful, the recorrelation process will yield a completely null fringe.  These  experiments will provide a good starting point for examining the viability of the fringe  correction process.    The procedure used for these tests is similar to that used in section 4.4.  Using a nominally flat  specimen, a set of phase‐stepped images is first recorded to serve as the reference set.  The  specimen is then displaced a known amount using the table and a second set of fringe images is  recorded.  The table displacement is calculated using an EDIC solution Based on 18  circumferentially spaced 60x60 pixel patches.  Finally the fringe set of images are shifted to  reverse the table motion and re‐correlate the laser speckles.  Figure 4.13 shows an example set  of measurements.   60     (a)   (b)  (c)  Figure 4.13 ‐ (a) Baseline zero fringe (b) Corrupted fringe after 0.5mm displacement (c) Corrected fringe after image shifting  Figure 4.13(a) shows the baseline zero fringe obtained by recording consecutive sets of phase  stepped images without moving the table.  In the ideal case this fringe would be completely  blank; however slight texture created by measurement noise is visible.  This noise is caused by  the superposition of a random speckle pattern on a regular CCD pixel grid. Figure 4.13 (b) shows  the fringe obtained after the specimen has been shifted 0.5mm in the positive x direction.  As  expected, the speckle correlation is completely lost and the resulting fringe pattern is  destroyed.  Finally, after performing the EDIC measurement, the fringe images are shifted  accordingly to correct for the 0.5mm displacement. The resulting fringe is shown in Figure 4.13  (c), which shows that the speckle correlation has been restored, but with a large phase gradient  superimposed across the image.  This initial result shows promise – speckle correlation can  indeed be recovered, however the cause and correction of the resulting phase gradient needs  to be determined.      61     4.5.1 Phase P Gra adients – Cause C and Correctio on  Upon invvestigation, tthe cause off the phase ggradient  visible in Figure 4.13 (c) was foun nd to be a co ombination  of severaal factors.  W Within the exxperimental apparatus, aa  beam expander is plaaced directlyy in front of the laser  source, w which makess both the illumination aand  referencee beams con nical in shape.  This conical shape is  one of th he factors that causes ph hase gradien nts within   Figure 4..14 ‐ Conicall asymmetrical  illuminattion of a flatt specimen  undergoing a shift d   corrected d ESPI fringe es.  Considerr the ideal caase of a  perfectlyy flat specimen imaged aasymmetricaally by two  conical b beams at anggles   1  and   2 as shown n in Figure  4.14.  If tthe specimen n is then shifted right byy a distance  of beam 1 inccreases by  d sin  1 as  d , the path length o shown in n Figure 4.15 5 and similarrly the path llength of  beam 2 d decreases byy  d sin  2 .  TThe relative path length   Figure 4 4.15 ‐ Path le ength changge of  beam 1 due to speccimen shift  thereforee changes byy:        d (sin  1  sin  2 )  (4.4)    The beams can be id dealized as o originating frrom point so ources at a d distance L fro om the surfaace,  being con nical in shap pe due to thee beam expaander and illuminating aan image  D  wide as shown  in Figure 4.16. The co one angles o of the beamss can be described as   62     1      D cos  1 L  ,  2   D cos  2 L     (4.5)   Because of the conical shape of the beam, the  beam angles, or angles of incidence, vary across  the image.  Considering only a one‐dimensional  image, the beam angles on the left side will be   1  1   1 2  1 2  ,2  ,2   2 2  2 2  and on the right they will be  Figure 4.16 ‐ Conical  beam illumination   respectively.  Considering the   change in path length at the left and right side of the image yields:                  L  d  sin   1  1     2  2   2   2            R  d  sin   1  1     2  2   2   2        (4.6)   Finally calculating the total path length based on equation (4.6) and simplifying using  trigonometric identities yields:          L   R  2d  cos  2 sin  2 2   cos  1 sin  1     2   (4.7)   For small cone angles, and substituting equation (4.5) this yields:      L R       dD cos 2  2  cos 2  1   L  (4.8)   Utilizing trigonometric identities, equation (4.8) simplifies to:  63     L R             dD sin  1   2 sin  1   2   L  (4.9)   Phase difference can then be related to the change in path length using the wavelength of the  source as:    2    L  R    L   R             (4.10)   Simplifying equation (4.10) yields:         Where:          2 dD sin  1   2 sin  1   2   L         (4.11)   d = Specimen shift distance  D = Image width at specimen  λ = Source wavelength  L = Beam path length   1 = Beam 1 angle of incidence   2 = Beam 2 angle of incidence   The phase gradient due to the conical illumination beams and angles of incidence can be  calculated using equation (4.11).  To validate this equation, an experiment was performed  where the flat mirror that reflects the illumination beam was mounted on a precision turntable.   By rotating the mirror set angular increments, the angle of incidence of the reference beam was  varied.  Sets of images were recorded before and after a constant specimen shift of 0.25mm in  the x direction.  The fringe set of images were then shifted back into alignment according to the  EDIC result and the number fringes measured numerically using a least squares solution in the  same manner described later in this section.  Figure 4.17 shows the results of the mirror turning  experiment.  64     As shown in the figure, the experimental data matches the results from equation (4.11) quite  well.  The difference between the two results may partly be due to the difficulty of accurately  identifying the illumination distance “L” because the position of the source focal point could not  be exactly identified.    Fringes (2π rad)  5 4  Ideal Data  3  Experimental data  2  Parallel Illumination  1 0 ‐1 ‐2 ‐3 ‐4 ‐5 ‐15  ‐10  ‐5  0 Δθ, (°)  5  10  15    Figure 4.17 ‐ Conical beam phase gradient validation results     The remaining phase gradients are caused by the change in the relative path length of the  illumination and reference beams from one side of the image to the other.  These changes in  path length can be attributed to a combination of factors.  Any specimen curvature in the z  direction will cause phase gradients as the specimen is moved since the relative path lengths of   65     the illumination and reference beams will change according to the curvature.  Specimen motion  that is not completely parallel to the x‐y plane of the specimen will also change the relative  path lengths across an image and introduce a phase gradient, as will specimen rotation.    To summarize; if the angles of incidence of the two beams is not constant across the specimen  surface and specimen motion occurs, the path lengths of the two beams will not change equally  and a phase gradient will occur.  Specimen rotation will also cause phase gradients for the same  reason.  For nominally flat specimens, adding lenses to create parallel illuminating beams and  adjusting the optical equipment to create constant angles of incidence will allow planar  motions to produce very little relative phase change.  After adding the lenses and adjusting the  vertical mirror near the specimen to create nominally equal angles of incidence, the phase  gradients of various planar motions in the x and y direction after fringe correction are shown in  Figure 4.18.     0.2mm (12.9 pixels)   0.4mm (25.5 pixels)  0.6mm (37.6 pixels)  0.8mm (50.4 pixels)     Figure 4.18 ‐ Phase gradients for various specimen shifts  The top row of figures shows specimen motions in the x direction, and the bottom row shifts in  the y direction.  The relative size of the shifts can be seen by observing the band of information  66     loss visible at the edge of the fringe patterns.   The noise content clearly increases with  specimen shift due to the speckle pattern gradually changing shape.  As the speckles change  shape, some of the speckle correlation is lost upon shifting the images back and the noise is  increased.  Therefore it is expected that fringe correction will only be feasible up to a certain  range which is to be investigated in future experiments.  Comparison of Figure 4.13 with Figure 4.18 shows that the residual phase gradient has been  largely corrected.  A slight phase gradient is still visible with larger specimen motions however,  even with the addition of parallel lenses and beam adjustment.  It should also be noted that  using physical methods to correct phase gradients requires the equipment to be adjusted  independently for each specimen measured.  The fringes in Figure 4.18 were obtained after  careful adjustment to illustrate that this type of gradient correction is possible.  In a more  practical application however it is very likely that phase gradients will still occur; even for the  case shown after careful adjustment slight phase gradients exist.   Therefore an additional  method to systematically correct this artifact would be very beneficial.    To this end, phase gradient correction by mathematical methods was investigated.  A least‐ squares solution, similar to that used to solve for pixel phase (equations (2.17)‐(2.20)) is used to  estimate these phase gradients.  The gradient is considered as a bi‐linear function in the form  of:       P  Qx  Ry    (4.12)   Considering an area within the image bounded by two concentric circles containing  n  pixels:   67               1 1  1  x1 x2  xn   1  y1    P   y2     2  Q              R yn     n     (4.13)   where   xn , yn are the co‐ordinates of the pixel with the origin equal to that of the circles  bounding the area and   n being the phase of the pixel.     This equation is over determined and can be solved using the least‐square method.  The  polynomial coefficients can be determined as:   P      1  Q   x x 2  R   y   y 2  (4.14)   Once the phase gradient is calculated using equation (4.14) it can be subtracted from the fringe  pattern, yielding a more accurate result of the true measurement fringe.  Figure 4.19 (a) shows  a corrected zero fringe with a specimen motion of 0.5mm; the phase gradient is clearly visible.   Figure 4.19 (b) shows the same fringe after the phase gradient is subtracted using the least  squares solution.   (a)      (b)  Figure 4.19 ‐ (a) Corrected fringe with phase gradient (b) Corrected  fringe after phase gradient subtraction  68      The fringe after phase subtraction is clearly much cleaner; the gradient is removed leaving a  fringe pattern much closer to the ideal case of a completely white image.  Correcting for the phase gradients in the case of residual stress hole drilling measurements  serves mainly to help avoid unwrapping errors.  The stress calculation itself has provisions for  removing the effect of the gradients; however unwrapping errors can still damage the stress  solution.  By removing the phase gradients, the possibility of extraneous unwrapping errors is  significantly reduced.  For ESPI measurements of other kinds however, mitigating phase  gradients may prove to be more significant.     To summarize, although phase gradients are created using the proposed ESPI fringe correction  process, they can be corrected using a combination of physical and mathematical methods.   These experiments show that after such treatment, a restored zero fringe is shown to have  good agreement with the ideal case of a completely null image.  Noise is clearly visible and will  increase with larger specimen shifts as the speckles change shape, but within a certain range,  the ESPI fringe correction process is shown to be feasible for the case of blank fringes.   4.6  Validation of ESPI Fringe Correction Using Hole Drilling  The fringe correction process has been shown to be feasible for correcting a null measurement  fringe which is an important result.  Ideally however this process will be used to correct rigid  body motions affecting actual ESPI measurements.  Therefore, in order to test the effectiveness  of the process in an actual application, the process was applied to actual ESPI hole drilling  measurements.  These series of experiments involved comparing a baseline measurement  performed under controlled conditions with a corrupted measurement containing some  69     specimen rigid‐body motion.  The fringe correction procedure was performed on the corrupted  measurement, and the recovered fringe pattern was used as the basis of the residual stress  solution.  This recovered solution was then compared with the solution obtained using the  baseline measurement to establish the effectiveness of the correction process.  By repeating  this experiment for various specimen motions, a range over which fringe correction is possible  was determined.  The specimen used for these tests was the same calibrated specimen used in section 4.2.  Since  this specimen contained a well‐known residual stress distribution, a measurement which  matches this stress was known to be accurate and serves as the baseline.  So long as the  recovered measurement matches the baseline, its accuracy can be safely assumed.  The initial tests performed examined the maximum range of specimen motion that could be  corrected.  The results for the various specimen directions are shown in Figures 4.20‐4.23.  The  dark black lines represent the baseline measurement performed in section 4.2.  If the residual  stress solution remains close to the line, then the process is successful.   Both positive and  negative Z direction specimen shifts were considered since it was thought the depth of field of  the lens may have an effect on the range of correction.  Examining the results, it’s quite  apparent that the procedure is effective over a specific range, after which the solution  deteriorates rapidly.  If a deviation of ± 3 MPa is considered, the correction is effective over the  ranges shown in Table 4.5.  The standard deviation is also tabulated for each stress component  within this table.     70     120 100  x σX y σY τxy xy  Stress (Mpa)  80 60 40 20 0 ‐20 0  0.5  1  1.5  2  2.5  X Direction Specimen Shift (mm) Figure 4.20 ‐ Recovered stress solution vs. X direction specimen shift    120 100  x σX y σY τxy xy  Stress (Mpa)  80 60 40 20 0 ‐20 0  0.5  1 1.5 Y Direction Specimen Shift (mm)  2  2.5  Figure 4.21 ‐ Recovered stress solution vs. Y direction specimen shift  71     120  x σX y σY τxy xy  100  Stress (Mpa)  80 60 40 20 0 ‐20 0  0.2  0.4  0.6  0.8  1  1.2  1.4  1.6  1.8  2  +Z Direction Specimen Shift (mm) Figure 4.22 – Recovered stress solution vs. +Z direction specimen shift 120 100  x σX  σYy τxy xy  Stress (Mpa)  80 60 40 20 0 ‐20 0  0.5  1  1.5  2  ‐Z Direction Specimen Shift (mm)    Figure 4.23 ‐ Recovered stress solution vs. ‐Z direction specimen shift 72      Table 4.5 ‐ Range and deviation of fringe correction process  Specimen Shift Direction Range (mm)  Standard Deviation (Mpa)   x   y    xy    X   1.4mm   0.283  0.642  0.243   Y   1.2mm   1.086  0.928  0.356   +Z   0.8mm   0.516  1.065  0.186   ‐Z   0.9mm   0.445  1.230  0.339     The data in the table show that specimen motions in the out‐of‐plane (Z) direction have the  most detrimental effect on the measurement recovery, as the range of correction in these  directions were both significantly lower than the in plane (X,Y) directions.  This follows from the  fact that specimen motions in the z direction change the path length of both ESPI beams much  more than in‐plane motions.  As the pattern changes the re‐correlation process suffers and the  measurement is lost.  Another trend is observed examining the standard deviations of the  various in plane stress components.  The y component of stress exhibits the highest deviation  across nearly all specimen motions.  This may be attributed to the fact that the optical setup of  the ESPI system is aligned to measure displacements in the x direction only.  For y‐stresses,  such displacements occur only through the action of Poisson’s ratio, and are only about one  third the size of the corresponding displacements for x‐stresses.  Thus, measurement of x‐ displacements gives sensitivity to y‐stresses of about one third the sensitivity to x‐stresses.  This  trend is evident when considering the graphs.  The y component of stress consistently deviates  from the true solution first while the x component of stress, which is more directly measured,  maintains agreement some distance longer.  If the system was adapted to measure all three  components of stress evenly, by changing the sensitivity vector such that x and y displacements   73     are measured equally, the range of correction for this application could most likely be  extended.   4.7  Specimen Removal and Replacement  As well as increasing the resilience of ESPI measurements to specimen rigid body motions, the  ESPI fringe correction process developed here has now made possible a novel measurement  method.  Throughout previous experiments the drilling process was integrated within the  apparatus – the drill was moved into position after the reference set of images was recorded.   This can cause problems however as chips created during drilling can contaminate the optics  and the cutting forces themselves can disturb the optical equipment.  If drilling could be  performed at a separate location these problems could be avoided, and the apparatus itself  could be simplified.  This provided the motivation for the following experiments.   The specimen used for these tests was developed for previous work [40] for hole drilling  residual stress measurements.  To establish a baseline residual stress result, a series of 5  measurements was performed with the specimen fixed rigidly to the optical table.  The results  are shown in Figure 4.24, with the average for each in plane stress component plotted as a  straight line.      74     160 140 120 Stress (MPa)  100 80  x σX y σY  xy τxy  60 40 20 0 ‐20 1  2  3  4  5  Measurement #     Figure 4.24 ‐ Removal & replacement baseline tests with the specimen fixed    Examining these results, they are quite closely grouped around the averages indicating  reasonable consistency.  This average stress solution therefore represents a reasonable  baseline residual stress solution for this particular specimen.  If a measurement produced using  specimen removal and replacement can produce a similar solution it can be successfully  validated.   75     To accom mplish specim men removaal and replaccement, an aadditional fixxture was co onstructed to o  hold the specimen in n the path off the ESPI beeams.  This fixture is sho own in Figuree 4.25.  The  process o of these experiments co onsisted of aligning the sspecimen in the fixture w within the  existing EESPI system..  The fixturee was then b bolted to thee optical tablle.  The holee location waas  next m marked on th he specimen n and  the set of referencce images w was  ded.  The speecimen was then  record removved from thee fixture and d  bolted d to a separaate fixture att a  Figure 4.25 ‐ Speciimen fixture e  differen nt location aand then drilled   with the same drilling system used in previous experimeents.  After d drilling, the sspecimen waas  replaced in the fixturre and the frringe set of iimages was recorded.   IIn order to test the  repeatab bility of the rreplacementt procedure the specimeen was then removed an nd replaced an  additionaal 10 times, with a new ffringe set off images bein ng recorded each time.  The results of  the experiment are sshown in Figgure 4.26, with the averaage of all 10 tests again sshown as a  straight line.  Considering the ressults, there is definite vaariation; how wever the m measurementt  does sho ow promise.  The removaal and replaccement proccess is shown to have go ood repeatab bility  with all the measurements spaceed closely arround the avverage.  A nu umerical com mparison  between n the baseline tests wherre the specim men was fixeed, and the removal and d replacement  experimeents is shown in Table 4.6.   76     140 120  Stress (MPa)  100 80  x σX y σY τxy xy  60 40 20 0 ‐20 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  Measurement #      Figure 4.26 ‐ Removal and replacement residual stress results  Table 4.6 ‐ Removal and replacement vs. baseline numerical comparison                      Average (MPa)  x    y  xy  Baseline  129.4 92.4 Removal & Replacement 123.5 78.2 Absolute Difference  5.9 14.2  0.4 ‐6.4 6.9  Comparing both tests numerically shows that they are in good agreement, with the stress  component in the y direction varying more than the other two.  Again this can be attributed to  the low sensitivity to displacements in the y direction.  This difference may also be attributed  due to the need to reposition the specimen and fixture independently of the previous tests.    77     Although care was taken to try and return the specimen to the same position used in the fixed  tests, small deviations could cause a slightly different measurement due to the beam angles of  the illumination and reference beam changing.  Since the removal and replacement results are  consistently lower than those of the fixed tests, this could certainly be the case.  A graphical  comparison of the fringes obtained during both the baseline and removal and replacement  tests are shown in Figure 4.27   Figure 4.27 ‐ (a) Baseline fringe (b) Removal and replacement fringe before correction         (c) Removal and replacement fringe after correction  This figure clearly shows the effectiveness of the fringe correction process as well as good  agreement between the baseline fixed specimen measurements and the removal and  replacement measurements. The effectiveness of the correction process is clearly evident when  considering Figure 4.27 (b) and (c). (b) shows a completely corrupted fringe pattern, while after  correction (c) shows a fringe pattern with good contrast and well defined fringes.  Comparing  Figure 4.27 (a) and (c) the similarity is evident; the fringe patterns show very close agreement,  indicating that a comparable solution can indeed be obtained using specimen removal and  replacement, even using the simple fixture that was constructed.  The noise content is slightly  higher in the corrected fringe however this is typical of the correction process as previously  discussed and does not affect the measurement significantly.    78     The experimental results presented in this section work to investigate and validate the various  aspects of the ESPI fringe correction process.  In order generate accurate ESPI data, an  adjustable ESPI hole drilling apparatus was constructed and validated using a calibrated  specimen.  In order to make use of phase stepped ESPI images for DIC measurements (EDIC), a  phase independent method was successfully developed.  The size effect of the speckles within  these ESPI images was investigated and an optimum speckle size of 1.73px, which yielded the  largest EDIC measurement range, was determined for this optical setup.  Null fringe correction,  representing the most basic application of the fringe correction process, was investigated and  shown to be successful; however a phase gradient artifact was encountered.  The cause of  these phase gradients was determined analytically, validated experimentally and corrected  using a combination of both physical and mathematical methods.  Once the fringe correction  process was established, it was applied to ESPI hole drilling measurements.  Using the 3 axis  table, specimen motions were systematically created within hole drilling measurements.  By  comparing recovered solutions after fringe correction with a baseline measurement performed  in controlled conditions, the accuracy of the process could be assessed.   This allowed the  effective range of the correction process to be determined.  Finally, a new ESPI measurement  method involving removal and replacement of the specimen was investigated.  This type of  measurement was made possible due to the flexibility afforded by the fringe correction  process.  It was shown that this type of new measurement is accurate and repeatable when  compared with a baseline measurement performed in the conventional manner.     79     5 Conclusions and Future Work 5.1  Conclusions  A novel adaptable ESPI system was designed and constructed  The ESPI apparatus developed here was designed and constructed for use when measuring  residual stresses using the hole drilling method.  The apparatus was validated using a specimen  with a known residual stress field; results were obtained and shown to be in good agreement  with the stresses contained in the specimen.  Phase independent DIC using ESPI phase stepped image sets (EDIC) was developed  By constructing a phase independent image from the available images within a stepped set,  accurate DIC results could be obtained using the existing images within an ESPI measurement.   Statistical tests determined that using an average (“A”) image yielded the best results of any  possible combination of phase‐stepped images or other phase independent quantities.    Using this new EDIC method, the effect of laser speckle size was investigated systematically by  varying the optical configuration of the apparatus.  It was determined that speckle size did have  a significant effect on EDIC effectiveness, and an optimum lens aperture F16 was determined to  yield the most accurate results for this particular apparatus.  This agrees well with previous  work done on single beam DSC measurements.  When compared with conventional painted  speckles, EDIC was found to be less accurate, but the errors within both methods were  comparable.  The difference in accuracy can be attributed to the spatial dependency of laser  speckles.  Physical surface features do not suffer from this dependency and therefore generally  80     yield more accurate DIC results.  Using EDIC, displacements in excess of 150 pixels or 2.5mm  were measured successfully with sub pixel error.  An ESPI fringe correction process was developed to correct for specimen motion  Utilizing EDIC measurements, an ESPI fringe correction process was developed and successfully  applied to residual stress hole drilling measurements.  Significant specimen rigid body motions  occurring between the recordings of phase stepped sets were able to be corrected using this  method.    Phase gradients resulting from this fringe correction were investigated and were found to be  mostly caused by the use of conical illumination beams.  This mechanism was shown  analytically and experimentally.  The phase gradients were largely mitigated by the addition of  lenses to convert the conical illumination into parallel illumination. In addition, the optical  equipment was carefully adjusted to ensure equal angles of incidence for both the reference  and illumination beams.  Even with careful optical adjustments, some gradients remained due  to specimen rotations and curvature.  To address these remaining gradients, mathematical  correction by a least squares solution and subtraction method was developed.  Using a precision 3‐axis table, specimen motions were inserted into actual ESPI residual stress  measurements after the hole drilling had occurred.  Using the fringe correction process,  measurements could be recovered accurately for specimen motions of up to 1.4mm in the x  direction, 1.1mm in the y direction and 0.8mm and 0.9mm in the positive and negative z  directions respectively.  These results were validated by matching them to conventional ESPI  measurements performed on the same specimen.  Without the fringe correction process,  81     motions of approximately 0.030mm in any direction would compromise the measurement  entirely.  The fringe correction process is therefore shown to improve the ability of ESPI to  measure stress accurately, independent of these motions, by 2 orders of magnitude.  This result is encouraging with respect to helping ESPI move to more practical use in the field,  especially in terms of a portable ESPI system.  Within such an application, it would be very  possible for the specimen to shift after drilling, due to either environmental disturbances or the  drilling itself.  Using the fringe correction process developed, no additional equipment or data  are required, and the ability of the system to handle specimen motions is significantly  improved.  Specimen removal and replacement was investigated  A novel residual stress hole drilling technique was also made possible by the fringe correction  process.  Previously the drilling process had been integrated within the experimental apparatus;  however measurements where the specimen was removed for drilling and replaced within the  system were investigated.  A simple fixture was developed for this purpose, and a new  specimen was fabricated.  This specimen was then measured 5 times using the conventional  measurement method with the specimen fixed, and a baseline residual stress solution was  established by taking the average of these tests.  The specimen and fixture were then aligned  within the system and the new process was tested.  In this case the specimen was removed  after the reference set of images was recorded, drilled at a separate location with the same  drilling system used previously, and replaced within the fixture.  The fringe set of images was  then recorded and the fringe correction procedure was applied.  Using this method, results  82     were obtained that were comparable to those done in the baseline tests with the specimen  fixed.  In order to test the repeatability of the method, the specimen was removed and  replaced an additional 9 times and a new set of fringe images was recorded.  The results for all  10 tests were shown to be in good agreement indicating that the process possesses good  repeatability.  This is an exciting result as it creates several new possibilities.  The drilling system can now  easily be separated from the ESPI apparatus.  By doing this, the optical system itself can be  simplified, and components can be placed in better alignment.  In addition, the chips created  during the cutting process can be kept separate from the delicate optical equipment.  Even with  the chip suction system implemented, specimen chips were still a problem within the apparatus  and they would often obstruct the vertical mirror in particular.  This problem can now be  avoided.  In addition, the data corruption caused by the cutting forces induced during the  drilling process can also be avoided using specimen removal and replacement.  Specimen  removal and replacement also opens the possibility of measuring a single specimen at multiple  attitudes within a single system.  For instance, consider a hole drilling measurement performed  on a thin plate.  Two measurements can now be performed simultaneously on the front and  back faces of the plate by simply taking a reference set of images with the specimen in the  fixture, flipping the specimen and recording reference images of the back face.  By repeating  this process after the hole is drilled, displacement data for the front and back face can be  obtained simultaneously.  Previously it would be necessary to devise an extremely complicated  ESPI system to achieve this type of measurement however through this work it is now possible  using the conventional ESPI system constructed.  83     5.2  Future Work  Investigate correction of individual stepped images for active correction  This work has been shown to correct specimen motions occurring in between recording sets of  phase‐stepped images.  Vibrations may cause the specimen to shift during the acquisition of a  phase‐stepped set, causing the steps to deviate from the desired 90‐degree increments.  Some  work was done examining the feasibility of correcting individual images within a set, however  the tests done were mainly inconclusive because the induced vibrations were too fast to be  accurately captured by the camera; significant blurring occurred which destroyed the speckle  correlation.  The use of stroboscopic laser illumination in combination with a higher speed  camera could reduce this blurring.  If this is possible, then individual images within a set could  possibly be corrected in the same manner as full sets within this work, so long as the imaging  frequency was high enough to minimize the displacement between each image in a set.  This  could allow another significant increase in ESPI system robustness and could mitigate the effect  of vibrations and other disturbances common to field environments.  Extend fringe correction to in plane rotations  Within this work, a fringe correction process is developed that can account for planar motions  and out of plane rotations.  It is possible however that in plane (xy) specimen rotations could  occur as well.  Therefore, it follows logically that adapting the process to account for these  rotations as well as investigating the performance of rotation correction should be investigated  in the future.    84     Develop a portable ESPI system  The ESPI fringe correction process represents a solid step towards constructing a viable ESPI  system for portable measurements.  Using this method as well as the adjustable design  developed for the experimental apparatus, it become practical to develop a feasible system  that could be used for making mobile residual stress measurements.  If work was done to  develop single image correction for more active specimen motion correction the robustness of  a portable system could be even further increased.      85     References  [1] J. De Lemos, H. Mischo, T. Pfeifer, Comparison of Strain/Stress Measurements on Free Form  Surfaces Using ESPI and Strain Gauge Technique, Proceedings of SPIE ‐ The International Society  for Optical Engineering, v 4420, Laser Metrology for Precision Measurement and Inspection in  Industry (2001) 123‐131.   [2] M.V. Rao, R. Samuel, A. Ananthan, S. Dasgupta, P.S. Nair, Electronics Speckle Interferometry  Applications for NDE of Spacecraft Structural Components, Proceedings of SPIE,  v 7155, Ninth  International Symposium on Laser Metrology (2008) 563‐571.  [3] F. Jin, F.P. Chiang, ESPI and Digital Speckle Correlation Applied to Inspection of Crevice  Corrosion on Aging Aircraft, Research in Nondestructive Evaluation v 10 (1998) 63‐73.  [4] G.S. Schajer, M. Steinzig, Sawblade Vibration Mode Shape Measurement Using ESPI, Journal  of Testing and Evaluation, v 36 (2008) 259‐263.  [5] J.M. Sabatier, V. Aranchuk, W.C.K. Alberts II, Rapid High‐Spatial‐Resolution Imaging of Buried  Landmines Using ESPI, Proceedings of SPIE, v 5415, Detection and Remediation Technologies  for Mines and Minelike Targets IX, (2004) 14‐20.   [6] G.S. Spagnolo, D. Ambrosini, D. Paoletti, ESPI for Mosaics Diagnostics, Proceedings of SPIE. v  4778, Interferometry XI: Applications (2002) 377‐384.  [7] M. Steinzig, E. Ponslet, Residual Stress Measurement Using the Hole Drilling Method and  Laser Speckle Interferometry: Part 1, Experimental Techniques, v 27, (2003) 43‐46.   [8] M.A. Sutton, Digital Image Correlation for Shape and Deformation Measurements, Springer  Handbook of Experimental Solid Mechanics, (2008).    [9] D. Amodio, G. Broggiato, F. Campana, G. Newaz, Digital Speckle Correlation for Strain  Measurement by Image Analysis, Experimental Mechanics, v 43, (2003) 396‐402.   [10] I. Yamaguchi, Measurement and Testing by Digital Speckle Correlation, Proceedings of SPIE  v 7129, Seventh International Symposium on Instrumentation and Control Technology:  Optoelectronic Technology and Instruments, Control Theory and Automation, and Space  Exploration, (2008) 71290Z‐9.   [11] L. Muravs'kyi, M. Hvozdyuk, T. Polovynko, Evaluation of The Surface Strains in the  Composites by the Methods of Digital Speckle Correlation, Materials Science, v 43 (2007) 568‐ 573.    86     [12] G. Schajer, M. Steinzig, Full‐Field Calculation of Hole Drilling Residual Stresses From  Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry Data, Experimental Mechanics, v 45, (2005) 526‐532.   [13] R. Ritter, K. Galanulis, D. Winter, E. Mueller, B. Breuckmann, Notes on the Application Of  Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry, Optics and Lasers in Engineering. v 26, (1997) 283‐ 299.   [14] F.S. Chau, J. Zhou, Combined Digital Speckle Shearing Interferometry and Digital Image  Correlation for Analysing Vibrating Objects, Proceedings of SPIE ‐ The International Society for  Optical Engineering, 2nd International Conference on Experimental Mechanics, v 4317, (2001)  380‐385.  [15] D. Findeis, J. Gryzagoridis, D.R. Rowland, Vibration Isolation Techniques Suitable for  Portable Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry, Proceedings of SPIE ‐ The International  Society for Optical Engineering, Nondestructive Evaluation and Health Monitoring of Aerospace  Materials and Civil Infrastructures, v 4704, (2002) 159‐167.   [16] P.L. Reu, B.D. Hansche, Digital Image Correlation Combined With Electronic Speckle Pattern  Interferometery for 3D Deformation Measurement In Small Samples, SEM Annual Conference  and Exposition on Experimental and Applied Mechanics 2006, v 3, (2006) 1396‐1402.  [17] W.H. Peters, W.F. Ranson, Digital Imaging Techniques in Experimental Stress Analysis,  Optical Engineering, v 21 (1982) 427‐431.   [18] M. Sutton, W. Wolters, W. Peters, W. Ranson, S. McNeill, Determination of Displacements  Using an Improved Digital Correlation Method, Image Vision Computing, v 1 (1983) 133‐139.   [19] T. Chu, W. Ranson, M. Sutton, Applications of Digital‐Image‐Correlation Techniques to  Experimental Mechanics, Experimental Mechanics, v 25, (1985) 232‐244.   [20] N. Takai, T. Asakura, Vectorial Measurements of Speckle Displacement by the 2‐D  Electronic Correlation Method, Applied Optics, v 24, (1985) 660‐665.   [21] D.J. Chen, F.P. Chiang, Optimal Sampling And Range of Measurement in Displacement‐Only  Laser‐Speckle Correlation, Experimental Mechanics, v 32, (1992) 145‐153.   [22] M. Sjodahl, L.R. Benckert, Systematic and Random Errors in Electronic Speckle  Photography, Applied Optics, v 33, (1994) 7461‐7471.   [23] P. Bing, Performance of Sub‐Pixel Registration Algorithms in Digital Image Correlation,  Measurement Science and Technology, v 17, (2006) 1615.   [24] R. Feiel, P. Wilksch, High‐Resolution Laser Speckle Correlation for Displacement and Strain  Measurement, Applied Optics, v 39, (2000) 54‐60.   87     [25] M. Sjodahl, L. Larsson, Speckle Correlation Used for Measuring Micro‐Structural Changes in  Paper, Proceedings of SPIE, Speckle Metrology 2003, v 4933, (2003) 33‐38.  [26] G. Cloud, Optical Methods in Experimental Mechanics Part 26: Subjective Speckle,  Experimental Techniques, v 31, (2007) 17‐19.   [27] G. Cloud, Optical Methods in Experimental Mechanics Part 27: Speckle Size Estimates,  Experimental Techniques, v 31, (2007) 19‐22.  [28] D.M. Kennedy, Z. Schauperl, S. Greene, Application of ESPI‐Method for Strain Analysis in  Thin Wall Cylinders, Optics and Lasers in Engineering, v 41, (2004) 585‐594.   [29] J.C. Wyant, Phase‐Shifting Interferometry, Optics 513 Course Notes, (1998), pp. 1‐38.  Available at:  http://www.optics.arizona.edu/jcwyant/Optics513/ChapterNotes/Chapter05/3.PrintedVersion PhaseShiftingInterferometry.pdf .  Retrieved on: July 25th, 2010  [30] Y. An, Residual Stress Measurement Using Cross‐Slitting and ESPI, University of British  Columbia, MASc Thesis, (2008).   [31] R.S. Sirohi, Optical Methods of Measurement : Wholefield Techniques, New York : Marcel  Dekker, (1999).  [32] H. Kadono, H. Takei, S. Toyooka, A Noise‐Immune Method of Phase Unwrapping in Speckle  Interferometry, Optics and Lasers in Engineering, v 26 (1997) 151‐164.    [33] R.C. Gonzalez, Digital Image Processing, Reading, Mass. : Addison‐Wesley, (1992).   [34] E.L. Hall, A Survey of Preprocessing and Feature Extraction Techniques for Radiographic  Images, IEEE Transactions on Computers, v 20, (1971) 1032‐1044.   [35] D.V. Nelson, A. Makino, T. Schmidt, Residual Stress Determination Using Hole Drilling and  3D Image Correlation, Experimental Mechanics, v 46, (2006) 31‐38.   [36] J.D. Lord, D. Penn, P. Whitehead, The Application of Digital Image Correlation for  Measuring Residual Stress by Incremental Hole Drilling, Applied Mechanics and Materials, v 13‐ 14 (2008) 65‐73.    [37] D. Lecompte, A. Smits, S. Bossuyt, H. Sol, J. Vantomme, D. Van Hemelrijck, A.M. Habraken,  Quality Assessment of Speckle Patterns for Digital Image Correlation, Optics and Lasers in  Engineering, v 44, (2006) 1132‐1145.    88     [38] G. Cloud, Optical Methods in Experimental Mechanics Part 24: Demonstrations of Laser  Speckle Phenomena, Experimental Techniques, v 30 (2006) 27‐30.   [39] B. Winiarski, P.J. Withers, Micron‐scale Residual Stress Measurement using Micro‐hole  Drilling and Digital Image Correlation, SEM Annual Conference and Exposition on Experimental  and Applied Mechanics 2010, (2010).  [40] M.C. Cavusoglu, Improvements In Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry for Residual  Stress Measurements, MASc Thesis, University of British Columbia, (2007).     89     

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.24.1-0071157/manifest

Comment

Related Items