UBC Undergraduate Research

A study of the feasibility in relocalizing the food system at the University of British Columbia Hague, Jennica Joanne; Ramsay, Heather; Chan, Willem Wai Lun; Kwon, Hyun-Joo; Lukasiewicz, Adam Steven; Kwan, Doris Cheuk Man; Tong, William Kwok Hung

Abstract

We looked at the feasibility of a relocalized food system at UBC. The ultimate goal of this project is not to promote the adoption a solely local diet, but to find the right balance of locally-produced, seasonal and imported foods purchased that would most feasibly support a “sustainable diet” in terms of environmental, economic, and social impacts. Benefits of a localized food system include less carbon emissions from the shorter transportation distance of food products, boosting the local economy, and a personal re-connection with food and the farmer. According to our ecological, economic and social indicators, we have determined the level of feasibility to be high if 50% of products purchased by UBC food services are available locally, 10% of total expenditures is towards food procurement is for local food, and there is ≥50% awareness level of the UBC community towards the benefits of purchasing local foods and willingness to do so. We also describe the use of an educational poster to increase awareness of a local food system on campus and provide methods for research for next year’s AGSC 450 class. Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Coordinator about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report.”

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