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The influence of positive citizenship rating on behaviour MacKenzie, Russell Keith

Abstract

This research deals with the influence of a positive citizenship rating scheme on the behaviour of junior high school students. Techniques of citizenship evaluation now in use are reviewed and their limitations in relation to modern educational objectives and practices pointed out. An investigation into the development of merit rating schemes was carried out. These merit systems are described and criticized as a basis of comparison with the positive citizenship rating scheme evaluated in this study. The general analysis of the positive citizenship rating scheme was approached by means of an investigation of the citizenship records of new students entering the school in June, 1945, as evaluated by the elementary schools. These new students were followed through the three grades in the junior high school as a group, in order to assess the general influence of the scheme. Also, an analysis of merit and demerit scores for grade, sex, achievement groups and teacher concerned for one complete year (1947-48) was conducted. A summarization of these findings are: 1. The elementary school citizenship ratings of new students entering the junior high school show a very high coefficient of correlation between achievement and citizenship (plus .862 ± .008). 2. At the end of the third year in the junior high school, it was found that the coefficient of correlation between achievement and the positive citizenship ratings was plus .408 ±.031. 3. In general, the school citizenship ratings improve as students advance from year to year in the junior high school. 4. The effect of the citizenship rating scheme in terms of "A" merits (i.e. those issued as records of superior academic performance) is such that the positive influence on individual behaviour is maintained and in most cases increased from grade to grade. 5. There was increased participation in extra-curricular activities and school service as recorded in the issuing of "B" merits (i.e. those issued as records of school service etc.). 6. In terms of "A" merits, girls participated more than the boys in the citizenship rating scheme at all grade levels. 7. In terms of "B" merits, girls participated more than the boys at the grade nine level. 8. Lack of uniformity and inconsistencies appeared in the analysis of number of merits and demerits issued by teachers. 9. The number of students receiving no demerits increased from twenty-two per cent in grade seven to thirty-seven in grade nine. Case studies of a number of student "types" are included as practical examples of the material available in the student bookkeeper's citizenship record books. Finally, a general evaluation and list of recommendations for the efficient administration of the scheme are indicated.

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