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Modifications of the Connecticut broiler ration: wheat vs. corn, varying levels of protein concentrates, vitamin, antibiotic, and arsonic acid supplementation Casorso, Roy

Abstract

Five experiments in series, requiring a total of 3,000 chicks, were conducted to test modifications of and supplements to the Connecticut broiler ration. Wheat and/or No. 1 recleaned ground feed screenings were tested to replace the corn of the original ration. Soybean oil meal and / or fishmeal alone or in combination with meatmeal were tested as sources of supplementary protein. Furthermore, two crude fermentation antibiotic preparations, arsonic acid and B-complex vitamins were tested as supplements to the Connecticut broiler ration. Good quality feed wheat can replace the corn content of the Connecticut broiler ration on a pound per pound basis. The excess protein in a modified Connecticut broiler ration in which the corn was replaced with wheat cannot be reduced by lowering the level of supplementary protein without slowing the growth rate of chicks. No. 1 recleaned ground feed screenings when incorporated into the Connecticut broiler ration as the sole grain did not promote as great a growth response in chicks as a combination of wheat and corn. The efficiency of feed utilization was lower with the feed screenings ration than with the ration with corn and wheat. However, when No. 1 recleaned ground feed screenings replaced one-half of a grain mixture in a chick starting ration the chicks grew at the same rate as the chicks receiving the ration in which no replacement was made. The mixture of meatmeal, fishmeal and soybean oil meal of the Connecticut broiler ration was superior in promoting faster chick growth than was a ration containing either fishmeal or soybean oil meal as sole sources of supplementary protein. A combination of fishmeal and soybean oil meal as a source of supplementary protein was superior to either protein supplement alone in promoting the early growth of chicks. The fishmeal, when included as the sole source of supplementary protein, promoted the most efficient utilization of feed, though such a ration did not produce maximum growth. All the modified Connecticut broiler rations, when supplemented with crude commercial antibiotic preparation gave an increased growth rate in chicks. The extent to which the antibiotic supplement increased the growth rate depended on the basal ration used. In all instances antibiotic supplemented rations were more efficiently utilized than were the unsupplemented control rations. The addition of arsonic acid promoted a greater growth response in chicks fed this supplemented ration than the unsupplemented control rations. This increased growth rate of chicks receiving the arsonic acid persisted to seven and one-half weeks. The addition of B-complex vitamins to the Connecticut broiler ration promoted a growth response in chicks equal to the growth response of chicks receiving an antibiotic supplemented Connecticut ration. The extent to which the mixture of vitamins increased the growth rate depended on the basal ration used.

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