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The development of the children's program within the Community Arts Council : a study of services offered by the Community Arts Council in the development of children's art programs Ryniak, Irene Lucille

Abstract

This study considers the development of the children's services within the Community Arts Council in relation to arts programs for children in the City of Vancouver. The changing emphasis of the program from 1947 to 1954 is examined through the records of sponsored classes, the minutes of meetings and interviews with class leaders, agency directors and class participants. The changing philosophy of the artist in the practice of his profession and the increased interest in the development of art programs for children in leisure-time settings has brought the artists and the recreation leaders together. Within the recreation field, the use of the social work method and the demand for the fulfilment of the social agencies' objectives through program have strained relationships between the artist and program staff. As the community agency establishes its role in the sponsorship of arts programs the agency adopts a responsibility for understanding the objectives and methods of the artist, who in turn must accept the philosophy and objectives of the agency. The Community Arts Council has demonstrated the need for mutual effort if the objectives of both are to be realized for the benefit of the child. The Children's Program project clarifies the factors which have disturbed the effective use of art specialists in the agencies. It also indicates the possibility of future development within the Community Arts Council to further co-operative planning to ensure sufficient skilled leadership and standards for cultural services.

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