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Tuberculosis rehabilitation in British Columbia and Alberta : a comparative analysis of publicly and privately sponsored programmes, 1960 Doxsee, Harold Robertson

Abstract

Rehabilitation of the handicapped as a result of tuberculosis is a most involved and complex process. In Canada today, the organization of rehabilitation services for tuberculous persons varies from province to province. In some provinces the rehabilitation services are handled exclusively by the provincial health departments; in other provinces the programmes are the responsibility of the provincial tuberculosis associations; in still other provinces, rehabilitation of the tuberculous is to a considerable extent a joint effort by voluntary and governmental agencies. This thesis examines the programmes for the tuberculous which are offered under public auspices in the province of British Columbia by the Division of Tuberculosis Control, and under private auspices in the province of Alberta by the Alberta Tuberculosis Association. The purpose of the study is to review the concept of rehabilitation, and to determine if differences of significance exist between the two programmes. The necessary material was compiled by a series of selected interviews with personnel involved in the operation of tuberculosis rehabilitation services in Alberta and British Columbia; analysis of annual reports of agencies in both provinces directly concerned in providing these services; and, by drawing upon the writer's own staff experience in one of these programmes. The scheme of analysis utilizes the following headings: (a) sponsorship and administration (b) facilities and personnel (c) rehabilitation services, and (d) co-ordination. The study reveals measurable differences in the two programmes selected, and these are reviewed. The major difference between the programmes is in terms of organizational structure. In British Columbia, a composite programme consisting of two specialized departments is in operation; one offering vocational rehabilitation services and the other welfare services. The Alberta programme in contrast, integrates vocational rehabilitation and social services, but has a smaller professional staff. The extent to which differences can be directly attributed to different auspices is doubtful; and there is room for further research. There is evidence, however, of need for more professionally trained social workers in comprehensive rehabilitation programmes.

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