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UBC Theses and Dissertations

Analysis of voltage-source-inverter-driven brushless dc motors with unbalanced Hall sensors Samoylenko, Nikolay

Abstract

Brushless dc motors with Hall sensors are widely used in various industrial and electromechanical applications. These machines have often been considered in the literature, under one common assumption - ideal placement of the sensors, which is often not the case, especially for low-precision motors. This thesis is composed of three manuscripts which investigate the unbalance of Hall sensors and propose methods to eliminate its adverse effects. The studies presented here show that misalignment of Hall sensors leads to unbalanced operation of the inverter and motor phases, which in turn results in increased low-frequency harmonics in torque ripple, possible acoustic noise, and degradation of the overall drive performance. Thus, the first manuscript introduces the problem of the misaligned Hall sensors by using a detailed model of a sample brushless dc motor and proposes a simple yet practical averaging technique to significantly decrease the effects of the misplaced sensors in steady state. The second manuscript extends the discussion to the dynamic performance of a low-precision brushless dc motor by introducing extrapolating filters which specifically target the transient operation. The third manuscript generalizes the concepts presented in the first two papers by taking into account both steady-state and transient performances and provides extensive hardware studies. The presented research considers a typical industrial brushless dc motor and includes measurements, detailed models and hardware experiments to validate the analysis. The proposed averaging approach is shown to achieve performance characteristics very close to those of a motor with perfectly balanced Hall sensors.

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