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UBC Theses and Dissertations

An enhanced distributed channel access deficit round-robin (EDRR) scheme for IEEE 802.11E wireless networks Powell, Casey

Abstract

IEEE 802.11 wireless local area network (WLAN) is the most popular and most widely deployed WLAN technology in the world. From large enterprise environments to the everyday home user, 802.11 networks are becoming almost as ubiquitous as wired Ethernet. With the explosion in use of wireless networks comes the increasing demand for them to support the latest technologies. Bandwidth intensive and latency-sensitive applications such as VoIP and streaming video are enjoying huge growth in industry, leading to the requirement that 802.11 WLANs should provide quality of service for these applications. Development of mechanisms for supporting quality of service at the medium access control layer in IEEE 802.11 WLANs is therefore an issue that is at the forefront of the research community. Task Group E of the 802.11 standards committee is working on a standard that adds quality of service enhancements in the 802.11 MAC layer. They do so by using traffic flows and prioritizing traffic according to what type of application it belongs to. There are, however, some weaknesses in the design that is currendy being proposed by the 802.11 standards committee. In this thesis we propose several enhancements to the IEEE 802.1 le draft standard that will provide improved quality of service for all traffic priorities, whether high or low. Through simulation and analytical investigation, we are able to show that we can do so without negatively affecting the performance of any of the wireless stations in the network or the traffic flows that they contain. We then conclude that our proposed scheme provides an attractive for enhancing the IEEE 802.1 le standard.

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