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The correlations of reading achievement and self concept at grades three, five, seven, eight, ten and twelve Gordon, Maria Geertruida

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between self concept and reading ability at different stages in a child's school career. Subjects were selected at random from grades three, five, seven, eight, ten and twelve from schools in one school district. Approximately 125 to 150 students at each grade level were tested with the Nelson Reading Test or the Nelson Denny Reading Test and the students were then assigned to groups of poor, average or good readers on the basis of their percentile scores for their grade. Twenty students were randomly selected from each ability group at each grade level to receive the Piers Harris Children's Self Concept Scale. Raw scores on the reading test were correlated with self concept scores for each grade level. Correlations were significant at the grade three, five, seven, and eight levels, lower but significant at the grade ten level and not significant at the grade twelve level. Mean scores for each ability group at each grade level were computed and analyzed in a six by three factoral design. Effects for ability group and interaction of grade and reading ability were significant. Differences between means for good and poor readers were significant at the grade three, five, seven and eight levels. Post hoc tests were done to find significant tetrad differences. It appears from the results of this study that although self concept and reading ability are positively correlated in the lower grades, the relationship becomes weaker after grade eight and is nonsignificant at the grade twelve level.

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