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UBC Theses and Dissertations

Performance evaluation of the border gateway protocol Navai, Negar

Abstract

The Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) is the de facto inter-domain routing protocol used to exchange reachability information between autonomous systems in the global Internet. The BGP is a path vector routing protocol. Distance vector routing protocols can take a long time to converge after a topological change. It is believed that the adoption of the path vector solves this problem. One of the objectives of this thesis is to investigate this claim. The BGP specification lacks convergence behavioral and performance analysis. This thesis presents the analysis of the BGP convergence behavior and performance. The behavior of the protocol can be estimated in an experimental manner by means of simulations. The effect of network topology on the number of BGP routing updates and convergence latency is examined. The analysis in this thesis is based on data collected in a simulation environment. The best and the worst-case of BGP convergence models are simulated. This analysis shows that BGP has bouncing problem. In the case of a route failure event, the upper bound on volume of routing update messages is found to be factorial and convergence latency is linear with respect to the number of autonomous systems. In the case of a route announcement event, the upper bound on number of routing update messages is found to be exponential with respect to the number of autonomous systems. It is found that performing MinRouteAdvertisementlnterval timer and loop detection on the receiver router significantly reduces the number of BGP routing updates.

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