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UBC Theses and Dissertations

Understanding academia's and educators' perception of arts-based research : using Superkids 2 documentary film as an example Guryil, Gizem

Abstract

Arts-based research (ABR) has started to become more mainstream in recent years, leading to the increased adoption of documentaries by academics as a form of media-based research. While documentaries have intriguing potential to be utilized in research, there has been little research on how documentaries can also be a powerful tool for disseminating research. This project investigates the effectiveness, benefits, and challenges of constructing and disseminating knowledge through a research-based documentary. Using the documentary film Superkids 2 as an example, this study aims to explore academia’s and educators’ perception of arts-based research and investigate any changes of perceptions of gifted education. Employing an experimental design (i.e., one-shot case study), this study treated the screening of the Superkids 2 as an intervention. This study developed a survey to measure and develop a foundation for understanding academia’s perspective of arts-based research and examining the intervention’s effect after its implementation. Research participants included K-12 teachers, graduate students, and university researchers/lecturers/faculty members who participated in two major international conferences in gifted education. This study notes participants’ appreciation and desire to learn more about arts-based research along with concerns in conducting arts-based research. Funding and time are the main concerns about conducting arts-based research. The results contribute to the employability of arts-based research and research-based documentaries, which can lead to more prominent recognition of documentaries by the public. Findings also explore the changes in participants’ perception of gifted education.

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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International

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