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UBC Theses and Dissertations

Mentorship programs and the novice nurse : a rapid evidence assessment Erickson, Stephanie Kyla

Abstract

New graduate registered nurses (RNs) experience many challenges as they transition from the role of student nurse to professional nurse. Mentoring can support new nurses with the development of clinical nursing skills and competencies, and is linked to professionalism, nursing quality improvement, self-confidence, retention, and job satisfaction. This rapid evidence assessment (REA) addresses how new graduate mentorship programs can be effective in improving performance, satisfaction, retention, and confidence in novice nurses’ practice. It also reports the key elements of effective new graduate mentorship programs and reported problems in implementing new graduate RN mentorship programs. Seventeen research studies were selected for inclusion and examined using Bandura’s social learning theory. The data from each research study was extracted using the EPPI-Centre Data Extraction and Coding Tool for Education Studies to allow for mapping and analysis. Each research study was then scored from highest level of evidence to lowest level of evidence. The findings were then synthesized to suggest that mentorship programs can be effective in improving performance, satisfaction, retention, and confidence in novice nurses’ practice under the right conditions. The reported key elements of effective new graduate RN mentorship programs include mentor-mentee matching, availability of mentors, adequate training and preparation of mentors, commitment and support, and length of the mentoring relationship. The reported problems in implementing new graduate RN mentorship programs include lack of training and preparation of mentors and mentees, availability of mentors, and mentor-mentee mismatch.

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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada

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