UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

The effects of wildfire disturbance and streamside clearcut harvesting on instream wood and small stream geomorphology in south-central British Columbia Scherer, Robert Andrew

Abstract

Few field studies have assessed the temporal and spatial dynamics of wood in small streams (bankfull widths < 5 m) flowing through forest ecosystems dominated by stand replacing wildfires. Comparisons of instream wood loads associated with clearcut harvesting, wildfire, and undisturbed, old forests are also scarce. The two main objectives of this research were: (1) to document the temporal and spatial variability of wood and its geomorphic role in relation to stand development stage; and (2) to compare wood loads and its geomorphic role in relation to streamside clearcut harvesting, wildfires and older, undisturbed forest stands. This research focused on 38 small streams with gradients less than 14% situated in the plateau regions of south-central British Columbia, Canada. A distinct temporal trend in wood loading was observed, with elevated volumes present 30-50 years subsequent to the wildfire disturbances following a “reverse J-shaped” trend in relation to time since the last major wildfire disturbance. The number of wood pieces was highly variable and few of the wood characteristics exhibited a significant trend in relation to time since the last major wildfire disturbance. Except at the smallest spatial scale (

Item Media

Item Citations and Data

License

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International

Usage Statistics