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Evaluating the utility of the adaptive tasks framework for assessing parental needs when providing primary care for their child with a chronic health condition Sahraei, Valla

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of the Adaptive Tasks Framework for assessing parental needs when providing primary care for their child with a chronic health condition. A qualitative descriptive methodology framed the study and two methods were employed to collect data: a secondary analysis of existing interview data from seven parents of children with chronic health conditions and interviews with four parents who were currently providing primary care for their child with a chronic health condition. The data was analyzed using content analysis, whereby interview data was explored to determine if it fit into one or more of the eight adaptive tasks categories. Parents reported needs in all of the eight adaptive tasks categories, with the need for information regarding their child's chronic health condition being the foremost concern among parents. The need for caring, empathetic, and patient health care professionals who are sympathetic to the informational needs of parents, while at the same time acknowledging their expertise, was the second need expressed by the parents in this study. Implications of these findings for nurses is that the Adaptive Tasks Framework provides a useful tool for assessing parental needs when managing their child's chronic health condition and for determining areas in which the parents may require support.

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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International

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