UBC Faculty Research and Publications

Short-term effects of mobilization on oxygenation in patients after open surgery for pancreatic cancer: a randomized controlled trial Fagevik Olsén, Monika; Becovic, Suada; Dean, Elizabeth

Abstract

Background: Despite the unequivocal role of progressive mobilization in post-surgical patient management, its specific effects and timing, particularly after abdominal surgery, remain debated. This study’s aim was to examine the short-term effects of mobilization on oxygenation in hemodynamically stable patients after open surgery for pancreatic cancer. Methods: A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted in which patients (n = 83) after open pancreatic surgery were randomized to either the same-day mobilization group (mobilized when hemodynamically stable within four hours after surgery) or the next-day mobilization group (mobilized first time in the morning of the first post-operative day). Mobilization was prescribed and modified based on hemodynamic and subjective responses with the goal of achieving maximal benefit with minimal risk. Blood gas samples were taken three times the evening after surgery; and before and after mobilization on the first post-operative day. Spirometry was conducted pre-operatively and on the first post-operative day. Adverse events and length of stay in postoperative intensive care were also recorded. Results: With three dropouts, 80 patients participated (40 per group). All patients in the same-day mobilization group, minimally sat over the edge of the bed on the day of surgery and all patients (both groups) minimally sat over the edge of the bed the day after surgery. Compared with patients in the next-day mobilization group, patients in the same-day mobilization group required lower FiO₂ and had higher SaO₂/FiO₂ at 1800 h on the day of surgery (p 

Item Media

Item Citations and Data

License

Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

Usage Statistics