UBC Faculty Research and Publications

Child Impairment and Parenting Self-Efficacy in Relation to Mothers’ Views of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Treatments Jiang, Yuanyuan; Gurm, Mandeep; Johnston, Charlotte

Abstract

Objective: This study assessed the relations of child impairment and parenting self-efficacy with parental views of the acceptability and effectiveness of behavioral, medication, and combined treatments for child ADHD. Child impairment and parenting self-efficacy were also assessed in relation to the effectiveness views of specific behavioral treatment strategies. Method: Ninety-five mothers of children with ADHD completed questionnaires assessing child impairment, parenting self-efficacy, perceptions of the acceptability and effectiveness of ADHD treatments, and views of the effectiveness of specific behavioral treatment strategies. Results: Hierarchical linear modeling using child impairment and parenting self-efficacy as predictors of treatment views suggest that mothers viewed combined treatments as most acceptable and effective when their child was more impaired, and mothers with higher parenting self-efficacy rated behavioral treatment strategies as more effective. Conclusion: Child impairment and parenting self-efficacy are related to perceptions of the acceptability and/or effectiveness of ADHD treatments.

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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada

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