UBC Faculty Research and Publications

Defining and measuring full service family practice in BC, 1991-2006 Lavergne, Ruth; McGrail, Kimberlyn, 1966-; Peterson, Sandra; Sivananthan, Saskia Nikali, 1983-; McKendry, Rachael; Mooney, Dawn

Abstract

Ongoing primary care reform in Canada is in part a response to concerns that Canadians lack timely access to a regular source of primary care. While the supply of general practice physicians per capita has been stable, changes in practice patterns including abandonment of specific areas of practice (such as obstetrics, anesthesia, or provision of services in hospitals, homes, or long-term care facilities) and movement to walk-in style clinics may shape accessibility of primary care as perceived and experienced by patients. In British Columbia (BC), the General Practice Services Committee (GPSC) has spearheaded reform efforts. Founded in 2003, the GPSC is a joint committee composed of the BC Ministry of Health, the BC Medical Association, and the Society of General Practitioners of BC. Its mandate is to support full service family practice and benefit patients. This report seeks to operationalize the GPSC definition of full service family practice using administrative data, and to track changes in physician practice patterns consistent with that definition over time.composed of the BC Ministry of Health, the BC Medical Association, and the Society of General Practitioners of BC. Its mandate is to support full service family practice and benefit patients. This report seeks to operationalize the GPSC definition of full service family practice using administrative data, and to track changes in physician practice patterns consistent with that definition over time.

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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada