International Conference on Gas Hydrates (ICGH) (6th : 2008)

THE FORMATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE HYDRATE IN SOLID SUSPENSIONS AND ELECTROLYTES Lamorena, Rheo B.; Lee, Woojin

Abstract

Evaluation of host geologic sediment interactions with carbon dioxide is very important in sequestration strategies. The objective of the study is to experimentally investigate the effects of different soil mineral types on carbon dioxide hydrate formation. At isothermal, isochoric, and isobaric conditions, batch experiments were conducted with different types of solids (bentonite, kaolinite, nontronite, pyrite, and soil) and electrolytes (NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, and MgCl2) to measure carbon dioxide hydrate formation times. A 50 mL pressurized vessel was used for the experiment by bubbling gaseous CO2 into the solid suspension. We observed that the formation time of carbon dioxide hydrate was dependent on the reactor temperature (273.4 K and 277.1 K) and types of solid and electrolyte. A clear peak was observed in the temperature profile of each experimental run and determined as the hydrate formation time. This is due to the initiation of the hydrate crystallization and latent heat release at the hydrate formation time. The temperature profiles vary significantly with respect to the types of solids and electrolytes. As crystallization initiates, peaks were observed at higher temperatures in pyrite and soil suspensions. The results showed that hydrate formation times for clay minerals in water were approximately twice and 10 times faster than that for pyrite and soil, respectively. The rates of gas consumption were able to be determined by the pressure monitoring. The kaolinite appeared to have the fastest gas consumption rate among the clay mineral suspensions, which was 2.4 times and 7.4 times faster than nontronite and bentonite, respectively. Results from these experiments seem to provide an insight on the formation and growth of carbon dioxide hydrate, once sequestered into the sea bed sediments under the deep sea environment.

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