International Construction Specialty Conference of the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering (ICSC) (5th : 2015)

Using simulations to better train future and existing construction management personnel Korman, Thomas M.; Čásenský, Martin; Johnston, Hal

Abstract

In the construction industry, there is a continued need for training current employees as well as future employees. Such training opportunities that exist include safety, technical, and project management. Historically training has included lectures from subject matter experts by those considered to be experts in a particular subject or field. However, this has required removing personnel from projects to allow time for training or by requiring employees to invest time outside the normal working hours for training. With the advent of the internet, on-site lectures have been replaced with webinars and/or telecast to allow personnel to remain in one location and receiving training; however, many educators cite that student engagement is often limited and learning is not as in-depth when compared to in-person training sessions. One new training technology that is developing is the use of virtual simulations that are designed to allow for specialized training while engaging them in the educational process. One such simulation, the COnstruction INdustry Simulation (COINS), has been developed to train students in the management of a construction company managing multiple projects simultaneously. COINS engages students in the decision making of heavy civil construction and commercial building sector. This simulation has been used in the classroom and now is just available to construction firms to use with personnel. This paper describes the development and use of COINS simulation designed and developed to educate future and existing construction management personnel. It is currently used at a number of different universities including the Czech Technical University in Prague.

Item Citations and Data

License

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada

Usage Statistics