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The Ubyssey Nov 8, 2016

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-%mtf^^
UNPROTECTED
Without the Residential Tenancy Act or an equivalent in place
students are left without important housing rights. PAGE % PAGE 2
YOURGUIDETOUBC EVENTS & PEOPLE
NOVEMBER 8, 2016 TUESDAY
EVENTS
UBC COMMERCE COMMUNITY PROGRAM
OPERATION CHRISTMAS CHILD
4W£ 40t 9V& 40b
OUR CAMPUS
Spread some Christmas love to the
WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 2 TO 15
////
OPERATION CHRISTMAS CHILD 11A.M. @ CPA HALL
Pick up a box for $5 and fill it up with goodies for a child in
Haiti, Costa Rica, Chile, Ukraine and other places.
$5
A
IH50C PHESEnTS= PHOFTHLH
I .  I  Mill HIM   DAHVERGNI -  DEAN OF   \LI   Hill LAW
mi. uraioiiER mi
ii:3ii rh -1? hh rm
WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 9
////
LASOC PROFTALKS 11:30 A.M. @ BUCHANAN TOWER
Mingle and learn more about the professors in the Law and
Society department!
$5 non-member / free for members
CLUTE / ZOO RIOTS / EMILY IN THE HEADLIGHTS
GIMME
111/10 9PM-1AM fa THE PIT|J
THURSDAY NOVEMBER 10
////
GIMMIESHELTER 9PM @THEPIT
Brought to you by BVP and BOS UBC, enjoy a great benefit
concert at the Pit!
$8 to $10
ON THE COVER
PHOTO BY
Joshua Medicoff
DESIGN BY
Aiken Lao
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Email your event listings to
printeditor@ubyssey.ca
% THE UBYSSEY
EDITORIAL
Photo Editor
Josh Medicoff
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Jack Hauen
coordinating ©ubyssey.ca  Our Campus
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NOVEMBER8,2016 | VOLUMEXCVIIII ISSUEXV
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STAFF
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LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student
newspaper of the University of British Columbia. It is published every
Tuesday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization and all students are encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written
by the Ubyssey staff. They are the
expressed opinion of the staff, anc
do not necessarily reflect the views
of The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appearing in The Ubyssey is the property
of The Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs
and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced without the expressed, written permission of The
Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding
member of Canadian University
=ress (CUP) and adheres to CUP's
guiding principles.
The Ubyssey accepts opinior
articles on any topic related to the
Jniversity of British Columbia(UBC)
and/or topics relevant to students
attending UBC. Submissions must
be written by UBC students, professors, alumni, or those in a suitable position (as determined by
the opinions editor) to speak or
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must not contain racism, sexism,
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It is agreed by all persons placing display or classified advertising
that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to publish an advertisement orif an errorin the ad occurs
the liability of the UPS will not be
greater than the price paid for the
ad. The UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value ortheimpact of the ad.
Ryo Sugiyama curates
a piece of Japan at UBC
Sugiyama was in some way fated for the Nitobe Memorial Garden.
Leo Soh
Our Campus Coordinator
A Japanese tea garden is the more
functional of the two traditional
Japanese gardens — it hosts the
chado, or tea ceremony, and
serves as a leisure space for the
household. Ryo Sugiyama is the
curator of UBC's very own tea
garden: Nitobe Memorial.
Sugiyama was in some way fated
for the garden. Upon arriving in
Canada on a one-year work visa in
2005, he visited the garden and met
Junji Shinada, the previous curator.
Five years later, when Shinada
retired, he contacted Sugiyama to
take the reins from him.
"Me and my wife are from
the same university, and she's a
horticulturalist as well. I heard of
the Japanese garden at UBC, so we
came here and we met [Shinada].
We didn't exchange any contact
info — we didn't have smartphones
at the time. Then after three, four
years, I got a phone call from him.
He said he was going to retire,
then asked me to take over," said
Sugiyama.
During his time at Chiba
University, where he graduated
with a master's degree in
landscape science, Sugiyama was
taught by a disciple of Kannosuke
Mori, the original designer of
the garden who oversaw its
construction in 1963.
Measuring in at 2.5 acres and
featuring a harmonic medley of
local and exotic plant species, the
garden itself is a daunting facility
to maintain, even for multiple
gardeners. But not only does
Sugiyama curate the garden by
himself, he is a perfectionist and
the catalyst behind the garden's
perennial beauty.
"My title is curator, but basically
I'm a gardener," he said. "The staff
from the botanical garden — they
can come to help me and they
are good horticulturalists, but
they don't know how to maintain
Japanese style. That's why I have
to do all the pruning. Usually, if this
was in Japan, [there are] at least
two full-time gardeners."
Maintaining Japanese style, and
creating an authentic Japanese
space in Canada, is a task that
Sugiyama takes seriously. It is
also a difficult one — the lack of
manpower, diversity of plants
and the Vancouver climate are
challenges that Sugiyama must face
and overcome.
"It's different and difficult —
the plants are different. You don't
have many conifers in Japanese
gardens in Japan. [It's] not a
great climate [especially for a]
cherry tree — it's kind of wet. In
Japan, we have a dry winter, but
Vancouver is a wet winter — so
I have to be careful about the
timing of pruning. Most plants
grow twice [as fast in] Japan, so
that means I need to maintain
more," he said.
Despite this, as of May 2016,
the Nitobe Memorial Garden is
considered by experts to be one
of the best traditional Japanese
gardens in North America and
one of the top five outside Japan.
The garden was created in
memoriam of Dr. Inazo Nitobe
(1862-1933), a renaissance man
who was crucial in bridging-
Japanese-Canadian relations. It
is for this reason that the garden
features an oasis — symbolizing
the Pacific — and a bridge
between the two sections of the
garden, each side symbolizing
Japan or Canada, and decorated
by their respective maple trees.
Sugiyama explained how the
Nitobe stone lantern, located
north of the garden entrance, is
PHOTO JOSHUA MEDICOFF/THE UBYSSEY
a physical marker of Japanese-
Canadian history at UBC.
"It was brought from Japan
just two years after Nitobe
passed away. This was placed
... on campus, but during the
Second World War, many people
[were] against Japan, so this
was damaged," he said. Once
then UBC President Norman
Mackenzie — who worked with
Nitobe for UNESCO - found
out, he cooperated with the
Japanese community to create the
Memorial Garden.
As the garden's curator,
Sugiyama believes he has a
responsibility to bear witness
to this history. He wants to
understand its history, and pass
on the knowledge to visitors.
"This garden is a place for
understanding Japanese garden
and Japanese culture. [It is] also
the place for the people which
come from all over the world to
communicate with each other,"
he said.
Sugiyama regrets that the
garden is located adjacent
to Place Vanier Residence —
students often hop the garden
walls and party. And while
Sugiyama can relate — he was
a student once, too — he wants
students to show more respect for
the facility.
"Just respect the garden —
even night time, just stay on the
path, don't break anything and if
you drink or smoke, take all the
garbage," he said.
Ultimately, Sugiyama carries
on Nitobe's legacy by curating a
piece of Japan at UBC.
"I hope people understand
what Japanese garden is, and also
I like people to feel something
peaceful or something warm
when you walk around — that's
my goal." Vi Vi
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This is not an opportunity with The Ubyssey or any affiliated entity.
Vi 10
V,
V, NOVEMBER 8, 2016 TUESDAY I   CULTURE   I   11
NIGHT
i
These nocturnal dreams are excerpts from Night   Times  at the Press Bar, located in the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery on campus. Record your
dreams and contribute to the next issue of nlght   times  at the belkin as part
of Julia   Feyrer and   Tamara  Henderson:   The  Last  Waves,   on through December 4.
For more information about the exhibition, visit belkin.ubc.ca
Jctober
IChocolate...
IcOVERED EVERYTHING
ITH
E TREES, THE CLOUDS,
THE GROUND,
EVERYTHING
SAD IN TH
E WORLD WAS OK AGAI
N .
THEN    I    WOKE    UP.     EVERYTHING    WAS
IcOVERED    IN    SHIT.
INOVEMBER
|/    HAD   A
DREAM    THAT    A    MAN    STABBED    ME    IN    THE    WINGS    AND    IT    HURT    SO    BADLY    I    WOKE    UP.     I    WAS    IN    PAIN    UNTIL    I    REALIZED    I
IWINGS,    MY    SHOULDERS    HURT    INSTEAD.
DON T HAVE
lOVEMBER
\l    WAS    DATING   A
FRIEND OF MINE.  IT WAS GREAT.
lOVEMBER
I    FOUND    TWO    KITTENS
AND AFTER WE MADE SURE OUR DOGS WEREN'T GOING TO EAT THEM WE DECIDED TO ADOPT THEM. AFTER AWHILE, THEY GREW UP AND
IT TURNED OUT THEY WERE RACCOONS BUT WE STILL THOUGHT THAT WAS COOL. MY COUSIN AND I BOUGHT FERRET LEASHES FOR
THEM AT THE PET STORE. BUT A WEEK LATER THE SMALL ONE DIED BECAUSE NO ONE KNEW HOW TO TAKE CARE OF RACCOONS. PEOPLE|
STARTED SPREADING A RUMOUR THAT MY DAD HAD POISONED THEM BECAUSE HE HATED THEM.  I WAS WORRIED THE WHOLE TIME ABOUT
CONTRACTING RABIES.  V,
V, SPORTS+REC
EDITOR OLAMIDE OLANIYAN
NOVEMBER 8, 2016 TUESDAY  IF
VOLLEYBALL //
Si.
.■    *    i
mm • * * • • »••
'a * * a • « » * • »*•
The Thunderbirds beat the Wesmen in straight sets on both nights.
=HOTO JEREMY JOHNSON-SILVERS/THE UBYSSEY
'Birds sweep Winnipeg in home opener
Salomon Micko Benrimoh
Staff Writer
The Thunderbird women's
volleyball team improved to a 4-0
record in conference play and a
10-2 total record this weekend after
beatingthe University of Winnipeg
Wesmen twice — each time in
straight sets of 3-0.
The first game on Friday saw
UBC jump out to take the first set,
more than doubling the Wesmen's
score at 25-10. The Wesmen came
back in the next two sets to make it
close — especially in the second set
that went into several match-points
— but ultimately the 'Birds came out
on top, winning both sets by scores
of 26-24 and 25-21, respectively.
Saturday night's game played
out in almost the exact same way as
the previous night. With a small but
surprisingly noisy crowd at the War
Memorial gym, the T-Birds again
stormed out to a double-digit lead
before winning the set by a final
score of 25-14. As the team looked to
be cruising their way to another easy
victory, the 'Birds were all smiles,
embracing each other kill after kill.
The smiles went away after the
second set started. The Wesmen
had caught a second wind and
jumped out to a surprising lead
over the 'Birds. But before their
lead could reach double digits,
UBC rebounded to come back and
eventually win the set by a final
score of 25-18.
The Wesmen's energy was
nowhere to be found in the third
and final set, and the 'Birds shut
out their Manitoban opponents
for the second night in a row by
winning it 25-11.
With ample time to rest and
dominating performances already
in the books, it looks like the
Thunderbirds will be a tough
opponent to beat this season. Vi
The team is now 4-0 in conference
play and the Thunderbirds will
look to maintain their perfect
conference record in their next
set of matches in two weeks when
they travel to Kamloops to take on
the Thompson Rivers Wolfpack on
November 18 and 19.
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TOP OF THE WORLD//
Women's hockey is
firing on all cylinders
«*alv -al
FILE PHOTO JEREMY JOHNSON-SILVERS/ THE UBYSSEY
The team has a 9-1 record, and are at the top of the Canada West League.
Bill Situ
Staff Writer
Going into the season, the bar was
set high for the UBC women's
hockey team.
With the second-place finish
last season and nine senior
players on the team, coaches and
players expected a successful
season ahead.
As it turns out so far, the team
is living up to those expectations.
Last weekend, the 'Birds
played a doubleheader against
the Manitoba Bisons on home ice
and came out on top 3-2 and 6-2
against a team that had not lost a
single game going into the match.
The two-game sweep of the
Bisons also extended the team's
winning streak to six games.
With the wins against
Manitoba, UBC now holds a 7-1-0
record, and is first place in the
Canada West Division — their
best performance by far in recent
years.
So what exactly is making the
team so successful? The answer:
the team's been strong on all
fronts of the ice.
As fifth-year forward
Stephanie Schaupmeyer put it
after the 6-2 victory against the
Bisons — where she recorded two
goals and four points over the
weekend — "[the 'Birds'] scoring-
can come from any lineup and
that's a huge advantage of the
team."
Clearly, the stats prove that
she really did mean what she said.
UBC currently ties Manitoba
for the most points for of all CIS
teams with 28. While it is still
early in the season, a number of
the team's skaters have multipoint weekends under their belts,
including Cassandra Vilgrain,
Mathea Fischer, Nicole Saxvik
and Schaupmeyer herself.
Vilgrain currently leads the CIS
in total points with 12.
"[UBC's] scoring
can come from any
lineup and that's a
huge advantage of
the team."
— STEPHANIE
SCHAUPMEYER,
FORWARD
What's more, the offensive
power isn't just coming from
the power forwards — a good
number of the scoring plays are
also coming from the defence,
which is exactly what the team is
working toward.
"We've been preaching a lot
about having our [defence]...
being a secondary threat in the
offensive zone," said UBC head
coach Graham Thomas.
On the other end of the ice,
the 'Birds' defence has also done
a lot to keep opposition in check.
With the exception of the a 5-3
loss against the Saskatchewan
Huskies on October 8, the team
hasn't allowed more than two
goals in all its other games.
For goaltending coach Pasco
Valana, this is reassuring. Since
all three goalkeepers are first-
years at UBC, it is a sign that the
departure of last year's starters
hasn't caused any significant
problems.
The season is far from nearing
its end, but with the way that
the 'Birds are currently playing,
few can doubt that the team
is destined for yet another
successful season. Vi
The 'Birds will be battling the
University ofRegina cougars on
Friday, November 18 and Saturday,
November 19 at home in the Doug
Mitchell Thunderbird Arena. 15
UBC's Michael
O'Connor and
Regina's Noah
Picton were
neck-in-neck
in passing
yards, with
397 and 364
respectively.
Vi 16
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By: L A. Bonte
For more comics visit FilbertCartoons.com

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