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The Ubyssey Oct 4, 2016

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Array  PAGE 2
YOURGUIDETOUBC EVENTS & PEOPLE
OCTOBER 4,2016 TUESDAY
EVENTS
OUR CAMPUS
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WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 5
////
HOWTOWRITECODE6P.M.@THEUBYSSEY
Our magical web developer is giving a quick workshop
on how our platform works. Bring your laptops!
FREE
STUDENT LEGAL FUND SOCIETY
FOOD & DRINKS WILL BE PROVIDED!
TENANCY RIGHTS WORKSHOP
WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 12
////
KNOWYOURTENANCYRIGHTS2 P.M. @THE NEST
Learn about your legal rights as a tenant! Free food and
refreshments are provided @ the Lev Lounge.
FREE
SATURDAY OCTOBER 15
////
LIGHT THE NIGHT 4 P.M. ©STANLEY PARK
Make a difference and help the 110,000 Canadians affected by
blood cancer with your illuminated lattern.
FREE REGISTRATION, CHECK ONLINE
ON THE COVER
PHOTO BY
JoshMedicoff
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Email your event listings to
printeditor@ubyssey.ca
THE UBYSSEY
EDITORIAL
Photo Editor
Josh Medicoff
photos@ubyssey.ca
Coordinating Editor
Jack Hauen
coord in ating@ubyssey.ca  Our Campus
Coordinator
Design Editor LeoSoh
Aiken Lao photos@ubyssey.ca
orin.teditor@ubyssey.ca
Business Manager
Ron Gorodetsky
business@ubyssey.ca
Web Developer
Peter Siemens
peter@ubyssey.ca
OCTOBER 4, 2016 | VOLUME XCVIII | ISSUE X
CONTACT
Editorial Office:
SUB 2208
604.822.2301
Business Office:
SUB 2209
ADVERTISING 604.822.2301
INQUIRIES 604.822.2301
President
Tanner Bokor
president@ubyssey.ca
Operations Assistant
Aine Coombs
0 pe rations@u byssey.ca
News Editors
Sruthi Tadepalli &
Samantha McCabe
news@ubyssey.ca
Culture Editor
Samuel Du Bois
culture@ubyssey.ca
Sports+ Rec Editor
Olamide Olaniyan
sports@u byssey.ca
Video Producer
Kate Colenbrander
video@ubyssey.ca
Opinions + Blog Editor
Bailey Ramsay
opinions® u byssey.ca
Science Editor
Koby Michaels
science@u byssey.ca
Copy Editor Office Administrator
Miguel Santa Maria       Olivia Law
copyeditor@ubyssey.ca   advertising@ubyssey.ca
STAFF
Natalie Morris, Matt
Langmuir, Bill Situ,
Gabey Lucas, Julia
Burnham, Sophie
Sutcliffe, Rachel
Ong, Lucy Fox,
Emma Hicks, Jeremy
Johnson-Silvers,
Diana Oproesci
LEGAL
The Ubysseyistheofficial student
newspaper of the Unive rsity of British Columbia. It is published every
Tuesday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an auton omous,
democratically run student organization and all students are encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written
oy the Ubyssey staff. They are the
expressed opinion of the staff, and
do not necessarily reflect the views
of The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Co-
umbia. All editorial content appearing in The Ubyssey is the property
of The Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs
and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced without the expressed, written permission of The
Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding
member of Canadian University
=ress (CUP) and adheres to CUP's
guiding principles.
The Ubyssey accepts opinion
articles on any topic related to the
JniversityofBritishColumbia(UBC!
and/or topics relevant to students
attending UBC. Submissions must
be written by UBC students, professors, alumni, or those in a suitable position (as determined by
the opinions editor) to speak on
JBC-related matters. Submissions
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or submissions will not be precluded from publication based solely
on association with particular ide-
ologiesorsubject matter that some
may find objectionable. Approva
for publication is, however, dependent on the quality of the argument
andThe Ubyssey editorial board's
judgment of appropriate content.
The New Student Union
Building 6133 University
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Online: ubyssey.ca
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Submissions may besent byemai
to opinion ©ubyssey.ca. Pleasein-
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It is agreed by all persons plac-
ng display or classified advertising
that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to publish an advertisement orifan error in the ad occurs
the liability of the UPS will not be
greater than the price paid for the
ad. The UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value or the impact of the ad.
Ashley Bentley is working
to make UBC a safer place
"When I say that sexual assault is an epidemic, I don't say that lightly.'
Leo Soh
Our Campus Coordinator
After four years at the helm of
the AMS Sexual Assault Support
Centre (SASC), Ashley Bentley
is "joining the dark side." She
leaves behind a legacy of positivity,
success, hard work and above all,
compassion.
On September 30,2016, Bentley
left her role at SASC to take on
a new role as the sexual assault
intervention and prevention
advisor for UBC through the VP
Students portfolio. "I think the
new role will be a really good
opportunity to continue some of
the work I've been doing at the
SASC and advocate from within the
system for change."
Since graduating from
Southampton Solent University
with a bachelor's degree in media
and cultural studies, Bentley has
constructed a career in the field of
social justice. "I've worked with
organizations such as [Women
Against Violence Against Women],
Wish Drop-in Society and Open
Door Group. Really, most of my
work has been about working with
marginalized communities which
have been affected by trauma to
look at creating cultural change of
some kind."
Her work brought her to
Vancouver in 2009 — in 2011,
Bentley found a new home at
SASC. "I love working with
post-secondary campuses. I
love connecting with students
and being a part of this vibrant
community, where you get to do
a lot of learning and also a lot of
unlearning."
Bentley has been extremely
successful in her role as SASC
manager. "When I first came to
the SASC as assistant manager
almost four years ago, we were an
incredibly small team. We had two
full time staff members and one
part time student staff member."
Bentley sought additional funding-
through partnerships and grants,
and "now, for the first year ever,
we have nine staff here at the SASC
and 35 volunteers."
The level of client engagement
at SASC has also skyrocketed. "In
terms of what we were seeing
last year from 2015 to now, our
numbers are doubling. A part of
that is the reality that not more
people are being sexually assaulted,
being harassed or experiencing
violence on campus, but that
people feel that this is a safe place
to come. They can be heard and we
can support them."
While SASC will miss her
sorely, Bentley's promotion comes
at a critical time, as UBC's new
sexual assault policy is currently
under final review. "Currently on
campus, the existing policy doesn't
specially address sexual assault.
The way it currently stands is
more applicable to situations of
harassment or discrimination. My
hope is that we will be looking
at alternative approaches to
reporting, [and also] at education
for folks who are causing harm...
that is beyond just discipline."
While Bentley has prioritized
support for victims of sexual
assault, she believes that the
education of perpetrators is just
as important. "The research that
currently exists suggests that
folks that cause harm do so on a
repeated basis and it's intentional.
Through my experiences at the
SASC and what I've beared witness
to, that's not always the case.
Because of the lack of consent
education that takes place at the
high school level, folks that are
causing harm might not recognize
that they [are] and that's a part of
rape culture."
While Bentley believes it is
important "to recognize that
anyone can be a survivor and
anybody can also cause harm,"
she notes that violence is
committed "predominantly against
[marginalized] women."
The research certainly backs
Bentley's claim. "When we look at
DHOTOJOSH MEDICOFF/THE UBYSSEY
the statistics, one in five women
will experience violence during
their campus experience. It's
not just affecting women, but in
terms of who we see accessing
our services at the SASC, it is
predominantly female identified
folks."
Bentley went as far as to say, "I
think there are certain traditions,
certain groups on campus that
promote that type of culture as
well." While Bentley declined to
name these campus groups, she
highlighted the research of Rachel
E. Sullivan, equity facilitator at
the Equity and Inclusion Office.
"Looking at that research, I would
say that some of those hubs that
were indicated within that research
are pretty indicative of what we see
and hear at the SASC as well."
Sullivan's research calls out
on-campus residences, the Pit Pub,
as well as fraternities and sororities
as locations where members of
marginalized communities face the
highest factors of risk with regards
to sexual assault and violence.
While good work is being done
through organizations like SASC,
Bentley feels that more resources
need to be directed at addressing
the problem of on-campus sexual
assault. "When I say that sexual
assault is an epidemic, I don't
say that lightly. We're seeing an
increase in the number of people
accessing [SASC's] services. In
terms of creating that cultural
change and making sure that
survivors and people who have
caused harm are getting the
support they need — we do need
more."
SASC welcomes all members
of the UBC community with
open arms. "We provide support
services to folks who have
experienced violence on campus
and our services are available for
people of all genders."
Bentley encourages survivors
of traumatic experiences and
their loved ones to contact SASC
for support, tl *a
w  m
RIGHTS ON CAMPUS!
TWO WORKSHOPS HAPPENING NEAR YOU, WE
WOULD LOVE TO SEE Y<
FOOD & DRINKS WILL BE PROVIDED!
OCTOBER17TH 112:30-2 PM
WITH DAVID EBY AT THE GALLED
SHOP
OCTOBER 12TH | 2-4 PM
WITH TRAC AT THE LEV LOUNGE
IN THE STUDENT NEST
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19+ AT
OF DEATH FEATURES
OCTOBER 4,2016 TUESDAY
STUDENT UNION SALARIES
ACROSS CANADA
WORDS BY JACK HAUEN, HAMZA TARIQ AND ALEX MCKEEN
PHOTOS JOSH MEDICOFF
Check ubyssey.ca/features for the full version soon, including fun interactive graphs. Oooh, interactive graphs. OCTOBER 4, 2016 TUESDAY I   FEATURES   I   9
Highest paid:
Waterloo execs — $46,532
Sweetest benefits:
Ryerson president
$6,000 for "benefits," a $1,000 transportation allowance, a
$1,000 expense account and $2,000 for "special projects."
Most execs
U ofT — seven
Most students:
U of T — 57,670
'Including value of benefits.
"Figure is calculated from salary of $25,000 in
2005 dollars and excludes the vice-president,
professional faculties, who is paid $10,000 in
2005 dollars.
The Students' Society of McGill did not respond
to our reguests for comment by press time. 10
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HEARTBREAK//
The team's season record worsens to 0-3.
=ILE PHOTO ERIC INASI/THE UBYSSEY
Women's rugby falls to Alberta 41-19
Salomon Micko Benrimoh
Contributor
Saturday's clouds cleared away
just in time for the women's rugby
showdown between UBC and the
University of Alberta Pandas on
Sunday, October 2.
The Thunderbirds went into
the game hoping for a win so
that they could improve on their
0-2 start to the season, while the
Pandas had a 1-1 record after a
win against Lethbridge and a loss
to Victoria
The game initially looked to
be in the 'Birds' favour, as UBC
winger and fullback Elizabeth
Theemes-Golding ran the ball
past Alberta's defence before
getting tackled just before the
goal line.
However, a botched pass led to
an interception and Alberta took
the game in a different direction.
The Pandas managed to push
through within metres of the goal
line but were held back by UBC's
defence.
Alberta eventually scored
the opening try and took a 7-0
lead just under the 20 minute
mark. UBC answered with an
interception that later allowed
them to score a try to tie the game
just three minutes later.
This would be the last time
that the game was tied and Alberta
stormed out to score another two
tries, taking a 19-7 lead.
The 'Birds gained possession of
the ball just before the end of the
half, but another turnover led the
Pandas to regain the ball until the
end of stoppage time.
The crowd present at the game
— although small — stayed with
the home team the entire game and
cheered on the T-Birds through
every play.
The second half opened with
another try by Alberta. UBC
answered by taking the ball deep
into the Alberta defensive zone,
ultimately scoring a try to bring the
score up to 24-14.
Alberta continued their
dominance of the match, scoring a
total of three more tries. Howeber,
they lost the extra point on two
occasions, both times resulting
from too short of a kick.
UBC was only able to answer
with one more try and the final
score after 80 minutes was 41-19. IB
The T-Birds are now 0-3 in the
season, with one game left against
Lethbridge on Friday, October 14.
BASKETBALL //
Thunderbirds defeat
Ottawa 51-43 for first
win since last season
■r^UX
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PHOTO PATRICK GILLIN/THE UBYSSEY
Women's basketball could be contenders in the 2016/17 season.
Arjun Singla
Contributor
On Friday night, the Thunderbirds
beat the visiting University of
Ottawa Gee-Gees 51-43 at home in
the War Memorial Gym, showing
that they could be a force to be
reckoned with in the upcoming
2016/17 season.
For the first 10 minutes of
the first quarter, the 'Birds had
been leading the game until the
Gee-Gee's tied it at 11 a piece.
Both teams came out with a lot of
intensity — especially on defence
— each wanting to prove that they
were better than the other. Getting
the opportunity to play a team from
a different conference does not
come very often and both teams
were equally hungry for a win.
However, the same energy was
missing in the next quarter of the
match.
"I think the second quarter was
a poor offensive quarter for both
teams," said UBC head coach Deb
Huband, who is entering her 22nd
season with the Thunderbirds.
The 'Birds scored only six
points while the Gee-Gee's scored
eleven in those 10 minutes. This
resulted in the Gee-Gee's leading
26-21 at halftime.
But the T-Birds were not going-
down without a fight. At the start
of the third, the 'Birds looked like
a completely different team which
allowed them to go on a 20-6 run.
This was the turning point in the
game and provided the edge that
UBC needed to win.
"In the third quarter, we put
a different lineup in. We went
with a smaller lineup and that just
spurred us on, allowed us to get
some quick scores, then we built a
little bit of a lead," said Huband.
The end of the game was
decided after that, but one should
never take one's foot off the gas
with the Gee-Gees' defence. They
refused to give up until the end of
the game. Despite being behind,
the team still had more bench
points at 18 compared to the 'Birds
at 13. Another area in which the
Gee-Gees led the T-Birds was at
the free throw line, shooting 92.3
per cent, while the T-Birds shot
85.7 per cent.
Both teams did not shoot the
ball extremely well, but the T-Birds
had a slightly higher field goal
percentage at 28.3 per cent, while
the Gee-Gees' were at 24.6 per
cent. Additionally, the T-Birds
were slightly better from the
three-point line than the Gee-
Gees, having made 3-19 while
the Gee-Gees made 3-23 from
downtown.
It was a closely fought game,
but the T-Birds' third-quarter run
was too big of a hurdle for the
Gee-Gees to overcome.
It was rookie Ali Norris —
in only her second game as a
Thunderbird — and veteran Kara
Spotton, who stood out for UBC
in the match. Norris ran some
wonderful plays which got the
team into a rhythm, while Spotton
protected the paint the entire
game. But altogether, the win
came down to the entire team's
effort.
According to Huband, the team
does not have a set starting lineup
yet, as they have a lot of new
players — including six rookies.
"We're all getting to know each
other a little bit, so there'll be
lots of opportunities to try bigger
lineups, smaller lineups, more
defensive-minded lineups," said
Huband. "We're still in the early
stages of determining roles."
Once the T-Birds do figure out
their regular rotations, this team
definitely should not be taken
lightly. IS
The 'Birds will be battling the
University ofFraser Valley Cascades
at 6 p.m. on Friday, October 14 for
their next preseason game. 15
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