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The Ubyssey Nov 22, 2016

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 HOW DOES THE PIT STACK UP?
I
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A
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A PAGE 2
YOUR GUIDETO UBC EVENTS & PEOPLE
NOVEMBER 22, 2016 TUESDAY
EVENTS
OUR CAMPUS
THURSDAY NOVEMBER 24
////
LACE UP FOR KIDS 6 P.M. @ DOUG MITCHELL
Celebrate and help support the BC Children's Hospital
Foundation and rare disease research.
MORE INFO AT BCCHF.CA
FRIDAY NOVEMBER 25
////
UBC VSSFU VIEWING PARTY2:30 PM @TBA
Cheer UBC on as they battle their longtime rival SFU! Film
team will be on-site to capture the excitement.
MORE INFO AT FACEBOOK.COM/UBCESPORT
SATURDAY NOVEMBER 26
////
UBC VS VICTORIA 3-7 P.M. @ WAR MEMORIAL GYM
Storm the War Memorial Gym and cheer on the women's
basketball team as they take on the University of Victoria.
$10
ON THE COVER
PHOTO BY
Kate Colenbrander
DESIGN BY
Aiken Lao
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your event listings to
printeditor@ubyssey.ca
THE UBYSSEY
Coordinating Editor Photo Editor
Jack Hauen Josh Medicoff
coordinating@ubyssey.ca  photos@ubyssey.ca
Design Editor
Aiken Lao
printeditor@ubyssey.ca
News Editors
SruthlTadepalll&
Samantha McCabe
news@ubyssey.ca
Culture Editor
Samuel Du Bois
culture@u byssey.ca
Sports + Rec Editor
Olamlde Olaniyan
sports® ubyssey.ca
Video Producer
Kate Colenbrander
video@ubyssey.ca
Opinions + Blog Editor
Bailey Ramsay
opinion@ubyssey.ca
Science Editor
Koby Michaels
science® u byssey.ca
Our Campus Web Developer
Coordinator PeterSlemens
Leo Soh peter@ubyssey.ca
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca 0ffice Administrator
Olivia Law
Copy Editor advertising ©ubyssey.ca
Miguel Santa Maria
copyeditor@ubyssey.ca
NOVEMBER22.2016 | VOLUME XCVIII | ISSUE XVII
CONTACT
Editorial Office:
SUB2208
604.822.2301
Business Office:
SUB2209
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Business Manager        President
Ron Gorodetsky Tanner Bokor
business@ubyssey.ca     president@ubyssey.ca
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ope rations® u bysseyca
STAFF
Natalie Morris, Matt
Langmuir, Bill Situ, Gabey
Lucas, Julia Burnham,
Sophie Sutcliffe, Rachel
Ong, Lucy Fox, Emma
Hicks, Jeremy Johnson-
Silvers, Diana Oproescu,
Stephanie Wu, Emmanue
Villamejor, Moira Wyton,
Patrick Gillin, Mischa Milne,
Sebastian Mendo, Isabelle
Commerford, Katharins
Friege, Hana Golightly,
Lauren Kearns, Samantha
Searle, Nivretta Thatra, Sean
Harbottle.MaiaBoakyeJulis
Pinnock, Marcella Muse,
Katya Dowey, Margret Fiand,
Vassi Sharlandjieva
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student
newspaper of the University of British Columbia. It is published every
Tuesday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run student
organization and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Ed itorials are chosen and writter
by th e U byssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of thestaff, and do
not necessarily reflect the views of
The Ubyssey Publications Society
or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appearing
in The Ubyssey is the property of
The Ubyssey Publications Society.
Stories, opinions, photographs anc
artwork contained herein cannot be
rep ro d u ced witho ut the exp ressed,
written permission of The Ubyssey
Publications Society.
Th e U byssey is a founding m em-
ber of Canadian University Press
(CUP) and adheres to CUPs guiding principles.
The Ubyssey accepts opinion
articles on any topic related to the
Jniversityof British Columbia (UBC)
and/or topics relevant to students attending UBC. Submissions must be
written by U BC stu dent1;. profc*r,on;
alumni,orthoseinas.. '■•::(■ ::::'>'::-
(as determined by thi ^opmionsed
itor) to speak on UBC relaied m,ir
ters. Submissions must nol contain
racism.sexism, home ipl icb a, trans
phobia, harassment or discnrnma
tion. Authors and/ors..':-■'?. ::-•>■.-.■
not be precluded from publication
basedsolelyon assorciiic in with pat
ticu la r id eol og ies or sub pet mallei
that some may find obicctionablc
Approval for publicalioii is. howrv
er, dependent on thcqujlity ol die
argurrierit and The Ubyssey edito-
The New Student Union
Building 6133 University
Boulevard
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z1
Online: ubyssey.ca
Twitter: ©ubyssey
ialboard'sjudgment of appropriate
content. Submissions may be sent
oy email to opinion®ubyssey.ca.
3lease include your student num-
oer or other proof of identification.
Anonymous sub missions will be accepted on extremely rare occasions.
Requests for anonymity will be granted '.pon agreement from four fifths
::•' -e editorial board. Full opinions
:::: cymaybefoundatubyssey.ca/
.. nit-an-opinion
It is ag reed by al I persons pi acinc
.: s::lay or classified advertising that
"■■-.! Ubyssey Publications Society
'.; -.topublishan advertisement or if
■:-error in the ad occurs the liability
■:-'ie UPS will not be greater than
'■■;■ aricepaidforthead.TheUPS
:.-.i I not be responsible for slight
.■■ -nges or typographical errors
\v,«\ do not lessen the value or the
impact of the ad.
YNOTFORTOTS serves the "smallest
voices with the biggest needs"
3H0T0 KOBY MICHAELS/THE UBYSSEY
Mohit Sodhi (left), Lindsay Richter (centre) and Conrad Bayley (right) make up YNOTFORTOTS.
Leo Soh
Our Campus Coordinator
Children in BC are battling poverty
in the aftermath of government
expenditure cuts and generational
poverty. YNOTFORTOTS's mission
is to alleviate their socioeconomic
condition.
Mohit Sodhi and Lindsay
Richter, the co-founders of the
society, are graduate students
at UBC, studying behavioural
neuroscience and neonatal-
perinatal medicine respectively.
The society founded an AMS
club at UBC this year and Conrad
Bayley, a third-year integrated
sciences major, is the club's
president.
Sodhi and Richter were always
interested in healthcare and its
determinants, especially in relation
to children, but it was during a
course they took last fall that an
idea began to take shape. Together,
they decided to turn this idea into
a society.
"We were in Social
Determinants of Health, an elective
class that we took, and we found
out that one in five children in
BC were in poverty," said Sodhi.
"We learned so much about how
vulnerability at such a young
age can later impact later health
outcomes and obviously their
educational outcomes as well, so
we couldn't sit still. Especially
amongst the budget cuts towards
public school systems, there are a
lot of kids and families suffering
here in the lower mainland."
Getting the society up and
running turned out to be a
challenge. Many charities were
already at work battling issues such
as poverty and homelessness, and
there wasn't much room to grow as
a charitable organization. However,
in childhood health and education,
Sodhi and Richter recognized
a niche with real problems
that needed solutions, and in
November 2015, they founded the
YNOTFORTOTS society.
"There's lots of charities out
there, especially focusing on the
downtown eastside and things like
that, but we wanted to focus on
what we're passionate about. East
Hastings is a high profile area that
lots of people are aware of and
they can help the homeless people
there ... [but] this is low profile, not
many people are aware of these
extreme budget cuts and how
they're affecting the immediate
next generation where we live,"
said Bayley.
Their first initiative was an
innovative one, which originated
from Richter's experiences
attending weddings. She modeled
a "gift registry" of sorts, so that
schools and parents can directly
request items they need from
ynotfortots.com. The requests are
posted on the site and are open for
anyone to fulfill.
The duo also has two other
projects on the go: the Students
Helping Students initiative and
the Special Projects initiative.
The former encourages students
at all levels of their education to
help their poverty-stricken peers,
who do not have what Bayley
calls "things we normally take for
granted."
"We want to show them the
value of giving, and they get to see
that first-hand the effect that their
altruistic activities have on kids
in these communities and cities,
because they see exactly where this
money is going," he said.
For example, Lord Strathcona
Elementary school, which
the YNOTFORTOTS society
has helped through their item
registry, recently suffered a lice
outbreak that they did not have
the resources to deal with. On
November 16, they held a special
fundraiser for this school, and were
able to provide relief.
"They're shifting away from the
academic and athletic supplies and
they're just asking for necessity
supplies. So our fundraiser [was]
specifically for Lord Strathcona
because this is a need basis, and not
a want basis. They're requesting
things like comforters, pillow cases
and pillows and bedsheets because
of the bed bugs and they're asking
for lice kits. And it means so much
to them," said Bayley.
To date, they have facilitated
giving over $5,000 in goods to
schools and daycares in poverty-
stricken communities, and hope to
grow this total significantly in the
coming months. While this figure
doesn't look like a large sum when
compared to the scale of childhood
poverty in BC, Bayley believes the
society is making its impact felt.
"To someone that said that this
is just a band-aid program, I would
say there are people that are better
suited to fixing these problems on
a government level. We're science
students, and we're doing what we
believe is the most direct and most
effective way to help," he said.
In the future, YNOTFORTOTS
hopes to continue its growth by
opening local branches across
BC and Canada. For now, they
are focusing on expansion in
greater Vancouver, finding new
partnerships with schools and
opening club branches at schools
such as UBC and SFU.
For UBC students, this means
an opportunity to get involved with
the AMS club and with the society
directly. According to Richter, "you
get out of it what you put into it,"
but with the society's explosive
rate of growth, she promises that
there will be many leadership
opportunities for motivated and
responsible students. Vi NEWS
EDITORS SRUTHITADEPALLI + SAMANTHA MCCABE
NOVEMBER 22,2016 TUESDAY
MENTAL HEALTH //
Why do you have to wait so long to see a counsellor?
I
ygg Counselling
# Services
3H0T0BR'ANTE CUNNINGHAM/THE UBYSSEY
UBC's counselling office is weathering a heavy load.
Rachel Ong
Staff Writer
With classes in full swing,
midterms ending, finals beginning
and sombre November weather,
UBC's counselling office has been
overwhelmed by an influx of
students in need, seeking accessible
support on campus.
With mental health and
wellness heavily on the radar for
this school year, UBC has been
no exception to the ever-growing-
buzz surrounding the issue.
Former student Ji Youn Kim's
article was featured in the news
and on social media earlier in
the semester, spreading the word
about the importance of mental
health awareness for students. Her
movement, The Tipping Point,
has since generated a following
on Facebook numbering over a
thousand people. The UBC Mental
Health Awareness Club and the
recent Thrive Week also have goals
of raising mental health awareness
on campus.
SEEING RED ON REDDIT
Anecdotal comments and stories
from other UBC students have
surfaced on social media, including
Facebook groups, comments, Reddit
and more — mostly putting UBC's
counselling services under fire.
Reddit user "JangsJudgement,"
a UBC engineering student, wrote
on an r/UBC thread last month
about their experience with UBC's
counselling services and the wait
time they experienced.
"So I had midterms these past
two weeks," the user wrote on
Reddit. "Felt super shitty afterward
[so I] decided to visit UBC
Counselling for some assistance
because I feel like I'm getting
closer to my breaking point."
JangJudgement's dissatisfaction
appeared to be the result of the
two-week wait time between their
arrival at the front desk of the
counselling office and actually
speaking to a professional.
"Nothing is said about a two-
week wait. [On the website], it
sounds as though you transition
right from the forms to the
consultation. If the two-week wait
is 'usual,' perhaps the website
should repeat that information
instead of... implying something
else altogether."
Comments such as "It's [one] of
those things where an institution
publicly makes it seem they truly
care about an issue, but doesn't put
the necessary resources towards
it," and "I just gave up on them and
was like, 'Fuck it, I'll just deal with
my issues myself,'" were echoed in
the comments of the same Reddit
thread.
When a student experiences
these longer wait times — the
wait isn't consistently several
weeks long— they are a result of a
massive increase in demand for the
counselling service. According to
statistics from UBC Counselling,
in 2015, 954 students were seen
from September 1 to November 2.
This year's numbers, in that same
two-month time span, jumped up
by over 300 students, with 1,259
individuals seeking counselling.
The service also sees a significant
spike in demand during midterms
and finals season.
ARE WAIT TIMES JUST PULLED
OUT OF A HAT?
While UBC Counselling receives
a lot of backlash over long wait
times and occasionally poor communication, it is a free service
that is meant to be easily accessible and available for all students,
regardless of their needs.
In an interview with
The Ubyssey, the director of
UBC Counselling, Dr. Cheryl
Washburn, spoke regarding the
various services that are offered
through the service and how
students can best avail of these
resources.
"We need to understand
the nature and urgency of the
concern," said Washburn. "We
work within a stepped-care
model that is designed to connect
a student to the least intensive,
but [most] effective level of care."
This stepped-care system
encourages students to self-
report the urgency of their
situation to front desk staff. It
is recommended that students
provide all necessary and relevant
background information at this
time such as what symptoms
they are experiencing and other
important aspects of their mental
health. The service is best used
when a student is able to identify
his or her own needs and what
they need from counselling.
"The first step would be a
consultation. Our front desk staff
allows the student to identify the
type of appointment that is going to
be the best fit," said Washburn.
After the initial consultation,
the potential courses of action are
provided on a case-by-case basis.
Resources "range in intensity
from self-directed resources that
focus on group therapy... all the
way up to crisis response and
hospitalization," according to
Washburn.
Some students are seen
immediately upon their arrival at
the counselling office, while some
are seen at a later date, depending
on their situation. Emergency
appointments are also available for
students who have urgent, more
pressing concerns, as identified in
their consultations.
As for the wait times, "we really
want students to be seen as timely
as possible and we do our best,"
said Washburn. She noted that if a
student truly feels they need to be
seen immediately, "it's important
they [talk] to us and we can try our
best to see them sooner."
WHO'S YOUR COUNSELLOR?
There are currently 18 counsellors
working on-site at UBC Counselling. There are two types of
professionals that might work with
counselling at UBC, according to
Washburn. These types are people
with a minimum educational level
of a master's degree in counselling, psychology or social work
— who are all also registered social
workers — or alternatively, clinical
psychologists who are registered
with the College of Psychology of
British Columbia.
ON-CAMPUS SUCCESSES
UBC Counselling isn't the best
solution for everyone, but some
students are very happy with their
experience.
"I actually had a really good
experience with UBC Counselling,"
said Nico Yu, a fourth-year
arts student, speaking of their
experience as something vital to
their mental health and well-being.
Yu agreed that while counselling
does have its problems, when
it comes to dire situations and
serious mental health concerns,
UBC provides students with
necessary, and sometimes life-
saving, care.
"[My experience] was really
good because the counsellor I
spoke to made sure I made an
appointment to come in every
week, just to make sure I was doing-
okay. And [even] when I was no
longer at risk, she still made the
effort to chat with me every week
and every other week... I don't
know how where I'd be without
that experience," they said.
Although other students that
The Ubyssey interviewed also cited
some issues with the counselling
service, another student managed
to find support in a place most
wouldn't expect.
"I'm personally a member of
Greek life on campus," said Brenna
Dowling, a fifth-year English
major. "My particular organization
[has] specific individuals who
help in dealing with... troubles
academically... problems with
mental health, or if you're just
overly stressed because you've
committed yourself to too many
things. When I wasn't able to
access UBC Counselling, they've
been a really good rock."
According to the Canadian
Mental Health Association, 20
per cent of Canadian adults will
suffer from some form of mental
illness in their lifetime. Forty-nine
per cent of people suffering from
mental illness have never — and
most likely will never — seek
professional help regarding their
conditions. With figures like these,
it is crucial that students who are
feeling overwhelmed by something
that might be a mental health issue
seek assistance.
Whether you seek help through
UBC Counselling services,
Speakeasy, the Greek System or one
of the many alternatives outside
of campus, help in some form is
always available and you are not
alone.
RESOURCES
On-campus
The Wellness Centre at UBC.
Students can "ask questions to
trained students about things like
safer sex, how to manage stress,
eating well and sleep."
Speakeasy. This is a service
that provides "a non-judgmental,
supportive ear for students and
faculty members who are feeling-
distressed."
Healthy Minds at UBC. A
blog run by "trained students ...
providing a personal perspective
on topics such as managing stress,
how to make friends on such a
large campus, how to practice
good eating habits and how
to stay healthy while thriving
academically."
Off-campus
If nothing on campus is working,
there are still many ways to get
help. Other resources for mental
health and wellness are widely
available in the community, and
are often run by the province of
British Columbia. Below is a list
of just some of the many services
available in the Lower Mainland:
The provincial Suicide Hotline
is reachable at 1-800-SUICIDE
(1-800-784-2433), 24 hours a day,
seven days a week.
310Mental Health Support
(310-6789 - do not add 604, 778
or 250 before the number) is also
available 24 hours a day for urgent
support.
Coast Mental Health has
put together an extremely
comprehensive list of resources
and phone numbers for anything
pertaining to mental health issues.
BC Mental Health and
Substance Use Services
(BCMHSUS) offers a list of
available services the one can
be referred to within Greater
Vancouver.
Chimo Community Services,
located in Richmond, provides
crisis counselling through "crisis,
transition and through education,"
according to their website. They
too have a crisis hotline number
(604-279-7070) that runs from 8
p.m. to 12 a.m. seven days a week,
answered by professionally trained
volunteers.
Here To Help BC offers self-
help resources such as screening-
tests online and information
sheets on mental health and
wellness.
Mindcheck.ca is "designed
to help youth and young adults ...
check out how they're feeling and
quickly connect to mental health
resources and support. Support
includes education, self-care tools,
website links and assistance in
connecting to local professional
resources."
If you are in need of immediate
assistance, medical distress or
have an emergency, do not hesitate
to call 9-1-1. Vi
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WEALTH    IC   UCnp
RICH IN HEALTH I  ^J        I       I   L_  l\ I—  ■
become a member online today:
www.wealthshop.ca
15%
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with this coupon!
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Walk/
Vi
V,
"I'm here today
to take a stance
and express
my voice as a
student."
-Julian Villafuerte, UBC
student
V, Sugar and Spice
Makes Winter
Nice
^s*
%JS
Uppercase
Now serving delicious
holiday treats
UPPERCASE
Main Level in the Student Nest | Owned and operated by the AMS
GALLERY
Level 4 in the Student Nest    %£ Owned and operated by the AMS   V,
V, NOVEMBER 22, 2016 TUESDAY I   CULTURE
NIGHT
i
These nocturnal dreams are excerpted from Night   Times  at the Press Bar, located in the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery on campus. Record your
dreams and contribute to the next issue of nlght   times  at the belkin as part
of Julia   Feyrer and   Tamara   Henderson:   The  Last  Waves,   on through December 4.
For more information about the exhibition, visit belkin.ubc.ca
lOVEMBER
\A   Ball
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fantastical   things   occurred  where       ea     -     r   y IN0RDINATE   SPEECH   PATTERNS.   I   WAS
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lOVEMBER
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lOVEMBER
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,J/Arts
Undergraduate
^ | Society
V, H>   •    =fia     ^ '»
TEACH IN KOREA
with the support of the Korean government!
Get a transformative cultural
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